Portal

  • National Archives’ Refusal to Ensure Preservation of CIA Torture Report Alarms Rights Groups

    Thursday, May 05, 2016
    Even President Barack Obama's executive branch cannot read the full report, and the National Archives and Records Administration has stonewalled questions about whether it qualifies as a federal record, which would require preservation. The rights groups worry that more history might be lost, and they reminded archivist Ferriero that the CIA has destroyed "crucial video records of the torture program" more than a decade ago, "without NARA's knowledge or authorization."   read more
  • 7 of 10 Most Profitable U.S. Hospitals are Non-Profits

    Thursday, May 05, 2016
    Money-making hospitals include nonprofits such as the Carle Foundation Hospital in Illinois, where a state appeals court in January ruled a state law allowing hospitals to avoid taxes is unconstitutional. Urbana Mayor Laurel Prussing said her city lost 11% of its assessed tax value when Carle stopped paying $6.5 million a year in property taxes. "We need to question this whole idea of what not-for-profit means," Prussing said. "This is a highly profitable business that manages to not pay taxes."   read more
  • Police in U.S. Increasingly Oppose States’ Expanded Gun Rights

    Thursday, May 05, 2016
    “We are a gun society...but we should be writing gun laws that make us safer,” said police chief Leonard Papania, “Do you want every incident on your street to escalate to acts of gun violence?” In more than a dozen states with long traditions of robust support for gun ownership rights, and where legislatures have relaxed gun laws, local police have been denouncing the measures. They say the new laws expose officers to greater danger and prevent them from doing their jobs effectively.   read more
  • New Federal Wind-Energy Rule Would Allow Killing of Thousands of Federally-Protected Eagles

    Thursday, May 05, 2016
    Under the plan announced Wednesday, wind companies and other power providers could kill or injure up to 4,200 bald eagles a year without penalty — nearly four times the current limit. Golden eagles could only be killed if companies minimize the losses, such as by retrofitting power poles to reduce electrocution risk. Companies would pay a $36,000 fee for a long-term permit allowing them to kill or injure eagles, and would have to submit reports of how many eagles they kill.   read more
  • Congress Pushes Agriculture Dept. To Exempt Ag Industry from Public Scrutiny over Promo Campaigns

    Thursday, May 05, 2016
    Congress is pushing the Agriculture Dept to exempt the groups behind promotional campaigns from public scrutiny of their internal operations despite recent controversy. The push comes after organizations representing eggs, pork, potatoes and even Christmas trees pressed for an exception from the federal Freedom of Information Act for programs that promote agricultural products. A provision supporting their push was part of spending legislation approved by a House panel last month.   read more

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Top Stories

  • The Third Leading Cause of Death in the U.S. is … Medical Error

    Wednesday, May 04, 2016
    The study estimates more than 250,000 Americans die each year from medical errors. That would rank just behind heart disease and cancer, which each took about 600,000 lives in 2014, and in front of respiratory disease, which caused about 150,000 deaths. Medical mistakes that can lead to death range from surgical complications to medication mix-ups. However, the system used to record death data doesn’t capture things like diagnostic errors and poor judgment that cost lives.   read more
  • Leaked Trade Deal Documents Show U.S. Weakened Environmental Protections, Gave Corporate Lobbyists More Say

    Tuesday, May 03, 2016
    “These leaked documents confirm what we have been saying for a long time: TTIP would put corporations at the center of policymaking, to the detriment of environment and public health,” said Greenpeace's Jorgo Riss. “We have known that the EU position was bad, now we see the U.S. position is even worse.” The Sierra Club said it was dismayed that the words “climate change” were “not mentioned once in the 248 pages.”   read more
  • New Jersey Loses a Cash-Cow Taxpayer

    Monday, May 02, 2016
    Last month, during a routine review of New Jersey’s finances, one could sense the alarm. The state’s wealthiest resident had reportedly “shifted his personal and business domicile to another state,” Frank W. Haines III, New Jersey’s legislative budget and finance officer, told a state Senate committee. If the news were true, New Jersey would lose so much in tax revenue that “we may be facing an unusual degree of income tax forecast risk,” Haines said.   read more

Unusual News

  • U.S. Government Pays $48 Million to Resettle First American “Climate Change Refugees”

    Wednesday, May 04, 2016
    The Isle de Jean Charles resettlement plan is one of the first programs of its kind in the world, a test of how to respond to climate change in the most dramatic circumstances without tearing communities apart. Under the terms of the grant, the island’s residents are to be resettled to drier land and a community that as of now does not exist. “We see this as setting a precedent for the rest of the country, the rest of the world,” said Marion McFadden, who is running the program at the HUD.   read more
  • Discrimination Continues after Death at Texas “Whites-Only” Cemetery

    Tuesday, May 03, 2016
    "Mrs. Barrera, who is Anglo and a U.S. citizen, intended that she and her husband be buried together in the San Domingo Cemetery," the lawsuit states. "In response to her request...Mr. Bradford told Mrs. Barrera 'absolutely not. When Mrs. Barrera asked why 'the board' wanted to exclude her husband's remains from the San Domingo Cemetery, Mr. Bradford responded 'because he's a Mexican,' and that she could 'go up the road and bury him with the niggers and Mexicans."   read more
  • Senator Says Spying Billboards Are Invasion of Privacy, Wants Investigation

    Monday, May 02, 2016
    A U.S. senator is calling for a federal investigation into an outdoor advertising company’s latest effort to target billboard ads to specific consumers. Sen. Charles Schumer (D-New York) has dubbed Clear Channel Outdoor Americas’ so-called RADAR program “spying billboards,” warning the service may violate privacy rights by tracking people’s cell phone data via the ad space.   read more

Where is the Money Going?

  • Sioux Tribe Accuses Government of Underfunding Native American Health Care

    Tuesday, May 03, 2016
    A tribe attorney said: "All we're seeking is for the citizens of Rosebud to get what they've been promised here. We're not suing because the emergency room was shut down. We're suing because [the federal government] under law is required to deliver an open emergency room that provides reasonable medical care. The emergency room has been closed for five months...?" The Sioux say "the federal government spends less on Indian health care than on any other group receiving public health care."   read more
  • Debt Collectors’ Dream: Nebraska makes it Easy to Go after Poor for Unpaid Medical Debts

    Friday, April 29, 2016
    Suing someone in Nebraska is cheaper and easier. The cost to file a lawsuit in that state is $45. About 79,000 debt collection lawsuits were filed in Nebraska courts in 2013 alone. Suing became an irresistible bargain for debt collectors. It’s a deal collectors have fought to keep, opposing even the slightest increase. For debtors, unaffordable debts turn into unaffordable garnishments, destroying already tight budgets and sending them into a loop.   read more
  • Loophole in Enforcement of “Living Wage” Laws: State Governments Kept in Dark on Compliance

    Wednesday, April 27, 2016
    Evidence of compliance is plain to see on most pay stubs, but state and federal laws don't require employers to routinely provide this crucial detail to the government. Without this data, wage enforcers who are empowered to investigate generally wait until a worker complains. And many workers — especially those in precarious situations — fear they'll be fired if they speak up. "It's pretty shocking how common the violations are," said Donna Levitt, a labor enforcement director in San Francisco.   read more

Controversies

  • Widespread Damage Done to Florida’s Treasured Coral Reef by Dredging of Miami Port for Freighters

    Wednesday, May 04, 2016
    Reports found that 81% of the reef near the dredging site was buried in sediment, causing 93% partial coral death. Environmentalists have warned Congress and the state that the corps’ plan to lessen the damage to corals in that area is flawed. Coral reefs are critical to South Florida because they help lessen the damage from hurricanes, are crucial to marine biodiversity and lure tourists.   read more
  • Georgia Bill Allowing Guns on Campus Throws Governor into Second Hot-Button Controversy

    Wednesday, May 04, 2016
    Gov. Deal has received hundreds of letters, emails and calls. Most appear to lean toward him signing the bill, though sprinkled in among the appeals were notes from students and faculty members who objected to the legislation. "If approved, this law would result in those of us on campus feeling less safe, not more safe," read one faculty resolution. Teacher Nancy Jo Kirk warned such a law could deter top-notch professors fearful of campuses "potentially filled with hidden guns."   read more
  • 15 States Wielding New or Stricter Voter ID Laws in Run-Up to Presidential Election

    Tuesday, May 03, 2016
    In Wisconsin, Todd Allbaugh resigned as chief of staff to a leading Republican state senator last year after attending a party caucus in which, he said, some legislators “were literally giddy” over the effect of the state’s voter ID law on minorities and college students. “I remember when Republicans were the ones who helped Johnson pass the civil rights bill in the ‘60s — not Democrats,” said Allbaugh. “I went down to the office and said, ‘I’m done. I can’t support this party anymore.’”   read more

U.S. and the World

  • Wall Street Stock Loan Schemes Take Billions from Taxpayers in Germany and 20 Other Nations

    Wednesday, May 04, 2016
    Wall Street has figured out a way to squeeze some extra income from these stocks. And German taxpayers pay for it. A spokesman for the German finance ministry called the transactions “illegitimate because their sole purpose is to avoid the legal taxation of dividends.” “Everybody and their brother was doing it in the U.S.,” said Elise Bean, who as subcommittee chief counsel helped lead the Senate’s investigation in 2008. “And I guess now everybody and their brother is doing it abroad.”   read more
  • Lawsuit Seeks Release of CIA Documents on U.S. Soldiers’ Exposure to Iraqi Chemical Weapons Made with U.S. Help

    Friday, April 29, 2016
    Now that the U.S. government has acknowledged that Western-built chemical weapons sickened U.S. soldiers in Iraq, The New York Times says the CIA can no longer deny access to records about it. The Pentagon acknowledged that more than 600 U.S. soldiers had been exposed to sarin in Iraq. The CDC links the chemicals to burns, blisters, infertility, eye damage, scarring of the respiratory system, and cancer risk. The military denied medical care to soldiers who were wounded by these weapons.   read more
  • Decades of Increased Enforcement at U.S.-Mexico Border has Backfired, Preventing Immigrants from Returning Home

    Friday, April 29, 2016
    The rapid escalation of border enforcement over the past three decades has backfired as a strategy to control undocumented immigration between Mexico and the U.S., according to new research that suggests further militarization of the border is a waste of money. "Rather than stopping undocumented Mexicans from coming to the U.S., greater enforcement stopped them from going home," said one of the researchers. "Greater enforcement also increased the risk of death and injury during border crossing."   read more

Appointments and Resignations

  • First Woman Appointed to Lead Warfighting Command

    Sunday, May 01, 2016
    The Senate has confirmed an Air Force general to be the first female officer to lead one of the military’s warfighting commands. By voice vote late Thursday, the Senate approved Gen. Lori Robinson to be commander of U.S. Northern Command. The command is responsible for preventing attacks against the United States.   read more
  • Ambassador to Slovakia: Who Is Adam Sterling?

    Sunday, March 27, 2016
    Before joining the State Dept in 1990, Sterling worked in New York City as a liaison officer in the mayor’s office to the U.N. and consular corps. His first Foreign Service posting was in Peru. In 1993, Sterling was sent to Belgium, but returned to the U.S. in 1995 to be a desk officer for Central Asian affairs, a region he would focus on through much of his career. Sterling was assigned in 1998 as a political officer in Kazakhstan, then in 2001 took a similar post in Tel Aviv, Israel.   read more
  • Djibouti’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is Mohamed Siad Doualeh?

    Tuesday, March 22, 2016
    Before joining the Foreign Ministry, he was a journalist at the newspaper La Nation in Djibouti. Doualeh was made ambassador to Switzerland, the World Trade Organization and the United Nations agencies based in Geneva in 2006, posts he held until coming to Washington. A music enthusiast, Doualeh is a founding member of the cultural association ADAC, longtime organizer of "The Fest'horn," the largest music festival dedicated to peace in the Horn of Africa.   read more

Domestic Policy/Agency of the Day

  • National Ocean Service

    The National Ocean Service (NOS) is one of five major line offices of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), a federal scientific agency of the United States Department of Commerce. Other NOAA offices include the National E...   more

Domestic Policy Divisions

Go to Department

Foreign Policy/Nation of the Day

  • Croatia

    Ruled for centuries under the Hapsburg Empire, Croatia is a Southern Slavic state that formed part of the former Yugoslavia until its disintegration at the end of the Cold War. The delicate balance of power binding diverse ethnic and religious gro...   more

Nations

Meet Your Government

  • Kennedy, Edward "Ted"

    Ted Kennedy served as Chairman of the James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation from 1988 until his death in 2009. He served in the Army from 1951 to 1953, then went on to receive a BA in government from Harvard in 1956 and a law degree in 1959...   more

Blog

  • Irving Wallace: 100th Birthday

    On March 19, 2016, the popular novelist Irving Wallace—my father—would have turned 100 years old. Instead of honoring my father by presenting a review of his achievements and recalling what a generous, warm-hearted person he was and how much enjoy...   more
  • National Archives’ Refusal to Ensure Preservation of CIA Torture Report Alarms Rights Groups

    Thursday, May 05, 2016
    Even President Barack Obama's executive branch cannot read the full report, and the National Archives and Records Administration has stonewalled questions about whether it qualifies as a federal record, which would require preservation. The rights groups worry that more history might be lost, and they reminded archivist Ferriero that the CIA has destroyed "crucial video records of the torture program" more than a decade ago, "without NARA's knowledge or authorization."   read more
  • 7 of 10 Most Profitable U.S. Hospitals are Non-Profits

    Thursday, May 05, 2016
    Money-making hospitals include nonprofits such as the Carle Foundation Hospital in Illinois, where a state appeals court in January ruled a state law allowing hospitals to avoid taxes is unconstitutional. Urbana Mayor Laurel Prussing said her city lost 11% of its assessed tax value when Carle stopped paying $6.5 million a year in property taxes. "We need to question this whole idea of what not-for-profit means," Prussing said. "This is a highly profitable business that manages to not pay taxes."   read more
  • Police in U.S. Increasingly Oppose States’ Expanded Gun Rights

    Thursday, May 05, 2016
    “We are a gun society...but we should be writing gun laws that make us safer,” said police chief Leonard Papania, “Do you want every incident on your street to escalate to acts of gun violence?” In more than a dozen states with long traditions of robust support for gun ownership rights, and where legislatures have relaxed gun laws, local police have been denouncing the measures. They say the new laws expose officers to greater danger and prevent them from doing their jobs effectively.   read more
  • New Federal Wind-Energy Rule Would Allow Killing of Thousands of Federally-Protected Eagles

    Thursday, May 05, 2016
    Under the plan announced Wednesday, wind companies and other power providers could kill or injure up to 4,200 bald eagles a year without penalty — nearly four times the current limit. Golden eagles could only be killed if companies minimize the losses, such as by retrofitting power poles to reduce electrocution risk. Companies would pay a $36,000 fee for a long-term permit allowing them to kill or injure eagles, and would have to submit reports of how many eagles they kill.   read more
  • Congress Pushes Agriculture Dept. To Exempt Ag Industry from Public Scrutiny over Promo Campaigns

    Thursday, May 05, 2016
    Congress is pushing the Agriculture Dept to exempt the groups behind promotional campaigns from public scrutiny of their internal operations despite recent controversy. The push comes after organizations representing eggs, pork, potatoes and even Christmas trees pressed for an exception from the federal Freedom of Information Act for programs that promote agricultural products. A provision supporting their push was part of spending legislation approved by a House panel last month.   read more

Top Stories

  • The Third Leading Cause of Death in the U.S. is … Medical Error

    Wednesday, May 04, 2016
    The study estimates more than 250,000 Americans die each year from medical errors. That would rank just behind heart disease and cancer, which each took about 600,000 lives in 2014, and in front of respiratory disease, which caused about 150,000 deaths. Medical mistakes that can lead to death range from surgical complications to medication mix-ups. However, the system used to record death data doesn’t capture things like diagnostic errors and poor judgment that cost lives.   read more
  • Leaked Trade Deal Documents Show U.S. Weakened Environmental Protections, Gave Corporate Lobbyists More Say

    Tuesday, May 03, 2016
    “These leaked documents confirm what we have been saying for a long time: TTIP would put corporations at the center of policymaking, to the detriment of environment and public health,” said Greenpeace's Jorgo Riss. “We have known that the EU position was bad, now we see the U.S. position is even worse.” The Sierra Club said it was dismayed that the words “climate change” were “not mentioned once in the 248 pages.”   read more
  • New Jersey Loses a Cash-Cow Taxpayer

    Monday, May 02, 2016
    Last month, during a routine review of New Jersey’s finances, one could sense the alarm. The state’s wealthiest resident had reportedly “shifted his personal and business domicile to another state,” Frank W. Haines III, New Jersey’s legislative budget and finance officer, told a state Senate committee. If the news were true, New Jersey would lose so much in tax revenue that “we may be facing an unusual degree of income tax forecast risk,” Haines said.   read more

Unusual News

  • U.S. Government Pays $48 Million to Resettle First American “Climate Change Refugees”

    Wednesday, May 04, 2016
    The Isle de Jean Charles resettlement plan is one of the first programs of its kind in the world, a test of how to respond to climate change in the most dramatic circumstances without tearing communities apart. Under the terms of the grant, the island’s residents are to be resettled to drier land and a community that as of now does not exist. “We see this as setting a precedent for the rest of the country, the rest of the world,” said Marion McFadden, who is running the program at the HUD.   read more
  • Discrimination Continues after Death at Texas “Whites-Only” Cemetery

    Tuesday, May 03, 2016
    "Mrs. Barrera, who is Anglo and a U.S. citizen, intended that she and her husband be buried together in the San Domingo Cemetery," the lawsuit states. "In response to her request...Mr. Bradford told Mrs. Barrera 'absolutely not. When Mrs. Barrera asked why 'the board' wanted to exclude her husband's remains from the San Domingo Cemetery, Mr. Bradford responded 'because he's a Mexican,' and that she could 'go up the road and bury him with the niggers and Mexicans."   read more
  • Senator Says Spying Billboards Are Invasion of Privacy, Wants Investigation

    Monday, May 02, 2016
    A U.S. senator is calling for a federal investigation into an outdoor advertising company’s latest effort to target billboard ads to specific consumers. Sen. Charles Schumer (D-New York) has dubbed Clear Channel Outdoor Americas’ so-called RADAR program “spying billboards,” warning the service may violate privacy rights by tracking people’s cell phone data via the ad space.   read more

Where is the Money Going?

  • Sioux Tribe Accuses Government of Underfunding Native American Health Care

    Tuesday, May 03, 2016
    A tribe attorney said: "All we're seeking is for the citizens of Rosebud to get what they've been promised here. We're not suing because the emergency room was shut down. We're suing because [the federal government] under law is required to deliver an open emergency room that provides reasonable medical care. The emergency room has been closed for five months...?" The Sioux say "the federal government spends less on Indian health care than on any other group receiving public health care."   read more
  • Debt Collectors’ Dream: Nebraska makes it Easy to Go after Poor for Unpaid Medical Debts

    Friday, April 29, 2016
    Suing someone in Nebraska is cheaper and easier. The cost to file a lawsuit in that state is $45. About 79,000 debt collection lawsuits were filed in Nebraska courts in 2013 alone. Suing became an irresistible bargain for debt collectors. It’s a deal collectors have fought to keep, opposing even the slightest increase. For debtors, unaffordable debts turn into unaffordable garnishments, destroying already tight budgets and sending them into a loop.   read more
  • Loophole in Enforcement of “Living Wage” Laws: State Governments Kept in Dark on Compliance

    Wednesday, April 27, 2016
    Evidence of compliance is plain to see on most pay stubs, but state and federal laws don't require employers to routinely provide this crucial detail to the government. Without this data, wage enforcers who are empowered to investigate generally wait until a worker complains. And many workers — especially those in precarious situations — fear they'll be fired if they speak up. "It's pretty shocking how common the violations are," said Donna Levitt, a labor enforcement director in San Francisco.   read more

Controversies

  • Widespread Damage Done to Florida’s Treasured Coral Reef by Dredging of Miami Port for Freighters

    Wednesday, May 04, 2016
    Reports found that 81% of the reef near the dredging site was buried in sediment, causing 93% partial coral death. Environmentalists have warned Congress and the state that the corps’ plan to lessen the damage to corals in that area is flawed. Coral reefs are critical to South Florida because they help lessen the damage from hurricanes, are crucial to marine biodiversity and lure tourists.   read more
  • Georgia Bill Allowing Guns on Campus Throws Governor into Second Hot-Button Controversy

    Wednesday, May 04, 2016
    Gov. Deal has received hundreds of letters, emails and calls. Most appear to lean toward him signing the bill, though sprinkled in among the appeals were notes from students and faculty members who objected to the legislation. "If approved, this law would result in those of us on campus feeling less safe, not more safe," read one faculty resolution. Teacher Nancy Jo Kirk warned such a law could deter top-notch professors fearful of campuses "potentially filled with hidden guns."   read more
  • 15 States Wielding New or Stricter Voter ID Laws in Run-Up to Presidential Election

    Tuesday, May 03, 2016
    In Wisconsin, Todd Allbaugh resigned as chief of staff to a leading Republican state senator last year after attending a party caucus in which, he said, some legislators “were literally giddy” over the effect of the state’s voter ID law on minorities and college students. “I remember when Republicans were the ones who helped Johnson pass the civil rights bill in the ‘60s — not Democrats,” said Allbaugh. “I went down to the office and said, ‘I’m done. I can’t support this party anymore.’”   read more

U.S. and the World

  • Wall Street Stock Loan Schemes Take Billions from Taxpayers in Germany and 20 Other Nations

    Wednesday, May 04, 2016
    Wall Street has figured out a way to squeeze some extra income from these stocks. And German taxpayers pay for it. A spokesman for the German finance ministry called the transactions “illegitimate because their sole purpose is to avoid the legal taxation of dividends.” “Everybody and their brother was doing it in the U.S.,” said Elise Bean, who as subcommittee chief counsel helped lead the Senate’s investigation in 2008. “And I guess now everybody and their brother is doing it abroad.”   read more
  • Lawsuit Seeks Release of CIA Documents on U.S. Soldiers’ Exposure to Iraqi Chemical Weapons Made with U.S. Help

    Friday, April 29, 2016
    Now that the U.S. government has acknowledged that Western-built chemical weapons sickened U.S. soldiers in Iraq, The New York Times says the CIA can no longer deny access to records about it. The Pentagon acknowledged that more than 600 U.S. soldiers had been exposed to sarin in Iraq. The CDC links the chemicals to burns, blisters, infertility, eye damage, scarring of the respiratory system, and cancer risk. The military denied medical care to soldiers who were wounded by these weapons.   read more
  • Decades of Increased Enforcement at U.S.-Mexico Border has Backfired, Preventing Immigrants from Returning Home

    Friday, April 29, 2016
    The rapid escalation of border enforcement over the past three decades has backfired as a strategy to control undocumented immigration between Mexico and the U.S., according to new research that suggests further militarization of the border is a waste of money. "Rather than stopping undocumented Mexicans from coming to the U.S., greater enforcement stopped them from going home," said one of the researchers. "Greater enforcement also increased the risk of death and injury during border crossing."   read more

Appointments and Resignations

  • First Woman Appointed to Lead Warfighting Command

    Sunday, May 01, 2016
    The Senate has confirmed an Air Force general to be the first female officer to lead one of the military’s warfighting commands. By voice vote late Thursday, the Senate approved Gen. Lori Robinson to be commander of U.S. Northern Command. The command is responsible for preventing attacks against the United States.   read more
  • Ambassador to Slovakia: Who Is Adam Sterling?

    Sunday, March 27, 2016
    Before joining the State Dept in 1990, Sterling worked in New York City as a liaison officer in the mayor’s office to the U.N. and consular corps. His first Foreign Service posting was in Peru. In 1993, Sterling was sent to Belgium, but returned to the U.S. in 1995 to be a desk officer for Central Asian affairs, a region he would focus on through much of his career. Sterling was assigned in 1998 as a political officer in Kazakhstan, then in 2001 took a similar post in Tel Aviv, Israel.   read more
  • Djibouti’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is Mohamed Siad Doualeh?

    Tuesday, March 22, 2016
    Before joining the Foreign Ministry, he was a journalist at the newspaper La Nation in Djibouti. Doualeh was made ambassador to Switzerland, the World Trade Organization and the United Nations agencies based in Geneva in 2006, posts he held until coming to Washington. A music enthusiast, Doualeh is a founding member of the cultural association ADAC, longtime organizer of "The Fest'horn," the largest music festival dedicated to peace in the Horn of Africa.   read more

Domestic Policy/Agency of the Day

  • U.S. Marshals Service

    As part of the Department of Justice (DOJ), the U.S. Marshals Service is the nation’s oldest federal law enforcement agency. Federal marshals have been serving the country since 1789, and today direct 94 individual federal judicial districts. Amon...   more

Domestic Policy Divisions

Go to Department

Foreign Policy/Nation of the Day

  • Greece

    Located at the southern tip of the Balkan Peninsula, Greece is one of the cradles of civilization. Originally settled by the Minoans in Crete, Greece has been a prosperous spot for traders throughout history. It also has been the source of much...   more

Nations

Meet Your Government

  • Bersin, Alan

    Alan Bersin, breaking a pattern of accepting government appointments to posts for which he has little prior experience, was appointed by Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano on April 15, 2009, as Assistant Secretary for International Affai...   more

Blog

  • Irving Wallace: 100th Birthday

    On March 19, 2016, the popular novelist Irving Wallace—my father—would have turned 100 years old. Instead of honoring my father by presenting a review of his achievements and recalling what a generous, warm-hearted person he was and how much enjoy...   more

PHOTO GALLERY

Get Smart Phone Meets Smartphone Click the photo for larger view Get Smart Phone Meets Smartphone