Portal

  • U.S. Maternal Mortality Rate Rises, Bucks Trend of Fewer Such Deaths Worldwide

    Friday, September 23, 2016
    One of the biggest worldwide public health triumphs in recent years has been maternal mortality. Global death rates fell by more than a third from 2000 to 2015. The United States, however, is one of the few countries in the world that has gone against the grain, new data show. Its maternal mortality rate has risen despite improvements in health care and an overwhelming global trend in the other direction.   read more
  • U.S. Ambassador to the Philippines: Who Is Sung Y. Kim?

    Saturday, September 24, 2016
    Kim’s father, Kim Ki-wan was a member of the Korean CIA and was posted as a diplomat to Japan. He was implicated in the 1973 kidnapping of dissident (and future president) Kim Dae-jung. Kim himself had been kidnapped, by North Korea, and held for 20 days in 1958. Born in 1960, Kim was 13 years old when his father, following the kidnapping, moved his family to Los Angeles. In 2011, Kim became the first American of Korean descent to serve as ambassador to South Korea. He served there until 2014.   read more
  • Singer Cancels University of Texas Show Because of Concealed Gun Policy

    Friday, September 23, 2016
    Singer-songwriter Ray LaMontagne canceled his show at the University of Texas’ Bass Concert Hall over the school’s policy to allow patrons to carry concealed handguns at the venue. Senate Bill 11, also called campus carry, was passed in 2015 by the Texas Legislature. It allows concealed carry of handguns by license holders on state college and university campuses, and bars schools from prohibiting them except in certain areas. The law took effect Aug. 1.   read more
  • Government Urges That Bumble Bee Be Placed on Endangered Species List

    Friday, September 23, 2016
    Federal wildlife officials made a formal recommendation to list the rusty patched bumble bee as an endangered species because it has disappeared from about 90% of its historic range in just the past two decades. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service made the recommendation after the Xerces Societypresented studies showing it was struggling due to a combination of disease, habitat loss, climate change and overuse of pesticides on commercial crops.   read more
  • Defense Attorney Backs Down, Removes “Black Lives Matter” Button in Courtroom

    Friday, September 23, 2016
    A deputy public defender in Las Vegas gave in to a judge’s request on Thursday to remove a “Black Lives Matter” pin in court, after a free-form discussion about the politics of protest and free speech amid a national debate over police brutality and race relations. In a new show of defiance that wasn’t directly addressed by the judge, Deputy Public Defender Erika Ballou and several attorneys in the audience behind her wore black arm bands.   read more

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Top Stories

  • For First Time in U.S., Electrical Power Produced by Ocean’s Waves Feeds a Power Grid

    Tuesday, September 20, 2016
    The ocean's endless motion packs enough power to meet a quarter of America's energy needs and dramatically reduce the nation's reliance on oil, gas and coal. But wave energy technology lags well behind wind and solar power, with technical hurdles still to be overcome. To that end, the Navy has established a test site in Hawaii, with hopes the technology can someday be used to produce clean, renewable power for coastal communities in fuel-starved places around the world.   read more
  • FBI Won’t Rule Out Practice of Impersonating Journalists in Undercover Operations

    Monday, September 19, 2016
    AP VP Paul Colford said the news cooperative was "deeply disappointed with the inspector general's findings, which effectively condone the FBI's impersonation of an AP journalist in 2007. Such action compromises the ability of a free press to gather the news safely and effectively and raises serious constitutional concerns. Once again, AP calls on the government to refrain from any activities involving the impersonation of the news media..." FBI Director Comey defended the tactic in 2014.   read more
  • U.S. House Republicans, as Election-Season Tactic, Vote to Halt Guantánamo Detainee Transfers

    Sunday, September 18, 2016
    The bill is an opportunity for Republicans to put Democrats on record and use their votes against them in campaigns. Within minutes of the vote, Republicans sent out a news release saying, "Democrats vote to close GITMO and bring terrorists to U.S. soil (again)." Said White House press secretary Josh Earnest: "When it comes to America's national security, at some point that should rate higher on the priority list than an individual's re-election prospects."   read more

Unusual News

  • Final Wave of Veto Overrides in Store for Missouri’s Most Overridden Governor Ever

    Sunday, September 18, 2016
    It's unknown where Nixon ranks of most overridden governors in U.S. history, but he appears unusual among contemporaries. His distinction is due partly to the rarity of Missouri's politically divided government. He's the only Missouri Democrat to govern opposite a Republican supermajority at least since Reconstruction. Since Nixon took office in 2009, lawmakers have overridden 83 of his vetoes — four times the combined total of all other governors' overrides dating back to the early 1800s.   read more
  • It’s Toddlers, Not Industrial Workers, Who Are At Highest Risk for Chemical Burns to the Eyes

    Sunday, September 18, 2016
    Chemical eye burns from chemicals are usually considered a problem in industrial settings. But it turns out that toddlers have the highest risk for this potentially blinding injury at home. “Just about every eye doctor has seen this,” said Dr. Levin. “It’s a potentially blinding problem that is a completely preventable tragedy.” From 2010 to 2013, there were 144,000 chemical eye burns totaling $106.7 million in ER charges. It is "the tip of the iceberg,” said Dr. Osterhoudt.   read more
  • Oregon Sees Surge of New Voters from Law that Registers Voters with Driver’s License Renewals

    Saturday, September 17, 2016
    Nearly 300,000 Oregonians have registered to vote in the past 12 months and more than 75 percent of them did so under the motor voter law. In addition, the state is on track to register 250,000 new voters under the law by the November election. The increase represents a 14 percent uptick in registered voters in the state since this time last year. Oregon was the first state to put such a law into effect and since then, California, Vermont and West Virginia have adopted similar laws.   read more

Where is the Money Going?

  • Income of Same-Sex Married Couples Exceeds that of Straight Couples

    Friday, September 16, 2016
    Gay affluence may be largely a Hollywood myth, with tired cliches of gays and lesbians living handsomely in chic American cities. But men in same-sex marriages tend to make a good deal more money than households with heterosexual spouses, according to data released by the U.S. Treasury Dept. The findings are as much a portrait of the community as they are a look at societal gender norms and biases, experts said, with wrinkles that are both well-understood and still being explored.   read more
  • Albuquerque Police Department Rakes in Huge Profits From Forfeiture Practice

    Wednesday, September 07, 2016
    Albuquerque hauls in more than $1 million a year by seizing cars, sometimes from innocent people, in defiance of state law and public outrage, claims a mother who wants the city’s program declared unconstitutional. The city even writes into its budget ahead of time the money it expects to make from selling seized cars.   read more
  • As Number of U.S. Homes for Sale Shrinks, Many Homeowners Receive Big Offers to Sell

    Tuesday, September 06, 2016
    It is a growing national problem. The number of homes on the market in the U.S. has fallen for the last 14 months. The inventory of homes for sale is the lowest it has been since modern records started being kept in 1982. Mark Zuckerberg, the billionaire Facebook CEO, found a place he liked near San Francisco’s Mission District in 2012 and paid the owner at least twice what it was worth. People of much more modest means are now echoing his tactics, even if they cannot extend his lavish terms.   read more

Controversies

  • Scientists Prove Texas Earthquakes Were Caused by Fracking

    Friday, September 23, 2016
    In 2012 and 2013, earthquakes — five of them considered significant — shook East Texas near Timpson. A team of scientists for the first time were able to track the uplifting ground movements in the earthquake using radar from satellites. A study says it confirms that these were not natural, something scientists had previously said was likely using a more traditional analysis.   read more
  • Public Disclosure of Medical Treatment Trial Results Now Ensured by New Federal Rules

    Tuesday, September 20, 2016
    At issue is how to help people find medical studies — and then to make the results public so that successes can reach patients more quickly. Federal law requires reporting the results of certain studies on a government website. But too often, that reporting doesn't happen, especially the failures. VP Joe Biden cited concern that such secrecy was stifling cancer progress. One analysis of 400 studies of diseases found 30% hadn't disclosed results within four years of completion.   read more
  • 858 Immigrants with Pending Deportation Orders Accidentally Granted U.S. Citizenship

    Tuesday, September 20, 2016
    They were all from "special interest countries" — those that present a national security concern for the U.S. — or neighboring countries with high rates of immigration fraud. DHS said the findings reflect what has long been a problem for immigration officials — old paper-based records containing fingerprint information that can't be searched electronically. Fingerprints are missing from federal databases for as many as 315,000 immigrants with deportation orders or who are fugitive criminals.   read more

U.S. and the World

  • U.S. Senate Passes Bill to Combat Lucrative Illegal Wildlife Trafficking Trade

    Tuesday, September 20, 2016
    Coons said he was disturbed by reports that African elephant population has shrunk by 30% since 2007, primarily due to poaching. "Not only are iconic wildlife species in grave danger of disappearing, but wildlife trafficking also fuels well-organized criminal networks," he said. "Imperiled animals are slaughtered for no reason other than money, and innocent human lives are lost in the process. We cannot wait any longer to use every tool at our disposal to curb this global crisis."   read more
  • Former Japanese Leader Heads Fundraising Effort for Ailing U.S. Sailors Who Aided Fukushima Relief

    Saturday, September 10, 2016
    "I felt I had to do something to help those who worked so hard for Japan," said the prime minister. "Maybe this isn't enough, but it will express our gratitude, that Japan is thankful." Sailors became sick with cancers, leukemia, and brain tumors, and they blame radiation. Their ships were in the direction of the radioactive plumes spewed from the Fukushima plant. Aircraft carriers routinely use drinking water from the ocean, which the lawsuit says was contaminated with radiation.   read more
  • U.S. Wildlife Officials Burn $1 Million Worth of Rhino Horns in Symbolic Ceremony against Poaching

    Friday, September 09, 2016
    Federal wildlife officials burned more than $1 million worth of rhino horn items in a ceremony Thursday, as they and onlookers raged over continued poaching and trafficking of the endangered animals. The items--whole horns and ornate objects--had been confiscated by U.S. officials before being used in the symbolic event — the first of its kind in the nation. "Wildlife trafficking through the United States, or into the United States, will not be tolerated," said Wildlife Service's Michelle Gadd.   read more

Appointments and Resignations

  • U.S. Ambassador to Burundi: Who Is Anne S. Casper?

    Wednesday, September 21, 2016
    Casper moved to Jeddah, Saudi Arabia in 2012 as the consul general there. She returned to Washington in 2014 as the deputy assistant secretary for international media and the following year was named senior adviser in the Center for Strategic Counterterrorism Communications. In 2016, she was named acting director of partnerships in the Global Engagement Center. Casper is known in the State Dept for intensely studying the language and customs of every country in which she serves.   read more
  • U.S. Ambassador to Greece: Who Is Geoffrey Pyatt?

    Sunday, September 18, 2016
    When WikiLeaks published State Dept cables, Pyatt became embroiled in controversy because of a 2007 cable he sent recommending that a secretary in India’s Ministry of External Affairs visit Washington D.C. in order to help “feed” U.S. government views on Iran into the Indian system. Pyatt became U.S. ambassador to Ukraine in July, 2013. In March, 2014, Russia invaded Ukraine and annexed Crimea. Since then Pyatt has helped coordinate the U.S. response to the action.   read more
  • U.S. Ambassador to Laos: Who Is Rena Bitter?

    Saturday, September 17, 2016
    In 2001 Bitter was made a special assistant in the office of Secretary of State Colin Powell. She was appointed in 2009 as Deputy Director of the U.S. State Dept Operations Center and became Director the following year. That put her in charge as the WikiLeaks papers were being released, and Bitter was one of the officials charged with trying to mitigate the damage caused by them. She was named Consul General in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, in 2013.   read more

Domestic Policy/Agency of the Day

  • National Capital Planning Commission

    The central planning agency for Washington D.C. and the surrounding communities, the National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC) formulates initiatives to guide future development and considers about 180 submitted proposals a year, with the...   more

Domestic Policy Divisions

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Foreign Policy/Nation of the Day

  • Argentina

    Argentina is the second largest country in South America, and the most prosperous country in Latin America. Having survived a brutal dictatorship and economic crisis in recent years, the country is politically stable and growing economically ag...   more

Nations

Meet Your Government

  • Santiago, Félix

    A native of Juana Diaz, Puerto Rico, Félix Santiago graduated from the University of Puerto Rico and earned an MA in administration from Central Michigan university. He served in the Sinai and in Peru, and was the Military Group Commander in El...   more

Blog

  • Irving Wallace: 100th Birthday

    On March 19, 2016, the popular novelist Irving Wallace—my father—would have turned 100 years old. Instead of honoring my father by presenting a review of his achievements and recalling what a generous, warm-hearted person he was and how much enjoy...   more
  • U.S. Maternal Mortality Rate Rises, Bucks Trend of Fewer Such Deaths Worldwide

    Friday, September 23, 2016
    One of the biggest worldwide public health triumphs in recent years has been maternal mortality. Global death rates fell by more than a third from 2000 to 2015. The United States, however, is one of the few countries in the world that has gone against the grain, new data show. Its maternal mortality rate has risen despite improvements in health care and an overwhelming global trend in the other direction.   read more
  • U.S. Ambassador to the Philippines: Who Is Sung Y. Kim?

    Saturday, September 24, 2016
    Kim’s father, Kim Ki-wan was a member of the Korean CIA and was posted as a diplomat to Japan. He was implicated in the 1973 kidnapping of dissident (and future president) Kim Dae-jung. Kim himself had been kidnapped, by North Korea, and held for 20 days in 1958. Born in 1960, Kim was 13 years old when his father, following the kidnapping, moved his family to Los Angeles. In 2011, Kim became the first American of Korean descent to serve as ambassador to South Korea. He served there until 2014.   read more
  • Singer Cancels University of Texas Show Because of Concealed Gun Policy

    Friday, September 23, 2016
    Singer-songwriter Ray LaMontagne canceled his show at the University of Texas’ Bass Concert Hall over the school’s policy to allow patrons to carry concealed handguns at the venue. Senate Bill 11, also called campus carry, was passed in 2015 by the Texas Legislature. It allows concealed carry of handguns by license holders on state college and university campuses, and bars schools from prohibiting them except in certain areas. The law took effect Aug. 1.   read more
  • Government Urges That Bumble Bee Be Placed on Endangered Species List

    Friday, September 23, 2016
    Federal wildlife officials made a formal recommendation to list the rusty patched bumble bee as an endangered species because it has disappeared from about 90% of its historic range in just the past two decades. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service made the recommendation after the Xerces Societypresented studies showing it was struggling due to a combination of disease, habitat loss, climate change and overuse of pesticides on commercial crops.   read more
  • Defense Attorney Backs Down, Removes “Black Lives Matter” Button in Courtroom

    Friday, September 23, 2016
    A deputy public defender in Las Vegas gave in to a judge’s request on Thursday to remove a “Black Lives Matter” pin in court, after a free-form discussion about the politics of protest and free speech amid a national debate over police brutality and race relations. In a new show of defiance that wasn’t directly addressed by the judge, Deputy Public Defender Erika Ballou and several attorneys in the audience behind her wore black arm bands.   read more

Top Stories

  • For First Time in U.S., Electrical Power Produced by Ocean’s Waves Feeds a Power Grid

    Tuesday, September 20, 2016
    The ocean's endless motion packs enough power to meet a quarter of America's energy needs and dramatically reduce the nation's reliance on oil, gas and coal. But wave energy technology lags well behind wind and solar power, with technical hurdles still to be overcome. To that end, the Navy has established a test site in Hawaii, with hopes the technology can someday be used to produce clean, renewable power for coastal communities in fuel-starved places around the world.   read more
  • FBI Won’t Rule Out Practice of Impersonating Journalists in Undercover Operations

    Monday, September 19, 2016
    AP VP Paul Colford said the news cooperative was "deeply disappointed with the inspector general's findings, which effectively condone the FBI's impersonation of an AP journalist in 2007. Such action compromises the ability of a free press to gather the news safely and effectively and raises serious constitutional concerns. Once again, AP calls on the government to refrain from any activities involving the impersonation of the news media..." FBI Director Comey defended the tactic in 2014.   read more
  • U.S. House Republicans, as Election-Season Tactic, Vote to Halt Guantánamo Detainee Transfers

    Sunday, September 18, 2016
    The bill is an opportunity for Republicans to put Democrats on record and use their votes against them in campaigns. Within minutes of the vote, Republicans sent out a news release saying, "Democrats vote to close GITMO and bring terrorists to U.S. soil (again)." Said White House press secretary Josh Earnest: "When it comes to America's national security, at some point that should rate higher on the priority list than an individual's re-election prospects."   read more

Unusual News

  • Final Wave of Veto Overrides in Store for Missouri’s Most Overridden Governor Ever

    Sunday, September 18, 2016
    It's unknown where Nixon ranks of most overridden governors in U.S. history, but he appears unusual among contemporaries. His distinction is due partly to the rarity of Missouri's politically divided government. He's the only Missouri Democrat to govern opposite a Republican supermajority at least since Reconstruction. Since Nixon took office in 2009, lawmakers have overridden 83 of his vetoes — four times the combined total of all other governors' overrides dating back to the early 1800s.   read more
  • It’s Toddlers, Not Industrial Workers, Who Are At Highest Risk for Chemical Burns to the Eyes

    Sunday, September 18, 2016
    Chemical eye burns from chemicals are usually considered a problem in industrial settings. But it turns out that toddlers have the highest risk for this potentially blinding injury at home. “Just about every eye doctor has seen this,” said Dr. Levin. “It’s a potentially blinding problem that is a completely preventable tragedy.” From 2010 to 2013, there were 144,000 chemical eye burns totaling $106.7 million in ER charges. It is "the tip of the iceberg,” said Dr. Osterhoudt.   read more
  • Oregon Sees Surge of New Voters from Law that Registers Voters with Driver’s License Renewals

    Saturday, September 17, 2016
    Nearly 300,000 Oregonians have registered to vote in the past 12 months and more than 75 percent of them did so under the motor voter law. In addition, the state is on track to register 250,000 new voters under the law by the November election. The increase represents a 14 percent uptick in registered voters in the state since this time last year. Oregon was the first state to put such a law into effect and since then, California, Vermont and West Virginia have adopted similar laws.   read more

Where is the Money Going?

  • Income of Same-Sex Married Couples Exceeds that of Straight Couples

    Friday, September 16, 2016
    Gay affluence may be largely a Hollywood myth, with tired cliches of gays and lesbians living handsomely in chic American cities. But men in same-sex marriages tend to make a good deal more money than households with heterosexual spouses, according to data released by the U.S. Treasury Dept. The findings are as much a portrait of the community as they are a look at societal gender norms and biases, experts said, with wrinkles that are both well-understood and still being explored.   read more
  • Albuquerque Police Department Rakes in Huge Profits From Forfeiture Practice

    Wednesday, September 07, 2016
    Albuquerque hauls in more than $1 million a year by seizing cars, sometimes from innocent people, in defiance of state law and public outrage, claims a mother who wants the city’s program declared unconstitutional. The city even writes into its budget ahead of time the money it expects to make from selling seized cars.   read more
  • As Number of U.S. Homes for Sale Shrinks, Many Homeowners Receive Big Offers to Sell

    Tuesday, September 06, 2016
    It is a growing national problem. The number of homes on the market in the U.S. has fallen for the last 14 months. The inventory of homes for sale is the lowest it has been since modern records started being kept in 1982. Mark Zuckerberg, the billionaire Facebook CEO, found a place he liked near San Francisco’s Mission District in 2012 and paid the owner at least twice what it was worth. People of much more modest means are now echoing his tactics, even if they cannot extend his lavish terms.   read more

Controversies

  • Scientists Prove Texas Earthquakes Were Caused by Fracking

    Friday, September 23, 2016
    In 2012 and 2013, earthquakes — five of them considered significant — shook East Texas near Timpson. A team of scientists for the first time were able to track the uplifting ground movements in the earthquake using radar from satellites. A study says it confirms that these were not natural, something scientists had previously said was likely using a more traditional analysis.   read more
  • Public Disclosure of Medical Treatment Trial Results Now Ensured by New Federal Rules

    Tuesday, September 20, 2016
    At issue is how to help people find medical studies — and then to make the results public so that successes can reach patients more quickly. Federal law requires reporting the results of certain studies on a government website. But too often, that reporting doesn't happen, especially the failures. VP Joe Biden cited concern that such secrecy was stifling cancer progress. One analysis of 400 studies of diseases found 30% hadn't disclosed results within four years of completion.   read more
  • 858 Immigrants with Pending Deportation Orders Accidentally Granted U.S. Citizenship

    Tuesday, September 20, 2016
    They were all from "special interest countries" — those that present a national security concern for the U.S. — or neighboring countries with high rates of immigration fraud. DHS said the findings reflect what has long been a problem for immigration officials — old paper-based records containing fingerprint information that can't be searched electronically. Fingerprints are missing from federal databases for as many as 315,000 immigrants with deportation orders or who are fugitive criminals.   read more

U.S. and the World

  • U.S. Senate Passes Bill to Combat Lucrative Illegal Wildlife Trafficking Trade

    Tuesday, September 20, 2016
    Coons said he was disturbed by reports that African elephant population has shrunk by 30% since 2007, primarily due to poaching. "Not only are iconic wildlife species in grave danger of disappearing, but wildlife trafficking also fuels well-organized criminal networks," he said. "Imperiled animals are slaughtered for no reason other than money, and innocent human lives are lost in the process. We cannot wait any longer to use every tool at our disposal to curb this global crisis."   read more
  • Former Japanese Leader Heads Fundraising Effort for Ailing U.S. Sailors Who Aided Fukushima Relief

    Saturday, September 10, 2016
    "I felt I had to do something to help those who worked so hard for Japan," said the prime minister. "Maybe this isn't enough, but it will express our gratitude, that Japan is thankful." Sailors became sick with cancers, leukemia, and brain tumors, and they blame radiation. Their ships were in the direction of the radioactive plumes spewed from the Fukushima plant. Aircraft carriers routinely use drinking water from the ocean, which the lawsuit says was contaminated with radiation.   read more
  • U.S. Wildlife Officials Burn $1 Million Worth of Rhino Horns in Symbolic Ceremony against Poaching

    Friday, September 09, 2016
    Federal wildlife officials burned more than $1 million worth of rhino horn items in a ceremony Thursday, as they and onlookers raged over continued poaching and trafficking of the endangered animals. The items--whole horns and ornate objects--had been confiscated by U.S. officials before being used in the symbolic event — the first of its kind in the nation. "Wildlife trafficking through the United States, or into the United States, will not be tolerated," said Wildlife Service's Michelle Gadd.   read more

Appointments and Resignations

  • U.S. Ambassador to Burundi: Who Is Anne S. Casper?

    Wednesday, September 21, 2016
    Casper moved to Jeddah, Saudi Arabia in 2012 as the consul general there. She returned to Washington in 2014 as the deputy assistant secretary for international media and the following year was named senior adviser in the Center for Strategic Counterterrorism Communications. In 2016, she was named acting director of partnerships in the Global Engagement Center. Casper is known in the State Dept for intensely studying the language and customs of every country in which she serves.   read more
  • U.S. Ambassador to Greece: Who Is Geoffrey Pyatt?

    Sunday, September 18, 2016
    When WikiLeaks published State Dept cables, Pyatt became embroiled in controversy because of a 2007 cable he sent recommending that a secretary in India’s Ministry of External Affairs visit Washington D.C. in order to help “feed” U.S. government views on Iran into the Indian system. Pyatt became U.S. ambassador to Ukraine in July, 2013. In March, 2014, Russia invaded Ukraine and annexed Crimea. Since then Pyatt has helped coordinate the U.S. response to the action.   read more
  • U.S. Ambassador to Laos: Who Is Rena Bitter?

    Saturday, September 17, 2016
    In 2001 Bitter was made a special assistant in the office of Secretary of State Colin Powell. She was appointed in 2009 as Deputy Director of the U.S. State Dept Operations Center and became Director the following year. That put her in charge as the WikiLeaks papers were being released, and Bitter was one of the officials charged with trying to mitigate the damage caused by them. She was named Consul General in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, in 2013.   read more

Domestic Policy/Agency of the Day

  • Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations

    Located within the US Department of State, the Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations (OBO) is responsible for the buildings that house America’s overseas embassies, consulates and missions. OBO conducts much of its work using domestic contractor...   more

Domestic Policy Divisions

Go to Department

Foreign Policy/Nation of the Day

  • Bahrain

    A former British protectorate, Bahrain is a small country (less than a million people) but one of the world’s most densely populated, with almost 80% of the population living in the two main cities of Manama and Al Muharraq. As with other prosp...   more

Nations

Meet Your Government

  • Cornyn, John

    Replacing Edward “Ted” Kennedy as chairman of the board of trustees for the James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation is U.S. Senator John Cornyn III (R-TX), one of the most conservative members of the Senate. The Foundation was founded by Cong...   more

Blog

  • Irving Wallace: 100th Birthday

    On March 19, 2016, the popular novelist Irving Wallace—my father—would have turned 100 years old. Instead of honoring my father by presenting a review of his achievements and recalling what a generous, warm-hearted person he was and how much enjoy...   more

PHOTO GALLERY

Get Smart Phone Meets Smartphone Click the photo for larger view Get Smart Phone Meets Smartphone