Portal

  • Nation’s First Academic Chair for Study of Atheism Established at Miami University

    Wednesday, May 25, 2016
    The chair has been established with a $2.2 million donation from Louis Appignani, a retired businessman. “I’m trying to eliminate discrimination against atheists,” he said. "This is a step in that direction." With atheists still often stigmatized and disparaged in this country, it took some persuading for the university to agree to create a chair with the word “atheism” in the title. "That was a deal-breaker for Lou,” Siegel said. “He wasn’t going to do it unless it had the word atheism in it.”   read more
  • Racist Portrayal of Mexican-Americans Seen in Text of Proposed Texas School Book

    Wednesday, May 25, 2016
    Chicanos are described as people who "opposed Western civilization and wanted to destroy this society." Mexican-Americans are linked to undocumented immigrants. "Instead of a text that is respectful of the Mexican-American history, we have a book poorly written [and] racist..." said Tony Diaz. The book is produced by a company that appears to be run by Cynthia Dunbar, a right-wing Christian activist who questioned the constitutionality of public schools.   read more
  • Americans, Age 18-34, More Likely to Live with Parents than Romantic Partners

    Wednesday, May 25, 2016
    Young men have consistently been more likely to live with their parents than young women have, and that remains true, generally because women marry younger and move out. But now living with parents is on the cusp of becoming the dominant arrangement for young women as well. “What you tend to see is that racial and ethnic minorities...especially from disadvantaged backgrounds, are the most likely to be living in their parent’s home and the least likely to have a partner,” Fry said.   read more
  • Thousands of Inmates Held in Federal Prisons Longer than Sentencing Period

    Wednesday, May 25, 2016
    The findings by the Justice Dept’s inspector general are a potential embarrassment for the U.S. Bureau of Prisons at a time when the Obama administration has assailed what it says are unfair and unduly harsh sentences for many inmates, particularly minorities and nonviolent offenders. The consequences can be serious, the report said. The delayed releases “deprive inmates of their liberty,” and have led to millions of dollars in added prison costs and legal settlements with former inmates.   read more
  • High Unemployment Rate and Low Pay for U.S. Military Spouses

    Wednesday, May 25, 2016
    Wrestling with frequent moves, deployments and erratic schedules of their service member mates, military spouses have an unemployment rate of up to 18 percent, compared to last month's national jobless rate of 5%. The study found that up to 42% of military spouses — or as many as 95,000 — are jobless, compared to about 25% of a comparable civilian spouse population. In addition, it estimated that military spouses with a bachelor's degree earn 40% less than their civilian counterparts.   read more

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Top Stories

  • Obama Lets U.S. Companies Arm another Dictatorship

    Tuesday, May 24, 2016
    The U.S. is rescinding a decades-old ban on sales of lethal military equipment to Vietnam, President Obama announced on Monday. He insisted it should not be seen as carte blanche for weapons sales. Human rights advocates, who had asked Obama to hold off on lifting the ban until Vietnam had released some political prisoners and promised to stop the police beatings of protesters, condemned the decision. “President Obama just gave Vietnam a reward that they don’t deserve,” said Human Rights Watch.   read more
  • FDA Accused of Bowing to Drug Industry Pressure in Delaying Generic Drug Risk Warning Labels

    Monday, May 23, 2016
    In 2011, the Supreme Court ruled that generic drugmakers could not be held liable for failing to warn patients about the risks of their products. People harmed by generics would be unable to sue even as those who had taken the brand-name of the same product won million-dollar judgments. Those people included the family of Kira Gilbert, who died at 22 of a heart attack after taking a generic of painkiller Darvon. Her family’s lawsuit was dismissed in 2012 because of the Supreme Court ruling.   read more
  • Segregation Found to be Worsening in America’s High-Poverty Schools

    Sunday, May 22, 2016
    "Segregation in public K-12 schools isn't getting better. It's getting worse, and getting worse quickly," said Rep. Scott. "More than 20 million students of color [are] now attending racially and socioeconomically isolated public schools." There are fewer math, biology, chemistry and physics courses in these schools than their more affluent counterparts with fewer minority students. In public schools, low-income and minority students were far less likely to enroll in these more rigorous courses.   read more

Unusual News

  • Rate of Adult Smokers in U.S. Takes Biggest Plunge in 20 Years

    Tuesday, May 24, 2016
    Why the smoking rate fell so much in 2015 — and whether it will fall as fast again — is not quite clear. About 50 years ago, roughly 42% of U.S. adults smoked. It was common nearly everywhere. The smoking rate's gradual decline has coincided with an increased public understanding that smoking is a cause of cancer, heart disease and other lethal health problems. Experts attribute recent declines to the mounting impact of anti-smoking ad campaigns, cigarette taxes and smoking bans.   read more
  • Obama Administration Officials Say Atrocities Prevention Board not Responsible for Preventing Atrocities

    Monday, May 23, 2016
    When President Obama in 2011 announced he planned to establish an Atrocities Prevention Board, the mission of the board seemed straightforward: preventing atrocities. But faced with questions about atrocities that haven't been prevented, the administration had a curious response: That's not the point. Officials briefing reporters on a new executive order said the purpose of the board is to "look over the horizon" and identify potential conflicts that need to be kept on the government's radar.   read more
  • Congress Reaches Bipartisan Safety Standards Agreement for Dangerous Chemicals

    Sunday, May 22, 2016
    "People believe when they go to the grocery store or the hardware store (and) get a product, that that product has been tested and it's been determined to be safe. That isn't the case," said Sen. Tom Udall, a lead sponsor of the bill. "Today we are stepping forward and we are putting a law in place that will protect American families and protect children from chemicals." The legislation is named after the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who pushed for chemical reform before his death in 2013.   read more

Where is the Money Going?

  • Two-Thirds of Americans Would Struggle to Pay for a $1,000 Emergency

    Saturday, May 21, 2016
    These difficulties span all incomes, according to the poll. Three-quarters of people in households making less than $50,000 a year and two-thirds of those making between $50,000 and $100,000 would have difficulty coming up with $1,000 to cover an unexpected bill. Even for the country's wealthiest 20% — households making more than $100,000 a year — 38% say they would have at least some difficulty coming up with $1,000.   read more
  • Study Finds Middle Class Shrinking in Four-Fifths of Metro Areas

    Monday, May 16, 2016
    In cities across America, the middle class is hollowing out. A widening wealth gap is moving more households into either higher- or lower-income groups in major metro areas, with fewer remaining in the middle. Middle class adults now make up less than half the population in such cities as New York, L.A., Boston and Houston. That sharp shift reflects a broad erosion--one that has has animated this year's presidential campaign, lifting the insurgent candidacies of Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders.   read more
  • F-35 Fighter Jet Program, Touted as Affordable, is Far from It, as Lockheed Raises Prices at Will

    Monday, May 16, 2016
    The cornerstone of the Joint Strike Fighter program is affordability. The program was sold using affordability as its battle cry. The program promised to "affordably develop the next generation strike fighter weapons system to meet an advanced threat (2010 and beyond), while improving lethality, survivability, and supportability." The affordability was addressed by combining multiple programs into one. It didn't work, especially with poor project management.   read more

Controversies

  • National Intelligence Director Clapper Suspected of Creating New Obstacle to Release of Censored Pages from 9/11 Report

    Tuesday, May 24, 2016
    Last-minute obstacles, often by design, have a way of cropping up in Washington. Graham hopes he is not seeing an example of that, after suggestions from James Clapper, director of national intelligence, that Congress will ultimately be left to decide what to do with the pages once intelligence officials finish a review. That approach took Graham by surprise. It threatens to add a new layer of complexity to a process that those backing the release thought was reaching its long-sought end.   read more
  • Chicago Police Use of Computer-Predictions of Shooters and Victims Prompts Civil Liberties Concerns

    Tuesday, May 24, 2016
    Now on a fourth revision of the computer algorithm that generates the list, critics are raising questions about potential breaches to civil liberties, and the list’s efficacy remains in doubt as killings have continued to rise this year. The critics wonder whether there is value in predicting who is likely to shoot or be shot with seemingly little ability to prevent it, and they question the fairness and legality of creating a list of people deemed likely to commit crimes in some future time,   read more
  • Troubled TSA Seen as Making Superficial Fix in Replacement of Controversial Security Chief

    Tuesday, May 24, 2016
    Hoggan received $90,000 in bonuses over a 13-month period, even though a leaked report showed that auditors were able to get fake weapons and explosives past security screeners 95% of the time in 70 covert tests. Hoggan’s bonus was paid out in $10,000 increments, an arrangement that members of Congress have said was intended to disguise the payments. In addition, several employees who say they were punished after filing whistleblower complaints have alleged that Hoggan played a role.   read more

U.S. and the World

  • Judge Passes Buck on Assigning Blame for Decision to Leave Behind 26 U.S. Citizens during Evacuation from Yemen

    Friday, May 20, 2016
    Federal courts don't have authority to decide if the government has an obligation to evacuate 26 U.S. citizens stranded in war-torn Yemen, a judge ruled Tuesday. Those citizens sued Secretary of State Kerry and Secretary of Defense Carter, saying the government ignored them while ordering diplomats and military personnel to flee the war-ravaged country. While the State Dept issued a travel warning and acknowledged danger to Americans, it did nothing to evacuate U.S. citizens, the group claimed.   read more
  • Big Pharma and Allies in Congress Pressure Colombia to Honor Patent of Costly Cancer Drug

    Thursday, May 19, 2016
    Health Minister Alejandro Gaviria's remarks are the strongest yet in a fight with the world's biggest drugmaker. The Colombian Embassy described intense lobbying pressure on Colombia, a staunch U.S. ally, from the pharma industry and its allies in the U.S. Congress. Gaviria said the pressure shows the forceful steps that big pharma is willing to take to protect its commercial interests. "They're very afraid that Colombia could become an example that spreads across the region," he said.   read more
  • While U.S. Confronts Painkiller Addiction Epidemic, Drugs’ Absence around World Leaves Many Suffering

    Wednesday, May 18, 2016
    Many ill people with a legitimate need for narcotic drugs cannot get them and are suffering and dying in pain. In Russia, India and Mexico, many doctors are reluctant to prescribe these painkillers, fearful of possible prosecution or other legal problems, even if they believe the prescriptions are justified. And in most poor and middle-income countries, these drugs are restricted and often unavailable, even for patients with terminal cancer, AIDS or grievous war wounds.   read more

Appointments and Resignations

  • Afghanistan’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is Hamdullah Mohib?

    Sunday, May 22, 2016
    Mohib was responsible for the creation of community service programming to recognize the achievements of Afghan women, and to support special-needs orphans living in Kabul. He worked for the American University of Afghanistan, both as its IT director and a teacher of IT classes. He also served in President Ghani’s campaign as his social media “guru” and subsequently as his deputy chief of staff. Mohib and his wife Lael have written articles together on Afghan political issues.   read more
  • Denmark’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is Lars Gert Lose?

    Saturday, May 21, 2016
    Part of Lose’s duties since arriving in the U.S. includes explaining Danish policies mentioned in the course of the U.S. presidential campaign. He commented on Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders’ statement that he would like to see the U.S. economy be more like Denmark’s. “It goes without saying, of course without interfering in the U.S. political debate, that we welcome any positive mention of Denmark,” Lose said. “Denmark has a lot to offer in terms of how we organize our society.”   read more
  • Ambassador to El Salvador: Who Is Jean E. Manes?

    Sunday, May 15, 2016
    Manes was principal officer in the consulate in Azores, where she helped negotiate the U.S. military presence in those islands. She then was named cultural affairs officer in an embassy in Brazil, where she helped develop an English teaching strategy in the run-up to the World Cup and Olympic Games. She returned to Washington in 2010 as staff director in the Office of Policy, Planning and Resources for Public Affairs. In 2012, she served a tour as counselor for public affairs in Afghanistan.   read more

Domestic Policy/Agency of the Day

  • National Nuclear Security Administration

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is a semi-autonomous agency within the U.S. Department of Energy responsible for overseeing the nation’s nuclear weapons complex. Using private contractors to run day-to-day operations, the NN...   more

Domestic Policy Divisions

Go to Department

Foreign Policy/Nation of the Day

  • Rwanda

    Rwanda’s history is one marred with perpetual civil war between the majority population of native Hutu people, who are peasant farmers, and the minority population of Tutsi, who arrived from the Horn of Africa in the 15th century. In 1894, the ...   more

Nations

Meet Your Government

  • Sullivan, Michael

    Michael Sullivan joined the Gillette Company as a stock clerk at the age of 18, working his way up through positions in human resources and quality operations before becoming assistant to the president. He graduated from BostonCollege and SuffolkU...   more

Blog

  • Irving Wallace: 100th Birthday

    On March 19, 2016, the popular novelist Irving Wallace—my father—would have turned 100 years old. Instead of honoring my father by presenting a review of his achievements and recalling what a generous, warm-hearted person he was and how much enjoy...   more
  • Nation’s First Academic Chair for Study of Atheism Established at Miami University

    Wednesday, May 25, 2016
    The chair has been established with a $2.2 million donation from Louis Appignani, a retired businessman. “I’m trying to eliminate discrimination against atheists,” he said. "This is a step in that direction." With atheists still often stigmatized and disparaged in this country, it took some persuading for the university to agree to create a chair with the word “atheism” in the title. "That was a deal-breaker for Lou,” Siegel said. “He wasn’t going to do it unless it had the word atheism in it.”   read more
  • Racist Portrayal of Mexican-Americans Seen in Text of Proposed Texas School Book

    Wednesday, May 25, 2016
    Chicanos are described as people who "opposed Western civilization and wanted to destroy this society." Mexican-Americans are linked to undocumented immigrants. "Instead of a text that is respectful of the Mexican-American history, we have a book poorly written [and] racist..." said Tony Diaz. The book is produced by a company that appears to be run by Cynthia Dunbar, a right-wing Christian activist who questioned the constitutionality of public schools.   read more
  • Americans, Age 18-34, More Likely to Live with Parents than Romantic Partners

    Wednesday, May 25, 2016
    Young men have consistently been more likely to live with their parents than young women have, and that remains true, generally because women marry younger and move out. But now living with parents is on the cusp of becoming the dominant arrangement for young women as well. “What you tend to see is that racial and ethnic minorities...especially from disadvantaged backgrounds, are the most likely to be living in their parent’s home and the least likely to have a partner,” Fry said.   read more
  • Thousands of Inmates Held in Federal Prisons Longer than Sentencing Period

    Wednesday, May 25, 2016
    The findings by the Justice Dept’s inspector general are a potential embarrassment for the U.S. Bureau of Prisons at a time when the Obama administration has assailed what it says are unfair and unduly harsh sentences for many inmates, particularly minorities and nonviolent offenders. The consequences can be serious, the report said. The delayed releases “deprive inmates of their liberty,” and have led to millions of dollars in added prison costs and legal settlements with former inmates.   read more
  • High Unemployment Rate and Low Pay for U.S. Military Spouses

    Wednesday, May 25, 2016
    Wrestling with frequent moves, deployments and erratic schedules of their service member mates, military spouses have an unemployment rate of up to 18 percent, compared to last month's national jobless rate of 5%. The study found that up to 42% of military spouses — or as many as 95,000 — are jobless, compared to about 25% of a comparable civilian spouse population. In addition, it estimated that military spouses with a bachelor's degree earn 40% less than their civilian counterparts.   read more

Top Stories

  • Obama Lets U.S. Companies Arm another Dictatorship

    Tuesday, May 24, 2016
    The U.S. is rescinding a decades-old ban on sales of lethal military equipment to Vietnam, President Obama announced on Monday. He insisted it should not be seen as carte blanche for weapons sales. Human rights advocates, who had asked Obama to hold off on lifting the ban until Vietnam had released some political prisoners and promised to stop the police beatings of protesters, condemned the decision. “President Obama just gave Vietnam a reward that they don’t deserve,” said Human Rights Watch.   read more
  • FDA Accused of Bowing to Drug Industry Pressure in Delaying Generic Drug Risk Warning Labels

    Monday, May 23, 2016
    In 2011, the Supreme Court ruled that generic drugmakers could not be held liable for failing to warn patients about the risks of their products. People harmed by generics would be unable to sue even as those who had taken the brand-name of the same product won million-dollar judgments. Those people included the family of Kira Gilbert, who died at 22 of a heart attack after taking a generic of painkiller Darvon. Her family’s lawsuit was dismissed in 2012 because of the Supreme Court ruling.   read more
  • Segregation Found to be Worsening in America’s High-Poverty Schools

    Sunday, May 22, 2016
    "Segregation in public K-12 schools isn't getting better. It's getting worse, and getting worse quickly," said Rep. Scott. "More than 20 million students of color [are] now attending racially and socioeconomically isolated public schools." There are fewer math, biology, chemistry and physics courses in these schools than their more affluent counterparts with fewer minority students. In public schools, low-income and minority students were far less likely to enroll in these more rigorous courses.   read more

Unusual News

  • Rate of Adult Smokers in U.S. Takes Biggest Plunge in 20 Years

    Tuesday, May 24, 2016
    Why the smoking rate fell so much in 2015 — and whether it will fall as fast again — is not quite clear. About 50 years ago, roughly 42% of U.S. adults smoked. It was common nearly everywhere. The smoking rate's gradual decline has coincided with an increased public understanding that smoking is a cause of cancer, heart disease and other lethal health problems. Experts attribute recent declines to the mounting impact of anti-smoking ad campaigns, cigarette taxes and smoking bans.   read more
  • Obama Administration Officials Say Atrocities Prevention Board not Responsible for Preventing Atrocities

    Monday, May 23, 2016
    When President Obama in 2011 announced he planned to establish an Atrocities Prevention Board, the mission of the board seemed straightforward: preventing atrocities. But faced with questions about atrocities that haven't been prevented, the administration had a curious response: That's not the point. Officials briefing reporters on a new executive order said the purpose of the board is to "look over the horizon" and identify potential conflicts that need to be kept on the government's radar.   read more
  • Congress Reaches Bipartisan Safety Standards Agreement for Dangerous Chemicals

    Sunday, May 22, 2016
    "People believe when they go to the grocery store or the hardware store (and) get a product, that that product has been tested and it's been determined to be safe. That isn't the case," said Sen. Tom Udall, a lead sponsor of the bill. "Today we are stepping forward and we are putting a law in place that will protect American families and protect children from chemicals." The legislation is named after the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who pushed for chemical reform before his death in 2013.   read more

Where is the Money Going?

  • Two-Thirds of Americans Would Struggle to Pay for a $1,000 Emergency

    Saturday, May 21, 2016
    These difficulties span all incomes, according to the poll. Three-quarters of people in households making less than $50,000 a year and two-thirds of those making between $50,000 and $100,000 would have difficulty coming up with $1,000 to cover an unexpected bill. Even for the country's wealthiest 20% — households making more than $100,000 a year — 38% say they would have at least some difficulty coming up with $1,000.   read more
  • Study Finds Middle Class Shrinking in Four-Fifths of Metro Areas

    Monday, May 16, 2016
    In cities across America, the middle class is hollowing out. A widening wealth gap is moving more households into either higher- or lower-income groups in major metro areas, with fewer remaining in the middle. Middle class adults now make up less than half the population in such cities as New York, L.A., Boston and Houston. That sharp shift reflects a broad erosion--one that has has animated this year's presidential campaign, lifting the insurgent candidacies of Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders.   read more
  • F-35 Fighter Jet Program, Touted as Affordable, is Far from It, as Lockheed Raises Prices at Will

    Monday, May 16, 2016
    The cornerstone of the Joint Strike Fighter program is affordability. The program was sold using affordability as its battle cry. The program promised to "affordably develop the next generation strike fighter weapons system to meet an advanced threat (2010 and beyond), while improving lethality, survivability, and supportability." The affordability was addressed by combining multiple programs into one. It didn't work, especially with poor project management.   read more

Controversies

  • National Intelligence Director Clapper Suspected of Creating New Obstacle to Release of Censored Pages from 9/11 Report

    Tuesday, May 24, 2016
    Last-minute obstacles, often by design, have a way of cropping up in Washington. Graham hopes he is not seeing an example of that, after suggestions from James Clapper, director of national intelligence, that Congress will ultimately be left to decide what to do with the pages once intelligence officials finish a review. That approach took Graham by surprise. It threatens to add a new layer of complexity to a process that those backing the release thought was reaching its long-sought end.   read more
  • Chicago Police Use of Computer-Predictions of Shooters and Victims Prompts Civil Liberties Concerns

    Tuesday, May 24, 2016
    Now on a fourth revision of the computer algorithm that generates the list, critics are raising questions about potential breaches to civil liberties, and the list’s efficacy remains in doubt as killings have continued to rise this year. The critics wonder whether there is value in predicting who is likely to shoot or be shot with seemingly little ability to prevent it, and they question the fairness and legality of creating a list of people deemed likely to commit crimes in some future time,   read more
  • Troubled TSA Seen as Making Superficial Fix in Replacement of Controversial Security Chief

    Tuesday, May 24, 2016
    Hoggan received $90,000 in bonuses over a 13-month period, even though a leaked report showed that auditors were able to get fake weapons and explosives past security screeners 95% of the time in 70 covert tests. Hoggan’s bonus was paid out in $10,000 increments, an arrangement that members of Congress have said was intended to disguise the payments. In addition, several employees who say they were punished after filing whistleblower complaints have alleged that Hoggan played a role.   read more

U.S. and the World

  • Judge Passes Buck on Assigning Blame for Decision to Leave Behind 26 U.S. Citizens during Evacuation from Yemen

    Friday, May 20, 2016
    Federal courts don't have authority to decide if the government has an obligation to evacuate 26 U.S. citizens stranded in war-torn Yemen, a judge ruled Tuesday. Those citizens sued Secretary of State Kerry and Secretary of Defense Carter, saying the government ignored them while ordering diplomats and military personnel to flee the war-ravaged country. While the State Dept issued a travel warning and acknowledged danger to Americans, it did nothing to evacuate U.S. citizens, the group claimed.   read more
  • Big Pharma and Allies in Congress Pressure Colombia to Honor Patent of Costly Cancer Drug

    Thursday, May 19, 2016
    Health Minister Alejandro Gaviria's remarks are the strongest yet in a fight with the world's biggest drugmaker. The Colombian Embassy described intense lobbying pressure on Colombia, a staunch U.S. ally, from the pharma industry and its allies in the U.S. Congress. Gaviria said the pressure shows the forceful steps that big pharma is willing to take to protect its commercial interests. "They're very afraid that Colombia could become an example that spreads across the region," he said.   read more
  • While U.S. Confronts Painkiller Addiction Epidemic, Drugs’ Absence around World Leaves Many Suffering

    Wednesday, May 18, 2016
    Many ill people with a legitimate need for narcotic drugs cannot get them and are suffering and dying in pain. In Russia, India and Mexico, many doctors are reluctant to prescribe these painkillers, fearful of possible prosecution or other legal problems, even if they believe the prescriptions are justified. And in most poor and middle-income countries, these drugs are restricted and often unavailable, even for patients with terminal cancer, AIDS or grievous war wounds.   read more

Appointments and Resignations

  • Afghanistan’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is Hamdullah Mohib?

    Sunday, May 22, 2016
    Mohib was responsible for the creation of community service programming to recognize the achievements of Afghan women, and to support special-needs orphans living in Kabul. He worked for the American University of Afghanistan, both as its IT director and a teacher of IT classes. He also served in President Ghani’s campaign as his social media “guru” and subsequently as his deputy chief of staff. Mohib and his wife Lael have written articles together on Afghan political issues.   read more
  • Denmark’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is Lars Gert Lose?

    Saturday, May 21, 2016
    Part of Lose’s duties since arriving in the U.S. includes explaining Danish policies mentioned in the course of the U.S. presidential campaign. He commented on Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders’ statement that he would like to see the U.S. economy be more like Denmark’s. “It goes without saying, of course without interfering in the U.S. political debate, that we welcome any positive mention of Denmark,” Lose said. “Denmark has a lot to offer in terms of how we organize our society.”   read more
  • Ambassador to El Salvador: Who Is Jean E. Manes?

    Sunday, May 15, 2016
    Manes was principal officer in the consulate in Azores, where she helped negotiate the U.S. military presence in those islands. She then was named cultural affairs officer in an embassy in Brazil, where she helped develop an English teaching strategy in the run-up to the World Cup and Olympic Games. She returned to Washington in 2010 as staff director in the Office of Policy, Planning and Resources for Public Affairs. In 2012, she served a tour as counselor for public affairs in Afghanistan.   read more

Domestic Policy/Agency of the Day

  • Defense Media Activity

    The Defense Media Activity (DMA), a division in the Department of Defense, runs programs related to public relations and information dissemination. It creates press releases through a news service and sets policy for internal publications, visu...   more

Domestic Policy Divisions

Go to Department

Foreign Policy/Nation of the Day

  • Montenegro

    Montenegro was part of the former Yugoslavia at one time. Illyrians originally settled the area, followed by the Greeks, Celts, Byzantines, Romans and the Slavs. The nation was eventually Christianized under Nicholas I and later united with Ser...   more

Nations

Meet Your Government

  • Hinojosa, Ricardo

    Ricardo H. Hinojosa is the chaiman of the United States Sentencing Commission.  He was born in Rio Grande City, Texas, graduated with honors from the University of Texas at Austin in 1972, and earned his law degree from Harvard Law School three ye...   more

Blog

  • Irving Wallace: 100th Birthday

    On March 19, 2016, the popular novelist Irving Wallace—my father—would have turned 100 years old. Instead of honoring my father by presenting a review of his achievements and recalling what a generous, warm-hearted person he was and how much enjoy...   more

PHOTO GALLERY

Get Smart Phone Meets Smartphone Click the photo for larger view Get Smart Phone Meets Smartphone