Where is the Money Going?

1 to 16 of about 1761 News
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DNC Tried to Leverage White House Ties to Reward Donors with Federal Board Appointments

“Being a donor does not get you a role in this administration,” said White House spokesman Eric Schultz, “nor does it preclude you from getting one." The practice of rewarding big donors with federal positions dates back to the times of the founding fathers. FEC's Bob Biersack said that “Big donors have always risen to the top of lists for appointment to plum ambassadorships and other boards and commissions around the federal landscape." Most of the people on the list gave huge sums to the DNC.   read more

Obama Vetoes Bill Limiting Ex-Presidents’ Allowance

Obama said he supports the bill's goal, but he sent the measure back to Congress because it would immediately end salaries and benefits to staffers carrying out the official duties of former presidents. He says the measure doesn't provide enough time for these employees to be moved to another payroll. Obama says the bill would also interfere with the Secret Service's ability to protect ex-presidents.   read more

Customs to Pay Nearly Half-Million Dollars in Body Cavity Search Settlement

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has agreed to pay a woman $475,000 to settle claims that she was subjected to a “humiliating and demeaning” illegal body cavity search at an El Paso border crossing. The unidentified woman sued several border patrol officers, the University Medical Center of El Paso and the El Paso County Hospital District in Federal Court in December 2013.   read more

Taxpayers Subsidize Junk Food

While government recommends people fill their plates with fruits and veggies to help prevent obesity, only a fraction of its subsidies support the production of fresh produce. The vast majority of subsidies go instead to commodity crops that are processed into many of the foods that are linked to the obesity crisis. “The subsidies damage our country’s health and increase the medical costs that will ultimately need to be paid to treat the effects of the obesity epidemic,” said a USPIRG report.   read more

State Laws Target Life Insurance Companies that Soak Up Money Earmarked for Beneficiaries

State actions are forcing companies to locate heirs and pay them the money they are owed. The laws follow years-long audits and multi-state investigations of the top 40 insurance companies that revealed many of them held on to benefits, even when they knew the person insured had died. "This is something that shocked me," said Illinois State Treasurer Michael Frerichs, whose office pushed for legislation. "We think it's important that the last wishes of the deceased are honored."   read more

For First Time in 50 Years, Federal Bill Seeks Limits on Debt Collection Seizures

“Every day, some Americans are having every penny in their paychecks garnished,” Cummings said. “Congress should not sit on the sidelines and watch our constituents be kept in a cycle of poverty.” “It really does put people into complete turmoil,” said Martha Bergmark, executive director of the nonprofit Voices for Civil Justice. “It’s a rolling disaster” with potential consequences in every aspect of a low-income debtor’s life, she said.   read more

Female Doctors Earn Substantially Less than Male Colleagues

The average pay gap between female and male orthopedic surgeons was nearly $41,000. The difference was about $38,000 among oncologists, about $36,000 among gynecologists and $34,000 among cardiologists. Radiology was the only specialty in which women were paid more--by roughly $2,000. “This paper is going to make women academic physicians start a conversation with their institutions to promote transparency and gender equality, because at the end of the day, it’s not fair,” said Dr. Arora.   read more

Congress Asks Soon-to-Be Ex-President Obama to Sign Bill Limiting Ex-Presidents’ Allowance

The legislation sets an annual allowance of $200,000 a year for travel, staff and office costs that have become a standard part of life after the Oval Office. For former presidents who make money through books, speaking fees and other ventures, the allowance is reduced for every dollar in outside income in excess of $400,000. Both Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, like other former presidents before them, have earned millions in speaking fees since leaving office.   read more

Income of Wealthiest 1% of Americans Surges, Widening U.S. Income Gap

Financial inequality became even wider in the U.S. last year, with average income for the top 1% surging 7.7% to $1.36 million. Income for the richest sliver rose twice as fast as it did for the remaining 99%. Income inequality has been a rallying cry of the 2016 election, with more Americans turning angry about a shrinking middle class. Donald Trump has pledged to restore prosperity by ripping up trade deals and Hillary Clinton has backed a debt-free college option and higher minimum wages.   read more

Southern States Have Highest Percentage of Doctors Who Take Payments from Big Pharma

Where a hospital is located and who owns it make a big difference in how many of its doctors take meals, consulting and promotional payments from pharmaceutical and medical device companies. A higher percentage of doctors in the South have received such payments than doctors in other regions of the country. Doctors in New Jersey, home to many of the largest drug companies, led the country in industry interactions: Nearly eight in 10 doctors took payments in 2014.   read more

Globetrotting Supreme Court Justices Disclose Privately Paid Travel

Justice Scalia was an enthusiastic traveler, taking more than 250 privately funded trips from 2004 to 2014. A few weeks before he died, he visited Singapore and Hong Kong. Justice Stephen G. Breyer was the most active traveler last year, taking 19 paid trips, including three to London and two to Paris. The trips were partly to promote his book “The Court and the World,” which was published last year. Justice Sonia Sotomayor was next, with 16 paid trips, but to less exotic places.   read more

Munitions Contractor Can Seek Site Cleanup Costs From Federal Government

A defense contractor responsible for cleaning up pollution at a facility where most munitions manufacturing was done under contracts with the U.S. military can seek cost recovery from the government, the Ninth Circuit ruled Monday. In 2013, Whittaker filed its own lawsuit under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, seeking recovery from the United States for expenses Whittaker incurred since the 1980s investigating and cleaning the Bermite site.   read more

House Votes to Give Itself an Increase in Office Expenses

House lawmakers Friday passed legislation to increase their office budgets for the first time in years but again deny themselves a pay raise of their own. The additional money for staff salaries and other office expenses is aimed in large part at retaining staff aides, who are often 20-somethings who struggle to make ends meet in Washington, where rents have skyrocketed and opportunities outside of Congress often pay more than Capitol Hill jobs.   read more

Appointing More Women to Corporate Boards Results in Higher CEO Salaries

An analysis of CEO pay at 100 large companies last year found that companies with greater gender diversity on their boards paid their chief executives about 15 percent more than the compensation dispensed by companies with less diverse boards. In dollars, this translated to approximately $2 million more in median pay last year among these companies. The median pay among the chief executives overseeing the companies whose boards had more gender diversity was $15.7 million last year.   read more

44% of Americans Over 50 Plan to Take Social Security before Retirement Age

Among those with incomes under $50,000, 58% say they feel more anxious than secure about the amount of savings they have for retirement. People with higher incomes appear less anxious, but still 40% of those with incomes of $100,000 or more worry whether their savings will be sufficient. Alison Cowen said she doesn't see any path for her to retire--ever. "I just don't have enough to live on for the rest of my life." The poll said a quarter of workers over 50 say they never plan to retire.   read more

Female CEOs Earn more than Males, but Make Up Only 5% of Executive Leaders

Women led companies in a variety of industries including technology, defense and retail. While there are few women at the helm, they tended to be in higher paying industries or positions — making up 10 of the top 100 highest paid overall. A recent report highlights the gulf between words and actions in hiring women as CEOs. "Despite all of the attention placed on increasing the number of female executives at American companies, the needle on the gender gap has hardly moved," wrote Pavle Sabic.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1761 News
1 2 3 ... 111 Next

Where is the Money Going?

1 to 16 of about 1761 News
1 2 3 ... 111 Next

DNC Tried to Leverage White House Ties to Reward Donors with Federal Board Appointments

“Being a donor does not get you a role in this administration,” said White House spokesman Eric Schultz, “nor does it preclude you from getting one." The practice of rewarding big donors with federal positions dates back to the times of the founding fathers. FEC's Bob Biersack said that “Big donors have always risen to the top of lists for appointment to plum ambassadorships and other boards and commissions around the federal landscape." Most of the people on the list gave huge sums to the DNC.   read more

Obama Vetoes Bill Limiting Ex-Presidents’ Allowance

Obama said he supports the bill's goal, but he sent the measure back to Congress because it would immediately end salaries and benefits to staffers carrying out the official duties of former presidents. He says the measure doesn't provide enough time for these employees to be moved to another payroll. Obama says the bill would also interfere with the Secret Service's ability to protect ex-presidents.   read more

Customs to Pay Nearly Half-Million Dollars in Body Cavity Search Settlement

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has agreed to pay a woman $475,000 to settle claims that she was subjected to a “humiliating and demeaning” illegal body cavity search at an El Paso border crossing. The unidentified woman sued several border patrol officers, the University Medical Center of El Paso and the El Paso County Hospital District in Federal Court in December 2013.   read more

Taxpayers Subsidize Junk Food

While government recommends people fill their plates with fruits and veggies to help prevent obesity, only a fraction of its subsidies support the production of fresh produce. The vast majority of subsidies go instead to commodity crops that are processed into many of the foods that are linked to the obesity crisis. “The subsidies damage our country’s health and increase the medical costs that will ultimately need to be paid to treat the effects of the obesity epidemic,” said a USPIRG report.   read more

State Laws Target Life Insurance Companies that Soak Up Money Earmarked for Beneficiaries

State actions are forcing companies to locate heirs and pay them the money they are owed. The laws follow years-long audits and multi-state investigations of the top 40 insurance companies that revealed many of them held on to benefits, even when they knew the person insured had died. "This is something that shocked me," said Illinois State Treasurer Michael Frerichs, whose office pushed for legislation. "We think it's important that the last wishes of the deceased are honored."   read more

For First Time in 50 Years, Federal Bill Seeks Limits on Debt Collection Seizures

“Every day, some Americans are having every penny in their paychecks garnished,” Cummings said. “Congress should not sit on the sidelines and watch our constituents be kept in a cycle of poverty.” “It really does put people into complete turmoil,” said Martha Bergmark, executive director of the nonprofit Voices for Civil Justice. “It’s a rolling disaster” with potential consequences in every aspect of a low-income debtor’s life, she said.   read more

Female Doctors Earn Substantially Less than Male Colleagues

The average pay gap between female and male orthopedic surgeons was nearly $41,000. The difference was about $38,000 among oncologists, about $36,000 among gynecologists and $34,000 among cardiologists. Radiology was the only specialty in which women were paid more--by roughly $2,000. “This paper is going to make women academic physicians start a conversation with their institutions to promote transparency and gender equality, because at the end of the day, it’s not fair,” said Dr. Arora.   read more

Congress Asks Soon-to-Be Ex-President Obama to Sign Bill Limiting Ex-Presidents’ Allowance

The legislation sets an annual allowance of $200,000 a year for travel, staff and office costs that have become a standard part of life after the Oval Office. For former presidents who make money through books, speaking fees and other ventures, the allowance is reduced for every dollar in outside income in excess of $400,000. Both Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, like other former presidents before them, have earned millions in speaking fees since leaving office.   read more

Income of Wealthiest 1% of Americans Surges, Widening U.S. Income Gap

Financial inequality became even wider in the U.S. last year, with average income for the top 1% surging 7.7% to $1.36 million. Income for the richest sliver rose twice as fast as it did for the remaining 99%. Income inequality has been a rallying cry of the 2016 election, with more Americans turning angry about a shrinking middle class. Donald Trump has pledged to restore prosperity by ripping up trade deals and Hillary Clinton has backed a debt-free college option and higher minimum wages.   read more

Southern States Have Highest Percentage of Doctors Who Take Payments from Big Pharma

Where a hospital is located and who owns it make a big difference in how many of its doctors take meals, consulting and promotional payments from pharmaceutical and medical device companies. A higher percentage of doctors in the South have received such payments than doctors in other regions of the country. Doctors in New Jersey, home to many of the largest drug companies, led the country in industry interactions: Nearly eight in 10 doctors took payments in 2014.   read more

Globetrotting Supreme Court Justices Disclose Privately Paid Travel

Justice Scalia was an enthusiastic traveler, taking more than 250 privately funded trips from 2004 to 2014. A few weeks before he died, he visited Singapore and Hong Kong. Justice Stephen G. Breyer was the most active traveler last year, taking 19 paid trips, including three to London and two to Paris. The trips were partly to promote his book “The Court and the World,” which was published last year. Justice Sonia Sotomayor was next, with 16 paid trips, but to less exotic places.   read more

Munitions Contractor Can Seek Site Cleanup Costs From Federal Government

A defense contractor responsible for cleaning up pollution at a facility where most munitions manufacturing was done under contracts with the U.S. military can seek cost recovery from the government, the Ninth Circuit ruled Monday. In 2013, Whittaker filed its own lawsuit under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, seeking recovery from the United States for expenses Whittaker incurred since the 1980s investigating and cleaning the Bermite site.   read more

House Votes to Give Itself an Increase in Office Expenses

House lawmakers Friday passed legislation to increase their office budgets for the first time in years but again deny themselves a pay raise of their own. The additional money for staff salaries and other office expenses is aimed in large part at retaining staff aides, who are often 20-somethings who struggle to make ends meet in Washington, where rents have skyrocketed and opportunities outside of Congress often pay more than Capitol Hill jobs.   read more

Appointing More Women to Corporate Boards Results in Higher CEO Salaries

An analysis of CEO pay at 100 large companies last year found that companies with greater gender diversity on their boards paid their chief executives about 15 percent more than the compensation dispensed by companies with less diverse boards. In dollars, this translated to approximately $2 million more in median pay last year among these companies. The median pay among the chief executives overseeing the companies whose boards had more gender diversity was $15.7 million last year.   read more

44% of Americans Over 50 Plan to Take Social Security before Retirement Age

Among those with incomes under $50,000, 58% say they feel more anxious than secure about the amount of savings they have for retirement. People with higher incomes appear less anxious, but still 40% of those with incomes of $100,000 or more worry whether their savings will be sufficient. Alison Cowen said she doesn't see any path for her to retire--ever. "I just don't have enough to live on for the rest of my life." The poll said a quarter of workers over 50 say they never plan to retire.   read more

Female CEOs Earn more than Males, but Make Up Only 5% of Executive Leaders

Women led companies in a variety of industries including technology, defense and retail. While there are few women at the helm, they tended to be in higher paying industries or positions — making up 10 of the top 100 highest paid overall. A recent report highlights the gulf between words and actions in hiring women as CEOs. "Despite all of the attention placed on increasing the number of female executives at American companies, the needle on the gender gap has hardly moved," wrote Pavle Sabic.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1761 News
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