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Obama Finally Puts an End to Unpopular Secure Communities Program

As part of broader immigration reforms, the Obama administration announced Thursday that the Secure Communities program, which mandated that local law enforcement submit biometric information on those suspected of being undocumented immigrants to the federal government, is going away. In its place will be the Priority Enforcement Program, which specifies that those held must be likely deportable or have a removal order in effect against them.   read more

When George W. Bush Gave a Primetime Immigration Speech, Networks Covered it Live; Obama…Forget It

“In 2006, Bush gave a 17-minute speech that was televised by all three networks that was about deploying 6,000 National Guard troops to the border. Obama is making a 10-minute speech that will have a vastly greater impact on the issue. And none of the networks are doing it,” said a senior administration official. The only broadcast networks that carried Obama's immigration talk live throughout the U.S. were Spanish language Univision and Telemundo.   read more

More Americans Die from Shoveling Snow than from Ebola

At least three people have died in New York State from shoveling snow during the extreme storm that hit the region—a higher fatality count than the number of people who have died from Ebola in the U.S. Once the storm ends, the media coverage of it will melt away. But the reporting frenzy over Ebola could continue indefinitely. However, shoveling snow is a bigger health problem for Americans than Ebola. Dr. Franklin said the annual number of deaths from shoveling snow might be close to 200.   read more

7 Companies that Paid their CEOs More Than They Paid in Taxes

While some would argue the salaries of the chief executives were too high, the point of the Institute’s report is the many tax credits, loopholes and deductions that allow businesses to reduce their tax bill and in some cases, get money back from the federal government. Boeing had the highest CEO salary of the seven, with $23.3 million going to top man James McNerney Jr. Meanwhile, the aircraft manufacturer and major government contractor enjoyed an $82 million refund from the IRS.   read more

60,000 in U.S. said to Live in Slave-Like Conditions

"Potential modern slavery cases were reported in fifty states” in 2013. Most of those in the U.S. reside in slave-like conditions because of prostitution or financial debts, and they can be found in many areas of society. “The report explains that slaves are forced to perform domestic work and home healthcare, they work in the food industry, as well as in construction, agriculture, nursing, factories and garment-manufacturing, among other sectors.”   read more

Reagan and Bush Sr. Gave Amnesty to Immigrants without going through Congress, so What’s Wrong with Obama Doing the Same?

“It is unconstitutional," said Republican Rep. Steve King, speaking of Obama's plan to grant amnesty to millions of immigrants. But that uproar in Congress stands in contrast to how lawmakers reacted 30 years ago when two Republican presidents took similar actions. In the 1980s Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush each granted amnesty to illegal immigrants without the help of Congress. “There was no political explosion then comparable to the one Republicans are threatening now,” wrote the AP.   read more

Obama has Issued Fewest Vetoes of any Two-Term President Since James Monroe…for the Moment

The last president who was in office six years to veto as few bills as Obama was James Monroe, who vetoed one bill from 1817 to 1825. Even considering the Republican landslide this month, the GOP, the House and Senate would need a two-thirds majority to override a veto, and that’s not likely to happen.   read more

U.S. Government Uses Boeing Technology to Spy on Phone Calls from the Air

The systems electronically mimic a cell tower, enabling law enforcement to collect location and other information about calls. When used in a small plane, they pick up information about tens of thousands of calls in one flight. Those familiar with the program say sweeps are being approved by judges, but since the orders are sealed, it’s unclear whether the courts are aware of the breadth of the systems’ coverage.   read more

U.S. Preterm Birth Rate Drops to 17-Year Low

The drop saved $11.9 billion in healthcare costs, according to the March of Dimes. The uninsured rate for women fell from 20.1% to 19.8% and it’s likely to drop further with the enactment of the Affordable Care Act. Smoking among women fell from 20.8% to 20.5%. Another cause of preterm births is the practice by some of medically unnecessary inductions or Caesarian sections, which have also fallen slightly from 8.1% to 8.0%.   read more

Lockheed Used Taxpayer Money to Lobby for more Taxpayer Money

Lockheed Martin for years has been running one of the government’s most important nuclear research facilities, Sandia National Laboratories. Five years ago, its lucrative contract with the Department of Energy (DOE) was coming to an end, so Lockheed started to lobby officials to win an extension. That lobbying included using some of the money paid by DOE for Lockheed to run Sandia. Under federal law, this is a big no-no. But Lockheed did it anyway.   read more

Government Panels Meant to Protect Small Businesses Taken over by Big Business

Consumer, environmental and worker safety regulators in Washington are supposed to ensure the concerns of small businesses are included in rulemaking. But increasingly federal agencies are instead giving too much weight to the voices of large corporate interests that have “hijacked” small business representation. The EPA, OSHA and CFPB have allowed trade associations and corporations they represent to “capture” small business review panels that are there to help the little guy.   read more

Weapons that Choose Their Own Kill Targets are Wave of Future…and Already in Use

At least three nations have deployed missiles that can destroy enemy positions without any guidance from human operators. “An autonomous weapons arms race is already taking place,”said physicist Steve Omohundro. Norway has the Joint Strike Missile, which can lock in on targets without human control. The Pentagon is testing Lockheed's Long Range Anti-Ship Missile, but officials won’t say if it can attack on its own. Many fear autonomous weapons will make warfare more likely or destructive.   read more

Iran Claims to Have Successfully Duplicated a U.S. Military Drone

U.S. drone technology is now in the hands of Iran, which claims to have reverse-engineered an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). In December 2011, the Iranian military captured a Lockheed UAV after it strayed into Iran’s airspace from Afghanistan. Iran claimed they’d hacked into the drone’s electronic system, allowing them to take control and divert it to their country. Engineers reportedly took the drone apart and figured out how it works, allowing them to build their own version.   read more

FDA Tests less than 1% of Food Products for Pesticide Residue

Consumers count on the FDA to keep food safe, but the agency tests very little of the produce sold in the U.S. for pesticides The FDA tests only one-tenth of 1% of the food imported for use on U.S. dinner tables, and that’s actually far more testing than happens to domestic food. This is startling considering that “from 1970 to 2007, hundreds of millions of pounds of pesticides were applied annually to U.S. food crops to protect them from pests,” the GAO wrote.   read more

Border Patrol Arrests Extend Hundreds of Miles from Border

Perhaps they should change the name to the Inland Patrol. Courts have ruled that the Border Patrol needs stronger justification for stopping people when they’re more than 100 miles from the border. However, officers in Texas have arrested people as far as 350 miles from the border with only the racial appearance of the arrestee as justification.   read more

U.S. Water Use Drops to Lowest Level in more than 40 Years

The decline in use was greatest in thermoelectric use, where it fell by 20%. Getting the credit for that is power plant closures, less use of coal-fired plants and more efficient cooling technologies. Next was irrigation use with a 9% drop and public supply, which fell by 5%. The decline in public supply usage was a first and came despite a 4% population increase.   read more
1 to 16 of about 2152 News
1 2 3 ... 135 Next

Top Stories

1 to 16 of about 2152 News
1 2 3 ... 135 Next

Obama Finally Puts an End to Unpopular Secure Communities Program

As part of broader immigration reforms, the Obama administration announced Thursday that the Secure Communities program, which mandated that local law enforcement submit biometric information on those suspected of being undocumented immigrants to the federal government, is going away. In its place will be the Priority Enforcement Program, which specifies that those held must be likely deportable or have a removal order in effect against them.   read more

When George W. Bush Gave a Primetime Immigration Speech, Networks Covered it Live; Obama…Forget It

“In 2006, Bush gave a 17-minute speech that was televised by all three networks that was about deploying 6,000 National Guard troops to the border. Obama is making a 10-minute speech that will have a vastly greater impact on the issue. And none of the networks are doing it,” said a senior administration official. The only broadcast networks that carried Obama's immigration talk live throughout the U.S. were Spanish language Univision and Telemundo.   read more

More Americans Die from Shoveling Snow than from Ebola

At least three people have died in New York State from shoveling snow during the extreme storm that hit the region—a higher fatality count than the number of people who have died from Ebola in the U.S. Once the storm ends, the media coverage of it will melt away. But the reporting frenzy over Ebola could continue indefinitely. However, shoveling snow is a bigger health problem for Americans than Ebola. Dr. Franklin said the annual number of deaths from shoveling snow might be close to 200.   read more

7 Companies that Paid their CEOs More Than They Paid in Taxes

While some would argue the salaries of the chief executives were too high, the point of the Institute’s report is the many tax credits, loopholes and deductions that allow businesses to reduce their tax bill and in some cases, get money back from the federal government. Boeing had the highest CEO salary of the seven, with $23.3 million going to top man James McNerney Jr. Meanwhile, the aircraft manufacturer and major government contractor enjoyed an $82 million refund from the IRS.   read more

60,000 in U.S. said to Live in Slave-Like Conditions

"Potential modern slavery cases were reported in fifty states” in 2013. Most of those in the U.S. reside in slave-like conditions because of prostitution or financial debts, and they can be found in many areas of society. “The report explains that slaves are forced to perform domestic work and home healthcare, they work in the food industry, as well as in construction, agriculture, nursing, factories and garment-manufacturing, among other sectors.”   read more

Reagan and Bush Sr. Gave Amnesty to Immigrants without going through Congress, so What’s Wrong with Obama Doing the Same?

“It is unconstitutional," said Republican Rep. Steve King, speaking of Obama's plan to grant amnesty to millions of immigrants. But that uproar in Congress stands in contrast to how lawmakers reacted 30 years ago when two Republican presidents took similar actions. In the 1980s Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush each granted amnesty to illegal immigrants without the help of Congress. “There was no political explosion then comparable to the one Republicans are threatening now,” wrote the AP.   read more

Obama has Issued Fewest Vetoes of any Two-Term President Since James Monroe…for the Moment

The last president who was in office six years to veto as few bills as Obama was James Monroe, who vetoed one bill from 1817 to 1825. Even considering the Republican landslide this month, the GOP, the House and Senate would need a two-thirds majority to override a veto, and that’s not likely to happen.   read more

U.S. Government Uses Boeing Technology to Spy on Phone Calls from the Air

The systems electronically mimic a cell tower, enabling law enforcement to collect location and other information about calls. When used in a small plane, they pick up information about tens of thousands of calls in one flight. Those familiar with the program say sweeps are being approved by judges, but since the orders are sealed, it’s unclear whether the courts are aware of the breadth of the systems’ coverage.   read more

U.S. Preterm Birth Rate Drops to 17-Year Low

The drop saved $11.9 billion in healthcare costs, according to the March of Dimes. The uninsured rate for women fell from 20.1% to 19.8% and it’s likely to drop further with the enactment of the Affordable Care Act. Smoking among women fell from 20.8% to 20.5%. Another cause of preterm births is the practice by some of medically unnecessary inductions or Caesarian sections, which have also fallen slightly from 8.1% to 8.0%.   read more

Lockheed Used Taxpayer Money to Lobby for more Taxpayer Money

Lockheed Martin for years has been running one of the government’s most important nuclear research facilities, Sandia National Laboratories. Five years ago, its lucrative contract with the Department of Energy (DOE) was coming to an end, so Lockheed started to lobby officials to win an extension. That lobbying included using some of the money paid by DOE for Lockheed to run Sandia. Under federal law, this is a big no-no. But Lockheed did it anyway.   read more

Government Panels Meant to Protect Small Businesses Taken over by Big Business

Consumer, environmental and worker safety regulators in Washington are supposed to ensure the concerns of small businesses are included in rulemaking. But increasingly federal agencies are instead giving too much weight to the voices of large corporate interests that have “hijacked” small business representation. The EPA, OSHA and CFPB have allowed trade associations and corporations they represent to “capture” small business review panels that are there to help the little guy.   read more

Weapons that Choose Their Own Kill Targets are Wave of Future…and Already in Use

At least three nations have deployed missiles that can destroy enemy positions without any guidance from human operators. “An autonomous weapons arms race is already taking place,”said physicist Steve Omohundro. Norway has the Joint Strike Missile, which can lock in on targets without human control. The Pentagon is testing Lockheed's Long Range Anti-Ship Missile, but officials won’t say if it can attack on its own. Many fear autonomous weapons will make warfare more likely or destructive.   read more

Iran Claims to Have Successfully Duplicated a U.S. Military Drone

U.S. drone technology is now in the hands of Iran, which claims to have reverse-engineered an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). In December 2011, the Iranian military captured a Lockheed UAV after it strayed into Iran’s airspace from Afghanistan. Iran claimed they’d hacked into the drone’s electronic system, allowing them to take control and divert it to their country. Engineers reportedly took the drone apart and figured out how it works, allowing them to build their own version.   read more

FDA Tests less than 1% of Food Products for Pesticide Residue

Consumers count on the FDA to keep food safe, but the agency tests very little of the produce sold in the U.S. for pesticides The FDA tests only one-tenth of 1% of the food imported for use on U.S. dinner tables, and that’s actually far more testing than happens to domestic food. This is startling considering that “from 1970 to 2007, hundreds of millions of pounds of pesticides were applied annually to U.S. food crops to protect them from pests,” the GAO wrote.   read more

Border Patrol Arrests Extend Hundreds of Miles from Border

Perhaps they should change the name to the Inland Patrol. Courts have ruled that the Border Patrol needs stronger justification for stopping people when they’re more than 100 miles from the border. However, officers in Texas have arrested people as far as 350 miles from the border with only the racial appearance of the arrestee as justification.   read more

U.S. Water Use Drops to Lowest Level in more than 40 Years

The decline in use was greatest in thermoelectric use, where it fell by 20%. Getting the credit for that is power plant closures, less use of coal-fired plants and more efficient cooling technologies. Next was irrigation use with a 9% drop and public supply, which fell by 5%. The decline in public supply usage was a first and came despite a 4% population increase.   read more
1 to 16 of about 2152 News
1 2 3 ... 135 Next