Top Stories

1 to 16 of about 2366 News
1 2 3 ... 148 Next

State Abortion Restriction Laws have Averaged almost One a Week Since 2010

State legislatures have passed 282 laws restricting abortions since 2010. Fifty-one new restrictions have gone into effect this year alone. Five of them either imposed or increased time women must wait between their first contact with a clinic and their procedure. Arkansas and Tennessee now require a 48-hour wait. North Carolina and Oklahoma are forcing women to wait at least 72 hours, joining Missouri, South Dakota and Utah in requiring women to wait at least three full days for an abortion.   read more

Justice Dept. Investigates Airline Price Fixing

The Justice Dept. would say no more than that it is looking into potential “unlawful coordination” among some airlines, but AP believes its focus is on whether the airlines illegally communicated about their pattern of adding new flights and routes, as well as the limiting of seats, which could be used to maintain high airfares. The Justice Dept. sent letters to American, Delta, Southwest and United Airlines--which are said to control more than 80% of the seats in the domestic travel market.   read more

Mentally Ill Shot to Death in U.S. in 2015: 124 and Counting

In most cases, officers responded to calls from relatives or neighbors who said a mentally fragile person was behaving erratically. Many of those who were armed didn’t have firearms, but toy guns or implements that are less lethal than a gun. Also, more than 50% were killed by officers lacking in training for dealing with the mentally ill. “And in many cases, officers responded with tactics that quickly made a volatile situation even more dangerous,” said the Post.   read more

U.S. Chamber of Commerce Serves as International Bulldog for Tobacco Industry

The Chamber has become “the hammer for the tobacco industry,” setting up lobbying operations in other countries to fight anti-smoking laws. Its zeal to help American tobacco companies has gone so far as to convince Ukraine to file a legal challenge against Australia over that country’s right to enact anti-smoking laws on its own soil. The Chamber, led by Thomas Donohue, has also worked to ensure that international agreements won’t impede the marketing of tobacco products in other countries.   read more

Industries, Congress and Federal Agencies Work Hard to Delay Worker Safety Regulations

The toll on Americans from on-the-job chemical exposures is staggering. It’s been difficult for new worker safety rules to get established when manufacturing companies launch opposition campaigns to undermine OSHA’s efforts and those of labor unions and other advocates. Industry trade groups have filed lawsuits over the years to overturn new OSHA regulations. Congress has also contributed to curtailing the work of OSHA, which was dubbed the “Gestapo” of the government by Rep. John Boehner.   read more

If Terrorist Attacks are on the Rise, What Does that Say about the 13-Year-Old “War on Terror”?

They put the cost of the post-9/11 fighting at $4.4 trillion. In addition to the costs of bullets and bandages, they included the interest on the money borrowed to fight the war (remember—Bush sought no tax increases to fund the fighting); the money it took out of the economy and cost Americans in increased interest; the future cost of treating and healing wounded veterans (expected to peak in 30 or 40 years at more than $1 trillion); and increased homeland security spending.   read more

In 5 Years, Average CEO Income has Increased 54%; Average Worker 0%

As the economy, which cratered at the end of the George W. Bush administration, has improved since 2009, the average CEO of the 350 largest corporations has gotten a 54% raise and is making $16.3 million a year. His employees, on the other hand, haven’t done as well, according to a study from the Economic Policy Institute. The average pay in those companies in 2009 was $53,200. Five years later, it’s still $53,200.   read more

Supreme Court Ruling on Housing Discrimination could Lead to Challenges to Republican Voter Suppression Laws

Opponents of new voting laws pushed by Republicans say the Texas case could help challenge voter ID laws. The laws’ effect is to curb voting by minorities and those most likely to vote Democratic. Attorney Culliton-Gonzalez said the ruling is “very helpful” with lawsuits against those laws. “It’s...hard to prove intent,” she said. “We have a lot of implicit bias and symbols of racism...but we don’t always find state legislators saying, ‘We’re going to suppress the African American vote...’"   read more

Since 9/11, More Americans have been Killed by Right-wing Extremists than by Muslim Jihadists

The Charleston shooting was “only the latest in a string of lethal attacks by people espousing racial hatred [and] hostility to government,” said the Times. “The assaults have taken the lives of police officers, members of racial or religious minorities and random civilians.” There has been a misperception among Americans that jihadists have posed a greater danger. But scholars and now law enforcement agencies are acknowledging that right-wing extremists are in fact the greater threat.   read more

As Home Ownership Rate Drops to 22-Year-Low, Rents are on the Rise

Between rising rents and tougher mortgage qualification standards, it’s difficult for many Americans to find a place of their own. The number of homeowners has now declined for eight straight years, and this year appears to be going in the same direction. The national homeownership rate was down to 63.7%. Meanwhile, it’s been getting tougher to rent, due to shrinking availability of units and rising rent prices. Also, much of the new rental property is aimed at the higher end of the market.   read more

This Year’s Supreme Court Decisions On-Track to be most Liberal in 46 Years

An analysis of this term’s rulings revealed 54% have been liberal. If that rate holds, it would be the most liberal since the 1969 term under Chief Justice However, the court is still well to the right of where it was under Warren, when more than 70% of the decisions were considered liberal. Roberts' court has overturned a District of Columbia gun ownership ban, weakened campaign finance reform, and upheld an Indiana voter identification law and Kentucky’s lethal injection statute.   read more

Justice Dept. Busts 243 over $712 million Worth of Medicare Fraud

The “coordinated takedown” was the “largest in Strike Force history,” the Justice Department announced. Attorney General Loretta Lynch said the doctors, patient recruiters, home health care providers, pharmacy owners, and others “billed for equipment that wasn’t provided, for care that wasn’t needed, and for services that weren’t rendered.” Charges include conspiracy to commit health care fraud, violations of the anti-kickback statutes, money laundering and aggravated identity theft.   read more

The Long History of White Men Attacking Black Churches

The threat of violence continues. On Thursday, 400 people were evacuated from the Allen Temple AME Church in Greenville, South Carolina, during a prayer vigil, due to a bomb threat, and the Morris Brown AME Church in Charleston was evacuated for the same reason on the same afternoon. On Friday, there was a bomb threat against Washington D.C.’s Metropolitan AME Church.   read more

Repeal of Affordable Care Act would Increase Output, but would also Increase Deficit and Number of Uninsured

A report from the Congressional Budget Office outlines the effects that an appeal would have. Fourteen million Americans would lose coverage through Medicaid and 18 million fewer would have insurance through the federal exchanges. That would be partly offset by 8 million more people who would be insured through their employers.   read more

Fracking Waste Injection Wells Linked to 60% of Earthquakes in Central and Eastern U.S.

Earthquakes associated with injection wells have “skyrocketed from a handful per year in the 1970s to more than 650 in 2014,” the university reported. Researchers found that “high-rate” injection wells were most often associated with quakes. These high-rate wells pump in excess of 300,000 barrels of wastewater into the ground per month. "We think the evidence is convincing that the earthquakes we are seeing near injection sites are induced by oil and gas activity," said researcher Weingarten.   read more

Walmart Accused of Stashing $76 Billion in Assets in 78 Foreign Tax Havens

A report from Americans for Tax Fairness said Walmart had at least 78 offshore subsidiaries and branches to stash the assets where they’re not subject to U.S. corporate tax rates. The study, which used information provided by the United Food & Commercial Workers International Union, said 90% of the havens were based in Luxembourg and the Netherlands. Bloomberg reported “overseas operations have helped the company cut more than $3.5 billion off its income tax bills in the past six years.”   read more
1 to 16 of about 2366 News
1 2 3 ... 148 Next

Top Stories

1 to 16 of about 2366 News
1 2 3 ... 148 Next

State Abortion Restriction Laws have Averaged almost One a Week Since 2010

State legislatures have passed 282 laws restricting abortions since 2010. Fifty-one new restrictions have gone into effect this year alone. Five of them either imposed or increased time women must wait between their first contact with a clinic and their procedure. Arkansas and Tennessee now require a 48-hour wait. North Carolina and Oklahoma are forcing women to wait at least 72 hours, joining Missouri, South Dakota and Utah in requiring women to wait at least three full days for an abortion.   read more

Justice Dept. Investigates Airline Price Fixing

The Justice Dept. would say no more than that it is looking into potential “unlawful coordination” among some airlines, but AP believes its focus is on whether the airlines illegally communicated about their pattern of adding new flights and routes, as well as the limiting of seats, which could be used to maintain high airfares. The Justice Dept. sent letters to American, Delta, Southwest and United Airlines--which are said to control more than 80% of the seats in the domestic travel market.   read more

Mentally Ill Shot to Death in U.S. in 2015: 124 and Counting

In most cases, officers responded to calls from relatives or neighbors who said a mentally fragile person was behaving erratically. Many of those who were armed didn’t have firearms, but toy guns or implements that are less lethal than a gun. Also, more than 50% were killed by officers lacking in training for dealing with the mentally ill. “And in many cases, officers responded with tactics that quickly made a volatile situation even more dangerous,” said the Post.   read more

U.S. Chamber of Commerce Serves as International Bulldog for Tobacco Industry

The Chamber has become “the hammer for the tobacco industry,” setting up lobbying operations in other countries to fight anti-smoking laws. Its zeal to help American tobacco companies has gone so far as to convince Ukraine to file a legal challenge against Australia over that country’s right to enact anti-smoking laws on its own soil. The Chamber, led by Thomas Donohue, has also worked to ensure that international agreements won’t impede the marketing of tobacco products in other countries.   read more

Industries, Congress and Federal Agencies Work Hard to Delay Worker Safety Regulations

The toll on Americans from on-the-job chemical exposures is staggering. It’s been difficult for new worker safety rules to get established when manufacturing companies launch opposition campaigns to undermine OSHA’s efforts and those of labor unions and other advocates. Industry trade groups have filed lawsuits over the years to overturn new OSHA regulations. Congress has also contributed to curtailing the work of OSHA, which was dubbed the “Gestapo” of the government by Rep. John Boehner.   read more

If Terrorist Attacks are on the Rise, What Does that Say about the 13-Year-Old “War on Terror”?

They put the cost of the post-9/11 fighting at $4.4 trillion. In addition to the costs of bullets and bandages, they included the interest on the money borrowed to fight the war (remember—Bush sought no tax increases to fund the fighting); the money it took out of the economy and cost Americans in increased interest; the future cost of treating and healing wounded veterans (expected to peak in 30 or 40 years at more than $1 trillion); and increased homeland security spending.   read more

In 5 Years, Average CEO Income has Increased 54%; Average Worker 0%

As the economy, which cratered at the end of the George W. Bush administration, has improved since 2009, the average CEO of the 350 largest corporations has gotten a 54% raise and is making $16.3 million a year. His employees, on the other hand, haven’t done as well, according to a study from the Economic Policy Institute. The average pay in those companies in 2009 was $53,200. Five years later, it’s still $53,200.   read more

Supreme Court Ruling on Housing Discrimination could Lead to Challenges to Republican Voter Suppression Laws

Opponents of new voting laws pushed by Republicans say the Texas case could help challenge voter ID laws. The laws’ effect is to curb voting by minorities and those most likely to vote Democratic. Attorney Culliton-Gonzalez said the ruling is “very helpful” with lawsuits against those laws. “It’s...hard to prove intent,” she said. “We have a lot of implicit bias and symbols of racism...but we don’t always find state legislators saying, ‘We’re going to suppress the African American vote...’"   read more

Since 9/11, More Americans have been Killed by Right-wing Extremists than by Muslim Jihadists

The Charleston shooting was “only the latest in a string of lethal attacks by people espousing racial hatred [and] hostility to government,” said the Times. “The assaults have taken the lives of police officers, members of racial or religious minorities and random civilians.” There has been a misperception among Americans that jihadists have posed a greater danger. But scholars and now law enforcement agencies are acknowledging that right-wing extremists are in fact the greater threat.   read more

As Home Ownership Rate Drops to 22-Year-Low, Rents are on the Rise

Between rising rents and tougher mortgage qualification standards, it’s difficult for many Americans to find a place of their own. The number of homeowners has now declined for eight straight years, and this year appears to be going in the same direction. The national homeownership rate was down to 63.7%. Meanwhile, it’s been getting tougher to rent, due to shrinking availability of units and rising rent prices. Also, much of the new rental property is aimed at the higher end of the market.   read more

This Year’s Supreme Court Decisions On-Track to be most Liberal in 46 Years

An analysis of this term’s rulings revealed 54% have been liberal. If that rate holds, it would be the most liberal since the 1969 term under Chief Justice However, the court is still well to the right of where it was under Warren, when more than 70% of the decisions were considered liberal. Roberts' court has overturned a District of Columbia gun ownership ban, weakened campaign finance reform, and upheld an Indiana voter identification law and Kentucky’s lethal injection statute.   read more

Justice Dept. Busts 243 over $712 million Worth of Medicare Fraud

The “coordinated takedown” was the “largest in Strike Force history,” the Justice Department announced. Attorney General Loretta Lynch said the doctors, patient recruiters, home health care providers, pharmacy owners, and others “billed for equipment that wasn’t provided, for care that wasn’t needed, and for services that weren’t rendered.” Charges include conspiracy to commit health care fraud, violations of the anti-kickback statutes, money laundering and aggravated identity theft.   read more

The Long History of White Men Attacking Black Churches

The threat of violence continues. On Thursday, 400 people were evacuated from the Allen Temple AME Church in Greenville, South Carolina, during a prayer vigil, due to a bomb threat, and the Morris Brown AME Church in Charleston was evacuated for the same reason on the same afternoon. On Friday, there was a bomb threat against Washington D.C.’s Metropolitan AME Church.   read more

Repeal of Affordable Care Act would Increase Output, but would also Increase Deficit and Number of Uninsured

A report from the Congressional Budget Office outlines the effects that an appeal would have. Fourteen million Americans would lose coverage through Medicaid and 18 million fewer would have insurance through the federal exchanges. That would be partly offset by 8 million more people who would be insured through their employers.   read more

Fracking Waste Injection Wells Linked to 60% of Earthquakes in Central and Eastern U.S.

Earthquakes associated with injection wells have “skyrocketed from a handful per year in the 1970s to more than 650 in 2014,” the university reported. Researchers found that “high-rate” injection wells were most often associated with quakes. These high-rate wells pump in excess of 300,000 barrels of wastewater into the ground per month. "We think the evidence is convincing that the earthquakes we are seeing near injection sites are induced by oil and gas activity," said researcher Weingarten.   read more

Walmart Accused of Stashing $76 Billion in Assets in 78 Foreign Tax Havens

A report from Americans for Tax Fairness said Walmart had at least 78 offshore subsidiaries and branches to stash the assets where they’re not subject to U.S. corporate tax rates. The study, which used information provided by the United Food & Commercial Workers International Union, said 90% of the havens were based in Luxembourg and the Netherlands. Bloomberg reported “overseas operations have helped the company cut more than $3.5 billion off its income tax bills in the past six years.”   read more
1 to 16 of about 2366 News
1 2 3 ... 148 Next