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Insurance Companies Avoid Patients with HIV/AIDS by Overcharging for Medications

Despite the mandate from the Affordable Care Act that prohibits insurance companies from discriminating against patients with preexisting conditions, many of them are getting around the restriction by charging HIV/AIDS patients much higher rates for their drugs, which causes them to switch to other providers.   read more

Why is the DEA Conducting Mass License Plate Tracking and Why was it Allowed to Conduct Mass Surveillance of Americans’ Phones Records?

"This program is a major DEA initiative that has the potential to track our movements around the country,” wrote ACLU's Bennett Stein. “The federal government is uniquely positioned to create a centralized repository of all drivers’ movements across the country — and the DEA seems to be moving toward doing just that. If license plate readers continue to proliferate without restriction...the agency will soon possess a detailed and invasive depiction of our lives.”   read more

Whistleblower Jeffrey Sterling Convicted

Posecutors argued Sterling was the source who helped James Risen discuss a CIA operation in his book “State of War.” “The Sterling case – especially in light of Obama’s complicity in the cover-up of torture during the Bush administration,” Dan Froomkin wrote, “sends a clear message to people in government service: You won’t get in trouble as long as you do what you’re told (even torture people). But if you tell [a reporter] something we want kept secret, we will spare no effort to destroy you.”   read more

Dream Come True for Oil Companies: Obama Expected to Approve Drilling off Atlantic Coast from Virginia to Georgia

Environmentalists contend the coast could suffer the same fate as the Gulf states after the 2010 BP disaster that fouled coastal waters with millions of barrels of oil. “Opening Atlantic waters to offshore drilling would take us in exactly the wrong direction,” said Bob Deans. Democratic senators from East Coast states blasted the move. “All of the risk is put on the backs of our shore communities, and all of the reward goes to Big Oil,” said Sen. Robert Menendez of New Jersey.   read more

Only 2 Countries Have Not Joined the UN Convention of the Rights of the Child: South Sudan and…United States

The U.S. signed the treaty in 1995. However, President Clinton never submitted it to the Senate for approval. George W. Bush also did not ask the Senate to ratify it. Nor has President Barack Obama, who during his 2008 campaign said, “It is embarrassing that the U.S. is in the company of Somalia, a lawless land. If I become president, I will review this and other human rights treaties.” Supporters say it’s unlikely the U.S. will ratify it soon, with Republicans now in charge of the Senate.   read more

Republican Dissent Killed Controversial House Abortion Bill, but Clones Emerge in State Legislatures

The 20-week limits have a disproportionate impact on the poor, who often don’t seek medical attention for their pregnancies until they’re farther along, and then have more trouble scraping up the money for an abortion if that’s what they decide to do. Other women, particularly younger ones with irregular menstrual cycles, sometimes don’t realize they’re pregnant until farther down the line. In addition, there are few exceptions in the laws for cases of fetal abnormalities.   read more

Measles Outbreak at Disneyland and Elsewhere Blamed on Foreign Visitors and Anti-Vaccine Movement

The infection count changes daily, hitting 85 nationwide Saturday night. The majority of the cases have been linked to Disneyland. More than 150 schools in Los Angeles County have exemption rates of 8% or higher for at least one of the five vaccines recommended for children, according to a study by the Times. All of them are in areas with incomes averaging $94,500, 60% higher than the county median.   read more

NSA Said to be Preparing for Future of Digital Warfare

The future of cyber warfare will mean paralyzing “computer networks and, by doing so, potentially all the infrastructure they control, including power and water supplies, factories, airports or the flow of money,” Spiegel reported. The NSA is taking the lead within the U.S. military, putting it on the potential frontlines of future conflicts. NSA director Admiral Michael Roger oversees an “army” of 40,000 specialists versed in digital spying and “destructive network attacks.”   read more

Farm Animals Suffer from Government Breeding Experiments Aimed at Bolstering Meat Industry Profits

The research has produced results that sickened veterinarians working for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which oversees the complex. Pigs wind up having offspring that are born frail, and wind up being crushed accidentally by their mother. Surgery and breeding techniques have forced cows to bear twins and triplets, instead of just one calf. The calves “often emerge weakened or deformed, dying in such numbers that even meat producers have been repulsed,” said the Times.   read more

British Spy Agency Swept Up Emails of Major U.S. and UK Media Outlets; Investigative Journalists Viewed as Threat

The NSA documents did not indicate if any journalists were intentionally targeted. However, other documents revealed that the British spy agency considered “investigative journalists” a threat, putting them in “a hierarchy alongside terrorists or hackers,” said The Guardian. A classified document directed to army intelligence stated “journalists and reporters representing all types of news media represent a potential threat to security. Of specific concern are investigative journalists..."   read more

L.A. Times Sues Pentagon for Info on Sputtering $40-Billion Missile System

The requested documents contained sensitive trade secrets. Last week, after waiting out the three-month appeal period, the Times sued to get them. The system’s three-stage rocket intercepts the target warhead in space head on in a “bullet-to-bullet” collision. Except when it doesn’t. So far, the missile is eight for 17 at shooting down its target, despite the Pentagon staging “carefully choreographed tests that are more predictable and less challenging than an actual attack would be.”   read more

Healthcare Skin in the Game: Our Skin, Their Game, the Case against High-Deductible Plans

High-deductible plans are becoming increasingly common. According to a survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation, in 2006 10% of workers were enrolled in a plan with a deductible of $1,000 or more. By 2014, that number had increased to 41% of workers. Smaller firms had an even larger percentage of workers covered by high-deductible policies. In companies employing fewer than 200 people, the numbers went from 16% in 2006 to 61% last year.   read more

Majority of Public School Children in U.S. Qualify for Free or Reduced-Price Lunches

Children can get a free lunch through the National School Lunch Program if their family is at or below 130% of the federal poverty rate. They get reduced-price lunches, costing no more than 40 cents, if their family income is between 130% and 185% of the poverty rate. In 2013, 51% of children qualified for free or reduced-price lunches. That’s up from 38% in 2000. Mississippi leads the nation with 71% of its children eligible for the school lunch program.   read more

White or Black doesn’t Matter; If you’re Poor, you’re more likely to be a Victim of Violent Crime

Those living at or below the federal poverty level had a victimization rate of 39.8 per 1,000, while those with high incomes had a rate of only 16.9. The pattern was consistent between whites and blacks, with poor members of both races suffering more than their better-off counterparts. The one anomaly was among Hispanic populations. For them, the victimization rate was about the same regardless of income.   read more

Mass Die-Offs of Birds and Fish on the Rise

A new scientific study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences says large-scale deaths of fish, birds and invertebrates increased over a 72-year period from 1940 to 2012. Researchers came to this conclusion after reviewing the records of 727 “mass mortality events.” The “good news” is that the number of die-offs for mammals remained about the same, while those involving amphibians and reptiles actually went down during the period under study.   read more

Are Wall Street and Big Business Running the Show in the New Congress?

The 114th Congress is only a couple of weeks old, and already powerful financial and corporate interests are having their way, particularly in the House. Legislation backed by Wall Street interests has targeted the Dodd-Frank reform law, which imposed a series of restrictions on banks and investment firms. Wall Street lobbying has been fierce. Combined with campaign contributions from various financial interests, 2014 saw a $1.2 billion war chest built for undermining Wall Street reform.   read more
1 to 16 of about 2220 News
1 2 3 ... 139 Next

Top Stories

1 to 16 of about 2220 News
1 2 3 ... 139 Next

Insurance Companies Avoid Patients with HIV/AIDS by Overcharging for Medications

Despite the mandate from the Affordable Care Act that prohibits insurance companies from discriminating against patients with preexisting conditions, many of them are getting around the restriction by charging HIV/AIDS patients much higher rates for their drugs, which causes them to switch to other providers.   read more

Why is the DEA Conducting Mass License Plate Tracking and Why was it Allowed to Conduct Mass Surveillance of Americans’ Phones Records?

"This program is a major DEA initiative that has the potential to track our movements around the country,” wrote ACLU's Bennett Stein. “The federal government is uniquely positioned to create a centralized repository of all drivers’ movements across the country — and the DEA seems to be moving toward doing just that. If license plate readers continue to proliferate without restriction...the agency will soon possess a detailed and invasive depiction of our lives.”   read more

Whistleblower Jeffrey Sterling Convicted

Posecutors argued Sterling was the source who helped James Risen discuss a CIA operation in his book “State of War.” “The Sterling case – especially in light of Obama’s complicity in the cover-up of torture during the Bush administration,” Dan Froomkin wrote, “sends a clear message to people in government service: You won’t get in trouble as long as you do what you’re told (even torture people). But if you tell [a reporter] something we want kept secret, we will spare no effort to destroy you.”   read more

Dream Come True for Oil Companies: Obama Expected to Approve Drilling off Atlantic Coast from Virginia to Georgia

Environmentalists contend the coast could suffer the same fate as the Gulf states after the 2010 BP disaster that fouled coastal waters with millions of barrels of oil. “Opening Atlantic waters to offshore drilling would take us in exactly the wrong direction,” said Bob Deans. Democratic senators from East Coast states blasted the move. “All of the risk is put on the backs of our shore communities, and all of the reward goes to Big Oil,” said Sen. Robert Menendez of New Jersey.   read more

Only 2 Countries Have Not Joined the UN Convention of the Rights of the Child: South Sudan and…United States

The U.S. signed the treaty in 1995. However, President Clinton never submitted it to the Senate for approval. George W. Bush also did not ask the Senate to ratify it. Nor has President Barack Obama, who during his 2008 campaign said, “It is embarrassing that the U.S. is in the company of Somalia, a lawless land. If I become president, I will review this and other human rights treaties.” Supporters say it’s unlikely the U.S. will ratify it soon, with Republicans now in charge of the Senate.   read more

Republican Dissent Killed Controversial House Abortion Bill, but Clones Emerge in State Legislatures

The 20-week limits have a disproportionate impact on the poor, who often don’t seek medical attention for their pregnancies until they’re farther along, and then have more trouble scraping up the money for an abortion if that’s what they decide to do. Other women, particularly younger ones with irregular menstrual cycles, sometimes don’t realize they’re pregnant until farther down the line. In addition, there are few exceptions in the laws for cases of fetal abnormalities.   read more

Measles Outbreak at Disneyland and Elsewhere Blamed on Foreign Visitors and Anti-Vaccine Movement

The infection count changes daily, hitting 85 nationwide Saturday night. The majority of the cases have been linked to Disneyland. More than 150 schools in Los Angeles County have exemption rates of 8% or higher for at least one of the five vaccines recommended for children, according to a study by the Times. All of them are in areas with incomes averaging $94,500, 60% higher than the county median.   read more

NSA Said to be Preparing for Future of Digital Warfare

The future of cyber warfare will mean paralyzing “computer networks and, by doing so, potentially all the infrastructure they control, including power and water supplies, factories, airports or the flow of money,” Spiegel reported. The NSA is taking the lead within the U.S. military, putting it on the potential frontlines of future conflicts. NSA director Admiral Michael Roger oversees an “army” of 40,000 specialists versed in digital spying and “destructive network attacks.”   read more

Farm Animals Suffer from Government Breeding Experiments Aimed at Bolstering Meat Industry Profits

The research has produced results that sickened veterinarians working for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which oversees the complex. Pigs wind up having offspring that are born frail, and wind up being crushed accidentally by their mother. Surgery and breeding techniques have forced cows to bear twins and triplets, instead of just one calf. The calves “often emerge weakened or deformed, dying in such numbers that even meat producers have been repulsed,” said the Times.   read more

British Spy Agency Swept Up Emails of Major U.S. and UK Media Outlets; Investigative Journalists Viewed as Threat

The NSA documents did not indicate if any journalists were intentionally targeted. However, other documents revealed that the British spy agency considered “investigative journalists” a threat, putting them in “a hierarchy alongside terrorists or hackers,” said The Guardian. A classified document directed to army intelligence stated “journalists and reporters representing all types of news media represent a potential threat to security. Of specific concern are investigative journalists..."   read more

L.A. Times Sues Pentagon for Info on Sputtering $40-Billion Missile System

The requested documents contained sensitive trade secrets. Last week, after waiting out the three-month appeal period, the Times sued to get them. The system’s three-stage rocket intercepts the target warhead in space head on in a “bullet-to-bullet” collision. Except when it doesn’t. So far, the missile is eight for 17 at shooting down its target, despite the Pentagon staging “carefully choreographed tests that are more predictable and less challenging than an actual attack would be.”   read more

Healthcare Skin in the Game: Our Skin, Their Game, the Case against High-Deductible Plans

High-deductible plans are becoming increasingly common. According to a survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation, in 2006 10% of workers were enrolled in a plan with a deductible of $1,000 or more. By 2014, that number had increased to 41% of workers. Smaller firms had an even larger percentage of workers covered by high-deductible policies. In companies employing fewer than 200 people, the numbers went from 16% in 2006 to 61% last year.   read more

Majority of Public School Children in U.S. Qualify for Free or Reduced-Price Lunches

Children can get a free lunch through the National School Lunch Program if their family is at or below 130% of the federal poverty rate. They get reduced-price lunches, costing no more than 40 cents, if their family income is between 130% and 185% of the poverty rate. In 2013, 51% of children qualified for free or reduced-price lunches. That’s up from 38% in 2000. Mississippi leads the nation with 71% of its children eligible for the school lunch program.   read more

White or Black doesn’t Matter; If you’re Poor, you’re more likely to be a Victim of Violent Crime

Those living at or below the federal poverty level had a victimization rate of 39.8 per 1,000, while those with high incomes had a rate of only 16.9. The pattern was consistent between whites and blacks, with poor members of both races suffering more than their better-off counterparts. The one anomaly was among Hispanic populations. For them, the victimization rate was about the same regardless of income.   read more

Mass Die-Offs of Birds and Fish on the Rise

A new scientific study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences says large-scale deaths of fish, birds and invertebrates increased over a 72-year period from 1940 to 2012. Researchers came to this conclusion after reviewing the records of 727 “mass mortality events.” The “good news” is that the number of die-offs for mammals remained about the same, while those involving amphibians and reptiles actually went down during the period under study.   read more

Are Wall Street and Big Business Running the Show in the New Congress?

The 114th Congress is only a couple of weeks old, and already powerful financial and corporate interests are having their way, particularly in the House. Legislation backed by Wall Street interests has targeted the Dodd-Frank reform law, which imposed a series of restrictions on banks and investment firms. Wall Street lobbying has been fierce. Combined with campaign contributions from various financial interests, 2014 saw a $1.2 billion war chest built for undermining Wall Street reform.   read more
1 to 16 of about 2220 News
1 2 3 ... 139 Next