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Hedge Funds do not Make Good Landlords

Among all residents surveyed, 46% reported plumbing problems, 39% had roaches or insects, 22% complained of rats, mice or termites, 21% said their heating or air conditioning didn’t work properly, 20% have endured mold, and 18% suffered leaky roofs, among other concerns. The study, conducted by the Right to the City Alliance’s Homes for All Campaign, also found that only 10% of tenants in Los Angeles and 26% in Riverside had ever met their landlord in person.   read more

Why do Unaccompanied Minors Try to Come to the U.S.? They’re Fleeing Violence, Gangs and Poverty…and Looking for Family Members

Forty-eight percent of unaccompanied children, when interviewed by the UN Refugee Agency, gave societal violence as a primary reason for fleeing their home country. For children from El Salvador, the number was 66%. Another factor is poverty. Two thirds of Hondurans are poor, while the rates aren’t much better for Guatemalans (55%) and Salvadorans (45%).   read more

Obama Administration was Warned Well in Advance of Unaccompanied Children Crossing the Border into Texas

The UTEP team found that an average of 66 children were being picked up at the border each day. Thirty Border Patrol agents were required to transport the children from Fort Brown to other locations where they could be fed and cleaned. All told, 24,000 unaccompanied minors were processed by Border Patrol stations in Texas last year, making it clear that the federal government had a brewing crisis on its hands.   read more

Idaho Nurse’s Lawsuit against Bulk Collection of Phone Records Gains Supporters

“When I found out that the NSA was collecting records of my phone calls, I was shocked,” Smith said in a prepared statement. “I have heard of other governments spying indiscriminately on their own citizens, but I naively thought it did not happen in America. I believe who I call, when I call them, and how long we talk is not something the government should be able to get without a warrant. I sued because I believe the Constitution protects my calls from government searches."   read more

Ronald Reagan’s Executive Order that Opened the Door for Spying on Americans

The granddaddy of spying authorizations goes back to the Reagan Administration, and even Congress doesn’t know much about how it works. So, what’s 12333 being used for? According to the Electronic Frontier Foundation, its authority is used to cull American’s electronic address books and buddy lists, to put malware on Facebook servers and to justify the recording of all of a country’s telephone calls.   read more

Amnesty International Criticizes Conditions at U.S. Supermax Prison that Houses Terrorists

ADX inmates endure 23 hours a day and sometimes more in their tiny, private cells. The one hour they’re not in solitary confinement is instead spent outside—in an exercise cage often with no one else around. Many ADX inmates suffer from mental illness, but are denied treatment such as medicine and counseling, according to the report. In addition, the prison operates with virtually no public oversight. The media cannot visit prisoners in person nor talk to them by phone.   read more

Democratic Senators Introduce Bill to Hold Corporate Officers Criminally Responsible for Concealing Dangers

The recent recall and controversy surrounding General Motors is one prime example, bill supporters say. Some GM officials knew about their cars’ faulty ignition switches as early as 2001, and yet allowed them to be sold and driven for years after. At least 13 people may have died as a result of these decisions. So far, the worst that the federal government has thrown at GM for its negligence is $35 million in fines, with no managers or executives facing prosecution.   read more

Full Disclosure and Accountability Said to be Missing from $7 Billion Citigroup Misconduct Settlement

The Department of Justice trumpeted reaching a $7 billion deal with Citigroup to settle charges of “egregious misconduct” in its sale of mortgage-backed securities. But critics of the deal are crying foul. “The $7 billion settlement...is meaningless without disclosure of...how many hundreds of billions of dollars Citigroup made, how many tens of billions investors lost, how many billions in bonuses were pocketed, [and] which executives were involved,” said Dennis Kelleher.   read more

When Companies Break Environmental Laws, Why are Responsible Individuals not Prosecuted?

Tens of thousands of businesses have been caught polluting the air, water or soil, but rarely does the federal government prosecute the leaders of these lawbreakers. There are more than 64,000 facilities in federal databases with violations of U.S. environmental laws, but less than 0.5% result in prosecutions. That’s because the government has consistently preferred to take civil actions against corporate polluters, even though laws exist to charge executives criminally.   read more

Lawsuit Contends National “Suspicious Activity” Database is Way too Broad

Taking photos of public art or being a minority is enough to land an American on the federal government’s watch list for being suspicious, which is now being challenged in court. The plaintiffs contend the Suspicious Activity Reporting program is much too broad, resulting in innocent people being added to the database. The program also sweeps up details about individuals exercising their First Amendment rights. Others have done nothing except be a member of certain ethnic groups.   read more

Federal Budget Deficit Finally Dips to Pre-Recession Level

The smaller deficit, estimated at $583 billion, was caused by slower defense spending, less-than-anticipated spending on Hurricane Sandy rebuilding and smaller-than-expected costs of Affordable Care Act (ACA) insurance subsidies. During the depths of the recession, the deficit reached $1.4 trillion. Budget cuts since have meant the government is spending less, but that has also slowed job growth, so tax receipts have not increased as much as they might have.   read more

Pesticides Suspected in Deaths of Birds and Bees

The Dutch study looked at the population of 15 types of birds and found a consistent decline in the population where Imidacloprid was present in surface water. Researchers believe the chemical kills off the insects that the birds eat, but they’re still unsure of the reason for the population decline. Other research has fingered neonicotinoids for the recent die-off of honeybees.   read more

40 Percent of Colleges Haven’t Investigated a Sex Assault Case in 5 Years

A probe initiated by Senator Claire McCaskill (D-Missouri) discovered many disturbing facts in the world of higher education and its approach to handling rapes and other sexual assaults. One that jumps right off the page: More than 40% of colleges and universities, including many private for-profit schools, haven’t investigated a single sexual assault case on their campuses over the past five years.   read more

British Foreign Office Claims Documents Relating to CIA Abduction Program were “Accidentally” Destroyed

The British government said that secret files documenting its role in a secret CIA program were destroyed by “water damage.” The information in question purportedly contained details about CIA flights in 2002 carrying detainees to and from the secret military installation known as Diego Garcia, located in the middle of the Indian Ocean. The British-controlled island may have housed a “black site” prison operated by the CIA for interrogating detainees.   read more

San Francisco First Large City to Force Treatment of Mentally Ill

Despite fierce opposition from mental health advocates, San Francisco leaders have approved a policy by which a judge can be petitioned to order mandatory treatment for the mentally ill. The policy change came as a result of the approval of a 12-year-old statute, Laura’s Law. The law was named after teenager Laura Wilcox, who was murdered in 2001 by a psychiatric patient. Nevada County, where Wilcox was murdered, was the first to adopt the program. Orange County has since signed on.   read more

Prosecution of Public Officials for Corruption Declines under Obama

The drop is even sharper when the Justice Department numbers are put up alongside those from 2004 (down 32% when there were 760 cases under Bush) and 1994 (down 27% when 711 were reported under Clinton). TRAC says public corruption referrals sent from federal agencies to Justice have averaged 1,674 during the past five years. This total is about the same as under Bush (1,663 referrals).   read more
1 to 16 of about 2028 News
1 2 3 ... 127 Next

Top Stories

1 to 16 of about 2028 News
1 2 3 ... 127 Next

Hedge Funds do not Make Good Landlords

Among all residents surveyed, 46% reported plumbing problems, 39% had roaches or insects, 22% complained of rats, mice or termites, 21% said their heating or air conditioning didn’t work properly, 20% have endured mold, and 18% suffered leaky roofs, among other concerns. The study, conducted by the Right to the City Alliance’s Homes for All Campaign, also found that only 10% of tenants in Los Angeles and 26% in Riverside had ever met their landlord in person.   read more

Why do Unaccompanied Minors Try to Come to the U.S.? They’re Fleeing Violence, Gangs and Poverty…and Looking for Family Members

Forty-eight percent of unaccompanied children, when interviewed by the UN Refugee Agency, gave societal violence as a primary reason for fleeing their home country. For children from El Salvador, the number was 66%. Another factor is poverty. Two thirds of Hondurans are poor, while the rates aren’t much better for Guatemalans (55%) and Salvadorans (45%).   read more

Obama Administration was Warned Well in Advance of Unaccompanied Children Crossing the Border into Texas

The UTEP team found that an average of 66 children were being picked up at the border each day. Thirty Border Patrol agents were required to transport the children from Fort Brown to other locations where they could be fed and cleaned. All told, 24,000 unaccompanied minors were processed by Border Patrol stations in Texas last year, making it clear that the federal government had a brewing crisis on its hands.   read more

Idaho Nurse’s Lawsuit against Bulk Collection of Phone Records Gains Supporters

“When I found out that the NSA was collecting records of my phone calls, I was shocked,” Smith said in a prepared statement. “I have heard of other governments spying indiscriminately on their own citizens, but I naively thought it did not happen in America. I believe who I call, when I call them, and how long we talk is not something the government should be able to get without a warrant. I sued because I believe the Constitution protects my calls from government searches."   read more

Ronald Reagan’s Executive Order that Opened the Door for Spying on Americans

The granddaddy of spying authorizations goes back to the Reagan Administration, and even Congress doesn’t know much about how it works. So, what’s 12333 being used for? According to the Electronic Frontier Foundation, its authority is used to cull American’s electronic address books and buddy lists, to put malware on Facebook servers and to justify the recording of all of a country’s telephone calls.   read more

Amnesty International Criticizes Conditions at U.S. Supermax Prison that Houses Terrorists

ADX inmates endure 23 hours a day and sometimes more in their tiny, private cells. The one hour they’re not in solitary confinement is instead spent outside—in an exercise cage often with no one else around. Many ADX inmates suffer from mental illness, but are denied treatment such as medicine and counseling, according to the report. In addition, the prison operates with virtually no public oversight. The media cannot visit prisoners in person nor talk to them by phone.   read more

Democratic Senators Introduce Bill to Hold Corporate Officers Criminally Responsible for Concealing Dangers

The recent recall and controversy surrounding General Motors is one prime example, bill supporters say. Some GM officials knew about their cars’ faulty ignition switches as early as 2001, and yet allowed them to be sold and driven for years after. At least 13 people may have died as a result of these decisions. So far, the worst that the federal government has thrown at GM for its negligence is $35 million in fines, with no managers or executives facing prosecution.   read more

Full Disclosure and Accountability Said to be Missing from $7 Billion Citigroup Misconduct Settlement

The Department of Justice trumpeted reaching a $7 billion deal with Citigroup to settle charges of “egregious misconduct” in its sale of mortgage-backed securities. But critics of the deal are crying foul. “The $7 billion settlement...is meaningless without disclosure of...how many hundreds of billions of dollars Citigroup made, how many tens of billions investors lost, how many billions in bonuses were pocketed, [and] which executives were involved,” said Dennis Kelleher.   read more

When Companies Break Environmental Laws, Why are Responsible Individuals not Prosecuted?

Tens of thousands of businesses have been caught polluting the air, water or soil, but rarely does the federal government prosecute the leaders of these lawbreakers. There are more than 64,000 facilities in federal databases with violations of U.S. environmental laws, but less than 0.5% result in prosecutions. That’s because the government has consistently preferred to take civil actions against corporate polluters, even though laws exist to charge executives criminally.   read more

Lawsuit Contends National “Suspicious Activity” Database is Way too Broad

Taking photos of public art or being a minority is enough to land an American on the federal government’s watch list for being suspicious, which is now being challenged in court. The plaintiffs contend the Suspicious Activity Reporting program is much too broad, resulting in innocent people being added to the database. The program also sweeps up details about individuals exercising their First Amendment rights. Others have done nothing except be a member of certain ethnic groups.   read more

Federal Budget Deficit Finally Dips to Pre-Recession Level

The smaller deficit, estimated at $583 billion, was caused by slower defense spending, less-than-anticipated spending on Hurricane Sandy rebuilding and smaller-than-expected costs of Affordable Care Act (ACA) insurance subsidies. During the depths of the recession, the deficit reached $1.4 trillion. Budget cuts since have meant the government is spending less, but that has also slowed job growth, so tax receipts have not increased as much as they might have.   read more

Pesticides Suspected in Deaths of Birds and Bees

The Dutch study looked at the population of 15 types of birds and found a consistent decline in the population where Imidacloprid was present in surface water. Researchers believe the chemical kills off the insects that the birds eat, but they’re still unsure of the reason for the population decline. Other research has fingered neonicotinoids for the recent die-off of honeybees.   read more

40 Percent of Colleges Haven’t Investigated a Sex Assault Case in 5 Years

A probe initiated by Senator Claire McCaskill (D-Missouri) discovered many disturbing facts in the world of higher education and its approach to handling rapes and other sexual assaults. One that jumps right off the page: More than 40% of colleges and universities, including many private for-profit schools, haven’t investigated a single sexual assault case on their campuses over the past five years.   read more

British Foreign Office Claims Documents Relating to CIA Abduction Program were “Accidentally” Destroyed

The British government said that secret files documenting its role in a secret CIA program were destroyed by “water damage.” The information in question purportedly contained details about CIA flights in 2002 carrying detainees to and from the secret military installation known as Diego Garcia, located in the middle of the Indian Ocean. The British-controlled island may have housed a “black site” prison operated by the CIA for interrogating detainees.   read more

San Francisco First Large City to Force Treatment of Mentally Ill

Despite fierce opposition from mental health advocates, San Francisco leaders have approved a policy by which a judge can be petitioned to order mandatory treatment for the mentally ill. The policy change came as a result of the approval of a 12-year-old statute, Laura’s Law. The law was named after teenager Laura Wilcox, who was murdered in 2001 by a psychiatric patient. Nevada County, where Wilcox was murdered, was the first to adopt the program. Orange County has since signed on.   read more

Prosecution of Public Officials for Corruption Declines under Obama

The drop is even sharper when the Justice Department numbers are put up alongside those from 2004 (down 32% when there were 760 cases under Bush) and 1994 (down 27% when 711 were reported under Clinton). TRAC says public corruption referrals sent from federal agencies to Justice have averaged 1,674 during the past five years. This total is about the same as under Bush (1,663 referrals).   read more
1 to 16 of about 2028 News
1 2 3 ... 127 Next