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86 Firearm Deaths a Day in U.S.; 60% are Suicides

“Suicide is far more common than homicide and its rate is increasing,” Garen Wintemute of U.C. Davis wrote in his new study. “The homicide rate is decreasing.” He also noted that firearm violence is a “large and costly public health problem in the United States for which the mortality rate has remained unchanged for more than a decade.” Even when the homicide rate was far higher than now, it was outpaced by the suicide rate, according to the study.   read more

Gov. Cuomo Bans Fracking in New York

State health officials said that until more studies can be performed, it was necessary to stop fracking because of the risks it poses to residents’ water supplies. The decision comes in the wake of state environmental and health reports that concluded New York citizens would be placed at risk by continued fracking operations. “We cannot afford to make a mistake,” said acting state Health Commissioner Howard Zucker. “The potential risks are too great. In fact, they are not fully known.”   read more

9 American Insiders Who Opposed Bush Torture Program

The ACLU has honored nine officials who took a stand against torture of U.S. detainees. Air Force Colonel Morris Davis, who was chief prosecutor for the military commissions at Guantánamo Bay from 2005 to 2007, advocated for a policy barring the use of evidence obtained through torture. His effort failed, and when Pentagon General Counsel William Haynes became Haynes’ boss, he resigned. “The guy who said waterboarding is A-OK, I was not going to take orders from. I quit,” Davis reportedly said.   read more

Army Claims it’s too Dangerous to Clean Up Radioactive Weapons Test Site in Indiana

More than 160,000 pounds of depleted uranium projectiles and millions of artillery shells were left, unexploded, at the firing range. The Army, however, is showing no signs of cleaning up the mess. In fact, it's asking the NRC to allow them to halt environmental testing of the area. Some local residents worry that the radioactive materials will spread during rains. “The Army never thought much about the future,” said Mike Moore. “No thought was given that you've ruined this land forever.”   read more

Congress Agrees to Protect 1 Million Acres in First Significant Land Conservation Legislation in 5 Years

For the first time since 2009, Congress has moved to protect large swaths of undeveloped land throughout the Western United States. By folding several bills into a defense authorization plan, environmentalists were able to push through protection for national parks, wilderness areas and untamed rivers. More than 1 million acres of public lands will be set aside. However, part of the price for the conservation package was the approval of measures benefiting various industry interests.   read more

4 Biggest Banks Win Big in Spending Bill

When Democrats controlled Congress in 2010, they tried to rein in some banking activities again under the Dodd-Frank law. The wide-ranging bill included a provision, the swaps push-out rule, which forced banks to relocate their risky derivatives trades to parts of their businesses that aren’t backed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. (FDIC). The four biggest U.S. banks, JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, Citibank and Wells Fargo, have been working to get rid of this provision ever since.   read more

Large Tobacco Company to Stop Hiring Children Younger than 16

Give Altria, makers of Marlboro cigarettes and other tobacco products, credit for one thing: the company will prohibit its U.S. tobacco growers from hiring children under the age of 16. Human Rights Watch found that tobacco farming exposed children and others working in the fields to nicotine, toxic pesticides and extreme heat. The group said most children interviewed reported nausea, vomiting, headaches, and dizziness, which are signs of acute nicotine poisoning.   read more

As Organic Foods Grow in Popularity, So Does Organic Fraud

The Cornucopia Institute says it has uncovered “one of the largest fraud investigations in the history of the organic industry.” Using aerial photography, the institute found 14 factory farms that have produced milk, meat and eggs under the organic label. Photographs showed the cattle and chickens on these farms were confined to “industrial-scale confinement livestock facilities” and cows were not given access to fields for grazing, which is required under federal rules for organic farming.   read more

Obama Administration Fights to Keep Details of Justice Department Torture Report Secret

While the media poured over the Senate's CIA torture report, the Obama administration was fighting to keep the lid on another torture report.The Justice Dept. probe into the CIA program was conducted by prosecutor John H. Durham, who spent four years delving into the controversy but ultimately recommended to Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. to not file charges against the agency or any of its employees or contractors. Holder followed Durham’s suggestion and refrained from going after the CIA.   read more

Rectal Feeding, Chaining Diapered Detainees to the Ceiling, Torture of 26 Wrongly Imprisoned…Is This What Americans Do?

In fact, 26 of the 119 detainees held by the CIA were individuals who did nothing wrong and were not involved with al Qaeda. One was Abu Hudhaifa, who endured ice water baths and more than 60 hours of standing without being allowed to sleep. Gul Rahman, a “suspected Islamic terrorist,” died of hypothermia after being forced to sleep without pants on a cold concrete floor. Other detainees were subjected to “rectal feeding and rectal rehydration,” even when cooperating with normal feedings.   read more

1% of Lawyers Filing Appeals to Supreme Court Account for 43% of Accepted Cases; Most Represent Corporations

“The results: a decided advantage for corporate America, and a growing insularity at the court,” according to the Reuters investigation. “Some legal experts contend that the reliance on a small cluster of specialists, most working on behalf of businesses, has turned the Supreme Court into an echo chamber – a place where an elite group of jurists embraces an elite group of lawyers who reinforce narrow views of how the law should be construed.”   read more

Energy Companies Contribute to Republican State Attorneys General who then Fight Pollution Regulation

An investigation uncovered “the unprecedented, secretive alliance” between numerous state attorneys general and “some of the nation’s top energy producers to push back against the Obama regulatory agenda.” Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt appears to be one of those having his strings pulled. His office copied a three-page letter from Devon Energy, which had backed Pruitt’s campaign, changed a few words, put it on official stationary and sent it to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.   read more

Bill to Halt NSA Warrantless Surveillance, Passed by House, Quietly Dropped before Going to Senate

The House passed a government funding bill that included an amendment that would have ended the ability of the National Security Agency to conduct “backdoor” warrantless surveillance of the content of Americans’ electronic communications. The bipartisan amendment passed with a veto-proof 293 votes. However, it was stripped from the bill by House leadership before it was sent to the Senate.   read more

No Growth in Government Spending Since Obama became President after 44 Years of Increases

Under President Obama, whom many conservatives claim is a tax-and-spend liberal, federal spending has declined after decades of increases. Data from the Office of Management and Budget shows that in 1965, government spending was $118 billion. For the next 44 years, that figure steadily went up through 2009, when outlays totaled $3.5 trillion. But starting in 2010 and for the next four years, there was no growth in nominal spending.   read more

Justice Dept. Sets Fraud Recovery Record; Half of Amount Comes from Bank of America and Johnson & Johnson

Justice lawyers obtained a record amount--$5.69 billion--in deals negotiated with the likes of Bank of America (BofA), Johnson & Johnson (J&J) and other violators this past year. Never before had the Justice Department exceeded $5 billion in cases under the False Claims Act. Since Obama took office in January 2009, the agency has produced $22.75 billion in settlements under the act. BofA and J&J accounted for half of the monies collected for fraud and false claims cases during FY 2014.   read more

U.S. Adult Smoking Rate Drops to Lowest Level on Record

Only 17.8% of U.S. adults smoked last year, the CDC found. That’s the lowest rate since the government began keeping track of the behavior in 1965. The actual number of smokers in 2013 was 42.1 million. Despite fewer people smoking, the habit continues to be the leading cause of premature death in the country. Smoking kills 480,000 Americans each year and results in $289 billion in annual health costs and lost productivity.   read more
1 to 16 of about 2178 News
1 2 3 ... 137 Next

Top Stories

1 to 16 of about 2178 News
1 2 3 ... 137 Next

86 Firearm Deaths a Day in U.S.; 60% are Suicides

“Suicide is far more common than homicide and its rate is increasing,” Garen Wintemute of U.C. Davis wrote in his new study. “The homicide rate is decreasing.” He also noted that firearm violence is a “large and costly public health problem in the United States for which the mortality rate has remained unchanged for more than a decade.” Even when the homicide rate was far higher than now, it was outpaced by the suicide rate, according to the study.   read more

Gov. Cuomo Bans Fracking in New York

State health officials said that until more studies can be performed, it was necessary to stop fracking because of the risks it poses to residents’ water supplies. The decision comes in the wake of state environmental and health reports that concluded New York citizens would be placed at risk by continued fracking operations. “We cannot afford to make a mistake,” said acting state Health Commissioner Howard Zucker. “The potential risks are too great. In fact, they are not fully known.”   read more

9 American Insiders Who Opposed Bush Torture Program

The ACLU has honored nine officials who took a stand against torture of U.S. detainees. Air Force Colonel Morris Davis, who was chief prosecutor for the military commissions at Guantánamo Bay from 2005 to 2007, advocated for a policy barring the use of evidence obtained through torture. His effort failed, and when Pentagon General Counsel William Haynes became Haynes’ boss, he resigned. “The guy who said waterboarding is A-OK, I was not going to take orders from. I quit,” Davis reportedly said.   read more

Army Claims it’s too Dangerous to Clean Up Radioactive Weapons Test Site in Indiana

More than 160,000 pounds of depleted uranium projectiles and millions of artillery shells were left, unexploded, at the firing range. The Army, however, is showing no signs of cleaning up the mess. In fact, it's asking the NRC to allow them to halt environmental testing of the area. Some local residents worry that the radioactive materials will spread during rains. “The Army never thought much about the future,” said Mike Moore. “No thought was given that you've ruined this land forever.”   read more

Congress Agrees to Protect 1 Million Acres in First Significant Land Conservation Legislation in 5 Years

For the first time since 2009, Congress has moved to protect large swaths of undeveloped land throughout the Western United States. By folding several bills into a defense authorization plan, environmentalists were able to push through protection for national parks, wilderness areas and untamed rivers. More than 1 million acres of public lands will be set aside. However, part of the price for the conservation package was the approval of measures benefiting various industry interests.   read more

4 Biggest Banks Win Big in Spending Bill

When Democrats controlled Congress in 2010, they tried to rein in some banking activities again under the Dodd-Frank law. The wide-ranging bill included a provision, the swaps push-out rule, which forced banks to relocate their risky derivatives trades to parts of their businesses that aren’t backed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. (FDIC). The four biggest U.S. banks, JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, Citibank and Wells Fargo, have been working to get rid of this provision ever since.   read more

Large Tobacco Company to Stop Hiring Children Younger than 16

Give Altria, makers of Marlboro cigarettes and other tobacco products, credit for one thing: the company will prohibit its U.S. tobacco growers from hiring children under the age of 16. Human Rights Watch found that tobacco farming exposed children and others working in the fields to nicotine, toxic pesticides and extreme heat. The group said most children interviewed reported nausea, vomiting, headaches, and dizziness, which are signs of acute nicotine poisoning.   read more

As Organic Foods Grow in Popularity, So Does Organic Fraud

The Cornucopia Institute says it has uncovered “one of the largest fraud investigations in the history of the organic industry.” Using aerial photography, the institute found 14 factory farms that have produced milk, meat and eggs under the organic label. Photographs showed the cattle and chickens on these farms were confined to “industrial-scale confinement livestock facilities” and cows were not given access to fields for grazing, which is required under federal rules for organic farming.   read more

Obama Administration Fights to Keep Details of Justice Department Torture Report Secret

While the media poured over the Senate's CIA torture report, the Obama administration was fighting to keep the lid on another torture report.The Justice Dept. probe into the CIA program was conducted by prosecutor John H. Durham, who spent four years delving into the controversy but ultimately recommended to Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. to not file charges against the agency or any of its employees or contractors. Holder followed Durham’s suggestion and refrained from going after the CIA.   read more

Rectal Feeding, Chaining Diapered Detainees to the Ceiling, Torture of 26 Wrongly Imprisoned…Is This What Americans Do?

In fact, 26 of the 119 detainees held by the CIA were individuals who did nothing wrong and were not involved with al Qaeda. One was Abu Hudhaifa, who endured ice water baths and more than 60 hours of standing without being allowed to sleep. Gul Rahman, a “suspected Islamic terrorist,” died of hypothermia after being forced to sleep without pants on a cold concrete floor. Other detainees were subjected to “rectal feeding and rectal rehydration,” even when cooperating with normal feedings.   read more

1% of Lawyers Filing Appeals to Supreme Court Account for 43% of Accepted Cases; Most Represent Corporations

“The results: a decided advantage for corporate America, and a growing insularity at the court,” according to the Reuters investigation. “Some legal experts contend that the reliance on a small cluster of specialists, most working on behalf of businesses, has turned the Supreme Court into an echo chamber – a place where an elite group of jurists embraces an elite group of lawyers who reinforce narrow views of how the law should be construed.”   read more

Energy Companies Contribute to Republican State Attorneys General who then Fight Pollution Regulation

An investigation uncovered “the unprecedented, secretive alliance” between numerous state attorneys general and “some of the nation’s top energy producers to push back against the Obama regulatory agenda.” Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt appears to be one of those having his strings pulled. His office copied a three-page letter from Devon Energy, which had backed Pruitt’s campaign, changed a few words, put it on official stationary and sent it to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.   read more

Bill to Halt NSA Warrantless Surveillance, Passed by House, Quietly Dropped before Going to Senate

The House passed a government funding bill that included an amendment that would have ended the ability of the National Security Agency to conduct “backdoor” warrantless surveillance of the content of Americans’ electronic communications. The bipartisan amendment passed with a veto-proof 293 votes. However, it was stripped from the bill by House leadership before it was sent to the Senate.   read more

No Growth in Government Spending Since Obama became President after 44 Years of Increases

Under President Obama, whom many conservatives claim is a tax-and-spend liberal, federal spending has declined after decades of increases. Data from the Office of Management and Budget shows that in 1965, government spending was $118 billion. For the next 44 years, that figure steadily went up through 2009, when outlays totaled $3.5 trillion. But starting in 2010 and for the next four years, there was no growth in nominal spending.   read more

Justice Dept. Sets Fraud Recovery Record; Half of Amount Comes from Bank of America and Johnson & Johnson

Justice lawyers obtained a record amount--$5.69 billion--in deals negotiated with the likes of Bank of America (BofA), Johnson & Johnson (J&J) and other violators this past year. Never before had the Justice Department exceeded $5 billion in cases under the False Claims Act. Since Obama took office in January 2009, the agency has produced $22.75 billion in settlements under the act. BofA and J&J accounted for half of the monies collected for fraud and false claims cases during FY 2014.   read more

U.S. Adult Smoking Rate Drops to Lowest Level on Record

Only 17.8% of U.S. adults smoked last year, the CDC found. That’s the lowest rate since the government began keeping track of the behavior in 1965. The actual number of smokers in 2013 was 42.1 million. Despite fewer people smoking, the habit continues to be the leading cause of premature death in the country. Smoking kills 480,000 Americans each year and results in $289 billion in annual health costs and lost productivity.   read more
1 to 16 of about 2178 News
1 2 3 ... 137 Next