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Three Charged in Billion-Dollar Medicare Fraud Scheme

Three people have been charged in an unprecedented $1 billion health care fraud scam, accused of using dozens of Miami nursing homes to bilk the taxpayer-funded Medicare and Medicaid programs. Authorities said Philip Esformes, who ran 30 nursing homes and assisted living facilities, joined with two conspirators and a complex network of corrupt doctors and hospitals to refer thousands of patients to their facilities even though the patients did not qualify for the services.   read more

One-Third of Recovering Hospital Patients in U.S. Suffer Harm from Rehab Care

Almost a quarter of the harmed patients had to be admitted to an acute care hospital, at a cost of about $7.7 million for the month analyzed. The physicians who reviewed the cases for the OIG say substandard treatment, inadequate monitoring, and failure to provide needed care caused most of the harm. Almost half the cases, 46%, were related to medication errors, and included bleeding from gastric ulcers due to blood thinners and a loss of consciousness linked to narcotic painkillers.   read more

Lawsuit Accuses U.S. Army of Denying Diabetes Treatment for Children on Army Bases

The American Diabetes Assn has been working to change Army policy since 2010, and says numerous families across the nation are affected. "The U.S. Army's policy is discriminatory and completely out of step with current practices relating to caring for children with diabetes," ADA's Hagan said. "This discriminatory policy provides little choice for parents who are effectively forced to pull their children out of the U.S. Army's high-quality programs or face jeopardizing their lives," said Smith.   read more

After 7 Years, U.S. Health Agency at Loss for Extending Patient Privacy Law to Booming Health Tech Industry

HIPAA requires tight security over personal health information. Apps and wearables may not have the same protections. A study looked at 600 of the most commonly used health apps and found that fewer than a third had privacy policies. Many apps connect to third-party websites without users’ knowledge and send data in unencrypted ways that potentially exposed personal information. Many people do not read an app’s privacy policy, leaving them open to having their information used in myriad ways.   read more

Deportations of U.S.-Bound Central American Refugees, Leading to Grim Fate, Continue Under Obama-Mexico Deal

Jenesis staggered naked and bleeding away from gang members. “She had been raped and shot in the stomach,” Elena recalled. After years of such brutality, the family finally fled. Yet they aren’t safe, in part because of a policy backed by Obama and Mexico to return refugees to the countries from which they fled. Because Americans worry about refugees swarming across our borders, we help pay for Mexico to intercept them and return them home, where they may well be raped or killed.   read more

Dangerous Doctors Keep Working Due to Flawed Reporting to National Database

Powerful economic incentives discourage hospitals from reporting doctor abuse, and in many cases, reports are never filed in the first place. But even when they are, they may classify violations in a way that conceals the scope of abuse. The investigation found about 70% more physicians accused of sexual misconduct than the 466 classified as such in the public version of the data bank. To date, no official action has ever been taken by HR against a hospital for failing to report properly.   read more

Fastest-Growing Complaint of American Consumers: Imposter Scams

In a new type of imposter scam, crooks infiltrate companies' or organizations' email systems and send messages purporting to be from the CEOs to employees with urgent instructions to wire money somewhere. Complaints about phony IRS agents was one of fastest-growing complaints last year, according to the new report. "Scammers are always changing their pitches and looking for things that work," said CFA 's Susan Grant. "The IRS phony agent obviously works. It scares the heck out of people."   read more

9/11 Families Find Validation and "Tip of Iceberg" in Long-Awaited Release of Infamous 28 Pages

"Each of the claims the 9/11 families and victims has made against the kingdom of Saudi Arabia enjoys extensive support in the findings of a broad range of investigative documents..." the families said. Sen. Blumenthal said the documents "provide more than enough evidence to raise serious concerns." Added Terry Strada: "There is so much more on the Saudi connection to 9/11 and this is the tip of the iceberg, but you had to get this first. It's the beginning, but I don't think it's the end."   read more

U.S. Congressional Committees Move to Rein in Civil Liberties Watchdog

Sen. Leahy described the provisions as “completely unacceptable” and “misguided.” He deplored what he called an emerging pattern of efforts by the intelligence panels to undermine the oversight board’s independence and authority. “The lesson from Snowden is how critical it is to have democratic debate and oversight of our intelligence community...” said Medine. “Now we have the intelligence committees trying to undercut that and push the intelligence community back into the shadows again.”   read more

EU Adopts Rules for U.S. Data Sharing, But Critics Say U.S. Surveillance Threat Remains

Critics argue the new framework, which comes into force Aug. 1, doesn't go far enough, that consumer protections are not strong enough and that the possibility of blanket surveillance from U.S. agencies remains. Concerns over data transfers had been stoked by the spying revelations made by Edward Snowden. Snowden's revelations prompted the complaint to the court from Max Schrems, an Austrian law student. "This deal is bad for users, which will not enjoy proper privacy protections..." he said.   read more

Federal Judge Decries DEA Warrantless Cell Phone Tracking

“Absent a search warrant,” wrote the judge, “the government may not turn a citizen’s cellphone into a tracking device.” Lawyer Nathan Wessler said the ruling was the first by a federal judge to suppress evidence obtained through the warrantless use of a cell-site simulator. “A federal court has finally held the authorities to account,” Wessler said, adding that the opinion “strongly reinforces the strength of our constitutional privacy rights in the digital age.”   read more

Thousands of U.S. Military Veterans Deported Due to Lack of Citizenship

While some deported veterans believe they earned citizenship by signing up for military service, others were misinformed. "That's one of the greatest tragedies of this. People didn't realize that they weren't already a citizen," Pasquarella said. "I think that the fact that a veteran who serves in our armed forces and goes to fight our wars could come home from service and then be deported is news to most Americans. I think most Americans would be shocked to learn that that is happening."   read more

American Voter Dissatisfaction with Two Likely Presidential Nominees Highest in Decades

Plumbing the reasons behind the woeful numbers, the Pew researchers found -- no surprise, really -- that this year's presidential contest is widely viewed as being excessively negative with little, if any focus on the concerns of real Americans. Just 27% of voters feel the campaign is "focused on important policy debates." Large numbers of supporters of both Trump and Clinton view their choice as more of a vote against the opposing candidate than an expression of support for their candidate.   read more

Bahamas Issues Travel Warning for Visitors to U.S.

The Bahamas on Friday issued a rare travel advisory for any of its citizens visiting the U.S., recommending that young men in particular take care in cities affected by recent tensions over police shootings. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs warns visitors to "exercise appropriate caution" in light of recent episodes involving police officers and black men. "In particular young males are asked to exercise extreme caution... Do not be confrontational and cooperate," said the statement.   read more

$2 Drug Tests Used in Police Traffic Stops Have Up to 32% Error Rate Leading to 75% Wrongful Convictions

Police arrest more than 1.2 million people a year in the U.S. on charges of illegal drug possession. Field tests help them move quickly from suspicion to conviction. But the kits are far from reliable. The tests seem simple, but a lot can go wrong. Some use a chemical which turns blue when exposed to cocaine. But it also turns blue when exposed to more than 80 other compounds, including certain acne medications and common household cleaners.   read more

Young Vets Drive 15-Year Surge in U.S. Veteran Suicide Rate, Including 85% Increase for Women

“This isn’t an estimate, this is the answer,” said the VA's Dr. Shulkin. Hardest hit were young veterans. The suicide rate for vets age 18-29 was 86 deaths per 100,000 for men and 33 per 100,000 for women — much higher than previous estimates, and almost twice as high as other age groups. Women were also disproportionately hit. Though female vets commit suicide at lower rates than males, those under 30 are more than six times as likely to take their own lives as women in the civilian world.   read more
1 to 16 of about 2750 News
1 2 3 ... 172 Next

Top Stories

1 to 16 of about 2750 News
1 2 3 ... 172 Next

Three Charged in Billion-Dollar Medicare Fraud Scheme

Three people have been charged in an unprecedented $1 billion health care fraud scam, accused of using dozens of Miami nursing homes to bilk the taxpayer-funded Medicare and Medicaid programs. Authorities said Philip Esformes, who ran 30 nursing homes and assisted living facilities, joined with two conspirators and a complex network of corrupt doctors and hospitals to refer thousands of patients to their facilities even though the patients did not qualify for the services.   read more

One-Third of Recovering Hospital Patients in U.S. Suffer Harm from Rehab Care

Almost a quarter of the harmed patients had to be admitted to an acute care hospital, at a cost of about $7.7 million for the month analyzed. The physicians who reviewed the cases for the OIG say substandard treatment, inadequate monitoring, and failure to provide needed care caused most of the harm. Almost half the cases, 46%, were related to medication errors, and included bleeding from gastric ulcers due to blood thinners and a loss of consciousness linked to narcotic painkillers.   read more

Lawsuit Accuses U.S. Army of Denying Diabetes Treatment for Children on Army Bases

The American Diabetes Assn has been working to change Army policy since 2010, and says numerous families across the nation are affected. "The U.S. Army's policy is discriminatory and completely out of step with current practices relating to caring for children with diabetes," ADA's Hagan said. "This discriminatory policy provides little choice for parents who are effectively forced to pull their children out of the U.S. Army's high-quality programs or face jeopardizing their lives," said Smith.   read more

After 7 Years, U.S. Health Agency at Loss for Extending Patient Privacy Law to Booming Health Tech Industry

HIPAA requires tight security over personal health information. Apps and wearables may not have the same protections. A study looked at 600 of the most commonly used health apps and found that fewer than a third had privacy policies. Many apps connect to third-party websites without users’ knowledge and send data in unencrypted ways that potentially exposed personal information. Many people do not read an app’s privacy policy, leaving them open to having their information used in myriad ways.   read more

Deportations of U.S.-Bound Central American Refugees, Leading to Grim Fate, Continue Under Obama-Mexico Deal

Jenesis staggered naked and bleeding away from gang members. “She had been raped and shot in the stomach,” Elena recalled. After years of such brutality, the family finally fled. Yet they aren’t safe, in part because of a policy backed by Obama and Mexico to return refugees to the countries from which they fled. Because Americans worry about refugees swarming across our borders, we help pay for Mexico to intercept them and return them home, where they may well be raped or killed.   read more

Dangerous Doctors Keep Working Due to Flawed Reporting to National Database

Powerful economic incentives discourage hospitals from reporting doctor abuse, and in many cases, reports are never filed in the first place. But even when they are, they may classify violations in a way that conceals the scope of abuse. The investigation found about 70% more physicians accused of sexual misconduct than the 466 classified as such in the public version of the data bank. To date, no official action has ever been taken by HR against a hospital for failing to report properly.   read more

Fastest-Growing Complaint of American Consumers: Imposter Scams

In a new type of imposter scam, crooks infiltrate companies' or organizations' email systems and send messages purporting to be from the CEOs to employees with urgent instructions to wire money somewhere. Complaints about phony IRS agents was one of fastest-growing complaints last year, according to the new report. "Scammers are always changing their pitches and looking for things that work," said CFA 's Susan Grant. "The IRS phony agent obviously works. It scares the heck out of people."   read more

9/11 Families Find Validation and "Tip of Iceberg" in Long-Awaited Release of Infamous 28 Pages

"Each of the claims the 9/11 families and victims has made against the kingdom of Saudi Arabia enjoys extensive support in the findings of a broad range of investigative documents..." the families said. Sen. Blumenthal said the documents "provide more than enough evidence to raise serious concerns." Added Terry Strada: "There is so much more on the Saudi connection to 9/11 and this is the tip of the iceberg, but you had to get this first. It's the beginning, but I don't think it's the end."   read more

U.S. Congressional Committees Move to Rein in Civil Liberties Watchdog

Sen. Leahy described the provisions as “completely unacceptable” and “misguided.” He deplored what he called an emerging pattern of efforts by the intelligence panels to undermine the oversight board’s independence and authority. “The lesson from Snowden is how critical it is to have democratic debate and oversight of our intelligence community...” said Medine. “Now we have the intelligence committees trying to undercut that and push the intelligence community back into the shadows again.”   read more

EU Adopts Rules for U.S. Data Sharing, But Critics Say U.S. Surveillance Threat Remains

Critics argue the new framework, which comes into force Aug. 1, doesn't go far enough, that consumer protections are not strong enough and that the possibility of blanket surveillance from U.S. agencies remains. Concerns over data transfers had been stoked by the spying revelations made by Edward Snowden. Snowden's revelations prompted the complaint to the court from Max Schrems, an Austrian law student. "This deal is bad for users, which will not enjoy proper privacy protections..." he said.   read more

Federal Judge Decries DEA Warrantless Cell Phone Tracking

“Absent a search warrant,” wrote the judge, “the government may not turn a citizen’s cellphone into a tracking device.” Lawyer Nathan Wessler said the ruling was the first by a federal judge to suppress evidence obtained through the warrantless use of a cell-site simulator. “A federal court has finally held the authorities to account,” Wessler said, adding that the opinion “strongly reinforces the strength of our constitutional privacy rights in the digital age.”   read more

Thousands of U.S. Military Veterans Deported Due to Lack of Citizenship

While some deported veterans believe they earned citizenship by signing up for military service, others were misinformed. "That's one of the greatest tragedies of this. People didn't realize that they weren't already a citizen," Pasquarella said. "I think that the fact that a veteran who serves in our armed forces and goes to fight our wars could come home from service and then be deported is news to most Americans. I think most Americans would be shocked to learn that that is happening."   read more

American Voter Dissatisfaction with Two Likely Presidential Nominees Highest in Decades

Plumbing the reasons behind the woeful numbers, the Pew researchers found -- no surprise, really -- that this year's presidential contest is widely viewed as being excessively negative with little, if any focus on the concerns of real Americans. Just 27% of voters feel the campaign is "focused on important policy debates." Large numbers of supporters of both Trump and Clinton view their choice as more of a vote against the opposing candidate than an expression of support for their candidate.   read more

Bahamas Issues Travel Warning for Visitors to U.S.

The Bahamas on Friday issued a rare travel advisory for any of its citizens visiting the U.S., recommending that young men in particular take care in cities affected by recent tensions over police shootings. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs warns visitors to "exercise appropriate caution" in light of recent episodes involving police officers and black men. "In particular young males are asked to exercise extreme caution... Do not be confrontational and cooperate," said the statement.   read more

$2 Drug Tests Used in Police Traffic Stops Have Up to 32% Error Rate Leading to 75% Wrongful Convictions

Police arrest more than 1.2 million people a year in the U.S. on charges of illegal drug possession. Field tests help them move quickly from suspicion to conviction. But the kits are far from reliable. The tests seem simple, but a lot can go wrong. Some use a chemical which turns blue when exposed to cocaine. But it also turns blue when exposed to more than 80 other compounds, including certain acne medications and common household cleaners.   read more

Young Vets Drive 15-Year Surge in U.S. Veteran Suicide Rate, Including 85% Increase for Women

“This isn’t an estimate, this is the answer,” said the VA's Dr. Shulkin. Hardest hit were young veterans. The suicide rate for vets age 18-29 was 86 deaths per 100,000 for men and 33 per 100,000 for women — much higher than previous estimates, and almost twice as high as other age groups. Women were also disproportionately hit. Though female vets commit suicide at lower rates than males, those under 30 are more than six times as likely to take their own lives as women in the civilian world.   read more
1 to 16 of about 2750 News
1 2 3 ... 172 Next