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U.S. Maternal Mortality Rate Rises, Bucks Trend of Fewer Such Deaths Worldwide

One of the biggest worldwide public health triumphs in recent years has been maternal mortality. Global death rates fell by more than a third from 2000 to 2015. The United States, however, is one of the few countries in the world that has gone against the grain, new data show. Its maternal mortality rate has risen despite improvements in health care and an overwhelming global trend in the other direction.   read more

For First Time in U.S., Electrical Power Produced by Ocean’s Waves Feeds a Power Grid

The ocean's endless motion packs enough power to meet a quarter of America's energy needs and dramatically reduce the nation's reliance on oil, gas and coal. But wave energy technology lags well behind wind and solar power, with technical hurdles still to be overcome. To that end, the Navy has established a test site in Hawaii, with hopes the technology can someday be used to produce clean, renewable power for coastal communities in fuel-starved places around the world.   read more

FBI Won’t Rule Out Practice of Impersonating Journalists in Undercover Operations

AP VP Paul Colford said the news cooperative was "deeply disappointed with the inspector general's findings, which effectively condone the FBI's impersonation of an AP journalist in 2007. Such action compromises the ability of a free press to gather the news safely and effectively and raises serious constitutional concerns. Once again, AP calls on the government to refrain from any activities involving the impersonation of the news media..." FBI Director Comey defended the tactic in 2014.   read more

U.S. House Republicans, as Election-Season Tactic, Vote to Halt Guantánamo Detainee Transfers

The bill is an opportunity for Republicans to put Democrats on record and use their votes against them in campaigns. Within minutes of the vote, Republicans sent out a news release saying, "Democrats vote to close GITMO and bring terrorists to U.S. soil (again)." Said White House press secretary Josh Earnest: "When it comes to America's national security, at some point that should rate higher on the priority list than an individual's re-election prospects."   read more

Health Providers Still Wrongly Cite “Failure to Improve” as Reason for Medicare Coverage Denial

Medicare beneficiaries often hear such rationales for denying coverage: They’re not improving. They’ve “reached a plateau.” They've achieved “maximum functional capacity.” But the so-called improvement standard is no longer in effect. What matters is maintenance. Medicare must cover care to "maintain the patient’s current condition or prevent...deterioration.” But providers have still frequently invoked the improvement standard.   read more

For First Time, Most Americans Willing to Financially Invest (A Little Bit) in Global Warming Fight

"I feel we need to make small sacrifices — and money is a small sacrifice — to make life better for future generations," said teacher Sarah Griffin. Post-grad student Greg Davis agreed: "It's far more important to protect the environment than to save money. I think that's true for businesses as well as individuals." That a majority is willing to pay more is a new phenomenon, said professor Tom Dietz. "While the amounts may seem small, the willingness to take action...is encouraging."   read more

Nation’s Police Increasingly Collect DNA Samples from People Not Criminally Charged or Even Suspects

When Adam’s father found out the police had taken his son’s DNA, he immediately contacted the Melbourne Police Dept. to ask what they intended to do with the sample and on what legal basis it had been taken. As a doctor, he understood what had happened could have far-reaching implications. “My concern, being in the medical field, is that it’s not just Adam’s DNA,” he said. “It’s my DNA, it’s my wife’s DNA, and our parents. Not to sound bad, but... There’s some collateral damage there.”   read more

Never-Before-Seen Bacteria Discovered in Depths of Fracking Wells

The bacteria was found among 31 microbes in two fracking wells in different kinds of shale separated by hundreds of miles. Interestingly, the wells are owned by different energy companies that use different techniques. "We think that the microbes in each well may form a self-sustaining ecosystem," said professor Wrighton. "Drilling the well and pumping in fracturing fluid creates the ecosystem, but the microbes adapt to their new environment in a way to sustain the system over long periods."   read more

3 Biggest U.S. Banking Regulatory Agencies Seek to Restrict Risky Investments by Wall Street

The proposed rules were in a long-awaited report released Thursday from the three largest banking regulatory agencies: the Federal Reserve, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. The agencies were required to issue the report by the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial overhaul. The report was supposed to be completed years ago. The most significant new rules were proposed by the Federal Reserve, which oversees all of the nation’s largest banks   read more

Fearful Americans Helped Fuel Trillion Dollars Spent on Domestic Counterterrorism since 9/11

The amount of money spent on homeland security to prevent another 9/11 is staggering. But what's driving the spending upward is fear, not facts, said John Mueller, a senior scientist at the Mershon Center. The level of fear Americans feel -- fueled by politicians and news reports -- isn't supported by the actual terrorism threat. An American has a 1 in 4 million chance of being killed by a terrorist on U.S. soil. One is far more likely to die from lightning or getting struck by a deer.   read more

Makers of Arthritis Drugs, Costliest in U.S., Come under Fire by Nation’s Biggest Drug Benefits Manager

The approach has set off some complaints among patients, who rely on regular injections of the drugs to keep painful symptoms in check. But Express Scripts said that the move was necessary to contain costs. The drugs account for nearly 10% of all drug spending among its members — costing an estimated $7.5 billion — even though fewer than 1% of its members use them. The company said the move would require drug companies to compete more directly, pushing drug companies to offer better discounts.   read more

Texas Republicans Accused of End Run around Court’s Invalidation of Discriminatory Voter ID Law

Advocacy groups said Texas’s education campaign was misleading voters into believing that voting would still be more difficult than it is. The reason is that the campaign omits the word “reasonably." That not only ignores the court’s order, but also leaves voters with the erroneous impression that they cannot vote unless they have exhausted every avenue to acquire an ID. The single word may seem a small matter, but the issue is not: More than 600,000 Texans have none of the required IDs.   read more

Dairy Producers Hit with Minor Penalties after "Premature Slaughter" of 500,000 Cows

The dairy producers were accused of conspiring to prematurely slaughter more than 500,000 cows between 2003 and 2010 to limit the production of raw milk and drive up prices for yogurt, sour cream and other dairy products. "The biggest dairy producers in the country, responsible for almost 70 percent of the nation's milk, conspired together in a classic price-fixing scheme, forcing higher prices for a basic food item onto honest consumers and families," said attorney Steve Berman.   read more

U.S. to Help Laos Clear Unexploded Bombs Leftover From Vietnam War

Declaring a “moral obligation” to heal the wounds of a secret war, President Barack Obama on Tuesday pledged help to clear away the 80 million unexploded bombs the U.S. dropped on Laos a generation ago — more than 10 for every one of the country’s 7 million people. Obama announced the U.S. would double its spending on bomb-clearing efforts to $90 million over three years.   read more

Who Is Pentagon Going to Call to Fill Shortage of Air Force Drone Pilots? Private Contractors.

“This is opening up a whole new can of worms — we have seen problems with security contractors on the battlefield since 9/11, and there’s been an improvement in oversight in that area, but that came after a decade of problems,” said law professor Laura A. Dickinson. “With drones, this is a new area where we already do not have a lot of transparency and with contractors operating drones there’s no clearly defined regime of oversight and accountability.”   read more

Journalists and Human Rights Activists among Targets of Nations Using Tech Firm’s Smartphone Spy Tools

The NSO Group sells surveillance tools that can capture all smartphone activity, such as a user’s location and personal contacts. They can even turn the phone into a secret recording device. Last month, its spyware tried to gain access to the iPhone of a human-rights activist in the UAE. A second target was a Mexican journalist who wrote about corruption in the Mexican government. “There’s no check on this ... governments can essentially use them however they want," said Bill Marczak.   read more
1 to 16 of about 2810 News
1 2 3 ... 176 Next

Top Stories

1 to 16 of about 2810 News
1 2 3 ... 176 Next

U.S. Maternal Mortality Rate Rises, Bucks Trend of Fewer Such Deaths Worldwide

One of the biggest worldwide public health triumphs in recent years has been maternal mortality. Global death rates fell by more than a third from 2000 to 2015. The United States, however, is one of the few countries in the world that has gone against the grain, new data show. Its maternal mortality rate has risen despite improvements in health care and an overwhelming global trend in the other direction.   read more

For First Time in U.S., Electrical Power Produced by Ocean’s Waves Feeds a Power Grid

The ocean's endless motion packs enough power to meet a quarter of America's energy needs and dramatically reduce the nation's reliance on oil, gas and coal. But wave energy technology lags well behind wind and solar power, with technical hurdles still to be overcome. To that end, the Navy has established a test site in Hawaii, with hopes the technology can someday be used to produce clean, renewable power for coastal communities in fuel-starved places around the world.   read more

FBI Won’t Rule Out Practice of Impersonating Journalists in Undercover Operations

AP VP Paul Colford said the news cooperative was "deeply disappointed with the inspector general's findings, which effectively condone the FBI's impersonation of an AP journalist in 2007. Such action compromises the ability of a free press to gather the news safely and effectively and raises serious constitutional concerns. Once again, AP calls on the government to refrain from any activities involving the impersonation of the news media..." FBI Director Comey defended the tactic in 2014.   read more

U.S. House Republicans, as Election-Season Tactic, Vote to Halt Guantánamo Detainee Transfers

The bill is an opportunity for Republicans to put Democrats on record and use their votes against them in campaigns. Within minutes of the vote, Republicans sent out a news release saying, "Democrats vote to close GITMO and bring terrorists to U.S. soil (again)." Said White House press secretary Josh Earnest: "When it comes to America's national security, at some point that should rate higher on the priority list than an individual's re-election prospects."   read more

Health Providers Still Wrongly Cite “Failure to Improve” as Reason for Medicare Coverage Denial

Medicare beneficiaries often hear such rationales for denying coverage: They’re not improving. They’ve “reached a plateau.” They've achieved “maximum functional capacity.” But the so-called improvement standard is no longer in effect. What matters is maintenance. Medicare must cover care to "maintain the patient’s current condition or prevent...deterioration.” But providers have still frequently invoked the improvement standard.   read more

For First Time, Most Americans Willing to Financially Invest (A Little Bit) in Global Warming Fight

"I feel we need to make small sacrifices — and money is a small sacrifice — to make life better for future generations," said teacher Sarah Griffin. Post-grad student Greg Davis agreed: "It's far more important to protect the environment than to save money. I think that's true for businesses as well as individuals." That a majority is willing to pay more is a new phenomenon, said professor Tom Dietz. "While the amounts may seem small, the willingness to take action...is encouraging."   read more

Nation’s Police Increasingly Collect DNA Samples from People Not Criminally Charged or Even Suspects

When Adam’s father found out the police had taken his son’s DNA, he immediately contacted the Melbourne Police Dept. to ask what they intended to do with the sample and on what legal basis it had been taken. As a doctor, he understood what had happened could have far-reaching implications. “My concern, being in the medical field, is that it’s not just Adam’s DNA,” he said. “It’s my DNA, it’s my wife’s DNA, and our parents. Not to sound bad, but... There’s some collateral damage there.”   read more

Never-Before-Seen Bacteria Discovered in Depths of Fracking Wells

The bacteria was found among 31 microbes in two fracking wells in different kinds of shale separated by hundreds of miles. Interestingly, the wells are owned by different energy companies that use different techniques. "We think that the microbes in each well may form a self-sustaining ecosystem," said professor Wrighton. "Drilling the well and pumping in fracturing fluid creates the ecosystem, but the microbes adapt to their new environment in a way to sustain the system over long periods."   read more

3 Biggest U.S. Banking Regulatory Agencies Seek to Restrict Risky Investments by Wall Street

The proposed rules were in a long-awaited report released Thursday from the three largest banking regulatory agencies: the Federal Reserve, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. The agencies were required to issue the report by the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial overhaul. The report was supposed to be completed years ago. The most significant new rules were proposed by the Federal Reserve, which oversees all of the nation’s largest banks   read more

Fearful Americans Helped Fuel Trillion Dollars Spent on Domestic Counterterrorism since 9/11

The amount of money spent on homeland security to prevent another 9/11 is staggering. But what's driving the spending upward is fear, not facts, said John Mueller, a senior scientist at the Mershon Center. The level of fear Americans feel -- fueled by politicians and news reports -- isn't supported by the actual terrorism threat. An American has a 1 in 4 million chance of being killed by a terrorist on U.S. soil. One is far more likely to die from lightning or getting struck by a deer.   read more

Makers of Arthritis Drugs, Costliest in U.S., Come under Fire by Nation’s Biggest Drug Benefits Manager

The approach has set off some complaints among patients, who rely on regular injections of the drugs to keep painful symptoms in check. But Express Scripts said that the move was necessary to contain costs. The drugs account for nearly 10% of all drug spending among its members — costing an estimated $7.5 billion — even though fewer than 1% of its members use them. The company said the move would require drug companies to compete more directly, pushing drug companies to offer better discounts.   read more

Texas Republicans Accused of End Run around Court’s Invalidation of Discriminatory Voter ID Law

Advocacy groups said Texas’s education campaign was misleading voters into believing that voting would still be more difficult than it is. The reason is that the campaign omits the word “reasonably." That not only ignores the court’s order, but also leaves voters with the erroneous impression that they cannot vote unless they have exhausted every avenue to acquire an ID. The single word may seem a small matter, but the issue is not: More than 600,000 Texans have none of the required IDs.   read more

Dairy Producers Hit with Minor Penalties after "Premature Slaughter" of 500,000 Cows

The dairy producers were accused of conspiring to prematurely slaughter more than 500,000 cows between 2003 and 2010 to limit the production of raw milk and drive up prices for yogurt, sour cream and other dairy products. "The biggest dairy producers in the country, responsible for almost 70 percent of the nation's milk, conspired together in a classic price-fixing scheme, forcing higher prices for a basic food item onto honest consumers and families," said attorney Steve Berman.   read more

U.S. to Help Laos Clear Unexploded Bombs Leftover From Vietnam War

Declaring a “moral obligation” to heal the wounds of a secret war, President Barack Obama on Tuesday pledged help to clear away the 80 million unexploded bombs the U.S. dropped on Laos a generation ago — more than 10 for every one of the country’s 7 million people. Obama announced the U.S. would double its spending on bomb-clearing efforts to $90 million over three years.   read more

Who Is Pentagon Going to Call to Fill Shortage of Air Force Drone Pilots? Private Contractors.

“This is opening up a whole new can of worms — we have seen problems with security contractors on the battlefield since 9/11, and there’s been an improvement in oversight in that area, but that came after a decade of problems,” said law professor Laura A. Dickinson. “With drones, this is a new area where we already do not have a lot of transparency and with contractors operating drones there’s no clearly defined regime of oversight and accountability.”   read more

Journalists and Human Rights Activists among Targets of Nations Using Tech Firm’s Smartphone Spy Tools

The NSO Group sells surveillance tools that can capture all smartphone activity, such as a user’s location and personal contacts. They can even turn the phone into a secret recording device. Last month, its spyware tried to gain access to the iPhone of a human-rights activist in the UAE. A second target was a Mexican journalist who wrote about corruption in the Mexican government. “There’s no check on this ... governments can essentially use them however they want," said Bill Marczak.   read more
1 to 16 of about 2810 News
1 2 3 ... 176 Next