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1 to 16 of about 2665 News
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No Criminal Punishment for U.S. Military Personnel in Afghan Hospital Bombing

A U.S. aerial gunship attack on a hospital in Afghanistan that killed 42 people occurred because of human errors, process mistakes and equipment failures, and none of the aircrew or U.S. ground troops knew the target was a hospital, a top U.S. general said Friday. Sixteen military members have been disciplined for their roles in the tragedy, Gen. Joseph Votel said. None face criminal charges.   read more

Obama Will Ban Questions on Criminal History for Some Government Jobs

While checks of criminal histories have become routine in the public and private sectors, a regulation being proposed by the Obama administration would remove a barrier that discourages many freed prisoners from applying for jobs. The rule would prevent supervisors interviewing applicants for about half of all federal positions from asking about a job seeker’s criminal or credit history until a conditional offer is made.   read more

Invasion of the Hedge Funders: 6 Men Gave $10 Million to Presidential Super PACs in One Month

Wall Street dominates political giving. But it’s these donors, a much smaller subset of the securities sector, who play with the biggest money. The fact that hedge fund money continued to flood the presidential race after one of the donors’ favorite candidates — Rubio — dropped out would be surprising were it not for the anti-Donald Trump movement. For this group, there’s still work to be done with their money — namely, beating back Trump’s ascension to the Republican nomination.   read more

New Evidence Linking Bladder Cancer to Agent Orange Gives Vietnam Vets Hope in Fight for VA Benefits

Vet Brian Sweeney grew emotional after a reporter read him details of the new bladder cancer research. Sweeney recalled in Vietnam once driving through a misty fog of chemicals so thick he had to stop the vehicle and turn around. “I didn’t know it at the time, but that was probably Agent Orange,” he said. When he went to the VA to see if he could receive benefits, the claims specialist “pretty much told me I wasn’t eligible because Agent Orange doesn’t cause bladder cancer.”   read more

Drug Industry Shrugs Off Widespread Criticism and Keeps Raising Drug Prices

Drugmakers have been enduring withering criticism over the rising cost of drugs. It does not seem to be working. They've raised prices on brand-name drugs by double-digit percentages since the start of the year, and list prices increased more than 12%, in line with the trend over the five previous years. One of the cruelties of drug pricing is that the burden falls most heavily on those least able to pay it. Uninsured patients often must pay the list price of a drug.   read more

Criminal Element in Republican Politicians is Alive and Well—and No Big Deal—in Texas

"Texans don't generally expect a lot of their politicians," said political scientist Cal Jillson. "Politicians often get off because the laws they are accused of violating are so poorly written. They have holes in them big enough to drive a truck through ... They'd rather have this guy who agrees with their politics, under indictment than someone else who is not beholden to them. What that says about Texas is that the state is currently run by [Republicans]."   read more

About-Face on Privacy Seen in Former National Security Officials Who Are Now in Pay of Tech Firms

In their years as top national security officials, Michael Hayden and Michael Chertoff were fierce advocates of using spying powers to pry into intelligence data. But today, their jobs have changed, and so, apparently, have their views on privacy. Both now work with tech companies and back Apple — not the FBI. They and other prominent former officials now support Apple and the impenetrable “end-to-end encryption” during a furious national debate over the balance between privacy and security.   read more

Long-term Damage to Republican Party Fundraising Seen from Trump’s Self-Funded Campaign

He often brags that he is paying for his campaign, saying, “I don’t need anybody’s money.” But Donald Trump’s disregard for fundraising by email, building lists of small donors and assembling a digital operation could hamstring him as a general-election candidate and do lasting damage to the Republican Party, strategists say. Trump has emailed no mass requests for contributions. Rather, he has passively harvested the contact information of his website visitors and merchandise customers.   read more

As the Rich Outlive the Poor, Social Security’s Safety Net Shifts from Poor to Rich

A large body of research shows that the rich live longer — and that the life span gap between rich and poor is growing. And that means that the progressive ideal built into the design of Social Security is, gradually, being thwarted. In some circumstances, the program can actually be regressive, offering richer benefits to those who are already affluent. For anyone who believes that it’s important for the Social Security program to remain progressive, the life-span shifts have big implications.   read more

Surveillance Court Finds U.S. Spy Agencies’ Improper Handling of Data “Disturbing”

A top-secret federal court has called the NSA and FBI's retention of personal information "disturbing and disappointing," and ordered them to reveal how they will destroy such information going forward. The court said the NSA may have broken the law by failing to redact information collected about its targets online. Judge Hogan also singled out the FBI, ordering it to submit a report containing each instance in which it places Americans under surveillance to "extract foreign intelligence."   read more

Slave and Abolitionist Harriet Tubman to Replace Slave Owner and U.S. President Andrew Jackson on $20 Bill

Not since 1929 has American currency undergone such a far-reaching change. The remaking of the nation’s paper currency may well have captured a historical moment for a multicultural, multiethnic and multiracial nation moving contentiously through the early years of a new century. Tubman, an African-American and a Union spy during the Civil War, would bump Jackson — a white man known as much for his persecution of Native Americans as for his war heroics — to the back of the $20.   read more

In Heavily Censored Ruling, Judge Rejects Challenge to Warrantless FBI Searches of Americans’ Emails

Hogan’s ruling is notable because some lawmakers want to require government agencies to get a warrant before searching the raw repository of emails for an American’s name or email address. Bipartisan majorities in the House have twice passed such a proposal in the last two years. The ruling was also the first time that the intelligence court has reviewed the surveillance program with contributions from an outside “friend of the court,” rather than hearing arguments from the government alone.   read more

European Nations Move to Corporate Transparency While U.S. Clings to Veil of Secrecy

The biggest European economies announced a plan to share information about owners of shell companies. But there is one major player that is coming up short, and that is the U.S., which in 2015 ranked third in a financial secrecy index. U.S. failure to respond to the worldwide clamor for financial accountability looks hypocritical from afar, considering the U.S.’s aggressive extraterritorial pursuit of foreign companies that breaks its laws and its demands that foreign banks provide information   read more

Health Care Law Brought Historic Increases in Coverage to Minorities, Immigrants and the Poor

So many low-income people gained coverage that it halted the decades-long expansion of the gap between the haves and the have-nots in the American health insurance system. Hispanics accounted for nearly a third of the increase--the single largest share of any racial or ethnic group. Low-wage workers, who did not have enough clout in the labor market to demand insurance, saw sharp increases. Coverage rates jumped for cooks, dishwashers, waiters, hairdressers and cashiers.   read more

New Arms Race Focuses on Smaller Nuclear Weapons More Likely to Be Used

The U.S., Russia and China are aggressively pursuing a new generation of smaller, less destructive nuclear weapons. The buildups threaten to revive a Cold War-era arms race and unsettle the balance of destructive force among nations that has kept the nuclear peace for more than a half-century. The concern is that the precision and less-destructive nature of these new weapons raises the temptation to use them. “We are witnessing the opening salvos of an arms race,” said analyst James Acton.   read more

Angry 9/11 Families See Obama Capitulation to Saudi Threat Over Congressional Bill on 9/11 Lawsuits

Saudi Arabia has told the U.S. that it will sell off hundreds of billions of dollars’ worth of American assets it holds if Congress passes a bill that would allow the Saudi government to be held responsible in U.S. courts for any role in the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. The Obama administration has lobbied Congress to block the bill’s passage. “It’s stunning to think that our government would back the Saudis over its own citizens,” said Mindy Kleinberg, whose husband died in the 9/11 attacks.   read more
1 to 16 of about 2665 News
1 2 3 ... 167 Next

Top Stories

1 to 16 of about 2665 News
1 2 3 ... 167 Next

No Criminal Punishment for U.S. Military Personnel in Afghan Hospital Bombing

A U.S. aerial gunship attack on a hospital in Afghanistan that killed 42 people occurred because of human errors, process mistakes and equipment failures, and none of the aircrew or U.S. ground troops knew the target was a hospital, a top U.S. general said Friday. Sixteen military members have been disciplined for their roles in the tragedy, Gen. Joseph Votel said. None face criminal charges.   read more

Obama Will Ban Questions on Criminal History for Some Government Jobs

While checks of criminal histories have become routine in the public and private sectors, a regulation being proposed by the Obama administration would remove a barrier that discourages many freed prisoners from applying for jobs. The rule would prevent supervisors interviewing applicants for about half of all federal positions from asking about a job seeker’s criminal or credit history until a conditional offer is made.   read more

Invasion of the Hedge Funders: 6 Men Gave $10 Million to Presidential Super PACs in One Month

Wall Street dominates political giving. But it’s these donors, a much smaller subset of the securities sector, who play with the biggest money. The fact that hedge fund money continued to flood the presidential race after one of the donors’ favorite candidates — Rubio — dropped out would be surprising were it not for the anti-Donald Trump movement. For this group, there’s still work to be done with their money — namely, beating back Trump’s ascension to the Republican nomination.   read more

New Evidence Linking Bladder Cancer to Agent Orange Gives Vietnam Vets Hope in Fight for VA Benefits

Vet Brian Sweeney grew emotional after a reporter read him details of the new bladder cancer research. Sweeney recalled in Vietnam once driving through a misty fog of chemicals so thick he had to stop the vehicle and turn around. “I didn’t know it at the time, but that was probably Agent Orange,” he said. When he went to the VA to see if he could receive benefits, the claims specialist “pretty much told me I wasn’t eligible because Agent Orange doesn’t cause bladder cancer.”   read more

Drug Industry Shrugs Off Widespread Criticism and Keeps Raising Drug Prices

Drugmakers have been enduring withering criticism over the rising cost of drugs. It does not seem to be working. They've raised prices on brand-name drugs by double-digit percentages since the start of the year, and list prices increased more than 12%, in line with the trend over the five previous years. One of the cruelties of drug pricing is that the burden falls most heavily on those least able to pay it. Uninsured patients often must pay the list price of a drug.   read more

Criminal Element in Republican Politicians is Alive and Well—and No Big Deal—in Texas

"Texans don't generally expect a lot of their politicians," said political scientist Cal Jillson. "Politicians often get off because the laws they are accused of violating are so poorly written. They have holes in them big enough to drive a truck through ... They'd rather have this guy who agrees with their politics, under indictment than someone else who is not beholden to them. What that says about Texas is that the state is currently run by [Republicans]."   read more

About-Face on Privacy Seen in Former National Security Officials Who Are Now in Pay of Tech Firms

In their years as top national security officials, Michael Hayden and Michael Chertoff were fierce advocates of using spying powers to pry into intelligence data. But today, their jobs have changed, and so, apparently, have their views on privacy. Both now work with tech companies and back Apple — not the FBI. They and other prominent former officials now support Apple and the impenetrable “end-to-end encryption” during a furious national debate over the balance between privacy and security.   read more

Long-term Damage to Republican Party Fundraising Seen from Trump’s Self-Funded Campaign

He often brags that he is paying for his campaign, saying, “I don’t need anybody’s money.” But Donald Trump’s disregard for fundraising by email, building lists of small donors and assembling a digital operation could hamstring him as a general-election candidate and do lasting damage to the Republican Party, strategists say. Trump has emailed no mass requests for contributions. Rather, he has passively harvested the contact information of his website visitors and merchandise customers.   read more

As the Rich Outlive the Poor, Social Security’s Safety Net Shifts from Poor to Rich

A large body of research shows that the rich live longer — and that the life span gap between rich and poor is growing. And that means that the progressive ideal built into the design of Social Security is, gradually, being thwarted. In some circumstances, the program can actually be regressive, offering richer benefits to those who are already affluent. For anyone who believes that it’s important for the Social Security program to remain progressive, the life-span shifts have big implications.   read more

Surveillance Court Finds U.S. Spy Agencies’ Improper Handling of Data “Disturbing”

A top-secret federal court has called the NSA and FBI's retention of personal information "disturbing and disappointing," and ordered them to reveal how they will destroy such information going forward. The court said the NSA may have broken the law by failing to redact information collected about its targets online. Judge Hogan also singled out the FBI, ordering it to submit a report containing each instance in which it places Americans under surveillance to "extract foreign intelligence."   read more

Slave and Abolitionist Harriet Tubman to Replace Slave Owner and U.S. President Andrew Jackson on $20 Bill

Not since 1929 has American currency undergone such a far-reaching change. The remaking of the nation’s paper currency may well have captured a historical moment for a multicultural, multiethnic and multiracial nation moving contentiously through the early years of a new century. Tubman, an African-American and a Union spy during the Civil War, would bump Jackson — a white man known as much for his persecution of Native Americans as for his war heroics — to the back of the $20.   read more

In Heavily Censored Ruling, Judge Rejects Challenge to Warrantless FBI Searches of Americans’ Emails

Hogan’s ruling is notable because some lawmakers want to require government agencies to get a warrant before searching the raw repository of emails for an American’s name or email address. Bipartisan majorities in the House have twice passed such a proposal in the last two years. The ruling was also the first time that the intelligence court has reviewed the surveillance program with contributions from an outside “friend of the court,” rather than hearing arguments from the government alone.   read more

European Nations Move to Corporate Transparency While U.S. Clings to Veil of Secrecy

The biggest European economies announced a plan to share information about owners of shell companies. But there is one major player that is coming up short, and that is the U.S., which in 2015 ranked third in a financial secrecy index. U.S. failure to respond to the worldwide clamor for financial accountability looks hypocritical from afar, considering the U.S.’s aggressive extraterritorial pursuit of foreign companies that breaks its laws and its demands that foreign banks provide information   read more

Health Care Law Brought Historic Increases in Coverage to Minorities, Immigrants and the Poor

So many low-income people gained coverage that it halted the decades-long expansion of the gap between the haves and the have-nots in the American health insurance system. Hispanics accounted for nearly a third of the increase--the single largest share of any racial or ethnic group. Low-wage workers, who did not have enough clout in the labor market to demand insurance, saw sharp increases. Coverage rates jumped for cooks, dishwashers, waiters, hairdressers and cashiers.   read more

New Arms Race Focuses on Smaller Nuclear Weapons More Likely to Be Used

The U.S., Russia and China are aggressively pursuing a new generation of smaller, less destructive nuclear weapons. The buildups threaten to revive a Cold War-era arms race and unsettle the balance of destructive force among nations that has kept the nuclear peace for more than a half-century. The concern is that the precision and less-destructive nature of these new weapons raises the temptation to use them. “We are witnessing the opening salvos of an arms race,” said analyst James Acton.   read more

Angry 9/11 Families See Obama Capitulation to Saudi Threat Over Congressional Bill on 9/11 Lawsuits

Saudi Arabia has told the U.S. that it will sell off hundreds of billions of dollars’ worth of American assets it holds if Congress passes a bill that would allow the Saudi government to be held responsible in U.S. courts for any role in the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. The Obama administration has lobbied Congress to block the bill’s passage. “It’s stunning to think that our government would back the Saudis over its own citizens,” said Mindy Kleinberg, whose husband died in the 9/11 attacks.   read more
1 to 16 of about 2665 News
1 2 3 ... 167 Next