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Supreme Court Hits Brakes on Obama’s Clean Power Plan

The surprising move is a blow to the administration and a victory for the coalition of 27 mostly Republican-led states and industry opponents that call the regulations "an unprecedented power grab." A 5-4 majority issued the temporary freeze. The Obama administration's plan aims to stave off the worst predicted impacts of climate change by reducing carbon dioxide emissions at existing power plants by about one-third by 2030.   read more

Federal Advisory Panel on Pain has 6 Members with Links to Drugmakers

Two panelists work for the Center for Practical Bioethics, which receives funding from multiple drugmakers, including OxyContin-maker Purdue Pharma, which donated $100,000 in 2013. One panelist holds a chair at the center created by a $1.5-million donation from Purdue. The other received more than $8,660 in speaking fees, meals, travel and other payments from pain drugmakers. The legislation creating the panel was championed for years by drugmakers.   read more

It’s Not Just Flint: Water Supplies in many U.S. Cities are Contaminated by Lead

In Flint, Michigan, as many as 8,000 children under age 6 were exposed to unsafe levels of lead. But it is hardly the only such occurrence. Unsafe levels of lead have turned up in tap water in city after city — in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Mississippi — as well as in scores of other places in recent years. Such episodes are unsettling reminders of what experts say are holes in the safety net of rules and procedures intended to keep water not just lead-free, but free of all poisons.   read more

U.S. Housing Agency Considers Booting Out Public Housing Residents with Improved Income

A HUD I.G. report has found that more than 25,000 of the 1.1 million U.S. families in public housing - about 2.5% - earn too much money to qualify for housing subsidies. "The families identified by HUD ... met the income limits at the time of admission...but their income now exceeds such income limits," HUD said. The agency added that rising income is good because it is a sign that a family is on its way to self-sufficiency, but when it's temporary it shouldn't be used to end assistance.   read more

Twitter Pulls Plug on 125,000 Extremists’ Accounts

Twitter’s disclosure of the number of terrorist account suspensions sets it apart from its social media peers. Facebook regularly discloses the number of government requests it has received for content takedowns on its service, but the company does not break out the removal of terror-related content. YouTube has given more than 200 outside organizations the ability to “flag” potentially harmful content, which YouTube can then review and remove.   read more

Legal U.S. Marijuana Sales Hit $5.4 Billion in 2015

The promises of the industry are potentially far-reaching and attracting notice on Wall Street. As more states legalize marijuana sales, analysts are weighing the stock market benefits of new businesses as cannabis goes corporate. Funds are considering the ethics of investing in marijuana. Parents are even debating whether to allow their children to buy the stocks. Lucrative legal side businesses are spinning off, like climate systems for growers and child-resistant marijuana bags.   read more

U.S. House Republicans Pass Legislation to Undercut Federal Anti-Fraud Banking Initiative

The legislation "would defang the Justice Department," said Rep. Nancy Pelosi, the most powerful Democrat in the House. "Federal prosecutors would be unable to prosecute fraud committed by big banks under FIRREA. This bill on the floor today says you cannot charge banks. The only investigation you can do of banks is if somebody does damage to the bank. Can you imagine that - with all the mortgage fraud that went on in our country?"   read more

U.S. Railroads Unable to Meet Deadline for Installing Safety Technology

Three of the biggest U.S. freight railroads have told the government they won't meet a 2018 deadline to start using safety technology intended to prevent accidents like the deadly derailment of an Amtrak train in Philadelphia last May. After a 2008 train collision that killed 25 people, Congress required railroads to start using the expensive technology on all tracks that carry passenger trains or those used to haul toxic liquids. Four commuter railroads also say they'll miss the deadline.   read more

Documents Reveal Drug Firms’ Schemes to Maximize Profits on Cancer, AIDS and Heart Drugs

The House committee reviewed more than 75,000 pages of documents from drugmaker Valeant. The paperwork shows that CEO J. Michael Pearson decided to buy two life-saving heart drugs, Nitropress and Isuprel, to dramatically hike prices and drive up his company's revenue and profit. The drugs generated $547 million in revenue and around $351 million in profits last year alone. The memo said the drugmaker also more than tripled the prices on over 20 additional U.S. products in 2014 and 2015.   read more

Convicted Felons Can Run for Office in Louisiana

Felons can run for public office in Louisiana because the state Senate improperly amended the state constitution in 1998 to prevent it, the Louisiana Supreme Court ruled. Under state Senate Bill No. 321, of 1997, unpardoned, convicted felons were to be prohibited from seeking a municipal or state office.The bill was amended in the Senate, providing an exception for felons who had completed their sentence more than 15 years before the candidate-qualifying date.   read more

U.S. and Britain Used Hacking Operation to Spy on Israeli Air Force

The spy operation, codenamed "Anarchist", was run out of a Cyprus base and targeted other Middle East states too. "We know that the Americans spy on the whole world, and also on us, also on their friends," said Israeli Energy Minister Yuval Steinitz. "But still, it is disappointing, inter alia because, going back decades already, we have not spied nor collected intelligence nor hacked encryptions in the United States."   read more

Civil Liberties Group Sues Fed over Counter-Terrorism Program Seen as Damaging to Muslims

The Brennan Center said the program relies on a flawed approach to counter terrorism that "all but ensures" it will stigmatize Muslims and reinforce Islamophobic stereotypes, suppress dissent, and sow discord in communities. The program has had bureaucratic infighting, as some experts have advocated enlisting ultra-orthodox, nonviolent Islamic activists and scholars in deradicalization efforts. Other experts have argued that such activists sometimes help indoctrinate violent militants.   read more

Court Orders DuPont to Go to Trial 40 Times a Year to Face Thousands of Toxic Chemical Victim Lawsuits

The initial 40 trials will be selected from lawsuits brought by individuals who say they contracted kidney or testicular cancer from chemical C-8, which was found in their drinking water. "People shouldn’t have to wait ten years for a trial," Judge Sargus said. The lawsuits center on claims DuPont used C-8 at a West Virginia plant for decades despite knowing it was toxic and had been found in nearby drinking water.   read more

U.S. Health Agency Accused of Releasing Lone Migrant Children to Traffickers

Sen. Rob Portman spoke about the problem of "sponsors for hire" who help human traffickers exploit unaccompanied minors entering the U.S. The report centers on a case in which the Dept. of Health and Human Services released at least six unaccompanied children into the hands of human traffickers in Marion, Ohio. The traffickers forced the children to work 12 hours a day on egg farms in and around Marion, and crammed them into or even under a small, white trailer, investigators found.   read more

U.S. Plans to Replenish Saudi Missiles Used in Air Strikes on Yemen that U.N. Says May Constitute Crimes against Humanity

The U.N. report sparked calls by rights groups for the U.S. and Britain to halt sales of weapons to Saudi Arabia that could be used in such attacks. The panel of experts documented 119 coalition sorties "relating to violations of international humanitarian law" and said that "many attacks involved multiple air strikes on multiple civilian objects." U.S. and Saudi officials are working on a $1.29 billion sale of U.S. munitions to replenish bombs and missiles used by the Saudis in Yemen.   read more

Court Approves Shooting Down of Migratory Birds Flying Near NYC Airports to Protect Planes

Some conservation groups believe authorities should trap and relocate birds where possible, rather than kill them. Friends of Animals said the latest permit was too broad because it allowed killings of migratory birds regardless of species, including those that are easy to catch. But Judge José Cabranes said the Fish and Wildlife Service had authority to issue the permit and that the permit authorized using lethal force.   read more
1 to 16 of about 2585 News
1 2 3 ... 162 Next

Top Stories

1 to 16 of about 2585 News
1 2 3 ... 162 Next

Supreme Court Hits Brakes on Obama’s Clean Power Plan

The surprising move is a blow to the administration and a victory for the coalition of 27 mostly Republican-led states and industry opponents that call the regulations "an unprecedented power grab." A 5-4 majority issued the temporary freeze. The Obama administration's plan aims to stave off the worst predicted impacts of climate change by reducing carbon dioxide emissions at existing power plants by about one-third by 2030.   read more

Federal Advisory Panel on Pain has 6 Members with Links to Drugmakers

Two panelists work for the Center for Practical Bioethics, which receives funding from multiple drugmakers, including OxyContin-maker Purdue Pharma, which donated $100,000 in 2013. One panelist holds a chair at the center created by a $1.5-million donation from Purdue. The other received more than $8,660 in speaking fees, meals, travel and other payments from pain drugmakers. The legislation creating the panel was championed for years by drugmakers.   read more

It’s Not Just Flint: Water Supplies in many U.S. Cities are Contaminated by Lead

In Flint, Michigan, as many as 8,000 children under age 6 were exposed to unsafe levels of lead. But it is hardly the only such occurrence. Unsafe levels of lead have turned up in tap water in city after city — in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Mississippi — as well as in scores of other places in recent years. Such episodes are unsettling reminders of what experts say are holes in the safety net of rules and procedures intended to keep water not just lead-free, but free of all poisons.   read more

U.S. Housing Agency Considers Booting Out Public Housing Residents with Improved Income

A HUD I.G. report has found that more than 25,000 of the 1.1 million U.S. families in public housing - about 2.5% - earn too much money to qualify for housing subsidies. "The families identified by HUD ... met the income limits at the time of admission...but their income now exceeds such income limits," HUD said. The agency added that rising income is good because it is a sign that a family is on its way to self-sufficiency, but when it's temporary it shouldn't be used to end assistance.   read more

Twitter Pulls Plug on 125,000 Extremists’ Accounts

Twitter’s disclosure of the number of terrorist account suspensions sets it apart from its social media peers. Facebook regularly discloses the number of government requests it has received for content takedowns on its service, but the company does not break out the removal of terror-related content. YouTube has given more than 200 outside organizations the ability to “flag” potentially harmful content, which YouTube can then review and remove.   read more

Legal U.S. Marijuana Sales Hit $5.4 Billion in 2015

The promises of the industry are potentially far-reaching and attracting notice on Wall Street. As more states legalize marijuana sales, analysts are weighing the stock market benefits of new businesses as cannabis goes corporate. Funds are considering the ethics of investing in marijuana. Parents are even debating whether to allow their children to buy the stocks. Lucrative legal side businesses are spinning off, like climate systems for growers and child-resistant marijuana bags.   read more

U.S. House Republicans Pass Legislation to Undercut Federal Anti-Fraud Banking Initiative

The legislation "would defang the Justice Department," said Rep. Nancy Pelosi, the most powerful Democrat in the House. "Federal prosecutors would be unable to prosecute fraud committed by big banks under FIRREA. This bill on the floor today says you cannot charge banks. The only investigation you can do of banks is if somebody does damage to the bank. Can you imagine that - with all the mortgage fraud that went on in our country?"   read more

U.S. Railroads Unable to Meet Deadline for Installing Safety Technology

Three of the biggest U.S. freight railroads have told the government they won't meet a 2018 deadline to start using safety technology intended to prevent accidents like the deadly derailment of an Amtrak train in Philadelphia last May. After a 2008 train collision that killed 25 people, Congress required railroads to start using the expensive technology on all tracks that carry passenger trains or those used to haul toxic liquids. Four commuter railroads also say they'll miss the deadline.   read more

Documents Reveal Drug Firms’ Schemes to Maximize Profits on Cancer, AIDS and Heart Drugs

The House committee reviewed more than 75,000 pages of documents from drugmaker Valeant. The paperwork shows that CEO J. Michael Pearson decided to buy two life-saving heart drugs, Nitropress and Isuprel, to dramatically hike prices and drive up his company's revenue and profit. The drugs generated $547 million in revenue and around $351 million in profits last year alone. The memo said the drugmaker also more than tripled the prices on over 20 additional U.S. products in 2014 and 2015.   read more

Convicted Felons Can Run for Office in Louisiana

Felons can run for public office in Louisiana because the state Senate improperly amended the state constitution in 1998 to prevent it, the Louisiana Supreme Court ruled. Under state Senate Bill No. 321, of 1997, unpardoned, convicted felons were to be prohibited from seeking a municipal or state office.The bill was amended in the Senate, providing an exception for felons who had completed their sentence more than 15 years before the candidate-qualifying date.   read more

U.S. and Britain Used Hacking Operation to Spy on Israeli Air Force

The spy operation, codenamed "Anarchist", was run out of a Cyprus base and targeted other Middle East states too. "We know that the Americans spy on the whole world, and also on us, also on their friends," said Israeli Energy Minister Yuval Steinitz. "But still, it is disappointing, inter alia because, going back decades already, we have not spied nor collected intelligence nor hacked encryptions in the United States."   read more

Civil Liberties Group Sues Fed over Counter-Terrorism Program Seen as Damaging to Muslims

The Brennan Center said the program relies on a flawed approach to counter terrorism that "all but ensures" it will stigmatize Muslims and reinforce Islamophobic stereotypes, suppress dissent, and sow discord in communities. The program has had bureaucratic infighting, as some experts have advocated enlisting ultra-orthodox, nonviolent Islamic activists and scholars in deradicalization efforts. Other experts have argued that such activists sometimes help indoctrinate violent militants.   read more

Court Orders DuPont to Go to Trial 40 Times a Year to Face Thousands of Toxic Chemical Victim Lawsuits

The initial 40 trials will be selected from lawsuits brought by individuals who say they contracted kidney or testicular cancer from chemical C-8, which was found in their drinking water. "People shouldn’t have to wait ten years for a trial," Judge Sargus said. The lawsuits center on claims DuPont used C-8 at a West Virginia plant for decades despite knowing it was toxic and had been found in nearby drinking water.   read more

U.S. Health Agency Accused of Releasing Lone Migrant Children to Traffickers

Sen. Rob Portman spoke about the problem of "sponsors for hire" who help human traffickers exploit unaccompanied minors entering the U.S. The report centers on a case in which the Dept. of Health and Human Services released at least six unaccompanied children into the hands of human traffickers in Marion, Ohio. The traffickers forced the children to work 12 hours a day on egg farms in and around Marion, and crammed them into or even under a small, white trailer, investigators found.   read more

U.S. Plans to Replenish Saudi Missiles Used in Air Strikes on Yemen that U.N. Says May Constitute Crimes against Humanity

The U.N. report sparked calls by rights groups for the U.S. and Britain to halt sales of weapons to Saudi Arabia that could be used in such attacks. The panel of experts documented 119 coalition sorties "relating to violations of international humanitarian law" and said that "many attacks involved multiple air strikes on multiple civilian objects." U.S. and Saudi officials are working on a $1.29 billion sale of U.S. munitions to replenish bombs and missiles used by the Saudis in Yemen.   read more

Court Approves Shooting Down of Migratory Birds Flying Near NYC Airports to Protect Planes

Some conservation groups believe authorities should trap and relocate birds where possible, rather than kill them. Friends of Animals said the latest permit was too broad because it allowed killings of migratory birds regardless of species, including those that are easy to catch. But Judge José Cabranes said the Fish and Wildlife Service had authority to issue the permit and that the permit authorized using lethal force.   read more
1 to 16 of about 2585 News
1 2 3 ... 162 Next