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Evicted to Make Way for a U.S. Military Base almost 50 Years Ago, Chagos Islanders May Finally Return Home

The former inhabitants of Diego Garcia who were kicked off their island home by the British so the U.S. could develop a key military base may soon get to return home after nearly 50 years in exile. Diego Garcia was created as strategic U.S. military base during the Cold War. It also may have been involved in the CIA’s secret rendition program, serving as a refueling site for clandestine flights carrying detainees and possible “black site” where suspected terrorists were interrogated.   read more

Conservatives Versus Soldiers in Case of Lieutenant Convicted of Murder

Lorance started with tough rhetoric the day he took over. “He looks like the all-American sweetheart when you meet him,” said Staff Sgt. Daniel Williams. “But he was just so aggressive. One of the first things he said to us was, we are going to go in Gestapo-style with night raids, pull people out of houses, make them afraid of us.” Lorance ordered sharpshooters to fire rounds into a village, striking near civilians. In one case, he told a sharpshooter to torment a man by firing near his head.   read more

Chicago Police Accused of Running Secret Interrogation Center

A warehouse on Chicago’s west side known as Homan Square has been in use for years by special police units as the equivalent of a “black site” interrogation center, reminiscent of those used by the CIA. Those questioned there, even children as young as 15, are denied their constitutional protections and are reportedly beaten and shackled. People brought there aren't even logged in. "When you go in, no one knows what’s happened to you," said Brian Church.   read more

Spare Parts are a Windfall for Weapons Makers

A 2014 report by the Pentagon’s inspector general revealed the agency’s “hardware store”—the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA)—paid one manufacturer, Bell Helicopter, $9 million more than it should have for commercial parts. The overpayments to Bell last year averaged out to 392%.The report also found that American taxpayers aren’t finished overpaying for parts. “DLA may overpay as much as $2.6 million over the next 12 months on future orders under this contract,” the report said.   read more

Climate Change Denying Scientist Received more than $1 Million from Oil, Gas and Coal Industries

When conservatives have argued climate change is not a human-produced problem, they often have exalted the work of scientist “Willie” Soon. But now it has been revealed that Soon received support from Exxon Mobil and the American Petroleum Institute, often blamed for generating greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming. Soon did not disclose this financial backing while publishing numerous scientific papers, which would indicate he was trying to hide this obvious conflict of interest.   read more

The Latest Spying Revelations: SIM Cards and Hard Drives

GCHQ planted malware on Gemalto computers, which enabled the agency to steal the encryption keys the company put on SIMs sold to AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile and other wireless companies around the world. Having the key makes it a snap to read all the information, whether voice or data, coming from a phone.   read more

FBI Director not Invited to Obama’s Conference on Violent Extremism

Obama administration officials said Comey wasn’t invited because they didn’t want the conference to focus on law enforcement. However law enforcement officials from other countries, including Aleksandr Bortnikov, the head of Russia’s Federal Security Service, the offspring of the KGB, did attend the meeting in Washington.   read more

U.S. Agrees to Minor Payment for Navy’s Damage to Philippine World Heritage-Listed Coral Reef Park

Washington agreed to pay $1.9 million for work to mitigate the damage caused to the coral reef. But an environmental group claims it will cost between $17 million and $27 million. "The said financial compensation is not enough to...absolve the U.S. Navy for the crime [it committed] in Tubbataha. The U.S. Navy not only incurred considerable damage to our world heritage site, they also clearly violated our Philippine sovereignty and laws,” said Clemente Bautista.   read more

U.S. Military Court Overturns Terrorism Conviction of Tortured Australian

“Hicks was the first prisoner to be convicted by a Guantánamo military commission, by virtue of his guilty plea, and he’s now the first to have his conviction vacated,” said McClatchy. “I was subjected to five and a half years of physical and psychological torture that I will now live with always,” said Hicks. He claims to have been subjected to waterboarding, beatings, and forced drugging. Threatened with being sent to Egypt to be tortured, he agreed to the condition for release—plead guilty.   read more

Obama Approves Sales of Armed Drones to Foreign Governments besides U.K.

With the encouragement of U.S. defense contractors, the Obama administration has, for the first time, decided to allow the export of armed drones to countries other than the United Kingdom. The foreign governments next in line to acquire weaponized unmanned aerial vehicles weren't identified. But it was reported that “allied nations from Italy to Turkey to the Persian Gulf region” have wanted to get their hands on drones that can attack targets.   read more

FBI Still Searching for Living Suspects in 1946 Mass Lynching

Federal authorities are racing against time. The remaining suspects in the shooting of four African Americans are currently in their 80s and 90s. The murders took place on July 25, 1946 at the Moore’s Ford Bridge, where two black couples were forced out of a car, tied up and shot 60 times by a white mob. A new report by the Equal Justice Initiative says the state of Georgia had more lynchings, 586, from 1877 to 1950 than any other state.   read more

In Battle against ISIS, U.S. Reverts to Not Counting Civilian Casualties

The U.S. ambassador to Iraq said U.S. and coalition strikes have killed 6,000 ISIS fighters. “That no civilians could be among that figure strikes observers and even military officials as all but impossible,” wrote Yousef. Particularly with 2,300 strikes delivering 8,200 missiles. “Not only does it reinforce the view that the lives of ordinary Iraqis and Syrians...do not matter, it flies in the face of the military’s own recommendations," wrote Gregory and Edney-Browne.   read more

Since 9/11, Muslim Terrorists have Killed 49 in the U.S.; Since 2009, Non-Muslim Terrorists have Killed 44

Among the attacks by non-Muslims mentioned in the SPLC report are the April 2012 killings of three African-Americans in Tulsa, Oklahoma, by racists Jake England and Alvin Watts; the August 2012 killing of six Sikhs by neo-Nazi skinhead Wade Michael Page in Oak Creek, Wisconsin: and the June 2014 shooting deaths of two police officers and a third man who tried to intervene by anti-government extremists Jerad and Amanda Miller in Las Vegas.   read more

California Loses Earthquake Crown to Oklahoma

Oklahoma rocketed to the top of the earthquake charts in 2014, tripling the number of 3.0 shakers in California, the one-time undisputed champion of the United States. But like the steroid scandal that tarnished baseball and ruined the statistical landscape in the 1990s, many scientists are pointing to the introduction of performance-enhancing chemicals to explain the recent 40-fold-plus increase in quakes—in Oklahoma’s case, hydraulic fracturing (fracking).   read more

Merck MMR Vaccine Failed to Protect Thousands from Mumps

Pharmaceutical giant Merck is being accused falsifying data so it could sell a vaccine that wasn’t as effective as advertised and didn’t work for thousands of individuals. Merck is being sued by two virologists who say Merck knowingly faked data about the effectiveness of the vaccine and still put it on the market. Two former Merck employees said in 2010 that the company infused a blood sample with animal antibodies to make it look like the vaccine had elicited increased antibody production.   read more

Medical Journals Close their Eyes when Publishing Research Ruled Fraudulent or Misleading by FDA

In 78 published papers on clinical trials with which the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) found objectionable conditions or practices significant enough to warrant regulatory action, only three mentioned problems with the trials. The violations included researchers falsifying data and occurrences where clinical trial participants should have been ruled ineligible.   read more
1 to 16 of about 2248 News
1 2 3 ... 141 Next

Top Stories

1 to 16 of about 2248 News
1 2 3 ... 141 Next

Evicted to Make Way for a U.S. Military Base almost 50 Years Ago, Chagos Islanders May Finally Return Home

The former inhabitants of Diego Garcia who were kicked off their island home by the British so the U.S. could develop a key military base may soon get to return home after nearly 50 years in exile. Diego Garcia was created as strategic U.S. military base during the Cold War. It also may have been involved in the CIA’s secret rendition program, serving as a refueling site for clandestine flights carrying detainees and possible “black site” where suspected terrorists were interrogated.   read more

Conservatives Versus Soldiers in Case of Lieutenant Convicted of Murder

Lorance started with tough rhetoric the day he took over. “He looks like the all-American sweetheart when you meet him,” said Staff Sgt. Daniel Williams. “But he was just so aggressive. One of the first things he said to us was, we are going to go in Gestapo-style with night raids, pull people out of houses, make them afraid of us.” Lorance ordered sharpshooters to fire rounds into a village, striking near civilians. In one case, he told a sharpshooter to torment a man by firing near his head.   read more

Chicago Police Accused of Running Secret Interrogation Center

A warehouse on Chicago’s west side known as Homan Square has been in use for years by special police units as the equivalent of a “black site” interrogation center, reminiscent of those used by the CIA. Those questioned there, even children as young as 15, are denied their constitutional protections and are reportedly beaten and shackled. People brought there aren't even logged in. "When you go in, no one knows what’s happened to you," said Brian Church.   read more

Spare Parts are a Windfall for Weapons Makers

A 2014 report by the Pentagon’s inspector general revealed the agency’s “hardware store”—the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA)—paid one manufacturer, Bell Helicopter, $9 million more than it should have for commercial parts. The overpayments to Bell last year averaged out to 392%.The report also found that American taxpayers aren’t finished overpaying for parts. “DLA may overpay as much as $2.6 million over the next 12 months on future orders under this contract,” the report said.   read more

Climate Change Denying Scientist Received more than $1 Million from Oil, Gas and Coal Industries

When conservatives have argued climate change is not a human-produced problem, they often have exalted the work of scientist “Willie” Soon. But now it has been revealed that Soon received support from Exxon Mobil and the American Petroleum Institute, often blamed for generating greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming. Soon did not disclose this financial backing while publishing numerous scientific papers, which would indicate he was trying to hide this obvious conflict of interest.   read more

The Latest Spying Revelations: SIM Cards and Hard Drives

GCHQ planted malware on Gemalto computers, which enabled the agency to steal the encryption keys the company put on SIMs sold to AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile and other wireless companies around the world. Having the key makes it a snap to read all the information, whether voice or data, coming from a phone.   read more

FBI Director not Invited to Obama’s Conference on Violent Extremism

Obama administration officials said Comey wasn’t invited because they didn’t want the conference to focus on law enforcement. However law enforcement officials from other countries, including Aleksandr Bortnikov, the head of Russia’s Federal Security Service, the offspring of the KGB, did attend the meeting in Washington.   read more

U.S. Agrees to Minor Payment for Navy’s Damage to Philippine World Heritage-Listed Coral Reef Park

Washington agreed to pay $1.9 million for work to mitigate the damage caused to the coral reef. But an environmental group claims it will cost between $17 million and $27 million. "The said financial compensation is not enough to...absolve the U.S. Navy for the crime [it committed] in Tubbataha. The U.S. Navy not only incurred considerable damage to our world heritage site, they also clearly violated our Philippine sovereignty and laws,” said Clemente Bautista.   read more

U.S. Military Court Overturns Terrorism Conviction of Tortured Australian

“Hicks was the first prisoner to be convicted by a Guantánamo military commission, by virtue of his guilty plea, and he’s now the first to have his conviction vacated,” said McClatchy. “I was subjected to five and a half years of physical and psychological torture that I will now live with always,” said Hicks. He claims to have been subjected to waterboarding, beatings, and forced drugging. Threatened with being sent to Egypt to be tortured, he agreed to the condition for release—plead guilty.   read more

Obama Approves Sales of Armed Drones to Foreign Governments besides U.K.

With the encouragement of U.S. defense contractors, the Obama administration has, for the first time, decided to allow the export of armed drones to countries other than the United Kingdom. The foreign governments next in line to acquire weaponized unmanned aerial vehicles weren't identified. But it was reported that “allied nations from Italy to Turkey to the Persian Gulf region” have wanted to get their hands on drones that can attack targets.   read more

FBI Still Searching for Living Suspects in 1946 Mass Lynching

Federal authorities are racing against time. The remaining suspects in the shooting of four African Americans are currently in their 80s and 90s. The murders took place on July 25, 1946 at the Moore’s Ford Bridge, where two black couples were forced out of a car, tied up and shot 60 times by a white mob. A new report by the Equal Justice Initiative says the state of Georgia had more lynchings, 586, from 1877 to 1950 than any other state.   read more

In Battle against ISIS, U.S. Reverts to Not Counting Civilian Casualties

The U.S. ambassador to Iraq said U.S. and coalition strikes have killed 6,000 ISIS fighters. “That no civilians could be among that figure strikes observers and even military officials as all but impossible,” wrote Yousef. Particularly with 2,300 strikes delivering 8,200 missiles. “Not only does it reinforce the view that the lives of ordinary Iraqis and Syrians...do not matter, it flies in the face of the military’s own recommendations," wrote Gregory and Edney-Browne.   read more

Since 9/11, Muslim Terrorists have Killed 49 in the U.S.; Since 2009, Non-Muslim Terrorists have Killed 44

Among the attacks by non-Muslims mentioned in the SPLC report are the April 2012 killings of three African-Americans in Tulsa, Oklahoma, by racists Jake England and Alvin Watts; the August 2012 killing of six Sikhs by neo-Nazi skinhead Wade Michael Page in Oak Creek, Wisconsin: and the June 2014 shooting deaths of two police officers and a third man who tried to intervene by anti-government extremists Jerad and Amanda Miller in Las Vegas.   read more

California Loses Earthquake Crown to Oklahoma

Oklahoma rocketed to the top of the earthquake charts in 2014, tripling the number of 3.0 shakers in California, the one-time undisputed champion of the United States. But like the steroid scandal that tarnished baseball and ruined the statistical landscape in the 1990s, many scientists are pointing to the introduction of performance-enhancing chemicals to explain the recent 40-fold-plus increase in quakes—in Oklahoma’s case, hydraulic fracturing (fracking).   read more

Merck MMR Vaccine Failed to Protect Thousands from Mumps

Pharmaceutical giant Merck is being accused falsifying data so it could sell a vaccine that wasn’t as effective as advertised and didn’t work for thousands of individuals. Merck is being sued by two virologists who say Merck knowingly faked data about the effectiveness of the vaccine and still put it on the market. Two former Merck employees said in 2010 that the company infused a blood sample with animal antibodies to make it look like the vaccine had elicited increased antibody production.   read more

Medical Journals Close their Eyes when Publishing Research Ruled Fraudulent or Misleading by FDA

In 78 published papers on clinical trials with which the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) found objectionable conditions or practices significant enough to warrant regulatory action, only three mentioned problems with the trials. The violations included researchers falsifying data and occurrences where clinical trial participants should have been ruled ineligible.   read more
1 to 16 of about 2248 News
1 2 3 ... 141 Next