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Guarantee of High Ratings Draws TV Networks toward Media-Hungry Trump over Media-Finicky Clinton

Some network officials concede that Trump can be unreliable, reversing himself on policies from one interview to the next. But they also say that Clinton — who is more reluctant to give interviews to print outlets than to television — is less comfortable interacting with the media, sometimes keeping her out of the conversation. Still, the presence of Trump can be irresistible, especially in an election where viewership and advertising rates have soared, generating tens of millions of dollars.   read more

Billionaires on the March to Control Dissemination of News

Billionaires don't become billionaires by being passive about their interests. Peter Thiel has devoted his almost unlimited means to lawsuits that promise to shutter a news organization he doesn't like. His campaign is in keeping with the pledge his favored candidate for president, Donald Trump, made to ease barriers to lawsuits against journalists. It's the flip side of the media realm’s new coin. Many fellow billionaires gained control of news organizations by buying them or starting them.   read more

Connecticut Oversight Agencies Failed to Investigate Years of Abuse and Neglect in Group Homes for Disabled

In Connecticut, the Dept of Developmental Services is supposed to pass on alarming reports— those that might suggest abuse — to a state agency. But the federal investigation found that the oversight system failed at almost every level. A review of 152 “critical incidents” where residents came to harm found the state failed to follow up on 99% of incidents that should have raised “reasonable suspicions of abuse or neglect,” and that hospital staff failed to do so in all but one of 310 ER visits.   read more

Statue of Liberty and Stonehenge among Landmark Sites Called Vulnerable to Climate Change Effects

Stonehenge eroding under the forces of extreme weather. The city of Venice slowly collapsing into its canals. The gradual flooding of the Statue of Liberty. Images like these, familiar from Hollywood climate-catastrophe thrillers, were evoked by a report released Thursday. That report highlights 31 sites in 29 countries that have already felt some impact from climate change, including well-known tourist destinations like Easter Island and Yellowstone National Park.   read more

Obama Has Overseen the Smallest Reduction in U.S. Nuclear Stockpile of Any Post-Cold War President

The new analysis underscored the striking gap between Obama’s soaring vision of a world without nuclear arms, which he laid out during the first months of his presidency, and the tough geopolitical and bureaucratic realities of getting rid of those weapons. The lack of progress in both arms control and warhead dismantlement also seems to coincide with the administration’s push for sweeping nuclear modernizations and weapons upgrades, estimated to cost up to $1 trillion over three decades.   read more

Antiquated Computers Run U.S. Government, Including Emergency Nuclear Force Messaging on 1970s-Era Floppy Discs

Nonpartisan investigators found that about three-fourths of the $80 billion budget goes to keep aging technology running, and the increasing cost is shortchanging modernization. The computers date back more than 50 years in some cases. "Replacement parts for the system are difficult to find because they are now obsolete," GAO said of the Pentagon's 1970s-era computer system that's used to operate U.S. nuclear forces. Social Security's computer system dates back even farther--to the late 1950s.   read more

Nation’s First Academic Chair for Study of Atheism Established at Miami University

The chair has been established with a $2.2 million donation from Louis Appignani, a retired businessman. “I’m trying to eliminate discrimination against atheists,” he said. "This is a step in that direction." With atheists still often stigmatized and disparaged in this country, it took some persuading for the university to agree to create a chair with the word “atheism” in the title. "That was a deal-breaker for Lou,” Siegel said. “He wasn’t going to do it unless it had the word atheism in it.”   read more

Obama Lets U.S. Companies Arm another Dictatorship

The U.S. is rescinding a decades-old ban on sales of lethal military equipment to Vietnam, President Obama announced on Monday. He insisted it should not be seen as carte blanche for weapons sales. Human rights advocates, who had asked Obama to hold off on lifting the ban until Vietnam had released some political prisoners and promised to stop the police beatings of protesters, condemned the decision. “President Obama just gave Vietnam a reward that they don’t deserve,” said Human Rights Watch.   read more

FDA Accused of Bowing to Drug Industry Pressure in Delaying Generic Drug Risk Warning Labels

In 2011, the Supreme Court ruled that generic drugmakers could not be held liable for failing to warn patients about the risks of their products. People harmed by generics would be unable to sue even as those who had taken the brand-name of the same product won million-dollar judgments. Those people included the family of Kira Gilbert, who died at 22 of a heart attack after taking a generic of painkiller Darvon. Her family’s lawsuit was dismissed in 2012 because of the Supreme Court ruling.   read more

Segregation Found to be Worsening in America’s High-Poverty Schools

"Segregation in public K-12 schools isn't getting better. It's getting worse, and getting worse quickly," said Rep. Scott. "More than 20 million students of color [are] now attending racially and socioeconomically isolated public schools." There are fewer math, biology, chemistry and physics courses in these schools than their more affluent counterparts with fewer minority students. In public schools, low-income and minority students were far less likely to enroll in these more rigorous courses.   read more

“Epidemic” of Public Interaction with Wildlife Puts Animals in Peril

Dr. Doolittle is only in the movies. A recent episode in which a bison calf at Yellowstone Park was euthanized after being placed in the back of an SUV is one example of the dire consequences of a widespread and common occurrence: humans interacting inappropriately with wild animals. Such encounters are fueled by the culture of selfies and an ignorance about nature, and they lead to encounters that are dangerous to both people and animals, say officials.   read more

In a First, Bill Passed by Oklahoma Republicans Promises Felony Charges and Prison for Doctors Who Perform Abortions

Gov. Fallin, who has signed several anti-abortion bills that were later blocked by the courts, will not comment on the new bill “until she and her staff have had a chance to review it,” said her office. But some legislators called the measure an ill-considered diversion. “I’m pro-life and a Roman Catholic, but I don’t think we should waste our time on legislation that someone will declare unconstitutional,” said Sen. Yen, an anesthesiologist and one of the few Republicans to oppose the bill.   read more

U.S. Senate Passes Bill Permitting 9/11 Families to Sue Saudi Arabia for Any Role in Attacks

“For the sake of the families, I want to make clear beyond the shadow of a doubt that every entity, including foreign states, will be held accountable if they are found to be sponsors of the heinous act of 9/11,” said Sen Schumer. “If the Saudis did not participate in this terrorism, they have nothing to fear about going to court. If they did, they should be held accountable.” Schumer said he believed Democrats would override a veto from President Obama.   read more

Hispanics Lag Farthest Behind in Corporate Board Appointments

Efforts to diversify America’s corporate boards with more minorities and women are still lagging. Overall, 399 new directors were selected for the top company boards last year. Hispanics claimed only 16 of those seats. The U.S. has the second-largest Spanish-speaking population in the world, second only to Mexico. “Companies need to do more to recruit Latinos into the boardroom if they are to compete successfully for the growing Latino consumers and future talent,” said HACR's Cid Wilson.   read more

$2 Billion in Annual Damage to U.S. Forests Caused by Insects Arriving in Overseas Cargo

"I consider air pollution and climate change to be serious, long-term threats to the forests," said Gary Lovett, senior scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in the Hudson Valley. "But neither of those is changing the forest the way the pests are." There are more than 400 forest pests in the country with every state affected. Imported tree pests long ago wiped out eastern chestnuts and elms. Now under siege are hemlocks, ash, beech, oaks, maples and dogwood.   read more

Obama at War Longer than any President in History

When he accepted the Nobel in 2009, he declared that humanity needed to reconcile “two seemingly irreconcilable truths — that war is sometimes necessary, and war at some level is an expression of human folly.” The president has tried to reconcile these truths by approaching his wars in narrow terms, as a chronic but manageable security challenge rather than as an all-consuming national campaign. The longevity of his war record, historians say, also reflects the changing definition of war.   read more
1 to 16 of about 2697 News
1 2 3 ... 169 Next

Top Stories

1 to 16 of about 2697 News
1 2 3 ... 169 Next

Guarantee of High Ratings Draws TV Networks toward Media-Hungry Trump over Media-Finicky Clinton

Some network officials concede that Trump can be unreliable, reversing himself on policies from one interview to the next. But they also say that Clinton — who is more reluctant to give interviews to print outlets than to television — is less comfortable interacting with the media, sometimes keeping her out of the conversation. Still, the presence of Trump can be irresistible, especially in an election where viewership and advertising rates have soared, generating tens of millions of dollars.   read more

Billionaires on the March to Control Dissemination of News

Billionaires don't become billionaires by being passive about their interests. Peter Thiel has devoted his almost unlimited means to lawsuits that promise to shutter a news organization he doesn't like. His campaign is in keeping with the pledge his favored candidate for president, Donald Trump, made to ease barriers to lawsuits against journalists. It's the flip side of the media realm’s new coin. Many fellow billionaires gained control of news organizations by buying them or starting them.   read more

Connecticut Oversight Agencies Failed to Investigate Years of Abuse and Neglect in Group Homes for Disabled

In Connecticut, the Dept of Developmental Services is supposed to pass on alarming reports— those that might suggest abuse — to a state agency. But the federal investigation found that the oversight system failed at almost every level. A review of 152 “critical incidents” where residents came to harm found the state failed to follow up on 99% of incidents that should have raised “reasonable suspicions of abuse or neglect,” and that hospital staff failed to do so in all but one of 310 ER visits.   read more

Statue of Liberty and Stonehenge among Landmark Sites Called Vulnerable to Climate Change Effects

Stonehenge eroding under the forces of extreme weather. The city of Venice slowly collapsing into its canals. The gradual flooding of the Statue of Liberty. Images like these, familiar from Hollywood climate-catastrophe thrillers, were evoked by a report released Thursday. That report highlights 31 sites in 29 countries that have already felt some impact from climate change, including well-known tourist destinations like Easter Island and Yellowstone National Park.   read more

Obama Has Overseen the Smallest Reduction in U.S. Nuclear Stockpile of Any Post-Cold War President

The new analysis underscored the striking gap between Obama’s soaring vision of a world without nuclear arms, which he laid out during the first months of his presidency, and the tough geopolitical and bureaucratic realities of getting rid of those weapons. The lack of progress in both arms control and warhead dismantlement also seems to coincide with the administration’s push for sweeping nuclear modernizations and weapons upgrades, estimated to cost up to $1 trillion over three decades.   read more

Antiquated Computers Run U.S. Government, Including Emergency Nuclear Force Messaging on 1970s-Era Floppy Discs

Nonpartisan investigators found that about three-fourths of the $80 billion budget goes to keep aging technology running, and the increasing cost is shortchanging modernization. The computers date back more than 50 years in some cases. "Replacement parts for the system are difficult to find because they are now obsolete," GAO said of the Pentagon's 1970s-era computer system that's used to operate U.S. nuclear forces. Social Security's computer system dates back even farther--to the late 1950s.   read more

Nation’s First Academic Chair for Study of Atheism Established at Miami University

The chair has been established with a $2.2 million donation from Louis Appignani, a retired businessman. “I’m trying to eliminate discrimination against atheists,” he said. "This is a step in that direction." With atheists still often stigmatized and disparaged in this country, it took some persuading for the university to agree to create a chair with the word “atheism” in the title. "That was a deal-breaker for Lou,” Siegel said. “He wasn’t going to do it unless it had the word atheism in it.”   read more

Obama Lets U.S. Companies Arm another Dictatorship

The U.S. is rescinding a decades-old ban on sales of lethal military equipment to Vietnam, President Obama announced on Monday. He insisted it should not be seen as carte blanche for weapons sales. Human rights advocates, who had asked Obama to hold off on lifting the ban until Vietnam had released some political prisoners and promised to stop the police beatings of protesters, condemned the decision. “President Obama just gave Vietnam a reward that they don’t deserve,” said Human Rights Watch.   read more

FDA Accused of Bowing to Drug Industry Pressure in Delaying Generic Drug Risk Warning Labels

In 2011, the Supreme Court ruled that generic drugmakers could not be held liable for failing to warn patients about the risks of their products. People harmed by generics would be unable to sue even as those who had taken the brand-name of the same product won million-dollar judgments. Those people included the family of Kira Gilbert, who died at 22 of a heart attack after taking a generic of painkiller Darvon. Her family’s lawsuit was dismissed in 2012 because of the Supreme Court ruling.   read more

Segregation Found to be Worsening in America’s High-Poverty Schools

"Segregation in public K-12 schools isn't getting better. It's getting worse, and getting worse quickly," said Rep. Scott. "More than 20 million students of color [are] now attending racially and socioeconomically isolated public schools." There are fewer math, biology, chemistry and physics courses in these schools than their more affluent counterparts with fewer minority students. In public schools, low-income and minority students were far less likely to enroll in these more rigorous courses.   read more

“Epidemic” of Public Interaction with Wildlife Puts Animals in Peril

Dr. Doolittle is only in the movies. A recent episode in which a bison calf at Yellowstone Park was euthanized after being placed in the back of an SUV is one example of the dire consequences of a widespread and common occurrence: humans interacting inappropriately with wild animals. Such encounters are fueled by the culture of selfies and an ignorance about nature, and they lead to encounters that are dangerous to both people and animals, say officials.   read more

In a First, Bill Passed by Oklahoma Republicans Promises Felony Charges and Prison for Doctors Who Perform Abortions

Gov. Fallin, who has signed several anti-abortion bills that were later blocked by the courts, will not comment on the new bill “until she and her staff have had a chance to review it,” said her office. But some legislators called the measure an ill-considered diversion. “I’m pro-life and a Roman Catholic, but I don’t think we should waste our time on legislation that someone will declare unconstitutional,” said Sen. Yen, an anesthesiologist and one of the few Republicans to oppose the bill.   read more

U.S. Senate Passes Bill Permitting 9/11 Families to Sue Saudi Arabia for Any Role in Attacks

“For the sake of the families, I want to make clear beyond the shadow of a doubt that every entity, including foreign states, will be held accountable if they are found to be sponsors of the heinous act of 9/11,” said Sen Schumer. “If the Saudis did not participate in this terrorism, they have nothing to fear about going to court. If they did, they should be held accountable.” Schumer said he believed Democrats would override a veto from President Obama.   read more

Hispanics Lag Farthest Behind in Corporate Board Appointments

Efforts to diversify America’s corporate boards with more minorities and women are still lagging. Overall, 399 new directors were selected for the top company boards last year. Hispanics claimed only 16 of those seats. The U.S. has the second-largest Spanish-speaking population in the world, second only to Mexico. “Companies need to do more to recruit Latinos into the boardroom if they are to compete successfully for the growing Latino consumers and future talent,” said HACR's Cid Wilson.   read more

$2 Billion in Annual Damage to U.S. Forests Caused by Insects Arriving in Overseas Cargo

"I consider air pollution and climate change to be serious, long-term threats to the forests," said Gary Lovett, senior scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in the Hudson Valley. "But neither of those is changing the forest the way the pests are." There are more than 400 forest pests in the country with every state affected. Imported tree pests long ago wiped out eastern chestnuts and elms. Now under siege are hemlocks, ash, beech, oaks, maples and dogwood.   read more

Obama at War Longer than any President in History

When he accepted the Nobel in 2009, he declared that humanity needed to reconcile “two seemingly irreconcilable truths — that war is sometimes necessary, and war at some level is an expression of human folly.” The president has tried to reconcile these truths by approaching his wars in narrow terms, as a chronic but manageable security challenge rather than as an all-consuming national campaign. The longevity of his war record, historians say, also reflects the changing definition of war.   read more
1 to 16 of about 2697 News
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