Portal

1 to 16 of about 10797 News
1 2 3 ... 675 Next
  • Obama Finally Puts an End to Unpopular Secure Communities Program

    Sunday, November 23, 2014
    As part of broader immigration reforms, the Obama administration announced Thursday that the Secure Communities program, which mandated that local law enforcement submit biometric information on those suspected of being undocumented immigrants to the federal government, is going away. In its place will be the Priority Enforcement Program, which specifies that those held must be likely deportable or have a removal order in effect against them.   read more
  • U.S. Celebrates 500th “Targeted Killing” Since 2002: 3,674 Dead including 473 Civilians

    Sunday, November 23, 2014
    Another milestone has been reached in the ongoing war against suspected terrorists in the Middle East and elsewhere—the United States has launched 500 attacks, or “targeted killings” in governmentspeak. The “targeted killings” aren’t as well targeted as they might be; 473 civilians are among the 3,674 who have died in the attacks.   read more
  • Are Justice Dept. Sting Operations Targeting Minorities?

    Sunday, November 23, 2014
    An investigation by USA Today found that 55% of suspects in these kinds of cases were black and more than a third were Hispanic. The total is more even than the percentages of black and Hispanic people caught up in the criminal justice system, much less the population in general.   read more
  • U.S. Ambassador to the Kyrgyzstan: Who Is Sheila Gwaltney?

    Sunday, November 23, 2014
    She was sent back to St. Petersburg in 2008, this time as consul general. In 2010, Gwaltney was assigned to Moscow as deputy chief of mission. She eventually served as chargé d'affaires, ad interim. As such, she was in charge of the embassy after Ambassador Mike McFaul left, and she handled much of the U.S. response to Russia’s annexation of Crimea and invasion of Ukraine, events she had warned of earlier.   read more
  • U.S. Ambassador to Latvia: Who Is Nancy Pettit?

    Sunday, November 23, 2014
    In 1992, Pettit got to put her knowledge of the Soviet Union to first-hand use when she was named a political officer in the embassy in Moscow. Her husband was also there, as were their two children, when a constitutional crisis swept the country. The Pettits and other embassy personnel and their families were forced to remain in an underground shelter for two days during the unrest.   read more
  • When George W. Bush Gave a Primetime Immigration Speech, Networks Covered it Live; Obama…Forget It

    Saturday, November 22, 2014
    “In 2006, Bush gave a 17-minute speech that was televised by all three networks that was about deploying 6,000 National Guard troops to the border. Obama is making a 10-minute speech that will have a vastly greater impact on the issue. And none of the networks are doing it,” said a senior administration official. The only broadcast networks that carried Obama's immigration talk live throughout the U.S. were Spanish language Univision and Telemundo.   read more
  • Another Fox Nominated to Guard Financial Chicken Coop

    Saturday, November 22, 2014
    From liberal Democrats to community bankers, opposition is lining up to President Obama’s choice for Under Secretary for Domestic Finance at the Treasury Dept.: Antonio Weiss. “Neither his background nor his professional experience makes him qualified to oversee consumer protection and domestic regulatory functions at the Treasury,” wrote Sen. Elizabeth Warren. She criticized Weiss for helping U.S. corporations relocate in countries that demand fewer taxes.   read more
  • Director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office: Who Is Michelle K. Lee?

    Saturday, November 22, 2014
    In 2003, Lee went to work for Google as its deputy general counsel and head of patents and patent strategy. She advised the search engine giant on its acquisition of YouTube, participation in the Nortel patent auction and on mobile phone patent issues. Lee left for government service in 2012 to head the newly opened Silicon Valley outpost of the USPTO.   read more
  • Images from Thousands of Americans’ Webcams are Streaming on Website in Russia

    Saturday, November 22, 2014
    More than 4,000 American cameras are listed on the website. In all, the site has webcam footage from people in 152 nations. Voyeurs can watch everything from babies in their cribs to college campuses to the insides of small businesses. The site also reveals the GPS location of each webcam along with links to a map. “[They claim] what they’re doing is entirely legal because they’ve hacked into cameras where the owners didn’t change the default password," said CBS.   read more
  • Director of the National Institute of Justice: Who Is Nancy Rodriguez?

    Saturday, November 22, 2014
    Since 1998, Rodriguez has been at Arizona State University (ASU). She first was an assistant professor in ASU’s School of Criminology and Criminal Justice and in 2004 was made associate professor in that school. In 2012, she was named ASU’s associate dean for student engagement in the College of Public Programs. Rodriguez recently completed a study of prosecution and sentencing practices of imprisoned drug offenders before and after Arizona’s mandatory drug treatment law was enacted.   read more
  • More Americans Die from Shoveling Snow than from Ebola

    Friday, November 21, 2014
    At least three people have died in New York State from shoveling snow during the extreme storm that hit the region—a higher fatality count than the number of people who have died from Ebola in the U.S. Once the storm ends, the media coverage of it will melt away. But the reporting frenzy over Ebola could continue indefinitely. However, shoveling snow is a bigger health problem for Americans than Ebola. Dr. Franklin said the annual number of deaths from shoveling snow might be close to 200.   read more
  • House Republicans Choose White Men to Head 20 of 21 Committees

    Friday, November 21, 2014
    Oops, they did it again. The Republican Party, despite vowing to be more inclusive of women and minorities, has chosen white men to lead all but one House committee. Over in the Senate, all but one standing committee will be led by a man. “Republicans promised to be more welcoming to women—but passed over women to give every single new committee chairmanship to a white man,” Spokeswoman Emily Bittner at the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee said in a statement.   read more
  • 10 Years after 9/11 Commission Recommended it, FCC Finds Funds for National First Responder Communications Network

    Friday, November 21, 2014
    The commission recommended that the federal government create a way for police and firefighters from different jurisdictions to communicate with each other in a crisis—something they couldn’t do during the response to the 9/11 attacks. Congress authorized the FCC to reserve certain broadcast frequencies for public safety use. The FCC auctioned off a band of wireless frequencies to telecommunications companies, which netted more than $11 billion to establish the network, FirstNet.   read more
  • Group Sues Border Patrol over Alleged Racial Profiling…in Ohio

    Friday, November 21, 2014
    The focus of the controversy is the Border Patrol’s Sandusky Bay Station, which has disproportionately targeted Hispanics since 2008, the plaintiffs say. Professor Kara Joyner says 85% of those arrested by Sandusky Bay agents have been Hispanic, even though the minority group makes up only 3% of the local population. Emails obtained as a result of the lawsuit show that Cory Bammer, who’s in charge of the Sandusky Bay office, has used racial slurs to refer to Latino workers.   read more
  • 59-Year-Old to be Released after 39 Years in Prison for Murder he didn’t Commit

    Friday, November 21, 2014
    Prosecutors won their case against Jackson by relying on the testimony of then 13-year-old Edward Vernon—who recently admitted he lied under pressure from police about what he saw on May 19, 1975, the day Franks was shot and killed. “The detective said that I was too young to go to jail, but he would arrest my parents for perjury because I was backing out,” Vernon said. “My mom was sick at that time, and that really scared me. I didn’t want my parents to get in trouble over this.”   read more
  • 7 Companies that Paid their CEOs More Than They Paid in Taxes

    Thursday, November 20, 2014
    While some would argue the salaries of the chief executives were too high, the point of the Institute’s report is the many tax credits, loopholes and deductions that allow businesses to reduce their tax bill and in some cases, get money back from the federal government. Boeing had the highest CEO salary of the seven, with $23.3 million going to top man James McNerney Jr. Meanwhile, the aircraft manufacturer and major government contractor enjoyed an $82 million refund from the IRS.   read more
  • Pentagon Censors Document that was Already Published in Full 18 Years Ago

    Thursday, November 20, 2014
    A document from 1961 by then-Defense Secretary McNamara regarding development of strategic nuclear missiles was fully released for public viewing in 1996. But the version of the document at the National Archives has been “heavily excised” of key information … that, again, was made public 18 years ago. Similarly, another 1961 memo, this one from the Joint Chiefs chairman to McNamara was mostly declassified long ago. But the National Archives and Pentagon censored large portions of it.   read more
1 to 16 of about 10797 News
1 2 3 ... 675 Next