U.S. and the World

1 to 16 of about 1582 News
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Jordan Jails Opposition Leader for Using Facebook to Call a Foreign Country the “American Cop in the Region”

The remark got Rushaid arrested and subsequently tried by the state security court for “acts harmful to the country’s relations with a friendly nation.” He was convicted and sentenced to 18 months in prison. Rushaid’s attorney called the verdict the “death for freedom of expression. The government is to blame.” Another Brotherhood member said the purpose of the security court is to try “the most heinous crimes against the country, not for...[expressing] an opinion on Facebook."   read more

U.S. Drops to 49th Place in World Press Freedom Index…Worst in 9 Years

The latest World Press Freedom Index shows the U.S. ranked 49th in the world, according to Reporters without Borders, which created the index. It hasn’t been this low since 2006, when it dropped to 53rd. The U.S. ranking is usually between the twenties and forties on the index.   read more

India Survives Latest Attack on Valentine’s Day

Young couples had to be on their toes on Saturday. Merely expressing their love in public could have led to them being married off, with right-wing Hindu groups vowing to force marriage on couples found celebrating an indecent “Western festival.” “If you are in love, you should get married,” said Ashok Sharma, vice president of Hindu Mahasabha, a conservative Hindu religious organization with branches across India.   read more

On a Typical Day, more Americans Spend the Night in Jail than in Detroit

The jail population average, which has skyrocketed since 1983 when the number was 224,000, has grown even though violent crime has decreased by nearly 50% during this span and property crime has fallen by 40%. Nearly 75% of those in jail are there for nonviolent traffic, property, drug, or public order offenses.   read more

Twitter Handles Information Requests from 58 National Governments, but 56% are from U.S.

The new report showed governments in general increased their requests by 40% compared to their previous report. “Providing this insight is simply the right thing to do, especially in an age of increasing concerns about government surveillance,” said Twitter's Jeremy Kessel. After the U.S., the government filing the most requests was Turkey, with 356, followed by Japan with 288. Twitter, however, did not comply with any of Turkey’s requests for user data.   read more

After 6 Years, Obama’s Pentagon Suddenly Declares Details of Afghanistan War “Classified”

The blackout on information will include such minor details as the number of Afghans who are serving in the army or police force, their salaries and data on infrastructure projects. The restrictions directly affect the American watchdog in Afghanistan, the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR), John Sopko, who has regularly reported on spending blunders, shoddy construction of infrastructure and other mistakes made by the U.S.   read more

Breaking News: Oil Really is the Main Reason One Country Interferes in another Country’s Civil War

About two-thirds of these wars saw intervention by another country or outside organization—and that the most common reason for this intervention had to do with oil “over and above historical, geographical or ethnic ties.” The research also revealed that the more oil a country had, the more likely a third party would be to enter the conflict   read more

Chinese Firm Moves into Louisiana’s “Cancer Alley”

A Chinese company with a history of environmental problems in its home country is building a methanol plant in an area of Louisiana where cancer rates and other health problems are already high because of the activities of U.S. petrochemical companies in the area. The methanol plant would be in St. James Parish, which is 90% African-American, and whose residents say they had no voice in the decision.   read more

Saudi Arabia’s New King, Salman bin Abdul-Aziz Al Saud Has Been Target of Lawsuits by Survivors of 9/11 Attacks

, Lloyd’s of London filed a suit seeking reimbursement from multiple parties, including Salman. In the lawsuit, Salman was identified as an “individual patron” of al-Qaeda and as the leader of the Saudi High Commission for Relief to Bosnia and Herzegovina (SHC). According to the lawsuit, “Under Prince Salman’s leadership, the SHC served as a primary front for supporting al Qaeda’s operations in the Balkans.   read more

Chicago Man Jailed for Acting as High-Priced U.S. Lobbyist for Sanctioned Dictator of Zimbabwe

Turner’s actions, which included organizing Illinois lawmakers to advocate for the sanctions removal, landed him in federal court. He was accused of conspiracy and two counts of failing to register as a foreign lobbyist. He avoided prosecution on the latter charges, but was found guilty of the first.   read more

50 Years of State of the Union Speeches: 66 Nations Ignored, While Others—Like Iraq and Russia—Get All the Attention

It’s probably no surprise that Vanuatu hasn’t come up in any of the speeches. Even some of our North American neighbors have been snubbed: the Bahamas, Belize and Guatemala are still waiting for their big moment. And there are a few countries of strategic importance that have escaped mention. The United Arab Emirates, a huge oil producer; Belgium, home of the European Union; and banking capital Switzerland all have been shut out. But Norway got a shout-out from George W. Bush.   read more

When the President of the U.S. Visits…India Edition

The ITC Maurya hotel, where Obama will be staying, has been taken over by Secret Service personnel and a multi-frequency control room manned by the U.S. officials has been set up. 15,000 CCTVs have also been installed across the capital, and American security personnel will be part of the teams manning the control rooms set up to monitor this footage.   read more

Will the big Winners of Normalization with Cuba be U.S. Diabetic Foot Ulcer Sufferers?

Each year, more than 73,000 diabetics in the U.S. have to have limbs or appendages amputated. Some of these surgeries could be prevented if Heberprot-P, a drug developed and produced in Cuba, is approved by the FDA. Heberprot-P has been around for nine years in Cuba, where it has helped numerous people avoid amputations resulting from diabetic foot ulcers. American researchers hope the U.S. will allow the drug to undergo clinical trials once trade normalization takes effect.   read more

U.S. Government Report Concludes 2014 was Warmest Year Worldwide since Recordkeeping began 135 Years Ago

2014 was the warmest year recorded since 1880, when weather records began to be kept. The average temperature was 0.69 degrees C (1.24° F) warmer than the average 20th century temperature. Had you been hoping for a white Christmas? Chances are, you didn’t have one. No state capital had snow cover on December 25 for only the second time since 1946.   read more

Pope Taps Junipero Serra for Sainthood despite Pesky Complaints of Genocide

Christians laud Serra for his tireless, impassioned efforts to convert Indians to the faith. Pope John Paul II beatified him in 1988. Others see the forced, if not brutal, denial of their native faith in a different light. The missions have been likened by critics to religious forced labor camps rather than churches.   read more

U.S. and India to Increase Bilateral Trade to $500 Billion

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said that the United States wanted to increase bilateral trade with India to $500 billion a year, a five-fold jump from $97 billion in 2013. He was in India for a two-day visit to set the stage for U.S. President Barack Obama's visit later in the month. This is the first time that a U.S. president has been invited to be the chief guest at the Republic Day celebrations on January 26.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1582 News
1 2 3 ... 99 Next

U.S. and the World

1 to 16 of about 1582 News
1 2 3 ... 99 Next

Jordan Jails Opposition Leader for Using Facebook to Call a Foreign Country the “American Cop in the Region”

The remark got Rushaid arrested and subsequently tried by the state security court for “acts harmful to the country’s relations with a friendly nation.” He was convicted and sentenced to 18 months in prison. Rushaid’s attorney called the verdict the “death for freedom of expression. The government is to blame.” Another Brotherhood member said the purpose of the security court is to try “the most heinous crimes against the country, not for...[expressing] an opinion on Facebook."   read more

U.S. Drops to 49th Place in World Press Freedom Index…Worst in 9 Years

The latest World Press Freedom Index shows the U.S. ranked 49th in the world, according to Reporters without Borders, which created the index. It hasn’t been this low since 2006, when it dropped to 53rd. The U.S. ranking is usually between the twenties and forties on the index.   read more

India Survives Latest Attack on Valentine’s Day

Young couples had to be on their toes on Saturday. Merely expressing their love in public could have led to them being married off, with right-wing Hindu groups vowing to force marriage on couples found celebrating an indecent “Western festival.” “If you are in love, you should get married,” said Ashok Sharma, vice president of Hindu Mahasabha, a conservative Hindu religious organization with branches across India.   read more

On a Typical Day, more Americans Spend the Night in Jail than in Detroit

The jail population average, which has skyrocketed since 1983 when the number was 224,000, has grown even though violent crime has decreased by nearly 50% during this span and property crime has fallen by 40%. Nearly 75% of those in jail are there for nonviolent traffic, property, drug, or public order offenses.   read more

Twitter Handles Information Requests from 58 National Governments, but 56% are from U.S.

The new report showed governments in general increased their requests by 40% compared to their previous report. “Providing this insight is simply the right thing to do, especially in an age of increasing concerns about government surveillance,” said Twitter's Jeremy Kessel. After the U.S., the government filing the most requests was Turkey, with 356, followed by Japan with 288. Twitter, however, did not comply with any of Turkey’s requests for user data.   read more

After 6 Years, Obama’s Pentagon Suddenly Declares Details of Afghanistan War “Classified”

The blackout on information will include such minor details as the number of Afghans who are serving in the army or police force, their salaries and data on infrastructure projects. The restrictions directly affect the American watchdog in Afghanistan, the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR), John Sopko, who has regularly reported on spending blunders, shoddy construction of infrastructure and other mistakes made by the U.S.   read more

Breaking News: Oil Really is the Main Reason One Country Interferes in another Country’s Civil War

About two-thirds of these wars saw intervention by another country or outside organization—and that the most common reason for this intervention had to do with oil “over and above historical, geographical or ethnic ties.” The research also revealed that the more oil a country had, the more likely a third party would be to enter the conflict   read more

Chinese Firm Moves into Louisiana’s “Cancer Alley”

A Chinese company with a history of environmental problems in its home country is building a methanol plant in an area of Louisiana where cancer rates and other health problems are already high because of the activities of U.S. petrochemical companies in the area. The methanol plant would be in St. James Parish, which is 90% African-American, and whose residents say they had no voice in the decision.   read more

Saudi Arabia’s New King, Salman bin Abdul-Aziz Al Saud Has Been Target of Lawsuits by Survivors of 9/11 Attacks

, Lloyd’s of London filed a suit seeking reimbursement from multiple parties, including Salman. In the lawsuit, Salman was identified as an “individual patron” of al-Qaeda and as the leader of the Saudi High Commission for Relief to Bosnia and Herzegovina (SHC). According to the lawsuit, “Under Prince Salman’s leadership, the SHC served as a primary front for supporting al Qaeda’s operations in the Balkans.   read more

Chicago Man Jailed for Acting as High-Priced U.S. Lobbyist for Sanctioned Dictator of Zimbabwe

Turner’s actions, which included organizing Illinois lawmakers to advocate for the sanctions removal, landed him in federal court. He was accused of conspiracy and two counts of failing to register as a foreign lobbyist. He avoided prosecution on the latter charges, but was found guilty of the first.   read more

50 Years of State of the Union Speeches: 66 Nations Ignored, While Others—Like Iraq and Russia—Get All the Attention

It’s probably no surprise that Vanuatu hasn’t come up in any of the speeches. Even some of our North American neighbors have been snubbed: the Bahamas, Belize and Guatemala are still waiting for their big moment. And there are a few countries of strategic importance that have escaped mention. The United Arab Emirates, a huge oil producer; Belgium, home of the European Union; and banking capital Switzerland all have been shut out. But Norway got a shout-out from George W. Bush.   read more

When the President of the U.S. Visits…India Edition

The ITC Maurya hotel, where Obama will be staying, has been taken over by Secret Service personnel and a multi-frequency control room manned by the U.S. officials has been set up. 15,000 CCTVs have also been installed across the capital, and American security personnel will be part of the teams manning the control rooms set up to monitor this footage.   read more

Will the big Winners of Normalization with Cuba be U.S. Diabetic Foot Ulcer Sufferers?

Each year, more than 73,000 diabetics in the U.S. have to have limbs or appendages amputated. Some of these surgeries could be prevented if Heberprot-P, a drug developed and produced in Cuba, is approved by the FDA. Heberprot-P has been around for nine years in Cuba, where it has helped numerous people avoid amputations resulting from diabetic foot ulcers. American researchers hope the U.S. will allow the drug to undergo clinical trials once trade normalization takes effect.   read more

U.S. Government Report Concludes 2014 was Warmest Year Worldwide since Recordkeeping began 135 Years Ago

2014 was the warmest year recorded since 1880, when weather records began to be kept. The average temperature was 0.69 degrees C (1.24° F) warmer than the average 20th century temperature. Had you been hoping for a white Christmas? Chances are, you didn’t have one. No state capital had snow cover on December 25 for only the second time since 1946.   read more

Pope Taps Junipero Serra for Sainthood despite Pesky Complaints of Genocide

Christians laud Serra for his tireless, impassioned efforts to convert Indians to the faith. Pope John Paul II beatified him in 1988. Others see the forced, if not brutal, denial of their native faith in a different light. The missions have been likened by critics to religious forced labor camps rather than churches.   read more

U.S. and India to Increase Bilateral Trade to $500 Billion

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said that the United States wanted to increase bilateral trade with India to $500 billion a year, a five-fold jump from $97 billion in 2013. He was in India for a two-day visit to set the stage for U.S. President Barack Obama's visit later in the month. This is the first time that a U.S. president has been invited to be the chief guest at the Republic Day celebrations on January 26.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1582 News
1 2 3 ... 99 Next