U.S. and the World

1 to 16 of about 1794 News
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More Measures Needed to Slow Global Warming

Six scientists who were leaders in past international climate conferences joined with the Universal Ecological Fund in Argentina to release a brief report Thursday, saying that if even more cuts in heat-trapping gases aren’t agreed upon soon, the world will warm by another 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit (1 degree Celsius) by around 2050.   read more

Study Finds Police Use of Body Cameras Dramatically Cuts Complaints

A Cambridge University study of British and U.S. police shows a 93% decrease in the number of complaints made against officers when they are using body cameras — pivotal findings that suggest the simple devices could reduce conflicts between police and the public. The idea behind the study is simple: people who are being observed — and know it — change their behavior. Researchers suggested that cameras encourage best behavior on the part of both the officers and the public.   read more

U.S. Senate Passes Bill to Combat Lucrative Illegal Wildlife Trafficking Trade

Coons said he was disturbed by reports that African elephant population has shrunk by 30% since 2007, primarily due to poaching. "Not only are iconic wildlife species in grave danger of disappearing, but wildlife trafficking also fuels well-organized criminal networks," he said. "Imperiled animals are slaughtered for no reason other than money, and innocent human lives are lost in the process. We cannot wait any longer to use every tool at our disposal to curb this global crisis."   read more

Former Japanese Leader Heads Fundraising Effort for Ailing U.S. Sailors Who Aided Fukushima Relief

"I felt I had to do something to help those who worked so hard for Japan," said the prime minister. "Maybe this isn't enough, but it will express our gratitude, that Japan is thankful." Sailors became sick with cancers, leukemia, and brain tumors, and they blame radiation. Their ships were in the direction of the radioactive plumes spewed from the Fukushima plant. Aircraft carriers routinely use drinking water from the ocean, which the lawsuit says was contaminated with radiation.   read more

U.S. Wildlife Officials Burn $1 Million Worth of Rhino Horns in Symbolic Ceremony against Poaching

Federal wildlife officials burned more than $1 million worth of rhino horn items in a ceremony Thursday, as they and onlookers raged over continued poaching and trafficking of the endangered animals. The items--whole horns and ornate objects--had been confiscated by U.S. officials before being used in the symbolic event — the first of its kind in the nation. "Wildlife trafficking through the United States, or into the United States, will not be tolerated," said Wildlife Service's Michelle Gadd.   read more

Olympics: If African-American Women were a Nation, They’d be in 6th Place

African-American women earned gold medals in 15 events (including participation in team sports) at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games. If they had been a nation, they would have been in sixth place. This despite with a population of about 19.6 million, they would be only the 67th most populous nation in the world.   read more

Lawsuit Seeks to Block Energy Dept.’s Huge Nuclear Waste Transport from Canada to U.S.

The Energy Dept's unprecedented proposed transfer of "a toxic liquid stew" containing nuclear waste between Canada and the U.S violates federal law, seven environmental groups claim in court. The proposed $60 million deal would see more than 6,000 gallons of the liquid waste transported more than 1,100 miles. "The radioactive waste byproducts...are acknowledged to be among the most radioactively hazardous materials on Earth," the complaint states.   read more

VW Payout to Deceived American VW Owners: $15 Billion; Payout to European Owners: $0

VW owners in the U.S. will receive about $20,000 per car as compensation for the company’s diesel deception. VW owners in Europe at most get a software update and a short length of plastic tubing. “Why are they getting so much and we’re getting nothing?” Franz said of U.S. owners. The startling gap in treatment is the result of European laws that shield corporations from class action suits brought by unhappy consumers.   read more

Largest Obama-Era Transfer of Guantánamo Detainees Cuts Prison Population by 20%

While it appears increasingly unlikely that President Obama will succeed in closing the prison before he leaves office in January, the transfer brought him significantly closer to another goal: getting out every detainee who has been approved for transfer. Some have been stranded on that list for years because they could not be repatriated. When Obama took office in 2009, 242 detainees remained at Guantánamo.   read more

Republican Lawmakers Block Promised Visas for At-Risk Afghan Translators Who Aided U.S.

Sen. John McCain, a longtime champion of the visa program, was blunt. “People are going to die,” McCain said on the Senate floor, challenging a fellow Republican who was blocking more visas. “Don’t you understand the gravity of that?” Republican infighting has left in question whether a special visa program for translators who assisted the military during the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq will be renewed, a devastating blow to 12,000 Afghans whose immigration applications are in limbo.   read more

Rise in Waterborne Illnesses in U.S. Linked to Global Warming

About a dozen species of vibrio bacteria make people sick from eating raw or undercooked seafood or drinking or swimming in tainted water. Until now, researchers had indirectly linked climate change to an increase in illnesses from the bacteria. DNA, a 50-year database of plankton, water temperatures and disease reports show a more comprehensive connection. The most consistent tracking of vibrio illnesses were in the U.S. The CDC blames about 100 deaths a year on vibrio on average.   read more

Mystery GMO Wheat Found Growing in Washington State Could Affect Foreign Trade with U.S.

A farmer discovered 22 plants in an unplanted field, and the wheat was developed to be resistant to the herbicide known as Roundup, created by seed giant Monsanto. Federal officials said they were working with the farmer to ensure that none of the modified wheat is sold. South Korea said Friday that it will inspect U.S. wheat imports for genetically modified wheat. The Ministry of Food and Drug Safety said it has asked the USDA for information on the unapproved wheat and inspection methods.   read more

U.S. Immigration Paradox: Welcoming More Refugees Fleeing Violence Even as They Are Deported

On one hand, the government was broadening a program for children fleeing three violence-racked countries there, allowing for more applicants to come to the U.S. as refugees. At the same time, it continued to deport young people from Central America who crossed the border and asked for protection — sending some of them back to those same countries. “Government is a big and complicated beast, and it can do contradictory things at the same time,” said Eve Stotland, legal director of The Door.   read more

U.S. Says It Plans to Expand Central American Refugee Admission Program

The White House has reached an agreement with Costa Rica to serve as a temporary host site for the most vulnerable migrants from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras while they wait to be processed as refugees. The U.N. high commissioner for refugees has agreed to set up an unusual process for reviewing requests for people in their home countries to qualify as refugees and send them to Costa Rica if they are facing immediate danger.   read more

Guantánamo Judge Accused of Secretly Allowing Destruction of CIA “Black Site” Prison Evidence

Allegations of evidence destruction have swirled around the case since May. The defense team believes the government removed some fixtures from a room in the CIA prison used for torture, but did not entirely destroy the structure. The prosecution has offered photographs and diagrams as a substitute for the top secret evidence, the report said, noting that prosecutors have apparently not revealed the identity of the nation housing the prison to preserve foreign relations.   read more

Guantánamo Defense Attorney Wants Tribunal Site Tested for Toxic Chemicals

A 9/11 defender told a military judge Thursday he can find no other example that mirrors the Guantánamo war court — an abandoned airfield tainted by fuel spills and toxic chemicals transformed into a court. “This is weird,” Air Force Capt. Michael Schwartz, the senior defense attorney for suspected 9/11 plotter Walid bin Attash, said of his request for the court to fund a toxicology expert to determine if the court is safe to work in.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1794 News
1 2 3 ... 113 Next

U.S. and the World

1 to 16 of about 1794 News
1 2 3 ... 113 Next

More Measures Needed to Slow Global Warming

Six scientists who were leaders in past international climate conferences joined with the Universal Ecological Fund in Argentina to release a brief report Thursday, saying that if even more cuts in heat-trapping gases aren’t agreed upon soon, the world will warm by another 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit (1 degree Celsius) by around 2050.   read more

Study Finds Police Use of Body Cameras Dramatically Cuts Complaints

A Cambridge University study of British and U.S. police shows a 93% decrease in the number of complaints made against officers when they are using body cameras — pivotal findings that suggest the simple devices could reduce conflicts between police and the public. The idea behind the study is simple: people who are being observed — and know it — change their behavior. Researchers suggested that cameras encourage best behavior on the part of both the officers and the public.   read more

U.S. Senate Passes Bill to Combat Lucrative Illegal Wildlife Trafficking Trade

Coons said he was disturbed by reports that African elephant population has shrunk by 30% since 2007, primarily due to poaching. "Not only are iconic wildlife species in grave danger of disappearing, but wildlife trafficking also fuels well-organized criminal networks," he said. "Imperiled animals are slaughtered for no reason other than money, and innocent human lives are lost in the process. We cannot wait any longer to use every tool at our disposal to curb this global crisis."   read more

Former Japanese Leader Heads Fundraising Effort for Ailing U.S. Sailors Who Aided Fukushima Relief

"I felt I had to do something to help those who worked so hard for Japan," said the prime minister. "Maybe this isn't enough, but it will express our gratitude, that Japan is thankful." Sailors became sick with cancers, leukemia, and brain tumors, and they blame radiation. Their ships were in the direction of the radioactive plumes spewed from the Fukushima plant. Aircraft carriers routinely use drinking water from the ocean, which the lawsuit says was contaminated with radiation.   read more

U.S. Wildlife Officials Burn $1 Million Worth of Rhino Horns in Symbolic Ceremony against Poaching

Federal wildlife officials burned more than $1 million worth of rhino horn items in a ceremony Thursday, as they and onlookers raged over continued poaching and trafficking of the endangered animals. The items--whole horns and ornate objects--had been confiscated by U.S. officials before being used in the symbolic event — the first of its kind in the nation. "Wildlife trafficking through the United States, or into the United States, will not be tolerated," said Wildlife Service's Michelle Gadd.   read more

Olympics: If African-American Women were a Nation, They’d be in 6th Place

African-American women earned gold medals in 15 events (including participation in team sports) at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games. If they had been a nation, they would have been in sixth place. This despite with a population of about 19.6 million, they would be only the 67th most populous nation in the world.   read more

Lawsuit Seeks to Block Energy Dept.’s Huge Nuclear Waste Transport from Canada to U.S.

The Energy Dept's unprecedented proposed transfer of "a toxic liquid stew" containing nuclear waste between Canada and the U.S violates federal law, seven environmental groups claim in court. The proposed $60 million deal would see more than 6,000 gallons of the liquid waste transported more than 1,100 miles. "The radioactive waste byproducts...are acknowledged to be among the most radioactively hazardous materials on Earth," the complaint states.   read more

VW Payout to Deceived American VW Owners: $15 Billion; Payout to European Owners: $0

VW owners in the U.S. will receive about $20,000 per car as compensation for the company’s diesel deception. VW owners in Europe at most get a software update and a short length of plastic tubing. “Why are they getting so much and we’re getting nothing?” Franz said of U.S. owners. The startling gap in treatment is the result of European laws that shield corporations from class action suits brought by unhappy consumers.   read more

Largest Obama-Era Transfer of Guantánamo Detainees Cuts Prison Population by 20%

While it appears increasingly unlikely that President Obama will succeed in closing the prison before he leaves office in January, the transfer brought him significantly closer to another goal: getting out every detainee who has been approved for transfer. Some have been stranded on that list for years because they could not be repatriated. When Obama took office in 2009, 242 detainees remained at Guantánamo.   read more

Republican Lawmakers Block Promised Visas for At-Risk Afghan Translators Who Aided U.S.

Sen. John McCain, a longtime champion of the visa program, was blunt. “People are going to die,” McCain said on the Senate floor, challenging a fellow Republican who was blocking more visas. “Don’t you understand the gravity of that?” Republican infighting has left in question whether a special visa program for translators who assisted the military during the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq will be renewed, a devastating blow to 12,000 Afghans whose immigration applications are in limbo.   read more

Rise in Waterborne Illnesses in U.S. Linked to Global Warming

About a dozen species of vibrio bacteria make people sick from eating raw or undercooked seafood or drinking or swimming in tainted water. Until now, researchers had indirectly linked climate change to an increase in illnesses from the bacteria. DNA, a 50-year database of plankton, water temperatures and disease reports show a more comprehensive connection. The most consistent tracking of vibrio illnesses were in the U.S. The CDC blames about 100 deaths a year on vibrio on average.   read more

Mystery GMO Wheat Found Growing in Washington State Could Affect Foreign Trade with U.S.

A farmer discovered 22 plants in an unplanted field, and the wheat was developed to be resistant to the herbicide known as Roundup, created by seed giant Monsanto. Federal officials said they were working with the farmer to ensure that none of the modified wheat is sold. South Korea said Friday that it will inspect U.S. wheat imports for genetically modified wheat. The Ministry of Food and Drug Safety said it has asked the USDA for information on the unapproved wheat and inspection methods.   read more

U.S. Immigration Paradox: Welcoming More Refugees Fleeing Violence Even as They Are Deported

On one hand, the government was broadening a program for children fleeing three violence-racked countries there, allowing for more applicants to come to the U.S. as refugees. At the same time, it continued to deport young people from Central America who crossed the border and asked for protection — sending some of them back to those same countries. “Government is a big and complicated beast, and it can do contradictory things at the same time,” said Eve Stotland, legal director of The Door.   read more

U.S. Says It Plans to Expand Central American Refugee Admission Program

The White House has reached an agreement with Costa Rica to serve as a temporary host site for the most vulnerable migrants from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras while they wait to be processed as refugees. The U.N. high commissioner for refugees has agreed to set up an unusual process for reviewing requests for people in their home countries to qualify as refugees and send them to Costa Rica if they are facing immediate danger.   read more

Guantánamo Judge Accused of Secretly Allowing Destruction of CIA “Black Site” Prison Evidence

Allegations of evidence destruction have swirled around the case since May. The defense team believes the government removed some fixtures from a room in the CIA prison used for torture, but did not entirely destroy the structure. The prosecution has offered photographs and diagrams as a substitute for the top secret evidence, the report said, noting that prosecutors have apparently not revealed the identity of the nation housing the prison to preserve foreign relations.   read more

Guantánamo Defense Attorney Wants Tribunal Site Tested for Toxic Chemicals

A 9/11 defender told a military judge Thursday he can find no other example that mirrors the Guantánamo war court — an abandoned airfield tainted by fuel spills and toxic chemicals transformed into a court. “This is weird,” Air Force Capt. Michael Schwartz, the senior defense attorney for suspected 9/11 plotter Walid bin Attash, said of his request for the court to fund a toxicology expert to determine if the court is safe to work in.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1794 News
1 2 3 ... 113 Next