U.S. and the World

1 to 16 of about 1478 News
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UN Report Estimates more than Half with AIDS don’t Know they’re Infected

More than half of all the world’s HIV patients are not aware of their medical condition, according to a new United Nations’ report. Nineteen million of the 35 million living with the human immunodeficiency virus are unaware that they’re infected. Michel Sidibé, executive director of UNAIDS, which produced the report, says: “Whether you live or die should not depend on access to an HIV test.”   read more

U.S. Government Demands Mexican Bus Company Pay Fine for Cocaine Smuggled by Drivers

After Border Patrol agents found and confiscated bags of the drug hidden inside a bus, federal prosecutors threatened to fine Turimex $1,000 per ounce of recovered cocaine. Turimex balked, saying they didn’t know the drugs were on the bus and were thus protected by the Tariiff Act of 1930. However, the wording of the Tariff Act of 1930 only protects ship’s owners and masters.   read more

Army Corps of Engineers to Leave behind Fire-Prone Buildings in Afghanistan because Occupants are Young, Fit Soldiers who can Flee Quickly

“The typical occupant populations for these facilities are young, fit, Afghan soldiers and recruits who have the physical ability to make a hasty retreat during a developing situation,” Major General Michael Eyre, commander of the Army Corps’s Transatlantic Division, wrote in a memo. The structures include 83 barracks, four medical clinics and two fire stations.   read more

Smaller U.S. Agencies Holding No Classified Data Curiously Become Targets of Chinese Hackers

It’s not just the Pentagon and other high profile U.S. agencies that have to worry about Chinese hackers. Even the little guys in Washington are coming under attack. Lower profile agencies with no secret data, like those overseeing personnel and printing, have now been infiltrated. Hackers may have just been curious to know what these offices do. “Along the way you’re going to shake a lot of doorknobs,” said Shawn Henry. “If the door is unlocked, why not look in?”   read more

Some in Germany See Return to Typewriters and Coffee Meet-ups as Way to Avoid U.S. High-Tech Spying

American spying overseas has proven so worrisome that one U.S. ally is considering ditching email and using typewriters to communicate classified information that can’t be intercepted electronically. Germany, whose government officials and citizens were angered last year upon learning the NSA had spied on them, is thinking seriously about embracing pre-computer technology. Some people are so concerned that they meet in person over coffee to keep conversations private.   read more

U.S. Teenager Beaten by Israeli Police

Tariq Khdeir of Tampa, Florida, was in Jerusalem outside the home of his slain cousin, Mohammed Tariq Khdeir of Tampa, Florida, was in Jerusalem outside the home of his slain cousin, Mohammed Abu Khdeir, who was bludgeoned and burned alive by assailants on July 2. Six Israelis have been arrested in connection with the brutal murder.. During the protest over Mohammed Abu Khdeir’s death, Israeli police apprehended Tariq Khdeir and hit him repeatedly until he fell unconscious.   read more

Organic Foods Not Necessarily Safe if They Come from China

Due to reckless industrial development, huge swaths of Chinese acreage contain harmful heavy metals, including cadmium, arsenic, lead, nickel and mercury. As much of 20% of China’s arable land is polluted in this manner. As for Chinese produce labeled “organic,” it’s unclear that eating that is healthier than consuming locally grown, non-organic foods. Organic crops are often fertilized with animal manure that could be contaminated with heavy metals.   read more

French Bank Agrees to Pay $8.9 Billion Penalty for Helping Iran and other Governments Sanctioned by U.S.

The scheming by BNP Paribas—which occurred over an eight-year period—assisted interests in Iran, Sudan and Cuba in conducting business subject to sanctions imposed by Washington. The bank continued to violate the law even after being warned by its own lawyers that its conduct was illegal. Legal experts hailed the agreement, noting its size for punishing such a large financial institution.   read more

Federal Appeals Panel Rules Border Patrol can be Sued over Killing of Mexican Boy in Mexico

While re-affirming an established rule that government immunity prevents the Border Patrol from being sued, the judges ruled that the agent was legally liable for the killing because his actions exceeded his authority. “No reasonable officer would have understood Agent Mesa’s alleged conduct to be lawful,” they wrote in their decision.   read more

High-Level Bipartisan Report Slams Obama’s Drift towards Permanent War

The panel, which included former members of Democratic and Republican administrations, also criticized the administration for not conducting an analysis of whether the use of drones for secret killings is worth the price. “A serious counterterrorism strategy needs to consider carefully, and constantly reassess, the balance between kinetic action [use of force] and other counterterrorism tools, and the potential unintended consequences of increased reliance on lethal UAVs,” the report said.   read more

185 Countries Guarantee Paid Family Leave; The 3 that don’t: Papua New Guinea, Oman and U.S.

Of the 188 countries in the world, only three have no paid family leave—Papua New Guinea, Oman and the U.S., according to a new report from the International Labour Organization (ILO). The other 185 governments have adopted laws authorizing mothers, and in 78 cases even fathers, to take time off and still receive paychecks while caring for newborns or other relatives.   read more

Obama Administration Eases Restrictions on Exports of Lightly Processed Oil for First Time Since 1970s

With the blessing of the Department of Commerce, two oil firms are now planning to ship ultra-light oil to foreign buyers. Industry experts say the deals represent a real change in U.S. export policy, even though technically the petroleum is not unrefined crude oil, which hasn’t been sold to overseas interests since the mid-1970s. The White House, though, insists the sales do not mean the administration has shifted U.S. policy on the issue.   read more

Presbyterian Church Divests from Caterpillar, Hewlett-Packard and Motorola over Israeli Occupation Policy

With only seven votes to spare (310-303), Presbyterian Church U.S.A.’s (PC(USA) governing body voted last week to divest $21 million from Caterpillar, Hewlett-Packard and Motorola Solutions. The corporations have reportedly provided Israel with means to destroy Palestinian homes, operate border checkpoints, and develop border barriers between it and Gaza. The church’s decision also included statements affirming the church’s belief in Israel’s right to exist.   read more

Refugees Worldwide Reach Level not Seen in Generations…and Half are Children

The numbers are a sharp increase, with much of it coming as a result of the fighting in Syria. In 2008, Syria was the country hosting the second-largest number of refugees. Now, it’s the second-largest refugee=producing nation, trailing only Afghanistan. More than half of all refugees worldwide come from those two nations, along with Somalia. The countries hosting the most refugees are Pakistan, with 1.6 million, and Iran, with almost 900,000.   read more

15 Americans Still Held Hostage Abroad or Missing

Caitlan Coleman was taken hostage in October 2012 by the Taliban with her husband, Canadian Joshua Boyle, while they were traveling through Afghanistan. Coleman was pregnant at the time and gave birth while in captivity. Boyle’s ex-wife, Zaynab Khadr, is the sister of the only Canadian to be held at Guantánamo Bay, Omar Khadr, who was transferred to Canadian custody in 2012.   read more

Muslim Convert to Christianity Sues Church for Publicizing his Conversion

Keeping the baptism a secret was vital, Doe says, because under some interpretations of Islamic law, Christian converts can be punished by beheading. Such a threat became very real for the plaintiff after Syrian militants saw the conversion notice and took him prisoner. He alleges that he was tortured, stabbed, shot and nearly had his head cut off before escaping.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1478 News
1 2 3 ... 93 Next

U.S. and the World

1 to 16 of about 1478 News
1 2 3 ... 93 Next

UN Report Estimates more than Half with AIDS don’t Know they’re Infected

More than half of all the world’s HIV patients are not aware of their medical condition, according to a new United Nations’ report. Nineteen million of the 35 million living with the human immunodeficiency virus are unaware that they’re infected. Michel Sidibé, executive director of UNAIDS, which produced the report, says: “Whether you live or die should not depend on access to an HIV test.”   read more

U.S. Government Demands Mexican Bus Company Pay Fine for Cocaine Smuggled by Drivers

After Border Patrol agents found and confiscated bags of the drug hidden inside a bus, federal prosecutors threatened to fine Turimex $1,000 per ounce of recovered cocaine. Turimex balked, saying they didn’t know the drugs were on the bus and were thus protected by the Tariiff Act of 1930. However, the wording of the Tariff Act of 1930 only protects ship’s owners and masters.   read more

Army Corps of Engineers to Leave behind Fire-Prone Buildings in Afghanistan because Occupants are Young, Fit Soldiers who can Flee Quickly

“The typical occupant populations for these facilities are young, fit, Afghan soldiers and recruits who have the physical ability to make a hasty retreat during a developing situation,” Major General Michael Eyre, commander of the Army Corps’s Transatlantic Division, wrote in a memo. The structures include 83 barracks, four medical clinics and two fire stations.   read more

Smaller U.S. Agencies Holding No Classified Data Curiously Become Targets of Chinese Hackers

It’s not just the Pentagon and other high profile U.S. agencies that have to worry about Chinese hackers. Even the little guys in Washington are coming under attack. Lower profile agencies with no secret data, like those overseeing personnel and printing, have now been infiltrated. Hackers may have just been curious to know what these offices do. “Along the way you’re going to shake a lot of doorknobs,” said Shawn Henry. “If the door is unlocked, why not look in?”   read more

Some in Germany See Return to Typewriters and Coffee Meet-ups as Way to Avoid U.S. High-Tech Spying

American spying overseas has proven so worrisome that one U.S. ally is considering ditching email and using typewriters to communicate classified information that can’t be intercepted electronically. Germany, whose government officials and citizens were angered last year upon learning the NSA had spied on them, is thinking seriously about embracing pre-computer technology. Some people are so concerned that they meet in person over coffee to keep conversations private.   read more

U.S. Teenager Beaten by Israeli Police

Tariq Khdeir of Tampa, Florida, was in Jerusalem outside the home of his slain cousin, Mohammed Tariq Khdeir of Tampa, Florida, was in Jerusalem outside the home of his slain cousin, Mohammed Abu Khdeir, who was bludgeoned and burned alive by assailants on July 2. Six Israelis have been arrested in connection with the brutal murder.. During the protest over Mohammed Abu Khdeir’s death, Israeli police apprehended Tariq Khdeir and hit him repeatedly until he fell unconscious.   read more

Organic Foods Not Necessarily Safe if They Come from China

Due to reckless industrial development, huge swaths of Chinese acreage contain harmful heavy metals, including cadmium, arsenic, lead, nickel and mercury. As much of 20% of China’s arable land is polluted in this manner. As for Chinese produce labeled “organic,” it’s unclear that eating that is healthier than consuming locally grown, non-organic foods. Organic crops are often fertilized with animal manure that could be contaminated with heavy metals.   read more

French Bank Agrees to Pay $8.9 Billion Penalty for Helping Iran and other Governments Sanctioned by U.S.

The scheming by BNP Paribas—which occurred over an eight-year period—assisted interests in Iran, Sudan and Cuba in conducting business subject to sanctions imposed by Washington. The bank continued to violate the law even after being warned by its own lawyers that its conduct was illegal. Legal experts hailed the agreement, noting its size for punishing such a large financial institution.   read more

Federal Appeals Panel Rules Border Patrol can be Sued over Killing of Mexican Boy in Mexico

While re-affirming an established rule that government immunity prevents the Border Patrol from being sued, the judges ruled that the agent was legally liable for the killing because his actions exceeded his authority. “No reasonable officer would have understood Agent Mesa’s alleged conduct to be lawful,” they wrote in their decision.   read more

High-Level Bipartisan Report Slams Obama’s Drift towards Permanent War

The panel, which included former members of Democratic and Republican administrations, also criticized the administration for not conducting an analysis of whether the use of drones for secret killings is worth the price. “A serious counterterrorism strategy needs to consider carefully, and constantly reassess, the balance between kinetic action [use of force] and other counterterrorism tools, and the potential unintended consequences of increased reliance on lethal UAVs,” the report said.   read more

185 Countries Guarantee Paid Family Leave; The 3 that don’t: Papua New Guinea, Oman and U.S.

Of the 188 countries in the world, only three have no paid family leave—Papua New Guinea, Oman and the U.S., according to a new report from the International Labour Organization (ILO). The other 185 governments have adopted laws authorizing mothers, and in 78 cases even fathers, to take time off and still receive paychecks while caring for newborns or other relatives.   read more

Obama Administration Eases Restrictions on Exports of Lightly Processed Oil for First Time Since 1970s

With the blessing of the Department of Commerce, two oil firms are now planning to ship ultra-light oil to foreign buyers. Industry experts say the deals represent a real change in U.S. export policy, even though technically the petroleum is not unrefined crude oil, which hasn’t been sold to overseas interests since the mid-1970s. The White House, though, insists the sales do not mean the administration has shifted U.S. policy on the issue.   read more

Presbyterian Church Divests from Caterpillar, Hewlett-Packard and Motorola over Israeli Occupation Policy

With only seven votes to spare (310-303), Presbyterian Church U.S.A.’s (PC(USA) governing body voted last week to divest $21 million from Caterpillar, Hewlett-Packard and Motorola Solutions. The corporations have reportedly provided Israel with means to destroy Palestinian homes, operate border checkpoints, and develop border barriers between it and Gaza. The church’s decision also included statements affirming the church’s belief in Israel’s right to exist.   read more

Refugees Worldwide Reach Level not Seen in Generations…and Half are Children

The numbers are a sharp increase, with much of it coming as a result of the fighting in Syria. In 2008, Syria was the country hosting the second-largest number of refugees. Now, it’s the second-largest refugee=producing nation, trailing only Afghanistan. More than half of all refugees worldwide come from those two nations, along with Somalia. The countries hosting the most refugees are Pakistan, with 1.6 million, and Iran, with almost 900,000.   read more

15 Americans Still Held Hostage Abroad or Missing

Caitlan Coleman was taken hostage in October 2012 by the Taliban with her husband, Canadian Joshua Boyle, while they were traveling through Afghanistan. Coleman was pregnant at the time and gave birth while in captivity. Boyle’s ex-wife, Zaynab Khadr, is the sister of the only Canadian to be held at Guantánamo Bay, Omar Khadr, who was transferred to Canadian custody in 2012.   read more

Muslim Convert to Christianity Sues Church for Publicizing his Conversion

Keeping the baptism a secret was vital, Doe says, because under some interpretations of Islamic law, Christian converts can be punished by beheading. Such a threat became very real for the plaintiff after Syrian militants saw the conversion notice and took him prisoner. He alleges that he was tortured, stabbed, shot and nearly had his head cut off before escaping.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1478 News
1 2 3 ... 93 Next