U.S. and the World

1 to 16 of about 1482 News
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U.S. Wasted $34 Million Pushing Soybeans on Afghanistan

The USDA decided it would be a good idea to spend $34 million on getting Afghan farmers to grow soybeans and for Afghan consumers to eat them. But the USDA struck out on both counts. The U.S. also paid about $1.5 million to build a soybean plan. When the crops failed, it paid to have 4,000 metric tons of soybeans flown in from the U.S at a cost of about $2 million. But no American expert could convince Afghans to incorporate soybeans into their diet.   read more

Air Force to Launch Satellites to Spy on other Satellites

U.S. Air Force officials overseeing the space-based surveillance say they were willing to discuss the mission to warn countries like China and Russia not to mess with American satellites and spacecraft orbiting the earth. The satellites will position themselves 22,300 miles above Earth, putting them in near-geosynchronous orbit, where a satellite maintains about the same relative position over the earth, to improve observational efforts.   read more

Corporate Tax Evasion Strategy Debated in Senate

Currently, U.S. businesses can claim they are foreign owned if only 20% of it is actually the property of overseas investors. President Barack Obama says this ceiling should be raised to 50% foreign ownership to slow down the rate of companies leaving the country.   read more

U.S. Pork Producers Keep Using Drug Banned or Restricted in 160 Countries

Food safety advocates point out that 160 countries have either outlawed the drug or limited its use, while also noting the existence of 160,000 reports of pigs becoming ill or dying after being fed ractopamine. The nonprofit Center for Food Safety cited information from the European Food Safety Authority showing ractopamine can cause increased heart rates in humans.   read more

UN Report Estimates more than Half with AIDS don’t Know they’re Infected

More than half of all the world’s HIV patients are not aware of their medical condition, according to a new United Nations’ report. Nineteen million of the 35 million living with the human immunodeficiency virus are unaware that they’re infected. Michel Sidibé, executive director of UNAIDS, which produced the report, says: “Whether you live or die should not depend on access to an HIV test.”   read more

U.S. Government Demands Mexican Bus Company Pay Fine for Cocaine Smuggled by Drivers

After Border Patrol agents found and confiscated bags of the drug hidden inside a bus, federal prosecutors threatened to fine Turimex $1,000 per ounce of recovered cocaine. Turimex balked, saying they didn’t know the drugs were on the bus and were thus protected by the Tariiff Act of 1930. However, the wording of the Tariff Act of 1930 only protects ship’s owners and masters.   read more

Army Corps of Engineers to Leave behind Fire-Prone Buildings in Afghanistan because Occupants are Young, Fit Soldiers who can Flee Quickly

“The typical occupant populations for these facilities are young, fit, Afghan soldiers and recruits who have the physical ability to make a hasty retreat during a developing situation,” Major General Michael Eyre, commander of the Army Corps’s Transatlantic Division, wrote in a memo. The structures include 83 barracks, four medical clinics and two fire stations.   read more

Smaller U.S. Agencies Holding No Classified Data Curiously Become Targets of Chinese Hackers

It’s not just the Pentagon and other high profile U.S. agencies that have to worry about Chinese hackers. Even the little guys in Washington are coming under attack. Lower profile agencies with no secret data, like those overseeing personnel and printing, have now been infiltrated. Hackers may have just been curious to know what these offices do. “Along the way you’re going to shake a lot of doorknobs,” said Shawn Henry. “If the door is unlocked, why not look in?”   read more

Some in Germany See Return to Typewriters and Coffee Meet-ups as Way to Avoid U.S. High-Tech Spying

American spying overseas has proven so worrisome that one U.S. ally is considering ditching email and using typewriters to communicate classified information that can’t be intercepted electronically. Germany, whose government officials and citizens were angered last year upon learning the NSA had spied on them, is thinking seriously about embracing pre-computer technology. Some people are so concerned that they meet in person over coffee to keep conversations private.   read more

U.S. Teenager Beaten by Israeli Police

Tariq Khdeir of Tampa, Florida, was in Jerusalem outside the home of his slain cousin, Mohammed Tariq Khdeir of Tampa, Florida, was in Jerusalem outside the home of his slain cousin, Mohammed Abu Khdeir, who was bludgeoned and burned alive by assailants on July 2. Six Israelis have been arrested in connection with the brutal murder.. During the protest over Mohammed Abu Khdeir’s death, Israeli police apprehended Tariq Khdeir and hit him repeatedly until he fell unconscious.   read more

Organic Foods Not Necessarily Safe if They Come from China

Due to reckless industrial development, huge swaths of Chinese acreage contain harmful heavy metals, including cadmium, arsenic, lead, nickel and mercury. As much of 20% of China’s arable land is polluted in this manner. As for Chinese produce labeled “organic,” it’s unclear that eating that is healthier than consuming locally grown, non-organic foods. Organic crops are often fertilized with animal manure that could be contaminated with heavy metals.   read more

French Bank Agrees to Pay $8.9 Billion Penalty for Helping Iran and other Governments Sanctioned by U.S.

The scheming by BNP Paribas—which occurred over an eight-year period—assisted interests in Iran, Sudan and Cuba in conducting business subject to sanctions imposed by Washington. The bank continued to violate the law even after being warned by its own lawyers that its conduct was illegal. Legal experts hailed the agreement, noting its size for punishing such a large financial institution.   read more

Federal Appeals Panel Rules Border Patrol can be Sued over Killing of Mexican Boy in Mexico

While re-affirming an established rule that government immunity prevents the Border Patrol from being sued, the judges ruled that the agent was legally liable for the killing because his actions exceeded his authority. “No reasonable officer would have understood Agent Mesa’s alleged conduct to be lawful,” they wrote in their decision.   read more

High-Level Bipartisan Report Slams Obama’s Drift towards Permanent War

The panel, which included former members of Democratic and Republican administrations, also criticized the administration for not conducting an analysis of whether the use of drones for secret killings is worth the price. “A serious counterterrorism strategy needs to consider carefully, and constantly reassess, the balance between kinetic action [use of force] and other counterterrorism tools, and the potential unintended consequences of increased reliance on lethal UAVs,” the report said.   read more

185 Countries Guarantee Paid Family Leave; The 3 that don’t: Papua New Guinea, Oman and U.S.

Of the 188 countries in the world, only three have no paid family leave—Papua New Guinea, Oman and the U.S., according to a new report from the International Labour Organization (ILO). The other 185 governments have adopted laws authorizing mothers, and in 78 cases even fathers, to take time off and still receive paychecks while caring for newborns or other relatives.   read more

Obama Administration Eases Restrictions on Exports of Lightly Processed Oil for First Time Since 1970s

With the blessing of the Department of Commerce, two oil firms are now planning to ship ultra-light oil to foreign buyers. Industry experts say the deals represent a real change in U.S. export policy, even though technically the petroleum is not unrefined crude oil, which hasn’t been sold to overseas interests since the mid-1970s. The White House, though, insists the sales do not mean the administration has shifted U.S. policy on the issue.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1482 News
1 2 3 ... 93 Next

U.S. and the World

1 to 16 of about 1482 News
1 2 3 ... 93 Next

U.S. Wasted $34 Million Pushing Soybeans on Afghanistan

The USDA decided it would be a good idea to spend $34 million on getting Afghan farmers to grow soybeans and for Afghan consumers to eat them. But the USDA struck out on both counts. The U.S. also paid about $1.5 million to build a soybean plan. When the crops failed, it paid to have 4,000 metric tons of soybeans flown in from the U.S at a cost of about $2 million. But no American expert could convince Afghans to incorporate soybeans into their diet.   read more

Air Force to Launch Satellites to Spy on other Satellites

U.S. Air Force officials overseeing the space-based surveillance say they were willing to discuss the mission to warn countries like China and Russia not to mess with American satellites and spacecraft orbiting the earth. The satellites will position themselves 22,300 miles above Earth, putting them in near-geosynchronous orbit, where a satellite maintains about the same relative position over the earth, to improve observational efforts.   read more

Corporate Tax Evasion Strategy Debated in Senate

Currently, U.S. businesses can claim they are foreign owned if only 20% of it is actually the property of overseas investors. President Barack Obama says this ceiling should be raised to 50% foreign ownership to slow down the rate of companies leaving the country.   read more

U.S. Pork Producers Keep Using Drug Banned or Restricted in 160 Countries

Food safety advocates point out that 160 countries have either outlawed the drug or limited its use, while also noting the existence of 160,000 reports of pigs becoming ill or dying after being fed ractopamine. The nonprofit Center for Food Safety cited information from the European Food Safety Authority showing ractopamine can cause increased heart rates in humans.   read more

UN Report Estimates more than Half with AIDS don’t Know they’re Infected

More than half of all the world’s HIV patients are not aware of their medical condition, according to a new United Nations’ report. Nineteen million of the 35 million living with the human immunodeficiency virus are unaware that they’re infected. Michel Sidibé, executive director of UNAIDS, which produced the report, says: “Whether you live or die should not depend on access to an HIV test.”   read more

U.S. Government Demands Mexican Bus Company Pay Fine for Cocaine Smuggled by Drivers

After Border Patrol agents found and confiscated bags of the drug hidden inside a bus, federal prosecutors threatened to fine Turimex $1,000 per ounce of recovered cocaine. Turimex balked, saying they didn’t know the drugs were on the bus and were thus protected by the Tariiff Act of 1930. However, the wording of the Tariff Act of 1930 only protects ship’s owners and masters.   read more

Army Corps of Engineers to Leave behind Fire-Prone Buildings in Afghanistan because Occupants are Young, Fit Soldiers who can Flee Quickly

“The typical occupant populations for these facilities are young, fit, Afghan soldiers and recruits who have the physical ability to make a hasty retreat during a developing situation,” Major General Michael Eyre, commander of the Army Corps’s Transatlantic Division, wrote in a memo. The structures include 83 barracks, four medical clinics and two fire stations.   read more

Smaller U.S. Agencies Holding No Classified Data Curiously Become Targets of Chinese Hackers

It’s not just the Pentagon and other high profile U.S. agencies that have to worry about Chinese hackers. Even the little guys in Washington are coming under attack. Lower profile agencies with no secret data, like those overseeing personnel and printing, have now been infiltrated. Hackers may have just been curious to know what these offices do. “Along the way you’re going to shake a lot of doorknobs,” said Shawn Henry. “If the door is unlocked, why not look in?”   read more

Some in Germany See Return to Typewriters and Coffee Meet-ups as Way to Avoid U.S. High-Tech Spying

American spying overseas has proven so worrisome that one U.S. ally is considering ditching email and using typewriters to communicate classified information that can’t be intercepted electronically. Germany, whose government officials and citizens were angered last year upon learning the NSA had spied on them, is thinking seriously about embracing pre-computer technology. Some people are so concerned that they meet in person over coffee to keep conversations private.   read more

U.S. Teenager Beaten by Israeli Police

Tariq Khdeir of Tampa, Florida, was in Jerusalem outside the home of his slain cousin, Mohammed Tariq Khdeir of Tampa, Florida, was in Jerusalem outside the home of his slain cousin, Mohammed Abu Khdeir, who was bludgeoned and burned alive by assailants on July 2. Six Israelis have been arrested in connection with the brutal murder.. During the protest over Mohammed Abu Khdeir’s death, Israeli police apprehended Tariq Khdeir and hit him repeatedly until he fell unconscious.   read more

Organic Foods Not Necessarily Safe if They Come from China

Due to reckless industrial development, huge swaths of Chinese acreage contain harmful heavy metals, including cadmium, arsenic, lead, nickel and mercury. As much of 20% of China’s arable land is polluted in this manner. As for Chinese produce labeled “organic,” it’s unclear that eating that is healthier than consuming locally grown, non-organic foods. Organic crops are often fertilized with animal manure that could be contaminated with heavy metals.   read more

French Bank Agrees to Pay $8.9 Billion Penalty for Helping Iran and other Governments Sanctioned by U.S.

The scheming by BNP Paribas—which occurred over an eight-year period—assisted interests in Iran, Sudan and Cuba in conducting business subject to sanctions imposed by Washington. The bank continued to violate the law even after being warned by its own lawyers that its conduct was illegal. Legal experts hailed the agreement, noting its size for punishing such a large financial institution.   read more

Federal Appeals Panel Rules Border Patrol can be Sued over Killing of Mexican Boy in Mexico

While re-affirming an established rule that government immunity prevents the Border Patrol from being sued, the judges ruled that the agent was legally liable for the killing because his actions exceeded his authority. “No reasonable officer would have understood Agent Mesa’s alleged conduct to be lawful,” they wrote in their decision.   read more

High-Level Bipartisan Report Slams Obama’s Drift towards Permanent War

The panel, which included former members of Democratic and Republican administrations, also criticized the administration for not conducting an analysis of whether the use of drones for secret killings is worth the price. “A serious counterterrorism strategy needs to consider carefully, and constantly reassess, the balance between kinetic action [use of force] and other counterterrorism tools, and the potential unintended consequences of increased reliance on lethal UAVs,” the report said.   read more

185 Countries Guarantee Paid Family Leave; The 3 that don’t: Papua New Guinea, Oman and U.S.

Of the 188 countries in the world, only three have no paid family leave—Papua New Guinea, Oman and the U.S., according to a new report from the International Labour Organization (ILO). The other 185 governments have adopted laws authorizing mothers, and in 78 cases even fathers, to take time off and still receive paychecks while caring for newborns or other relatives.   read more

Obama Administration Eases Restrictions on Exports of Lightly Processed Oil for First Time Since 1970s

With the blessing of the Department of Commerce, two oil firms are now planning to ship ultra-light oil to foreign buyers. Industry experts say the deals represent a real change in U.S. export policy, even though technically the petroleum is not unrefined crude oil, which hasn’t been sold to overseas interests since the mid-1970s. The White House, though, insists the sales do not mean the administration has shifted U.S. policy on the issue.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1482 News
1 2 3 ... 93 Next