U.S. and the World

1 to 16 of about 1636 News
1 2 3 ... 103 Next

Guantánamo Prisoner Asks “Why am I Still Here?”

The documents note that al-Alwi has made threats to kill U.S. personnel during his detention at Guantánamo and that he promised to do so following his release. However, there have been no efforts on the part of the U.S. government to prove any of those charges in a court of law. His petition to be tried in a civilian court has been denied, with federal judges determining that “it is more probable than not that petitioner was supporting the Taliban and al Qaeda.”   read more

U.S. Diplomats will no Longer Stay at Waldorf-Astoria now that it’s Owned by Chinese

The department traditionally takes two secured floors at the Waldorf for the UN session. However, the department has been worried about security issues at the iconic hotel since it was purchased last year by the Chinese Anbang Insurance Group for $1.95 billion.   read more

Why is Homeland Security Moving its Animal Disease Research Lab to a Place Hit by Tornadoes?

The National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility will be operated by the Department of Homeland Security on the campus of Kansas State University in Manhattan. It’s replacing a facility located on Plum Island, off New York’s Long Island. It was put there in 1954 because it’s far from agricultural facilities and the prevailing winds blow out to sea, and would take any outbreaks away from land. NBAF sits in the path of Tornado Alley, a large stretch of the Midwest vulnerable to violent storms.   read more

Iceland Still Ranked World’s most Peaceful Nation: United States Inches up to 94th

The Nordic island nation was designated the most peaceful nation on earth, according to the Institute for Economics & Peace’s latest Global Peace Index. The United States was way down on the Global Peace Index, placing at No. 94, but a definite improvement from last year’s 101. Part of the improvement came from the partial withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan and U.S. efforts to secure a nuclear deal with Iran.   read more

Is the Chinese Hacking of U.S. Government Employees’ Data Really any Different than What the U.S. Does to China?

The Obama administration has little moral ground to stand on when it comes to computer espionage, particularly after Edward Snowden exposed just how often the U.S. government has pried into public and private electronic systems overseas. The NSA infiltrated the servers of the Chinese firm Huawei, which was deemed a security threat by Washington. The NSA monitored the firm's executives and obtained information about its inner workings that Huawei says connect a third of the world’s population.   read more

Irresponsible Drug Waste Dumping by Pharmaceutical Firms Found to Fuel Rise of Antibiotic-Resistant Superbugs

One of Pfizer’s antibiotics suppliers in China, NCPC, discharges pharmaceutical waste into the environment. Generic drug company McKesson contracts with an Indian company, Aurobindo, which in turn gets drug supplies from four polluting Chinese factories. And Teva, based in Israel, deals with three Chinese companies that “have been in the Chinese media spotlight for various offenses including improper waste management and the release of noxious chemicals.”   read more

150,000 Killed in Afghanistan and Pakistan Since 2001, including 47,500 Civilians

the war produced 149,000 fatalities in Afghanistan and Pakistan from 2001 to April 2014. Included in the figures are U.S. military personnel, non-U.S. Allied troops, contractors, Taliban, al Qaeda and other opposition fighters—as well as more than 47,000 civilians from both countries. There have been 26,270 Afghan civilians killed and 21,500 Pakistanis.   read more

From U.S. to Netherlands and South Pacific, Courthouses Form Key Battleground for Fight against Climate Change

Representatives from six South Pacific countries recently announced that they intend to sue carbon polluters for their role in causing climate change. The plaintiffs are vulnerable to rising sea levels and greater storm activity brought on by climate change. Those wanting to bring the polluters to justice face several hurdles, a big one being finding a court in which to sue. U.S. federal courts are an option, but might not work because polluters in America are covered by the Clean Air Act.   read more

SAT Exam Popularity among China’s Upper Class Fuels Chinese Undergrad Boom in U.S.

About 55,000 Chinese took the SAT in 2014. The total “reflects an increasingly international view of education for Chinese young people, not to mention their parents.” The test is so popular in China that new anti-cheating measures have been instituted. In recent weeks, 23 students were arrested for cheating, some of whom used transmission devices to get answers remotely. To catch them, teachers have been using silent drones to fly around the classrooms monitoring transmission signals   read more

Red Cross took in $488 Million for Haiti…and Built 6 Houses

In the wake of the January 2010 earthquake that hit near Port au Prince, Haiti, millions of Americans pitched in and donated to relief funds, much of it to the American Red Cross (ARC). Now, a report says that little of the $488 million sent to that organization has actually gone into rebuilding the country. Its claim that it built houses for more than 130,000 Haitians was a slight exaggeration; it actually built six houses.   read more

Federal Court Rules Residents of American Samoans cannot Sue to become U.S. Citizens

A complaint filed on behalf of several Samoans, some of whom live there and others who live in the United States proper, pointed out that those born in American Samoa are considered U.S. nationals, but not citizens. That means that even when they move to Hawaii or another state, they’re not entitled to vote, hold office or enjoy certain other rights reserved for citizens. Their U.S. passports have a restriction that labels them as U.S. nationals.   read more

This is the Only Country that Ranks Worse than North Korea on the World Press Freedom Index

Reporters Without Borders has awarded Eritrea last place on its World Press Freedom Index for seven straight years. Of the 223 journalists imprisoned around the world, 23 are in Eritrea. The only press allowed in Eritrea is that which is controlled by the government and even then the journalists are not safe. Thirteen employees of an education ministry radio station were imprisoned for five years without being told why.   read more

Thousands of American Students Find it’s Cheaper to Get a Good University Education in Germany than in the U.S.

Instead of paying $30,000 to $50,000 annually in tuition and fees at American private universities, students can attend German institutions for only a few hundred dollars a year. One example is Technical University of Munich, “one of the most highly regarded universities in Europe,” where a U.S. student pays only $120 a semester in fees. The fee includes a ticket that allows free public transportation anywhere in Munich, and student health insurance is less than $90 a month.   read more

Obama Administration Removes Cuba from Terrorism List after 33 Years

Cuba was placed on that list in 1982 when it was supporting guerilla movements in South America. That support has long-since ceased, but the Castro administration remained on the list until now, when a 45-day period for Congress to review the plan ended. Cuba is still subject to an economic and travel embargo, so the only practical effect might be that the Havana government might find it easier to do business with U.S. companies in deals that are authorized.   read more

10 House Members who Friended the Azerbaijan Dictatorship

The politicians "received hundreds of thousands of dollars’ worth of travel expenses, silk scarves, crystal tea sets and Azerbaijani rugs valued at $2,500 to $10,000. On his return from Azerbaijan, Bridenstine sponsored an amendment to the defense bill that would have required the Defense Department to issue reports on the strategic importance of natural gas interests in the Caspian Sea area and the value of building a pipeline out of the region.   read more

Is Prosecution or Rehabilitation the Better Response to Home-Grown Terrorist Recruits?

The prosecutor in the case, U.S. Attorney Andrew Luger, had previously opposed rehabilitation over prison for another Somali-American, Abdullahi Yusuf, who also wanted to join IS. Luger appears to have had a change of heart however, and hopes to fight the recruitment of young people by IS with programs such as mentoring and job counseling. The federal government estimates that between 150 and 180 Americans have tried to leave the country and join up with groups fighting in Syria.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1636 News
1 2 3 ... 103 Next

U.S. and the World

1 to 16 of about 1636 News
1 2 3 ... 103 Next

Guantánamo Prisoner Asks “Why am I Still Here?”

The documents note that al-Alwi has made threats to kill U.S. personnel during his detention at Guantánamo and that he promised to do so following his release. However, there have been no efforts on the part of the U.S. government to prove any of those charges in a court of law. His petition to be tried in a civilian court has been denied, with federal judges determining that “it is more probable than not that petitioner was supporting the Taliban and al Qaeda.”   read more

U.S. Diplomats will no Longer Stay at Waldorf-Astoria now that it’s Owned by Chinese

The department traditionally takes two secured floors at the Waldorf for the UN session. However, the department has been worried about security issues at the iconic hotel since it was purchased last year by the Chinese Anbang Insurance Group for $1.95 billion.   read more

Why is Homeland Security Moving its Animal Disease Research Lab to a Place Hit by Tornadoes?

The National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility will be operated by the Department of Homeland Security on the campus of Kansas State University in Manhattan. It’s replacing a facility located on Plum Island, off New York’s Long Island. It was put there in 1954 because it’s far from agricultural facilities and the prevailing winds blow out to sea, and would take any outbreaks away from land. NBAF sits in the path of Tornado Alley, a large stretch of the Midwest vulnerable to violent storms.   read more

Iceland Still Ranked World’s most Peaceful Nation: United States Inches up to 94th

The Nordic island nation was designated the most peaceful nation on earth, according to the Institute for Economics & Peace’s latest Global Peace Index. The United States was way down on the Global Peace Index, placing at No. 94, but a definite improvement from last year’s 101. Part of the improvement came from the partial withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan and U.S. efforts to secure a nuclear deal with Iran.   read more

Is the Chinese Hacking of U.S. Government Employees’ Data Really any Different than What the U.S. Does to China?

The Obama administration has little moral ground to stand on when it comes to computer espionage, particularly after Edward Snowden exposed just how often the U.S. government has pried into public and private electronic systems overseas. The NSA infiltrated the servers of the Chinese firm Huawei, which was deemed a security threat by Washington. The NSA monitored the firm's executives and obtained information about its inner workings that Huawei says connect a third of the world’s population.   read more

Irresponsible Drug Waste Dumping by Pharmaceutical Firms Found to Fuel Rise of Antibiotic-Resistant Superbugs

One of Pfizer’s antibiotics suppliers in China, NCPC, discharges pharmaceutical waste into the environment. Generic drug company McKesson contracts with an Indian company, Aurobindo, which in turn gets drug supplies from four polluting Chinese factories. And Teva, based in Israel, deals with three Chinese companies that “have been in the Chinese media spotlight for various offenses including improper waste management and the release of noxious chemicals.”   read more

150,000 Killed in Afghanistan and Pakistan Since 2001, including 47,500 Civilians

the war produced 149,000 fatalities in Afghanistan and Pakistan from 2001 to April 2014. Included in the figures are U.S. military personnel, non-U.S. Allied troops, contractors, Taliban, al Qaeda and other opposition fighters—as well as more than 47,000 civilians from both countries. There have been 26,270 Afghan civilians killed and 21,500 Pakistanis.   read more

From U.S. to Netherlands and South Pacific, Courthouses Form Key Battleground for Fight against Climate Change

Representatives from six South Pacific countries recently announced that they intend to sue carbon polluters for their role in causing climate change. The plaintiffs are vulnerable to rising sea levels and greater storm activity brought on by climate change. Those wanting to bring the polluters to justice face several hurdles, a big one being finding a court in which to sue. U.S. federal courts are an option, but might not work because polluters in America are covered by the Clean Air Act.   read more

SAT Exam Popularity among China’s Upper Class Fuels Chinese Undergrad Boom in U.S.

About 55,000 Chinese took the SAT in 2014. The total “reflects an increasingly international view of education for Chinese young people, not to mention their parents.” The test is so popular in China that new anti-cheating measures have been instituted. In recent weeks, 23 students were arrested for cheating, some of whom used transmission devices to get answers remotely. To catch them, teachers have been using silent drones to fly around the classrooms monitoring transmission signals   read more

Red Cross took in $488 Million for Haiti…and Built 6 Houses

In the wake of the January 2010 earthquake that hit near Port au Prince, Haiti, millions of Americans pitched in and donated to relief funds, much of it to the American Red Cross (ARC). Now, a report says that little of the $488 million sent to that organization has actually gone into rebuilding the country. Its claim that it built houses for more than 130,000 Haitians was a slight exaggeration; it actually built six houses.   read more

Federal Court Rules Residents of American Samoans cannot Sue to become U.S. Citizens

A complaint filed on behalf of several Samoans, some of whom live there and others who live in the United States proper, pointed out that those born in American Samoa are considered U.S. nationals, but not citizens. That means that even when they move to Hawaii or another state, they’re not entitled to vote, hold office or enjoy certain other rights reserved for citizens. Their U.S. passports have a restriction that labels them as U.S. nationals.   read more

This is the Only Country that Ranks Worse than North Korea on the World Press Freedom Index

Reporters Without Borders has awarded Eritrea last place on its World Press Freedom Index for seven straight years. Of the 223 journalists imprisoned around the world, 23 are in Eritrea. The only press allowed in Eritrea is that which is controlled by the government and even then the journalists are not safe. Thirteen employees of an education ministry radio station were imprisoned for five years without being told why.   read more

Thousands of American Students Find it’s Cheaper to Get a Good University Education in Germany than in the U.S.

Instead of paying $30,000 to $50,000 annually in tuition and fees at American private universities, students can attend German institutions for only a few hundred dollars a year. One example is Technical University of Munich, “one of the most highly regarded universities in Europe,” where a U.S. student pays only $120 a semester in fees. The fee includes a ticket that allows free public transportation anywhere in Munich, and student health insurance is less than $90 a month.   read more

Obama Administration Removes Cuba from Terrorism List after 33 Years

Cuba was placed on that list in 1982 when it was supporting guerilla movements in South America. That support has long-since ceased, but the Castro administration remained on the list until now, when a 45-day period for Congress to review the plan ended. Cuba is still subject to an economic and travel embargo, so the only practical effect might be that the Havana government might find it easier to do business with U.S. companies in deals that are authorized.   read more

10 House Members who Friended the Azerbaijan Dictatorship

The politicians "received hundreds of thousands of dollars’ worth of travel expenses, silk scarves, crystal tea sets and Azerbaijani rugs valued at $2,500 to $10,000. On his return from Azerbaijan, Bridenstine sponsored an amendment to the defense bill that would have required the Defense Department to issue reports on the strategic importance of natural gas interests in the Caspian Sea area and the value of building a pipeline out of the region.   read more

Is Prosecution or Rehabilitation the Better Response to Home-Grown Terrorist Recruits?

The prosecutor in the case, U.S. Attorney Andrew Luger, had previously opposed rehabilitation over prison for another Somali-American, Abdullahi Yusuf, who also wanted to join IS. Luger appears to have had a change of heart however, and hopes to fight the recruitment of young people by IS with programs such as mentoring and job counseling. The federal government estimates that between 150 and 180 Americans have tried to leave the country and join up with groups fighting in Syria.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1636 News
1 2 3 ... 103 Next