U.S. and the World

1 to 16 of about 1789 News
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Olympics: If African-American Women were a Nation, They’d be in 6th Place

African-American women earned gold medals in 15 events (including participation in team sports) at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games. If they had been a nation, they would have been in sixth place. This despite with a population of about 19.6 million, they would be only the 67th most populous nation in the world.   read more

Lawsuit Seeks to Block Energy Dept.’s Huge Nuclear Waste Transport from Canada to U.S.

The Energy Dept's unprecedented proposed transfer of "a toxic liquid stew" containing nuclear waste between Canada and the U.S violates federal law, seven environmental groups claim in court. The proposed $60 million deal would see more than 6,000 gallons of the liquid waste transported more than 1,100 miles. "The radioactive waste byproducts...are acknowledged to be among the most radioactively hazardous materials on Earth," the complaint states.   read more

VW Payout to Deceived American VW Owners: $15 Billion; Payout to European Owners: $0

VW owners in the U.S. will receive about $20,000 per car as compensation for the company’s diesel deception. VW owners in Europe at most get a software update and a short length of plastic tubing. “Why are they getting so much and we’re getting nothing?” Franz said of U.S. owners. The startling gap in treatment is the result of European laws that shield corporations from class action suits brought by unhappy consumers.   read more

Largest Obama-Era Transfer of Guantánamo Detainees Cuts Prison Population by 20%

While it appears increasingly unlikely that President Obama will succeed in closing the prison before he leaves office in January, the transfer brought him significantly closer to another goal: getting out every detainee who has been approved for transfer. Some have been stranded on that list for years because they could not be repatriated. When Obama took office in 2009, 242 detainees remained at Guantánamo.   read more

Republican Lawmakers Block Promised Visas for At-Risk Afghan Translators Who Aided U.S.

Sen. John McCain, a longtime champion of the visa program, was blunt. “People are going to die,” McCain said on the Senate floor, challenging a fellow Republican who was blocking more visas. “Don’t you understand the gravity of that?” Republican infighting has left in question whether a special visa program for translators who assisted the military during the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq will be renewed, a devastating blow to 12,000 Afghans whose immigration applications are in limbo.   read more

Rise in Waterborne Illnesses in U.S. Linked to Global Warming

About a dozen species of vibrio bacteria make people sick from eating raw or undercooked seafood or drinking or swimming in tainted water. Until now, researchers had indirectly linked climate change to an increase in illnesses from the bacteria. DNA, a 50-year database of plankton, water temperatures and disease reports show a more comprehensive connection. The most consistent tracking of vibrio illnesses were in the U.S. The CDC blames about 100 deaths a year on vibrio on average.   read more

Mystery GMO Wheat Found Growing in Washington State Could Affect Foreign Trade with U.S.

A farmer discovered 22 plants in an unplanted field, and the wheat was developed to be resistant to the herbicide known as Roundup, created by seed giant Monsanto. Federal officials said they were working with the farmer to ensure that none of the modified wheat is sold. South Korea said Friday that it will inspect U.S. wheat imports for genetically modified wheat. The Ministry of Food and Drug Safety said it has asked the USDA for information on the unapproved wheat and inspection methods.   read more

U.S. Immigration Paradox: Welcoming More Refugees Fleeing Violence Even as They Are Deported

On one hand, the government was broadening a program for children fleeing three violence-racked countries there, allowing for more applicants to come to the U.S. as refugees. At the same time, it continued to deport young people from Central America who crossed the border and asked for protection — sending some of them back to those same countries. “Government is a big and complicated beast, and it can do contradictory things at the same time,” said Eve Stotland, legal director of The Door.   read more

U.S. Says It Plans to Expand Central American Refugee Admission Program

The White House has reached an agreement with Costa Rica to serve as a temporary host site for the most vulnerable migrants from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras while they wait to be processed as refugees. The U.N. high commissioner for refugees has agreed to set up an unusual process for reviewing requests for people in their home countries to qualify as refugees and send them to Costa Rica if they are facing immediate danger.   read more

Guantánamo Judge Accused of Secretly Allowing Destruction of CIA “Black Site” Prison Evidence

Allegations of evidence destruction have swirled around the case since May. The defense team believes the government removed some fixtures from a room in the CIA prison used for torture, but did not entirely destroy the structure. The prosecution has offered photographs and diagrams as a substitute for the top secret evidence, the report said, noting that prosecutors have apparently not revealed the identity of the nation housing the prison to preserve foreign relations.   read more

Guantánamo Defense Attorney Wants Tribunal Site Tested for Toxic Chemicals

A 9/11 defender told a military judge Thursday he can find no other example that mirrors the Guantánamo war court — an abandoned airfield tainted by fuel spills and toxic chemicals transformed into a court. “This is weird,” Air Force Capt. Michael Schwartz, the senior defense attorney for suspected 9/11 plotter Walid bin Attash, said of his request for the court to fund a toxicology expert to determine if the court is safe to work in.   read more

U.S. Military Urges Release of Guantánamo Detainee Who Wrote Bestselling Book Detailing Abuse

Slahi was subjected to interrogation approved by Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld. Slahi wrote of extensive sleep deprivation, beatings, dousings with ice water, and of being shackled in a freezing cell. He denied involvement with terrorism and was never charged with a crime. He was accused of working on chemical and biological weapons for Al Qaeda, but documents showed that intelligence officials decided he “was probably misidentified” and had merely been a bookkeeper and translator.   read more

Wall Street Profits from Tax Avoidance Deals that Harm Danish Taxpayers

Goldman Sachs, Citigroup, Merrill Lynch and other banks have profited for years by arranging short-term loans of stock in Danish companies, a maneuver that has deprived Denmark of substantial tax revenues. With the banks’ help, stock owners avoid paying Danish authorities the dividend taxes they would otherwise owe. The lost revenue is significant: It equals roughly 1.1% of the budget deficit of the Danish government last year, or about 70 Danish crowns ($10) for each resident.   read more

Ireland, Beneficiary of U.S. Corporate “Inversion” Deals, Celebrates Huge Jump in GDP

In the U.S., officials have derided “inversion deals,” which allow a U.S. company to move its headquarters overseas to cut its tax bills. In Ireland, they are celebrating them. The Irish government Tuesday revised the country’s economic growth rate in 2015 to 26.3% from a preliminary estimate of 7.8%. Ireland’s economy has been on the upswing since the country repaid its bailout, and at play was the magic of those inversion deals and other sleights of finance.   read more

Traffic Fatalities in U.S. Far Worse Than in Other Affluent Countries

The statistics probably reflect that Americans tend to drive more miles and for longer periods, said Dr. Guohua Li. "The more you're on the road, the more you're exposed to the potential for a crash," agreed Erin Sauber-Schatz, lead author of the CDC report. U.S. drivers also more often speed, drive drunk and take other risks, Li said. The U.S. toll went up last year to 35,200, as drivers racked up more miles behind the wheel as a result of an improved economy and lower gas prices.   read more

Obama Administration Accused of Misleading Asylum Seekers

Immigration agents never told them they had to file for asylum within one year after they entered the country, nor did they present a viable path for meeting that deadline. "Plaintiffs' ability to seek asylum has been thwarted by a government process that is anything but fair; indeed, it conflicts with fundamental notions of due process..." the complaint states. The 1996 law created an expedited removal process for undocumented immigrants caught within 100 miles of the border.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1789 News
1 2 3 ... 112 Next

U.S. and the World

1 to 16 of about 1789 News
1 2 3 ... 112 Next

Olympics: If African-American Women were a Nation, They’d be in 6th Place

African-American women earned gold medals in 15 events (including participation in team sports) at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games. If they had been a nation, they would have been in sixth place. This despite with a population of about 19.6 million, they would be only the 67th most populous nation in the world.   read more

Lawsuit Seeks to Block Energy Dept.’s Huge Nuclear Waste Transport from Canada to U.S.

The Energy Dept's unprecedented proposed transfer of "a toxic liquid stew" containing nuclear waste between Canada and the U.S violates federal law, seven environmental groups claim in court. The proposed $60 million deal would see more than 6,000 gallons of the liquid waste transported more than 1,100 miles. "The radioactive waste byproducts...are acknowledged to be among the most radioactively hazardous materials on Earth," the complaint states.   read more

VW Payout to Deceived American VW Owners: $15 Billion; Payout to European Owners: $0

VW owners in the U.S. will receive about $20,000 per car as compensation for the company’s diesel deception. VW owners in Europe at most get a software update and a short length of plastic tubing. “Why are they getting so much and we’re getting nothing?” Franz said of U.S. owners. The startling gap in treatment is the result of European laws that shield corporations from class action suits brought by unhappy consumers.   read more

Largest Obama-Era Transfer of Guantánamo Detainees Cuts Prison Population by 20%

While it appears increasingly unlikely that President Obama will succeed in closing the prison before he leaves office in January, the transfer brought him significantly closer to another goal: getting out every detainee who has been approved for transfer. Some have been stranded on that list for years because they could not be repatriated. When Obama took office in 2009, 242 detainees remained at Guantánamo.   read more

Republican Lawmakers Block Promised Visas for At-Risk Afghan Translators Who Aided U.S.

Sen. John McCain, a longtime champion of the visa program, was blunt. “People are going to die,” McCain said on the Senate floor, challenging a fellow Republican who was blocking more visas. “Don’t you understand the gravity of that?” Republican infighting has left in question whether a special visa program for translators who assisted the military during the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq will be renewed, a devastating blow to 12,000 Afghans whose immigration applications are in limbo.   read more

Rise in Waterborne Illnesses in U.S. Linked to Global Warming

About a dozen species of vibrio bacteria make people sick from eating raw or undercooked seafood or drinking or swimming in tainted water. Until now, researchers had indirectly linked climate change to an increase in illnesses from the bacteria. DNA, a 50-year database of plankton, water temperatures and disease reports show a more comprehensive connection. The most consistent tracking of vibrio illnesses were in the U.S. The CDC blames about 100 deaths a year on vibrio on average.   read more

Mystery GMO Wheat Found Growing in Washington State Could Affect Foreign Trade with U.S.

A farmer discovered 22 plants in an unplanted field, and the wheat was developed to be resistant to the herbicide known as Roundup, created by seed giant Monsanto. Federal officials said they were working with the farmer to ensure that none of the modified wheat is sold. South Korea said Friday that it will inspect U.S. wheat imports for genetically modified wheat. The Ministry of Food and Drug Safety said it has asked the USDA for information on the unapproved wheat and inspection methods.   read more

U.S. Immigration Paradox: Welcoming More Refugees Fleeing Violence Even as They Are Deported

On one hand, the government was broadening a program for children fleeing three violence-racked countries there, allowing for more applicants to come to the U.S. as refugees. At the same time, it continued to deport young people from Central America who crossed the border and asked for protection — sending some of them back to those same countries. “Government is a big and complicated beast, and it can do contradictory things at the same time,” said Eve Stotland, legal director of The Door.   read more

U.S. Says It Plans to Expand Central American Refugee Admission Program

The White House has reached an agreement with Costa Rica to serve as a temporary host site for the most vulnerable migrants from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras while they wait to be processed as refugees. The U.N. high commissioner for refugees has agreed to set up an unusual process for reviewing requests for people in their home countries to qualify as refugees and send them to Costa Rica if they are facing immediate danger.   read more

Guantánamo Judge Accused of Secretly Allowing Destruction of CIA “Black Site” Prison Evidence

Allegations of evidence destruction have swirled around the case since May. The defense team believes the government removed some fixtures from a room in the CIA prison used for torture, but did not entirely destroy the structure. The prosecution has offered photographs and diagrams as a substitute for the top secret evidence, the report said, noting that prosecutors have apparently not revealed the identity of the nation housing the prison to preserve foreign relations.   read more

Guantánamo Defense Attorney Wants Tribunal Site Tested for Toxic Chemicals

A 9/11 defender told a military judge Thursday he can find no other example that mirrors the Guantánamo war court — an abandoned airfield tainted by fuel spills and toxic chemicals transformed into a court. “This is weird,” Air Force Capt. Michael Schwartz, the senior defense attorney for suspected 9/11 plotter Walid bin Attash, said of his request for the court to fund a toxicology expert to determine if the court is safe to work in.   read more

U.S. Military Urges Release of Guantánamo Detainee Who Wrote Bestselling Book Detailing Abuse

Slahi was subjected to interrogation approved by Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld. Slahi wrote of extensive sleep deprivation, beatings, dousings with ice water, and of being shackled in a freezing cell. He denied involvement with terrorism and was never charged with a crime. He was accused of working on chemical and biological weapons for Al Qaeda, but documents showed that intelligence officials decided he “was probably misidentified” and had merely been a bookkeeper and translator.   read more

Wall Street Profits from Tax Avoidance Deals that Harm Danish Taxpayers

Goldman Sachs, Citigroup, Merrill Lynch and other banks have profited for years by arranging short-term loans of stock in Danish companies, a maneuver that has deprived Denmark of substantial tax revenues. With the banks’ help, stock owners avoid paying Danish authorities the dividend taxes they would otherwise owe. The lost revenue is significant: It equals roughly 1.1% of the budget deficit of the Danish government last year, or about 70 Danish crowns ($10) for each resident.   read more

Ireland, Beneficiary of U.S. Corporate “Inversion” Deals, Celebrates Huge Jump in GDP

In the U.S., officials have derided “inversion deals,” which allow a U.S. company to move its headquarters overseas to cut its tax bills. In Ireland, they are celebrating them. The Irish government Tuesday revised the country’s economic growth rate in 2015 to 26.3% from a preliminary estimate of 7.8%. Ireland’s economy has been on the upswing since the country repaid its bailout, and at play was the magic of those inversion deals and other sleights of finance.   read more

Traffic Fatalities in U.S. Far Worse Than in Other Affluent Countries

The statistics probably reflect that Americans tend to drive more miles and for longer periods, said Dr. Guohua Li. "The more you're on the road, the more you're exposed to the potential for a crash," agreed Erin Sauber-Schatz, lead author of the CDC report. U.S. drivers also more often speed, drive drunk and take other risks, Li said. The U.S. toll went up last year to 35,200, as drivers racked up more miles behind the wheel as a result of an improved economy and lower gas prices.   read more

Obama Administration Accused of Misleading Asylum Seekers

Immigration agents never told them they had to file for asylum within one year after they entered the country, nor did they present a viable path for meeting that deadline. "Plaintiffs' ability to seek asylum has been thwarted by a government process that is anything but fair; indeed, it conflicts with fundamental notions of due process..." the complaint states. The 1996 law created an expedited removal process for undocumented immigrants caught within 100 miles of the border.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1789 News
1 2 3 ... 112 Next