U.S. and the World

1 to 16 of about 1431 News
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Contrary to Obama Claims, 88% of Deportees Committed Minor Infractions or No Crime at All

Only 12% of deportations in 2013 committed a serious or “Level 1” offense (defined by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) as someone convicted of an “aggravated felony,” or two or more felonies). About half of all deportees were charged with violating traffic or immigration laws. Those guilty of entering the country illegally comprised 22.7% of deportations. Such an offense is classified as a petty misdemeanor under the federal criminal code, TRAC noted.   read more

Blackwater Guards Finally to be Tried for Killing 14 Iraqi Civilians

Following the incident, DSS officials forced the Blackwater specialists to provide written statements of the shootings in exchange for full immunity from criminal prosecution. That decision by the State Department derailed the U.S. Department of Justice’s first attempt to prosecute the guards once they returned to the U.S. A federal appeals court then reinstated the charges, saying the lower court had erred in dismissing the case.   read more

Afghan Children Die by the Dozens because of Explosives U.S. Left Behind at Firing Ranges

The open fields of Afghanistan have become lethal for many of that nation’s children due to scores of unexploded ordinance left by U.S. military forces. Dozens of Afghan children have died after wandering into abandoned U.S. firing ranges filled with undetonated artillery shells, rockets and grenades. The U.N. says at least 70 civilians—62 of whom were children—have died since 2012 in and around U.S. or NATO firing ranges or bases.   read more

Judge Rules Terrorism Victims can Seize $500 Million Midtown Manhattan Office Tower Owned by Iranians

In September 2013, another federal judge, Katherine Forrest, decided the majority interest held by Assa Corp. and the Alavi Foundation was a front for Iran’s Bank Melli, making it a front for the Iranian government. Forrest also ruled that the U.S. government could take control of the building. The plaintiffs include numerous individuals who claim they were victimized by various terrorism acts supported by Iran, including 1983 bombings in Beirut, Lebanon.   read more

Obama Administration Approves Boeing’s Sale of Airplane Parts to Iran…First Time in 35 Years

As part of the interim agreement on Iran’s nuclear program, the U.S. government is allowing Boeing and General Electric (GE), which manufactures jet engines, to export spare parts to that nation. The accord allowing the sales calls for Iran to stop production of enriched uranium. In exchange, Western nations are allowing $6 billion to $7 billion in trade with the country.   read more

U.S. Military Engaged in 546 Separate “Activities” in Africa Last Year

The U.S. military is involved in airstrikes targeting suspected militants, night raids aimed at kidnapping terror suspects, airlifts of French and African troops onto the battlefields of proxy wars, and evacuation operations in destabilized countries. Much of what the U.S. military does in Africa is train, advise, equip and fund local armies.   read more

U.S. Sanctions against Russia May Hit Concerts by Miley Cyrus, Justin Timberlake and Elton John

Obama announced the U.S. government would impose sanctions on 27 close friends and associates of Putin. The list included billionaires Gennady Timchenko and brothers Arkady and Boris Rotenberg. The three men jointly own a concert venue, Hartwall Areena, in Helsinki, Finland, which is supposed to host several concerts featuring Miley Cyrus, Justin Timberlake, Robbie Williams, Peter Gabriel, Aerosmith, Elton John and Nine Inch Nails.   read more

Family Sues BP after Terrorists Killed a U.S. Contractor in Algeria

According to Fred Hagans, the lawyer representing Buttaccio’s family, BP denied Buttaccio cell phone access to the company’s wireless network because he was not in a management position. Had he been able to access it, he could have received “texts and news updates that allowed others to stay hidden and survive the attack.” In addition, the suit claims, BP had not put a plan in place to deal with an attack.   read more

No Americans Died in Afghanistan or Iraq in March…First Month in 11 Years

The streak of Americans dying in the wars-on-terror finally ended in March, after more than a decade of continuous fatalities. March 2014 witnessed zero U.S. deaths in Afghanistan, the first time without an American life lost in that conflict or the Iraq war since 2003. However, it took only one day into April for the U.S. to again record a fatality. On April 1, Army Captain James E. Chaffin died in Kandahar, Afghanistan. The 27-year-old’s death was not combat related.   read more

The Putin-Crimea-NBA Connection: Will Ownership of the Nets Move to Russia?

Prokhorov still has political ambitions back in Russia, where it was rumored he wants to run for mayor of Moscow. But currently he can’t run for office, not since Putin pushed through a law outlawing any Russian with foreign assets from being elected. Second, the Obama administration has already imposed some sanctions against Russia’s elite, and if more are put into place, that could leave Prokhorov’s NBA franchise vulnerable.   read more

State Dept. Blocks Publication of Study it Commissioned on Hate-Filled Saudi Textbooks

According to the report, Saudi textbooks have included the following passages: “Kill the person who changes his religion … for there is no benefit in keeping them alive.” “It is permissible to kill a sorcerer” (particularly notable given Saudi police arrested more than 200 people in 2012 alone for alleged sorcery). Pagans, Christians and Jews are “the worst creatures” who “will dwell in hellfire.” God made Jews out of “swine and apes.”   read more

U.S. Foreign Policy in Africa: Oil and Commandoes

Of all crude oil imported to the U.S. in 2006, 22% came from Africa; nearly a third of China’s oil imports currently come from that continent. It has been projected that those percentages will increase for both countries. African oil is particularly desirable to refiners because it tends to be high-quality with a low amount of sulfur.   read more

Are We Already in the Age of Surveillance Time Machines?

The program can look “into the past” and allow spies to “retrieve audio of interest that was not tasked at the time of the original call.” When a subject is identified, the NSA can use the month’s worth of calls to get a history of his or her movements, associates and plans. Civil libertarians warned that it is just a matter of time before the NSA expands the program to more countries and employs technology that allows it to go back even further in time.   read more

Do Foreign Leaders even Know that Their own Spy Agencies are Cooperating with the NSA?

“For a variety of reasons, our intelligence relationships are rarely disrupted by foreign political perturbations, international or domestic,” the NSA document states. “First, we are helping our partners address critical intelligence shortfalls, just as they are assisting us. Second, in many of our foreign partners’ capitals, few senior officials outside of their defense-intelligence apparatuses are witting to any SIGINT [Signals Intelligence] connection to the U.S./NSA.”   read more

Italians Object to U.S. Rifle Ad Using Michelangelo’s David

An American gun manufacturer has outraged Italians over what they say is a crass manipulation of Renaissance art just to sell an assault weapon. Illinois-based ArmaLite produced an ad showing Michelangelo’s David holding an AR-50A1 bolt-action rifle. The ad was published in major Italian newspapers and websites. The condemnation from government and cultural fronts was sharp and immediate. “The image of David, armed, offends and infringes the law,” said Italy's minister of culture.   read more

Democratic and Republican Presidents Agree…U.N. Human Rights Treaty Doesn’t Apply to Americans

U.S. Presidents Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama have all contended that the treaty, which forbids imprisonment without trial and arbitrary killings, among other abuses, does not apply to actions taken outside the United States. This interpretation has allowed these presidents to violate anti-torture and other provisions by holding prisoners outside the United States, including at Guantánamo Bay and at “black sites” around the world.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1431 News
1 2 3 ... 90 Next

U.S. and the World

1 to 16 of about 1431 News
1 2 3 ... 90 Next

Contrary to Obama Claims, 88% of Deportees Committed Minor Infractions or No Crime at All

Only 12% of deportations in 2013 committed a serious or “Level 1” offense (defined by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) as someone convicted of an “aggravated felony,” or two or more felonies). About half of all deportees were charged with violating traffic or immigration laws. Those guilty of entering the country illegally comprised 22.7% of deportations. Such an offense is classified as a petty misdemeanor under the federal criminal code, TRAC noted.   read more

Blackwater Guards Finally to be Tried for Killing 14 Iraqi Civilians

Following the incident, DSS officials forced the Blackwater specialists to provide written statements of the shootings in exchange for full immunity from criminal prosecution. That decision by the State Department derailed the U.S. Department of Justice’s first attempt to prosecute the guards once they returned to the U.S. A federal appeals court then reinstated the charges, saying the lower court had erred in dismissing the case.   read more

Afghan Children Die by the Dozens because of Explosives U.S. Left Behind at Firing Ranges

The open fields of Afghanistan have become lethal for many of that nation’s children due to scores of unexploded ordinance left by U.S. military forces. Dozens of Afghan children have died after wandering into abandoned U.S. firing ranges filled with undetonated artillery shells, rockets and grenades. The U.N. says at least 70 civilians—62 of whom were children—have died since 2012 in and around U.S. or NATO firing ranges or bases.   read more

Judge Rules Terrorism Victims can Seize $500 Million Midtown Manhattan Office Tower Owned by Iranians

In September 2013, another federal judge, Katherine Forrest, decided the majority interest held by Assa Corp. and the Alavi Foundation was a front for Iran’s Bank Melli, making it a front for the Iranian government. Forrest also ruled that the U.S. government could take control of the building. The plaintiffs include numerous individuals who claim they were victimized by various terrorism acts supported by Iran, including 1983 bombings in Beirut, Lebanon.   read more

Obama Administration Approves Boeing’s Sale of Airplane Parts to Iran…First Time in 35 Years

As part of the interim agreement on Iran’s nuclear program, the U.S. government is allowing Boeing and General Electric (GE), which manufactures jet engines, to export spare parts to that nation. The accord allowing the sales calls for Iran to stop production of enriched uranium. In exchange, Western nations are allowing $6 billion to $7 billion in trade with the country.   read more

U.S. Military Engaged in 546 Separate “Activities” in Africa Last Year

The U.S. military is involved in airstrikes targeting suspected militants, night raids aimed at kidnapping terror suspects, airlifts of French and African troops onto the battlefields of proxy wars, and evacuation operations in destabilized countries. Much of what the U.S. military does in Africa is train, advise, equip and fund local armies.   read more

U.S. Sanctions against Russia May Hit Concerts by Miley Cyrus, Justin Timberlake and Elton John

Obama announced the U.S. government would impose sanctions on 27 close friends and associates of Putin. The list included billionaires Gennady Timchenko and brothers Arkady and Boris Rotenberg. The three men jointly own a concert venue, Hartwall Areena, in Helsinki, Finland, which is supposed to host several concerts featuring Miley Cyrus, Justin Timberlake, Robbie Williams, Peter Gabriel, Aerosmith, Elton John and Nine Inch Nails.   read more

Family Sues BP after Terrorists Killed a U.S. Contractor in Algeria

According to Fred Hagans, the lawyer representing Buttaccio’s family, BP denied Buttaccio cell phone access to the company’s wireless network because he was not in a management position. Had he been able to access it, he could have received “texts and news updates that allowed others to stay hidden and survive the attack.” In addition, the suit claims, BP had not put a plan in place to deal with an attack.   read more

No Americans Died in Afghanistan or Iraq in March…First Month in 11 Years

The streak of Americans dying in the wars-on-terror finally ended in March, after more than a decade of continuous fatalities. March 2014 witnessed zero U.S. deaths in Afghanistan, the first time without an American life lost in that conflict or the Iraq war since 2003. However, it took only one day into April for the U.S. to again record a fatality. On April 1, Army Captain James E. Chaffin died in Kandahar, Afghanistan. The 27-year-old’s death was not combat related.   read more

The Putin-Crimea-NBA Connection: Will Ownership of the Nets Move to Russia?

Prokhorov still has political ambitions back in Russia, where it was rumored he wants to run for mayor of Moscow. But currently he can’t run for office, not since Putin pushed through a law outlawing any Russian with foreign assets from being elected. Second, the Obama administration has already imposed some sanctions against Russia’s elite, and if more are put into place, that could leave Prokhorov’s NBA franchise vulnerable.   read more

State Dept. Blocks Publication of Study it Commissioned on Hate-Filled Saudi Textbooks

According to the report, Saudi textbooks have included the following passages: “Kill the person who changes his religion … for there is no benefit in keeping them alive.” “It is permissible to kill a sorcerer” (particularly notable given Saudi police arrested more than 200 people in 2012 alone for alleged sorcery). Pagans, Christians and Jews are “the worst creatures” who “will dwell in hellfire.” God made Jews out of “swine and apes.”   read more

U.S. Foreign Policy in Africa: Oil and Commandoes

Of all crude oil imported to the U.S. in 2006, 22% came from Africa; nearly a third of China’s oil imports currently come from that continent. It has been projected that those percentages will increase for both countries. African oil is particularly desirable to refiners because it tends to be high-quality with a low amount of sulfur.   read more

Are We Already in the Age of Surveillance Time Machines?

The program can look “into the past” and allow spies to “retrieve audio of interest that was not tasked at the time of the original call.” When a subject is identified, the NSA can use the month’s worth of calls to get a history of his or her movements, associates and plans. Civil libertarians warned that it is just a matter of time before the NSA expands the program to more countries and employs technology that allows it to go back even further in time.   read more

Do Foreign Leaders even Know that Their own Spy Agencies are Cooperating with the NSA?

“For a variety of reasons, our intelligence relationships are rarely disrupted by foreign political perturbations, international or domestic,” the NSA document states. “First, we are helping our partners address critical intelligence shortfalls, just as they are assisting us. Second, in many of our foreign partners’ capitals, few senior officials outside of their defense-intelligence apparatuses are witting to any SIGINT [Signals Intelligence] connection to the U.S./NSA.”   read more

Italians Object to U.S. Rifle Ad Using Michelangelo’s David

An American gun manufacturer has outraged Italians over what they say is a crass manipulation of Renaissance art just to sell an assault weapon. Illinois-based ArmaLite produced an ad showing Michelangelo’s David holding an AR-50A1 bolt-action rifle. The ad was published in major Italian newspapers and websites. The condemnation from government and cultural fronts was sharp and immediate. “The image of David, armed, offends and infringes the law,” said Italy's minister of culture.   read more

Democratic and Republican Presidents Agree…U.N. Human Rights Treaty Doesn’t Apply to Americans

U.S. Presidents Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama have all contended that the treaty, which forbids imprisonment without trial and arbitrary killings, among other abuses, does not apply to actions taken outside the United States. This interpretation has allowed these presidents to violate anti-torture and other provisions by holding prisoners outside the United States, including at Guantánamo Bay and at “black sites” around the world.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1431 News
1 2 3 ... 90 Next