U.S. and the World

1 to 16 of about 1753 News
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Judge Passes Buck on Assigning Blame for Decision to Leave Behind 26 U.S. Citizens during Evacuation from Yemen

Federal courts don't have authority to decide if the government has an obligation to evacuate 26 U.S. citizens stranded in war-torn Yemen, a judge ruled Tuesday. Those citizens sued Secretary of State Kerry and Secretary of Defense Carter, saying the government ignored them while ordering diplomats and military personnel to flee the war-ravaged country. While the State Dept issued a travel warning and acknowledged danger to Americans, it did nothing to evacuate U.S. citizens, the group claimed.   read more

Big Pharma and Allies in Congress Pressure Colombia to Honor Patent of Costly Cancer Drug

Health Minister Alejandro Gaviria's remarks are the strongest yet in a fight with the world's biggest drugmaker. The Colombian Embassy described intense lobbying pressure on Colombia, a staunch U.S. ally, from the pharma industry and its allies in the U.S. Congress. Gaviria said the pressure shows the forceful steps that big pharma is willing to take to protect its commercial interests. "They're very afraid that Colombia could become an example that spreads across the region," he said.   read more

While U.S. Confronts Painkiller Addiction Epidemic, Drugs’ Absence around World Leaves Many Suffering

Many ill people with a legitimate need for narcotic drugs cannot get them and are suffering and dying in pain. In Russia, India and Mexico, many doctors are reluctant to prescribe these painkillers, fearful of possible prosecution or other legal problems, even if they believe the prescriptions are justified. And in most poor and middle-income countries, these drugs are restricted and often unavailable, even for patients with terminal cancer, AIDS or grievous war wounds.   read more

Senate Proposal Would Allow Video Access to Civilian Courts by Guantánamo Detainees

Detainees at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, could plead guilty to criminal charges in civilian court via remote videoconference under a provision being considered by the Senate that could open a new avenue to whittling down the prison’s remaining population. The Senate Armed Services Committee announced late Thursday that it had included the provision in the annual National Defense Authorization Act.   read more

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Sued for Aiding International Pelt and Animal Parts Market

Eight wolves were exported in 2014 as hunting trophies and another 26 gray wolf "garments were exported from the United States for circus or traveling exhibition purposes," according to the complaint. Bishop said that animal fur exporting is big business and that pelts and parts are used all over the world. "Some people have told me that it takes about 30 bobcat pelts to make a jacket, that it is popular in China or Russia, but I don't know a lot about the industry," he said.   read more

Top Egyptian Official Blames “Tom and Jerry” Cartoons for Middle East Violence

“[Tom and Jerry] portrays the violence in a funny manner and sends the message that, yes, I can hit him…and I can blow him up with explosives. It becomes set in [the viewer’s] mind that this is natural,” said Ambassador Abdel Sadek. Despite the SIS head’s statements, it does not yet appear that the government will actually take any steps to censor Tom and Jerry or video games. However, Egypt has had a history of censoring movies, primarily due to the sexual content depicted in some scenes.   read more

Wall Street Stock Loan Schemes Take Billions from Taxpayers in Germany and 20 Other Nations

Wall Street has figured out a way to squeeze some extra income from these stocks. And German taxpayers pay for it. A spokesman for the German finance ministry called the transactions “illegitimate because their sole purpose is to avoid the legal taxation of dividends.” “Everybody and their brother was doing it in the U.S.,” said Elise Bean, who as subcommittee chief counsel helped lead the Senate’s investigation in 2008. “And I guess now everybody and their brother is doing it abroad.”   read more

Lawsuit Seeks Release of CIA Documents on U.S. Soldiers’ Exposure to Iraqi Chemical Weapons Made with U.S. Help

Now that the U.S. government has acknowledged that Western-built chemical weapons sickened U.S. soldiers in Iraq, The New York Times says the CIA can no longer deny access to records about it. The Pentagon acknowledged that more than 600 U.S. soldiers had been exposed to sarin in Iraq. The CDC links the chemicals to burns, blisters, infertility, eye damage, scarring of the respiratory system, and cancer risk. The military denied medical care to soldiers who were wounded by these weapons.   read more

Decades of Increased Enforcement at U.S.-Mexico Border has Backfired, Preventing Immigrants from Returning Home

The rapid escalation of border enforcement over the past three decades has backfired as a strategy to control undocumented immigration between Mexico and the U.S., according to new research that suggests further militarization of the border is a waste of money. "Rather than stopping undocumented Mexicans from coming to the U.S., greater enforcement stopped them from going home," said one of the researchers. "Greater enforcement also increased the risk of death and injury during border crossing."   read more

Innocent Canadian Charged as Terrorist Blames U.S. for Forcing Canada to Increase Terrorism Prosecutions

De Jaray says she was "collateral damage" in Canada's attempt to curry favor with the U.S. "Canada began targeting its own citizens in order to create the perception that Canada was 'tough on crime' and, in particular, terrorism, to win favor with the United States and secure contracts for military goods and services," the complaint states. "Ms. De Jaray lost her home, her business, her savings, her health... Ms. de Jaray's life was destroyed...without evidence and without reason."   read more

U.S. Denial of Visa for Brutal Afghan V.P. Highlights U.S.-Afghanistan Paradox

Dostum’s ascent to power in Afghanistan exemplifies a central U.S. failure in the war. The U.S. has built and paid for a government that is filled with warlords and power brokers whom U.S. officials say pose as much of a threat to the stability of Afghanistan as the insurgents. Now the U.S. had to deny a visa to the No. 2 official, an alleged war criminal, in a government whose survival depends on the presence of nearly 10,000 U.S. troops and tens of billions of dollars a year in assistance.   read more

Portuguese Court Clears Way for Extradition of Ex-CIA Agent to Italy in Bush-Era Kidnapping Case

De Sousa has exhausted her appeals in the Italian judicial system. It is not clear whether, upon her return to Italy, she would immediately begin serving her prison term, which would last a minimum of four years. Portuguese courts have stated that De Sousa, once sent to Italy, should have the right to a new trial, or at least the opportunity to present new evidence and witnesses in an appeal. But one of the Italian prosecutors said she would be sent straight to prison, “and that’s that."   read more

Leader of Syria Rescue Group, Arriving in U.S. for Award, Is Refused Entry

Saleh sought to turn the focus away from his own case to the experience of millions of Syrians who find the world’s borders closed to them. “In any airport, the treatment we get as Syrians is different,” he said. “The way they look at us, we are suspected.” Said USAID's Gayle Smith: "Raed and his colleagues don’t run away. They run toward the bombs, protected only by their white helmets and driven by a simple belief inspired by the Quran — to save one life is to save humanity.”   read more

Saudi-9/11 Controversy Heats Up on Presidential Campaign Trail while Obama Meets with Saudi Sheikhs

With New York bracing for a primary Tuesday, both Democratic candidates came out in favor of Schumer's bill, though Bernie Sanders hit the issue harder and sooner than Hillary Clinton. While both backed the legislation, the Vermont senator went farther in calling for more sunlight to shine on the Saudi section of the 9/11 commission's report. "The families of those lost on that terrible day have the right to review any evidence that connects the hijackers to foreign supporters..." he said.   read more

European Officials Warn Its Citizens’ Privacy at Risk from U.S. Firms, Spy Agencies under Data-Sharing Pact

Sounding the alarm over the current deal, national privacy watchdogs from France, Germany and other EU member states say they worry that U.S. companies like Google, Facebook and Amazon could misuse data, including information from search engine queries and social media posts. They also say they fear that U.S. law enforcement and intelligence agencies might gain access to European citizens’ personal information without sufficient safeguards in place.   read more

U.S. Lobster Industry Accuses Sweden of Feigning Disease Concerns to Hide Big-Business Motives

Exactly how 32 American lobsters wound up in Swedish waters isn't clear. But many suspect they were exported to Europe and then either escaped or were set free by animal rights activists. Whatever the case, their discovery has set off a high-stakes trade dispute between Sweden on one side and the U.S. and Canada on the other. The North Americans are recruiting members of Maine's congressional delegation and U.S. ambassadors and asking Secretary of State John Kerry and the White House for help.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1753 News
1 2 3 ... 110 Next

U.S. and the World

1 to 16 of about 1753 News
1 2 3 ... 110 Next

Judge Passes Buck on Assigning Blame for Decision to Leave Behind 26 U.S. Citizens during Evacuation from Yemen

Federal courts don't have authority to decide if the government has an obligation to evacuate 26 U.S. citizens stranded in war-torn Yemen, a judge ruled Tuesday. Those citizens sued Secretary of State Kerry and Secretary of Defense Carter, saying the government ignored them while ordering diplomats and military personnel to flee the war-ravaged country. While the State Dept issued a travel warning and acknowledged danger to Americans, it did nothing to evacuate U.S. citizens, the group claimed.   read more

Big Pharma and Allies in Congress Pressure Colombia to Honor Patent of Costly Cancer Drug

Health Minister Alejandro Gaviria's remarks are the strongest yet in a fight with the world's biggest drugmaker. The Colombian Embassy described intense lobbying pressure on Colombia, a staunch U.S. ally, from the pharma industry and its allies in the U.S. Congress. Gaviria said the pressure shows the forceful steps that big pharma is willing to take to protect its commercial interests. "They're very afraid that Colombia could become an example that spreads across the region," he said.   read more

While U.S. Confronts Painkiller Addiction Epidemic, Drugs’ Absence around World Leaves Many Suffering

Many ill people with a legitimate need for narcotic drugs cannot get them and are suffering and dying in pain. In Russia, India and Mexico, many doctors are reluctant to prescribe these painkillers, fearful of possible prosecution or other legal problems, even if they believe the prescriptions are justified. And in most poor and middle-income countries, these drugs are restricted and often unavailable, even for patients with terminal cancer, AIDS or grievous war wounds.   read more

Senate Proposal Would Allow Video Access to Civilian Courts by Guantánamo Detainees

Detainees at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, could plead guilty to criminal charges in civilian court via remote videoconference under a provision being considered by the Senate that could open a new avenue to whittling down the prison’s remaining population. The Senate Armed Services Committee announced late Thursday that it had included the provision in the annual National Defense Authorization Act.   read more

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Sued for Aiding International Pelt and Animal Parts Market

Eight wolves were exported in 2014 as hunting trophies and another 26 gray wolf "garments were exported from the United States for circus or traveling exhibition purposes," according to the complaint. Bishop said that animal fur exporting is big business and that pelts and parts are used all over the world. "Some people have told me that it takes about 30 bobcat pelts to make a jacket, that it is popular in China or Russia, but I don't know a lot about the industry," he said.   read more

Top Egyptian Official Blames “Tom and Jerry” Cartoons for Middle East Violence

“[Tom and Jerry] portrays the violence in a funny manner and sends the message that, yes, I can hit him…and I can blow him up with explosives. It becomes set in [the viewer’s] mind that this is natural,” said Ambassador Abdel Sadek. Despite the SIS head’s statements, it does not yet appear that the government will actually take any steps to censor Tom and Jerry or video games. However, Egypt has had a history of censoring movies, primarily due to the sexual content depicted in some scenes.   read more

Wall Street Stock Loan Schemes Take Billions from Taxpayers in Germany and 20 Other Nations

Wall Street has figured out a way to squeeze some extra income from these stocks. And German taxpayers pay for it. A spokesman for the German finance ministry called the transactions “illegitimate because their sole purpose is to avoid the legal taxation of dividends.” “Everybody and their brother was doing it in the U.S.,” said Elise Bean, who as subcommittee chief counsel helped lead the Senate’s investigation in 2008. “And I guess now everybody and their brother is doing it abroad.”   read more

Lawsuit Seeks Release of CIA Documents on U.S. Soldiers’ Exposure to Iraqi Chemical Weapons Made with U.S. Help

Now that the U.S. government has acknowledged that Western-built chemical weapons sickened U.S. soldiers in Iraq, The New York Times says the CIA can no longer deny access to records about it. The Pentagon acknowledged that more than 600 U.S. soldiers had been exposed to sarin in Iraq. The CDC links the chemicals to burns, blisters, infertility, eye damage, scarring of the respiratory system, and cancer risk. The military denied medical care to soldiers who were wounded by these weapons.   read more

Decades of Increased Enforcement at U.S.-Mexico Border has Backfired, Preventing Immigrants from Returning Home

The rapid escalation of border enforcement over the past three decades has backfired as a strategy to control undocumented immigration between Mexico and the U.S., according to new research that suggests further militarization of the border is a waste of money. "Rather than stopping undocumented Mexicans from coming to the U.S., greater enforcement stopped them from going home," said one of the researchers. "Greater enforcement also increased the risk of death and injury during border crossing."   read more

Innocent Canadian Charged as Terrorist Blames U.S. for Forcing Canada to Increase Terrorism Prosecutions

De Jaray says she was "collateral damage" in Canada's attempt to curry favor with the U.S. "Canada began targeting its own citizens in order to create the perception that Canada was 'tough on crime' and, in particular, terrorism, to win favor with the United States and secure contracts for military goods and services," the complaint states. "Ms. De Jaray lost her home, her business, her savings, her health... Ms. de Jaray's life was destroyed...without evidence and without reason."   read more

U.S. Denial of Visa for Brutal Afghan V.P. Highlights U.S.-Afghanistan Paradox

Dostum’s ascent to power in Afghanistan exemplifies a central U.S. failure in the war. The U.S. has built and paid for a government that is filled with warlords and power brokers whom U.S. officials say pose as much of a threat to the stability of Afghanistan as the insurgents. Now the U.S. had to deny a visa to the No. 2 official, an alleged war criminal, in a government whose survival depends on the presence of nearly 10,000 U.S. troops and tens of billions of dollars a year in assistance.   read more

Portuguese Court Clears Way for Extradition of Ex-CIA Agent to Italy in Bush-Era Kidnapping Case

De Sousa has exhausted her appeals in the Italian judicial system. It is not clear whether, upon her return to Italy, she would immediately begin serving her prison term, which would last a minimum of four years. Portuguese courts have stated that De Sousa, once sent to Italy, should have the right to a new trial, or at least the opportunity to present new evidence and witnesses in an appeal. But one of the Italian prosecutors said she would be sent straight to prison, “and that’s that."   read more

Leader of Syria Rescue Group, Arriving in U.S. for Award, Is Refused Entry

Saleh sought to turn the focus away from his own case to the experience of millions of Syrians who find the world’s borders closed to them. “In any airport, the treatment we get as Syrians is different,” he said. “The way they look at us, we are suspected.” Said USAID's Gayle Smith: "Raed and his colleagues don’t run away. They run toward the bombs, protected only by their white helmets and driven by a simple belief inspired by the Quran — to save one life is to save humanity.”   read more

Saudi-9/11 Controversy Heats Up on Presidential Campaign Trail while Obama Meets with Saudi Sheikhs

With New York bracing for a primary Tuesday, both Democratic candidates came out in favor of Schumer's bill, though Bernie Sanders hit the issue harder and sooner than Hillary Clinton. While both backed the legislation, the Vermont senator went farther in calling for more sunlight to shine on the Saudi section of the 9/11 commission's report. "The families of those lost on that terrible day have the right to review any evidence that connects the hijackers to foreign supporters..." he said.   read more

European Officials Warn Its Citizens’ Privacy at Risk from U.S. Firms, Spy Agencies under Data-Sharing Pact

Sounding the alarm over the current deal, national privacy watchdogs from France, Germany and other EU member states say they worry that U.S. companies like Google, Facebook and Amazon could misuse data, including information from search engine queries and social media posts. They also say they fear that U.S. law enforcement and intelligence agencies might gain access to European citizens’ personal information without sufficient safeguards in place.   read more

U.S. Lobster Industry Accuses Sweden of Feigning Disease Concerns to Hide Big-Business Motives

Exactly how 32 American lobsters wound up in Swedish waters isn't clear. But many suspect they were exported to Europe and then either escaped or were set free by animal rights activists. Whatever the case, their discovery has set off a high-stakes trade dispute between Sweden on one side and the U.S. and Canada on the other. The North Americans are recruiting members of Maine's congressional delegation and U.S. ambassadors and asking Secretary of State John Kerry and the White House for help.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1753 News
1 2 3 ... 110 Next