Controversies

1 to 16 of about 4567 News
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Checkpoint That Turned Up Eight Kilos of Cocaine Is Ruled Unconstitutional

Texas police who found 8 kilos of cocaine during a random search of a Greyhound bus “created a checkpoint that trespassed on the Constitution” so the drugs cannot be used as evidence, a federal judge ruled. “Brief stops at checkpoints are reasonable if they are for a narrow particular law enforcement purpose directly connected to the use of the roads,” Hughes wrote, citing Supreme Court precedent.   read more

Labor Department Investigating Wells Fargo Worker Abuse

The U.S. Labor Department is investigating possible abuses of employees by Wells Fargo in connection with the bank’s alleged efforts to open millions of unauthorized accounts to meet sales goals. The scandal over millions of deposit and credit card accounts allegedly opened without customers’ permission has widened. The Labor Department review comes atop investigations by congressional committees and federal prosecutors.   read more

Environmental Groups Criticize Changes to Endangered Species Act

The two federal agencies tasked with listing endangered species have finalized revisions to the petition process, but environmentalists see the changes as limiting and burdensome. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service claim the latest changes are part of the Obama administration’s efforts since 2011 to make the Endangered Species Act listing process more transparent, easier to implement and more effective.   read more

Court Says Ohio Purge of Voter Rolls Is Illegal

Ohio cannot remove voters from registration rolls for failing to vote, the Sixth Circuit ruled. A three-judge panel determined that Ohio’s “supplemental process” for purging voters from registration rolls violates the National Voter Registration Act. The two-step process begins when a voter fails to respond to an address confirmation mailer, and ends when the individual fails to vote in consecutive federal elections.   read more

Half a Million U.S. Homes Lack Proper Plumbing

While that is not a hardship for more affluent communities — about one in five American homes are not on city sewer lines — the legacy of rural poverty has left its imprint here: Many people have failing septic tanks and are too poor to fix them. Others, like Rudolph, have nothing at all. That is not so uncommon. Nearly half a million households in the United States lack the basic dignity of hot and cold running water, a bathtub or shower, or a working flush toilet.   read more

More Than a Third of Calls to Vets’ Suicide Hotline Roll Over

More than one-third of calls to a suicide hotline for troubled veterans are not being answered by front-line staffers because of poor work habits and other problems at the Department of Veterans Affairs, according to the hotline’s former director. Some hotline workers handle fewer than five calls per day and leave before their shifts end, even as crisis calls have increased sharply in recent years, said Greg Hughes, the former director of the VA’s Veterans Crisis Line.   read more

Wells Fargo Employees Sue Bank for Being Pressured to Open Unneeded Accounts

Former and present Wells Fargo employees in California filed a $2.6 billion class action against the bank, claiming they are the “biggest victims” of the bank’s policy of opening accounts without customers’ knowledge. The bank’s aggressive and illegal sales tactics pushed employees to “breaking point.” Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf saw Wells Fargo stock soar as a result, while thousands of employees earning $12 per hour were left to shoulder the blame for banks’ conduct, the 26-page lawsuit says.   read more

Warming Oceans May Kill Off Baby Lobsters

Scientists found that lobster larvae struggled to survive when they were reared in water 5 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than the temperatures that are currently typical of the western Gulf of Maine, a key lobster fishing area off of New England. Five degrees is how much the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change expects the Gulf of Maine’s temperature to warm by the year 2100.   read more

Addiction Treatment Price Gouging Gets House Scrutiny

As the U.S. faces a steadily increasing scourge of opioid addiction, prices for lifesaving drugs to treat overdoses and addiction have skyrocketed. A decade ago, the antidote for opioid overdose – naloxone – cost $1 per dose. Now, the drug costs $40. “It’s beyond dispute that such price increases have had a devastating impact on patients, their families, insurers, first responders and health care providers,” Rep. John Conyers (D-Michigan) said Thursday.   read more

Law Professor Says Trump Could Be Impeached Over “University” if Elected

A University of Utah law professor believes the fraud allegations against Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s now-defunct real estate school could constitute impeachable offenses if he is elected Nov. 8. Christopher Peterson released a 23-page academic paper this week outlining how the fraud and racketeering claims in three lawsuits against Trump University, if proven, would rise to the level of impeachable offenses under the Constitution.   read more

BP to Settle 25,000 Suits Over Toxic Refinery

BP is poised to settle a mass tort lawsuit with more than 25,000 people who were exposed to toxic emissions from its southeast Texas refinery. More than 40,000 residents of Texas City and neighboring La Marque sued BP, claiming that over 40 days in April and May 2010 the company released more than 500,000 pounds of toxic chemicals, including carcinogenic benzene, after diverting the compounds to the flare that was only 33 to 66 percent efficient.   read more

Singer Cancels University of Texas Show Because of Concealed Gun Policy

Singer-songwriter Ray LaMontagne canceled his show at the University of Texas’ Bass Concert Hall over the school’s policy to allow patrons to carry concealed handguns at the venue. Senate Bill 11, also called campus carry, was passed in 2015 by the Texas Legislature. It allows concealed carry of handguns by license holders on state college and university campuses, and bars schools from prohibiting them except in certain areas. The law took effect Aug. 1.   read more

Government Urges That Bumble Bee Be Placed on Endangered Species List

Federal wildlife officials made a formal recommendation to list the rusty patched bumble bee as an endangered species because it has disappeared from about 90% of its historic range in just the past two decades. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service made the recommendation after the Xerces Societypresented studies showing it was struggling due to a combination of disease, habitat loss, climate change and overuse of pesticides on commercial crops.   read more

Scientists Prove Texas Earthquakes Were Caused by Fracking

In 2012 and 2013, earthquakes — five of them considered significant — shook East Texas near Timpson. A team of scientists for the first time were able to track the uplifting ground movements in the earthquake using radar from satellites. A study says it confirms that these were not natural, something scientists had previously said was likely using a more traditional analysis.   read more

Public Disclosure of Medical Treatment Trial Results Now Ensured by New Federal Rules

At issue is how to help people find medical studies — and then to make the results public so that successes can reach patients more quickly. Federal law requires reporting the results of certain studies on a government website. But too often, that reporting doesn't happen, especially the failures. VP Joe Biden cited concern that such secrecy was stifling cancer progress. One analysis of 400 studies of diseases found 30% hadn't disclosed results within four years of completion.   read more

858 Immigrants with Pending Deportation Orders Accidentally Granted U.S. Citizenship

They were all from "special interest countries" — those that present a national security concern for the U.S. — or neighboring countries with high rates of immigration fraud. DHS said the findings reflect what has long been a problem for immigration officials — old paper-based records containing fingerprint information that can't be searched electronically. Fingerprints are missing from federal databases for as many as 315,000 immigrants with deportation orders or who are fugitive criminals.   read more
1 to 16 of about 4567 News
1 2 3 ... 286 Next

Controversies

1 to 16 of about 4567 News
1 2 3 ... 286 Next

Checkpoint That Turned Up Eight Kilos of Cocaine Is Ruled Unconstitutional

Texas police who found 8 kilos of cocaine during a random search of a Greyhound bus “created a checkpoint that trespassed on the Constitution” so the drugs cannot be used as evidence, a federal judge ruled. “Brief stops at checkpoints are reasonable if they are for a narrow particular law enforcement purpose directly connected to the use of the roads,” Hughes wrote, citing Supreme Court precedent.   read more

Labor Department Investigating Wells Fargo Worker Abuse

The U.S. Labor Department is investigating possible abuses of employees by Wells Fargo in connection with the bank’s alleged efforts to open millions of unauthorized accounts to meet sales goals. The scandal over millions of deposit and credit card accounts allegedly opened without customers’ permission has widened. The Labor Department review comes atop investigations by congressional committees and federal prosecutors.   read more

Environmental Groups Criticize Changes to Endangered Species Act

The two federal agencies tasked with listing endangered species have finalized revisions to the petition process, but environmentalists see the changes as limiting and burdensome. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service claim the latest changes are part of the Obama administration’s efforts since 2011 to make the Endangered Species Act listing process more transparent, easier to implement and more effective.   read more

Court Says Ohio Purge of Voter Rolls Is Illegal

Ohio cannot remove voters from registration rolls for failing to vote, the Sixth Circuit ruled. A three-judge panel determined that Ohio’s “supplemental process” for purging voters from registration rolls violates the National Voter Registration Act. The two-step process begins when a voter fails to respond to an address confirmation mailer, and ends when the individual fails to vote in consecutive federal elections.   read more

Half a Million U.S. Homes Lack Proper Plumbing

While that is not a hardship for more affluent communities — about one in five American homes are not on city sewer lines — the legacy of rural poverty has left its imprint here: Many people have failing septic tanks and are too poor to fix them. Others, like Rudolph, have nothing at all. That is not so uncommon. Nearly half a million households in the United States lack the basic dignity of hot and cold running water, a bathtub or shower, or a working flush toilet.   read more

More Than a Third of Calls to Vets’ Suicide Hotline Roll Over

More than one-third of calls to a suicide hotline for troubled veterans are not being answered by front-line staffers because of poor work habits and other problems at the Department of Veterans Affairs, according to the hotline’s former director. Some hotline workers handle fewer than five calls per day and leave before their shifts end, even as crisis calls have increased sharply in recent years, said Greg Hughes, the former director of the VA’s Veterans Crisis Line.   read more

Wells Fargo Employees Sue Bank for Being Pressured to Open Unneeded Accounts

Former and present Wells Fargo employees in California filed a $2.6 billion class action against the bank, claiming they are the “biggest victims” of the bank’s policy of opening accounts without customers’ knowledge. The bank’s aggressive and illegal sales tactics pushed employees to “breaking point.” Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf saw Wells Fargo stock soar as a result, while thousands of employees earning $12 per hour were left to shoulder the blame for banks’ conduct, the 26-page lawsuit says.   read more

Warming Oceans May Kill Off Baby Lobsters

Scientists found that lobster larvae struggled to survive when they were reared in water 5 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than the temperatures that are currently typical of the western Gulf of Maine, a key lobster fishing area off of New England. Five degrees is how much the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change expects the Gulf of Maine’s temperature to warm by the year 2100.   read more

Addiction Treatment Price Gouging Gets House Scrutiny

As the U.S. faces a steadily increasing scourge of opioid addiction, prices for lifesaving drugs to treat overdoses and addiction have skyrocketed. A decade ago, the antidote for opioid overdose – naloxone – cost $1 per dose. Now, the drug costs $40. “It’s beyond dispute that such price increases have had a devastating impact on patients, their families, insurers, first responders and health care providers,” Rep. John Conyers (D-Michigan) said Thursday.   read more

Law Professor Says Trump Could Be Impeached Over “University” if Elected

A University of Utah law professor believes the fraud allegations against Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s now-defunct real estate school could constitute impeachable offenses if he is elected Nov. 8. Christopher Peterson released a 23-page academic paper this week outlining how the fraud and racketeering claims in three lawsuits against Trump University, if proven, would rise to the level of impeachable offenses under the Constitution.   read more

BP to Settle 25,000 Suits Over Toxic Refinery

BP is poised to settle a mass tort lawsuit with more than 25,000 people who were exposed to toxic emissions from its southeast Texas refinery. More than 40,000 residents of Texas City and neighboring La Marque sued BP, claiming that over 40 days in April and May 2010 the company released more than 500,000 pounds of toxic chemicals, including carcinogenic benzene, after diverting the compounds to the flare that was only 33 to 66 percent efficient.   read more

Singer Cancels University of Texas Show Because of Concealed Gun Policy

Singer-songwriter Ray LaMontagne canceled his show at the University of Texas’ Bass Concert Hall over the school’s policy to allow patrons to carry concealed handguns at the venue. Senate Bill 11, also called campus carry, was passed in 2015 by the Texas Legislature. It allows concealed carry of handguns by license holders on state college and university campuses, and bars schools from prohibiting them except in certain areas. The law took effect Aug. 1.   read more

Government Urges That Bumble Bee Be Placed on Endangered Species List

Federal wildlife officials made a formal recommendation to list the rusty patched bumble bee as an endangered species because it has disappeared from about 90% of its historic range in just the past two decades. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service made the recommendation after the Xerces Societypresented studies showing it was struggling due to a combination of disease, habitat loss, climate change and overuse of pesticides on commercial crops.   read more

Scientists Prove Texas Earthquakes Were Caused by Fracking

In 2012 and 2013, earthquakes — five of them considered significant — shook East Texas near Timpson. A team of scientists for the first time were able to track the uplifting ground movements in the earthquake using radar from satellites. A study says it confirms that these were not natural, something scientists had previously said was likely using a more traditional analysis.   read more

Public Disclosure of Medical Treatment Trial Results Now Ensured by New Federal Rules

At issue is how to help people find medical studies — and then to make the results public so that successes can reach patients more quickly. Federal law requires reporting the results of certain studies on a government website. But too often, that reporting doesn't happen, especially the failures. VP Joe Biden cited concern that such secrecy was stifling cancer progress. One analysis of 400 studies of diseases found 30% hadn't disclosed results within four years of completion.   read more

858 Immigrants with Pending Deportation Orders Accidentally Granted U.S. Citizenship

They were all from "special interest countries" — those that present a national security concern for the U.S. — or neighboring countries with high rates of immigration fraud. DHS said the findings reflect what has long been a problem for immigration officials — old paper-based records containing fingerprint information that can't be searched electronically. Fingerprints are missing from federal databases for as many as 315,000 immigrants with deportation orders or who are fugitive criminals.   read more
1 to 16 of about 4567 News
1 2 3 ... 286 Next