Controversies

1 to 16 of about 3267 News
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Are Justice Dept. Sting Operations Targeting Minorities?

An investigation by USA Today found that 55% of suspects in these kinds of cases were black and more than a third were Hispanic. The total is more even than the percentages of black and Hispanic people caught up in the criminal justice system, much less the population in general.   read more

Another Fox Nominated to Guard Financial Chicken Coop

From liberal Democrats to community bankers, opposition is lining up to President Obama’s choice for Under Secretary for Domestic Finance at the Treasury Dept.: Antonio Weiss. “Neither his background nor his professional experience makes him qualified to oversee consumer protection and domestic regulatory functions at the Treasury,” wrote Sen. Elizabeth Warren. She criticized Weiss for helping U.S. corporations relocate in countries that demand fewer taxes.   read more

House Republicans Choose White Men to Head 20 of 21 Committees

Oops, they did it again. The Republican Party, despite vowing to be more inclusive of women and minorities, has chosen white men to lead all but one House committee. Over in the Senate, all but one standing committee will be led by a man. “Republicans promised to be more welcoming to women—but passed over women to give every single new committee chairmanship to a white man,” Spokeswoman Emily Bittner at the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee said in a statement.   read more

Group Sues Border Patrol over Alleged Racial Profiling…in Ohio

The focus of the controversy is the Border Patrol’s Sandusky Bay Station, which has disproportionately targeted Hispanics since 2008, the plaintiffs say. Professor Kara Joyner says 85% of those arrested by Sandusky Bay agents have been Hispanic, even though the minority group makes up only 3% of the local population. Emails obtained as a result of the lawsuit show that Cory Bammer, who’s in charge of the Sandusky Bay office, has used racial slurs to refer to Latino workers.   read more

59-Year-Old to be Released after 39 Years in Prison for Murder he didn’t Commit

Prosecutors won their case against Jackson by relying on the testimony of then 13-year-old Edward Vernon—who recently admitted he lied under pressure from police about what he saw on May 19, 1975, the day Franks was shot and killed. “The detective said that I was too young to go to jail, but he would arrest my parents for perjury because I was backing out,” Vernon said. “My mom was sick at that time, and that really scared me. I didn’t want my parents to get in trouble over this.”   read more

Pentagon Censors Document that was Already Published in Full 18 Years Ago

A document from 1961 by then-Defense Secretary McNamara regarding development of strategic nuclear missiles was fully released for public viewing in 1996. But the version of the document at the National Archives has been “heavily excised” of key information … that, again, was made public 18 years ago. Similarly, another 1961 memo, this one from the Joint Chiefs chairman to McNamara was mostly declassified long ago. But the National Archives and Pentagon censored large portions of it.   read more

Baltimore Prosecutors Withdraw Evidence of Cellphone Tracking because of FBI Non-Disclosure Agreement

Police were suspected by a defense attorney of using the StingRay system, which can capture information about cell phone calls and users, to collect data about their client. So the lawyer pressed Detective Haley in court about how the department obtained certain evidence against the accused. The judge told the officer to answer the question, but the prosecution instead withdrew evidence, including a handgun and cellphone, from the case so they wouldn’t get in trouble with the FBI.   read more

VA Gets Failing Grade in Cybersecurity…for 16th Year in Row

The IG’s 2013 audit report revealed that the agency’s IT operations had 6,000 cybersecurity vulnerabilities that needed fixing and it listed 35 corrective actions to be taken. Stephen Warren, VA’s IT executive, said that the 6,000 vulnerabilities isn’t really that large of a number if viewed in the proper context: “When you talk about 6,000 vulnerabilities, we treat them all as important, but when you look at it on the scale you've got to put some balance in it.”   read more

DuPont Insecticide Plant where 4 Workers Died hadn’t been Inspected in 7 Years

The employees who died had responded to a faulty valve that was releasing deadly gas throughout the plant. Inspectors from OSHA hadn’t checked the plant in seven years. At that time two violations for management of hazardous chemicals were issued. DuPont had been hit with tougher penalties by the EPA after the agency found violations of hazardous waste management and air emissions standards. The plant had also has been cited by Texas regulators for repeatedly breaking state laws.   read more

Approval of CIA Plan to Allow Destruction of Emails Triggers Alarm

The emails that could be put at risk are those relevant to the agency's “rendition, detention and torture programs,” stated the groups' letter to the NARA. “[The policy's] implications are potentially vast," said Steve Aftergood. "[The] CIA has an unfortunate history of destroying valuable records, and NARA has had a hard time imposing discipline on the agency.” As an example, Professor Cox cited the CIA’s “infamous destruction” of the Guantanamo interrogation videotapes.   read more

Do Right-to-Carry Laws Lead to Increase in Violent Crime?

Data compiled by the NRC revealed aggravated assault increased about 8% because of right-to-carry laws. Researchers say that estimate may be low, pointing out that different models show a 33% increase in firearm-related assaults following passage of those laws. Further, “the totality of the evidence...suggests that right-to-carry laws are associated with substantially higher rates” of aggravated assault, rape, robbery and murder.   read more

Federal Judge Rules Nebraska’s Initiative Rule is Unconstitutional

In his lawsuit, plaintiff Kent Bernbeck objected to this provision claiming it resulted in giving more importance to rural voters at the expense of urban ones. U.S. District Judge Joseph F. Bataillon agreed with Bernbeck and found the requirement violated the U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment and equal protection clause. This was Bernbeck's third lawsuit in 17 years aimed at easing restrictions on the ballot petition process.   read more

California Plan Could Force Organic Farmers to Use Pesticides

The document argues that the nation’s largest organic farming industry wouldn’t be economically harmed by having to use pesticides because they could simply sell their product in the conventional food market. They would keep their official state organic certification, but couldn’t call themselves organic in the marketplace.   read more

American Psychological Association Finally Agrees to Investigate Collusion in Bush Torture Program

Some APA members were displeased when the organization altered its ethics rules in 2002 to provide cover to psychologists working for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and who participated in harsh interrogation sessions with detainees. Essentially, the change gave psychologists permission to ignore ethical concerns if ordered by the government to help extract information from al-Qaeda members.   read more

Maui Votes to Halt Genetically Modified Crop Cultivation; Monsanto and Dow Sue

Seed companies Monsanto and Dow spent $8 million to try to defeat a proposal that would ban cultivation of genetically modified organisms in Maui County, Hawaii, in this month’s general election. The initiative passed anyway and now the seed companies are suing to prevent its enforcement. Monsanto and Dow unit Mycogen Seeds use acreage on the islands of Maui and Molokai, both part of Maui County, to research and develop new strains of genetically modified corn.   read more

Coal Mine Disaster CEO Indicted 4 1/2 Years Later

The indictment says Donald Blankenship turned a blind eye to hundreds of safety violations “in order to produce more coal, avoid the costs of following safety laws, and make more money.” It charges he ordered miners “not to construct certain ventilation controls that would produce more reliable airflow because constructing them diverted time from coal production.” Federal investigators concluded that the explosion that killed the 29 men was preventable.   read more
1 to 16 of about 3267 News
1 2 3 ... 205 Next

Controversies

1 to 16 of about 3267 News
1 2 3 ... 205 Next

Are Justice Dept. Sting Operations Targeting Minorities?

An investigation by USA Today found that 55% of suspects in these kinds of cases were black and more than a third were Hispanic. The total is more even than the percentages of black and Hispanic people caught up in the criminal justice system, much less the population in general.   read more

Another Fox Nominated to Guard Financial Chicken Coop

From liberal Democrats to community bankers, opposition is lining up to President Obama’s choice for Under Secretary for Domestic Finance at the Treasury Dept.: Antonio Weiss. “Neither his background nor his professional experience makes him qualified to oversee consumer protection and domestic regulatory functions at the Treasury,” wrote Sen. Elizabeth Warren. She criticized Weiss for helping U.S. corporations relocate in countries that demand fewer taxes.   read more

House Republicans Choose White Men to Head 20 of 21 Committees

Oops, they did it again. The Republican Party, despite vowing to be more inclusive of women and minorities, has chosen white men to lead all but one House committee. Over in the Senate, all but one standing committee will be led by a man. “Republicans promised to be more welcoming to women—but passed over women to give every single new committee chairmanship to a white man,” Spokeswoman Emily Bittner at the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee said in a statement.   read more

Group Sues Border Patrol over Alleged Racial Profiling…in Ohio

The focus of the controversy is the Border Patrol’s Sandusky Bay Station, which has disproportionately targeted Hispanics since 2008, the plaintiffs say. Professor Kara Joyner says 85% of those arrested by Sandusky Bay agents have been Hispanic, even though the minority group makes up only 3% of the local population. Emails obtained as a result of the lawsuit show that Cory Bammer, who’s in charge of the Sandusky Bay office, has used racial slurs to refer to Latino workers.   read more

59-Year-Old to be Released after 39 Years in Prison for Murder he didn’t Commit

Prosecutors won their case against Jackson by relying on the testimony of then 13-year-old Edward Vernon—who recently admitted he lied under pressure from police about what he saw on May 19, 1975, the day Franks was shot and killed. “The detective said that I was too young to go to jail, but he would arrest my parents for perjury because I was backing out,” Vernon said. “My mom was sick at that time, and that really scared me. I didn’t want my parents to get in trouble over this.”   read more

Pentagon Censors Document that was Already Published in Full 18 Years Ago

A document from 1961 by then-Defense Secretary McNamara regarding development of strategic nuclear missiles was fully released for public viewing in 1996. But the version of the document at the National Archives has been “heavily excised” of key information … that, again, was made public 18 years ago. Similarly, another 1961 memo, this one from the Joint Chiefs chairman to McNamara was mostly declassified long ago. But the National Archives and Pentagon censored large portions of it.   read more

Baltimore Prosecutors Withdraw Evidence of Cellphone Tracking because of FBI Non-Disclosure Agreement

Police were suspected by a defense attorney of using the StingRay system, which can capture information about cell phone calls and users, to collect data about their client. So the lawyer pressed Detective Haley in court about how the department obtained certain evidence against the accused. The judge told the officer to answer the question, but the prosecution instead withdrew evidence, including a handgun and cellphone, from the case so they wouldn’t get in trouble with the FBI.   read more

VA Gets Failing Grade in Cybersecurity…for 16th Year in Row

The IG’s 2013 audit report revealed that the agency’s IT operations had 6,000 cybersecurity vulnerabilities that needed fixing and it listed 35 corrective actions to be taken. Stephen Warren, VA’s IT executive, said that the 6,000 vulnerabilities isn’t really that large of a number if viewed in the proper context: “When you talk about 6,000 vulnerabilities, we treat them all as important, but when you look at it on the scale you've got to put some balance in it.”   read more

DuPont Insecticide Plant where 4 Workers Died hadn’t been Inspected in 7 Years

The employees who died had responded to a faulty valve that was releasing deadly gas throughout the plant. Inspectors from OSHA hadn’t checked the plant in seven years. At that time two violations for management of hazardous chemicals were issued. DuPont had been hit with tougher penalties by the EPA after the agency found violations of hazardous waste management and air emissions standards. The plant had also has been cited by Texas regulators for repeatedly breaking state laws.   read more

Approval of CIA Plan to Allow Destruction of Emails Triggers Alarm

The emails that could be put at risk are those relevant to the agency's “rendition, detention and torture programs,” stated the groups' letter to the NARA. “[The policy's] implications are potentially vast," said Steve Aftergood. "[The] CIA has an unfortunate history of destroying valuable records, and NARA has had a hard time imposing discipline on the agency.” As an example, Professor Cox cited the CIA’s “infamous destruction” of the Guantanamo interrogation videotapes.   read more

Do Right-to-Carry Laws Lead to Increase in Violent Crime?

Data compiled by the NRC revealed aggravated assault increased about 8% because of right-to-carry laws. Researchers say that estimate may be low, pointing out that different models show a 33% increase in firearm-related assaults following passage of those laws. Further, “the totality of the evidence...suggests that right-to-carry laws are associated with substantially higher rates” of aggravated assault, rape, robbery and murder.   read more

Federal Judge Rules Nebraska’s Initiative Rule is Unconstitutional

In his lawsuit, plaintiff Kent Bernbeck objected to this provision claiming it resulted in giving more importance to rural voters at the expense of urban ones. U.S. District Judge Joseph F. Bataillon agreed with Bernbeck and found the requirement violated the U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment and equal protection clause. This was Bernbeck's third lawsuit in 17 years aimed at easing restrictions on the ballot petition process.   read more

California Plan Could Force Organic Farmers to Use Pesticides

The document argues that the nation’s largest organic farming industry wouldn’t be economically harmed by having to use pesticides because they could simply sell their product in the conventional food market. They would keep their official state organic certification, but couldn’t call themselves organic in the marketplace.   read more

American Psychological Association Finally Agrees to Investigate Collusion in Bush Torture Program

Some APA members were displeased when the organization altered its ethics rules in 2002 to provide cover to psychologists working for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and who participated in harsh interrogation sessions with detainees. Essentially, the change gave psychologists permission to ignore ethical concerns if ordered by the government to help extract information from al-Qaeda members.   read more

Maui Votes to Halt Genetically Modified Crop Cultivation; Monsanto and Dow Sue

Seed companies Monsanto and Dow spent $8 million to try to defeat a proposal that would ban cultivation of genetically modified organisms in Maui County, Hawaii, in this month’s general election. The initiative passed anyway and now the seed companies are suing to prevent its enforcement. Monsanto and Dow unit Mycogen Seeds use acreage on the islands of Maui and Molokai, both part of Maui County, to research and develop new strains of genetically modified corn.   read more

Coal Mine Disaster CEO Indicted 4 1/2 Years Later

The indictment says Donald Blankenship turned a blind eye to hundreds of safety violations “in order to produce more coal, avoid the costs of following safety laws, and make more money.” It charges he ordered miners “not to construct certain ventilation controls that would produce more reliable airflow because constructing them diverted time from coal production.” Federal investigators concluded that the explosion that killed the 29 men was preventable.   read more
1 to 16 of about 3267 News
1 2 3 ... 205 Next