Controversies

1 to 16 of about 4497 News
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Use of Force by Police Officers Decreased by 8% When Wearing Body Cameras

The reduction among the 60 officers who wore cameras amounts to about 20 fewer incidents of physical force per year. The authors speculate that if the cameras were worn by the entire department, the same reduction would translate to about 250 fewer incidents per year. The study cautions that cameras alone are just one piece of the puzzle. It notes that community policing strategies and better officer training are also essential to preventing such encounters.   read more

African-American Women Lead Big Increase in Pregnancy-Related Deaths in Texas

Last week, researchers studying maternal mortality in the U.S. reported an ominous trend: The rate of pregnancy-related deaths in Texas seemed to have doubled since 2010, making the state one of the most dangerous places in the developed world to have a baby. The bottom line: Maternal deaths have indeed been increasing in Texas, and black women are bearing the brunt of the crisis. For 2011 and 2012, black mothers accounted for 11.4% of Texas births but 28.8% of pregnancy-related deaths.   read more

Repeal of Arizona Abortion Law Forcing Doctors to Lie to Patients Leads to Dropping of Lawsuit

Judge Logan dismissed the lawsuit, which claimed that the bill required doctors tell their patients the lie that medication abortion could be reversed. "The reversal of this unjustified restriction is good news for women, but it shouldn't have taken a year in court to convince Arizona politicians to keep junk science out of the exam room," said ACLU's Andrew Beck. "Lawmakers should recognize that Arizona women deserve high-quality medical care — not political ideology masquerading as medicine."   read more

Traffic Fatalities Up By 9% in 2016

Increase in fatalities since 2014 "is really getting to the crisis level," said GHSA's Jonathan Adkins. "While many factors likely contributed to the fatality increase, a stronger economy and lower unemployment rates are at the core of the trend," said the council. The council also predicts that 438 people will be killed on the nation's roads over the three-day Labor Day weekend that begins Sept. 2, which would make it the deadliest Labor Day weekend since 2008.   read more

For First Time, EPA Draws Link between Dallas Quakes and Fracking

The Texas RR Commission has been reluctant to acknowledge any connection between drilling and earthquakes, despite the conclusions of scientists in other states. But the EPA said: "In light of findings from several researchers, its own analysis of some cases, and the fact that earthquakes in some areas diminished following shut-in or reduced injection volume in targeted wells, EPA believes there is significant possibility that North Texas earthquake activity is associated with disposal wells."   read more

NYPD Repeatedly Broke Surveillance Rules While Targeting Muslims after 9/11 Attacks

The report said NYPD's Intelligence Bureau regularly let deadlines pass before asking to extend investigations into political activity, and often failed to explain the roles of undercover officers, as required. ACLU's Lieberman said they stood by “allegations that there were often no valid reasons for the NYPD to open or extend investigations of American Muslims." She said the surveillance "was highly irregular [and] operated in a black box..."   read more

Federal Judge Denies Texas Professors’ Request to Keep Guns Out of Classrooms

Texas college students will carry concealed guns into classes when the fall semester begins Wednesday, as a federal judge refused three professors' request to keep concealed handguns out of their classrooms. The professors claimed the law was unconstitutionally vague, violated their academic freedom and due process, and could endanger people in their classrooms. "We will continue to fight for lethal weapon-free learning environments at U.T. and in the state of Texas," said Prof. Carter.   read more

Court Supports Ohio’s Elimination of Early Voting

Dismissing the Democratic Party and minority voters' disenfranchisement claims, the court upheld Ohio's elimination of a week of early voting. Critics claimed Republicans placed an undue burden on black voters when they passed Senate Bill 238 and eliminated early voting in 2014. "Both the [evidence and testimony] and the substantial support found in the record stand in opposition to the majority opinion's blithe assertion 'that it's easy to vote in Ohio,'" Judge Stanch wrote in her dissent.   read more

Climate Change Will Exacerbate Smog Problem in Southeastern U.S.

The drier, warmer autumn weather that's becoming more common due to climate change may extend summer smog well into the fall in the Southeastern U.S. in the years ahead, according to a study published on Monday. Research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences also suggests a culprit for the smog that many people might not expect: It's the lush woodlands that give much of the South a lovely green canopy.   read more

Native American Tribes Protest Pipeline Construction

Two weeks ago, members of the Dakota, Lakota and Yankton Sioux set up tipis in camps on a tributary of the Missouri River to fight a crude oil pipeline they fear will poison the Missouri River. For the moment, they have stood off the pipeline company and the Army Corps of Engineers. Two hearings are set in North Dakota Federal Court this week: on Wednesday, the court will consider the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's July 27 lawsuit against the Army Corps of Engineers.   read more

Trump’s “Empire” Includes Massive Debt to China, Goldman Sachs

An investigation by The New York Times into the financial maze of Trump’s real estate holdings in the United States reveals that companies he owns have at least $650 million in debt — twice the amount than can be gleaned from public filings he has made as part of his bid for the White House. The Times’ inquiry also found that Trump’s fortunes depend deeply on a wide array of financial backers, including one he has cited in attacks during his campaign.   read more

Subpoena of Reporter Could Damage All Journalists’ Credibility

New York prosecutors attempting to shore up a case against an accused baby killer have subpoenaed a reporter the suspect spoke to. The action will test the state’s press shielding law, which tends to side more heavily with confidential sourcing versus named sourcing. “This is all a show to make it look like the police have credibility and are not the thugs they are when they are doing these interrogations,” attorney Michael Croce said.   read more

Illinois Gives Domestic Workers “Bill of Rights”

New Illinois rules, signed by Gov. Bruce Rauner this month, extend sexual harassment protections as well as minimum-wage pay and a guaranteed one day off in a seven-day work week to the domestic workforce, which is mostly female and immigrant heavy. Six other states have similar laws, but Illinois is now the first in the Midwest and advocates say they hope to expand their efforts into the southern states.   read more

Navy Given Approval to Continue Harming Whales With Sonar

The National Marine Fisheries Service has authorized the Navy to continue harming protected marine mammals with low frequency sonar, despite a court ruling against the practice. The notices for the four Letters of Authorization, published Thursday, are surprising in that the agency has virtually ignored the July 15 U.S. Court of Appeals’ decision that the Navy’s peacetime use of sonar is not in compliance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act   read more

Officials Charged With Poisoning Flint Water May Avoid Prosecution Because of Legal Loophole

The prosecution of current and former state of Michigan employees for their role in Flint’s lead-contaminated water crisis likely will face an early test over whether one of the most serious charges can even be levied against the middle- and lower-level government officials. All eight workers charged so far face a misconduct in office charge. But there is no statute clearly defining official misconduct.   read more

Anti-Immigrant Sheriff Referred for Federal Prosecution

A federal judge Friday referred Maricopa County, Arizona, Sheriff Joe Arpaio and his second-in-command for criminal prosecution, finding that they ignored and misrepresented to subordinates court orders designed to keep the sheriff’s office from racially profiling Latinos. The referral does not mean the sheriff will face criminal charges; it is up to federal prosecutors to decide whether to pursue the case.   read more
1 to 16 of about 4497 News
1 2 3 ... 282 Next

Controversies

1 to 16 of about 4497 News
1 2 3 ... 282 Next

Use of Force by Police Officers Decreased by 8% When Wearing Body Cameras

The reduction among the 60 officers who wore cameras amounts to about 20 fewer incidents of physical force per year. The authors speculate that if the cameras were worn by the entire department, the same reduction would translate to about 250 fewer incidents per year. The study cautions that cameras alone are just one piece of the puzzle. It notes that community policing strategies and better officer training are also essential to preventing such encounters.   read more

African-American Women Lead Big Increase in Pregnancy-Related Deaths in Texas

Last week, researchers studying maternal mortality in the U.S. reported an ominous trend: The rate of pregnancy-related deaths in Texas seemed to have doubled since 2010, making the state one of the most dangerous places in the developed world to have a baby. The bottom line: Maternal deaths have indeed been increasing in Texas, and black women are bearing the brunt of the crisis. For 2011 and 2012, black mothers accounted for 11.4% of Texas births but 28.8% of pregnancy-related deaths.   read more

Repeal of Arizona Abortion Law Forcing Doctors to Lie to Patients Leads to Dropping of Lawsuit

Judge Logan dismissed the lawsuit, which claimed that the bill required doctors tell their patients the lie that medication abortion could be reversed. "The reversal of this unjustified restriction is good news for women, but it shouldn't have taken a year in court to convince Arizona politicians to keep junk science out of the exam room," said ACLU's Andrew Beck. "Lawmakers should recognize that Arizona women deserve high-quality medical care — not political ideology masquerading as medicine."   read more

Traffic Fatalities Up By 9% in 2016

Increase in fatalities since 2014 "is really getting to the crisis level," said GHSA's Jonathan Adkins. "While many factors likely contributed to the fatality increase, a stronger economy and lower unemployment rates are at the core of the trend," said the council. The council also predicts that 438 people will be killed on the nation's roads over the three-day Labor Day weekend that begins Sept. 2, which would make it the deadliest Labor Day weekend since 2008.   read more

For First Time, EPA Draws Link between Dallas Quakes and Fracking

The Texas RR Commission has been reluctant to acknowledge any connection between drilling and earthquakes, despite the conclusions of scientists in other states. But the EPA said: "In light of findings from several researchers, its own analysis of some cases, and the fact that earthquakes in some areas diminished following shut-in or reduced injection volume in targeted wells, EPA believes there is significant possibility that North Texas earthquake activity is associated with disposal wells."   read more

NYPD Repeatedly Broke Surveillance Rules While Targeting Muslims after 9/11 Attacks

The report said NYPD's Intelligence Bureau regularly let deadlines pass before asking to extend investigations into political activity, and often failed to explain the roles of undercover officers, as required. ACLU's Lieberman said they stood by “allegations that there were often no valid reasons for the NYPD to open or extend investigations of American Muslims." She said the surveillance "was highly irregular [and] operated in a black box..."   read more

Federal Judge Denies Texas Professors’ Request to Keep Guns Out of Classrooms

Texas college students will carry concealed guns into classes when the fall semester begins Wednesday, as a federal judge refused three professors' request to keep concealed handguns out of their classrooms. The professors claimed the law was unconstitutionally vague, violated their academic freedom and due process, and could endanger people in their classrooms. "We will continue to fight for lethal weapon-free learning environments at U.T. and in the state of Texas," said Prof. Carter.   read more

Court Supports Ohio’s Elimination of Early Voting

Dismissing the Democratic Party and minority voters' disenfranchisement claims, the court upheld Ohio's elimination of a week of early voting. Critics claimed Republicans placed an undue burden on black voters when they passed Senate Bill 238 and eliminated early voting in 2014. "Both the [evidence and testimony] and the substantial support found in the record stand in opposition to the majority opinion's blithe assertion 'that it's easy to vote in Ohio,'" Judge Stanch wrote in her dissent.   read more

Climate Change Will Exacerbate Smog Problem in Southeastern U.S.

The drier, warmer autumn weather that's becoming more common due to climate change may extend summer smog well into the fall in the Southeastern U.S. in the years ahead, according to a study published on Monday. Research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences also suggests a culprit for the smog that many people might not expect: It's the lush woodlands that give much of the South a lovely green canopy.   read more

Native American Tribes Protest Pipeline Construction

Two weeks ago, members of the Dakota, Lakota and Yankton Sioux set up tipis in camps on a tributary of the Missouri River to fight a crude oil pipeline they fear will poison the Missouri River. For the moment, they have stood off the pipeline company and the Army Corps of Engineers. Two hearings are set in North Dakota Federal Court this week: on Wednesday, the court will consider the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's July 27 lawsuit against the Army Corps of Engineers.   read more

Trump’s “Empire” Includes Massive Debt to China, Goldman Sachs

An investigation by The New York Times into the financial maze of Trump’s real estate holdings in the United States reveals that companies he owns have at least $650 million in debt — twice the amount than can be gleaned from public filings he has made as part of his bid for the White House. The Times’ inquiry also found that Trump’s fortunes depend deeply on a wide array of financial backers, including one he has cited in attacks during his campaign.   read more

Subpoena of Reporter Could Damage All Journalists’ Credibility

New York prosecutors attempting to shore up a case against an accused baby killer have subpoenaed a reporter the suspect spoke to. The action will test the state’s press shielding law, which tends to side more heavily with confidential sourcing versus named sourcing. “This is all a show to make it look like the police have credibility and are not the thugs they are when they are doing these interrogations,” attorney Michael Croce said.   read more

Illinois Gives Domestic Workers “Bill of Rights”

New Illinois rules, signed by Gov. Bruce Rauner this month, extend sexual harassment protections as well as minimum-wage pay and a guaranteed one day off in a seven-day work week to the domestic workforce, which is mostly female and immigrant heavy. Six other states have similar laws, but Illinois is now the first in the Midwest and advocates say they hope to expand their efforts into the southern states.   read more

Navy Given Approval to Continue Harming Whales With Sonar

The National Marine Fisheries Service has authorized the Navy to continue harming protected marine mammals with low frequency sonar, despite a court ruling against the practice. The notices for the four Letters of Authorization, published Thursday, are surprising in that the agency has virtually ignored the July 15 U.S. Court of Appeals’ decision that the Navy’s peacetime use of sonar is not in compliance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act   read more

Officials Charged With Poisoning Flint Water May Avoid Prosecution Because of Legal Loophole

The prosecution of current and former state of Michigan employees for their role in Flint’s lead-contaminated water crisis likely will face an early test over whether one of the most serious charges can even be levied against the middle- and lower-level government officials. All eight workers charged so far face a misconduct in office charge. But there is no statute clearly defining official misconduct.   read more

Anti-Immigrant Sheriff Referred for Federal Prosecution

A federal judge Friday referred Maricopa County, Arizona, Sheriff Joe Arpaio and his second-in-command for criminal prosecution, finding that they ignored and misrepresented to subordinates court orders designed to keep the sheriff’s office from racially profiling Latinos. The referral does not mean the sheriff will face criminal charges; it is up to federal prosecutors to decide whether to pursue the case.   read more
1 to 16 of about 4497 News
1 2 3 ... 282 Next