Controversies

1 to 16 of about 3661 News
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Oklahoma Supreme Court Gives Homeowners Go-Ahead to Sue Oil Companies over Fracking Earthquakes

Cooper’s case is a class action involving residents from nine counties, making the litigation worth potentially millions of dollars in damages. Six houses were destroyed and 172 others were damaged when three quakes of 5.0 magnitude or greater struck the Prague area from November 5-8, 2011, according to the Oklahoma Emergency Management Agency. The oil companies argued that the Oklahoma Corporation Commission should handle the lawsuits, not the courts—a position the state Supreme Court rejected.   read more

NSA Again Given Go-Ahead for Mass Phone Data Collection

On Tuesday, FISC Judge Michael W. Mosman rejected FreedomWorks’ challenge. Mosman also claimed that a previous ruling by the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, which said the surveillance program was illegal, did not apply to the FISC, “setting up a potential conflict between the two courts,” according to The New York Times. “Second Circuit rulings are not binding” on the surveillance court, Mosman wrote, “and this court respectfully disagrees with that court’s analysis...”   read more

New York City Bans “Poor Doors” to Mixed-Income Housing

New York Mayor Bill De Blasio crafted language that was put into state legislation signed Friday by Gov. Andrew Cuomo that requires developers of high rises that have a mix of affordable units and market-rate units to allow both groups to use the same doorways. "No taxpayer dollar should go to a program that further segregates our communities," said New York councilwoman Helen Brewer.   read more

States where Politicians have Vowed to Continue Fighting Same-Sex Marriage

Alabama’s chief justice, Roy Moore, has said he will resist the Supreme Court ruling, while his wife, Kayla Moore, head of The Foundation for Moral Law, wrote on Facebook that “the U.S. Supreme Court [has] no legal authority to redefine marriage.” Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton told county clerks to ignore the ruling and refuse to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples.   read more

Guantánamo Defense Lawyers Ask for Access to 14,000 CIA Photos of Secret Prisons

The images show both the interiors and exteriors of CIA secret locations where detainees were held and interrogated. They reportedly include detainee cells, bathrooms, naked prisoners at the time of transport, confinement boxes that held detainees, and a waterboard in the “Salt Pit,” the largest CIA detention facility in Afghanistan. Also said to be depicted are members of the CIA and foreign intelligence services, along with interrogation program architects James Mitchell and Bruce Jessen.   read more

Survey of 382 U.S. Law Enforcement Agencies Shows Far Greater Concern about Anti-Government Extremists than about Islamic Terrorists

Ask a cop what kind of extremist they’re most concerned about and the answer is likely to be those opposed to the government, not Muslim terrorists. Anti-government extremists were listed more than any other by far: 73.8%. Al Qaeda-inspired extremists came in a distant second, at 39.3%. The researchers also found that that law enforcement “perceive violent extremism to be a much more severe threat nationally than the threat of violent extremism in their own jurisdictions.”   read more

FBI Claims it Doesn’t Have to Share Records with Justice Dept. Inspector General

The FBI has contended since 2010 that the IG’s office lacks the legal authority to see documents related to certain matters, including grand juries, Title III electronic surveillances and Fair Credit Reporting Act information. FBI officials also claim they don’t have to share documents related to two investigations of alleged whistleblower retaliation, or those pertaining to an IG review of the FBI’s use of telephonic metadata.   read more

After 8 Years of Delay, EPA Finally Agrees to Test Dangers of Monsanto’s Favorite Pesticide

Glyphosate, which is the active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide, will finally undergo analysis for its effects on endangered species by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The EPA’s agreement is only the beginning of a long, slow process. The agency has agreed to complete its assessments by 2020.   read more

Manufacturers Press Congress to Halt Regulation of Recreational Off-Highway Vehicles

A bill now moving through both houses of Congress at the behest of ROV firms would mandate a study by the National Academy of Sciences—at a cost to the CPSC of $800,000 to $1 million—to investigate whether those standards are necessary. The study is beside the point, of course. Manufacturers are hoping that by the end of two years, there will be a Republican administration in the White House that will appoint a corporative majority to the CPSC and the rule changes will just go away.   read more

Internal Audit Blasts NHTSA’s Weak Regulation of Automakers

The smoking gun was a report from a Wisconsin State Trooper about a fatal accident involving a Cobalt in which the ignition switch had turned off, preventing airbags from being deployed after the driver lost control of the car. GM was finally forced to recall 2.6 million vehicles to remedy the problem, which is responsible for at least 114 deaths.   read more

Isn’t It Finally Time that Congressional Research Service Reports be Made Available to the Public?

The research arm of Congress spends $100 million a year informing lawmakers on key policy issues through reports that are mostly hidden from the public. Now some groups are trying to make these reports available to those who paid for them—U.S. taxpayers. The reports by the Congressional Research Service are not classified. But nor are they put up online. Third-party sources offer them for sale, but it’s unreasonable to expect Americans to pay again for something they already financed.   read more

Domestic Violence Victims Evicted for being “Nuisances”

As if getting beaten isn’t bad enough, some towns have adopted ordinances that punish victims for being nuisances. In one case, a woman who had been warned by police not to make another 911 call was attacked by her boyfriend, leaving a four-inch stab wound in her neck. Her neighbor called 911 in spite of her pleas not to. Police demanded the landlord evict her. “These laws threaten citizens’ fundamental right to call on the police for help,” said Matthew Desmond.   read more

Alaska Air Flight Attendants Sue Boeing over Toxic Airplane Cabins

Their lawsuit claims Boeing knows its airplane cabins can become filled with toxic air but won’t do anything to solve the problem. The plaintiffs claim this problem is “a previously hidden and ‘dirty little secret’ of the commercial airline industry.” A flight attendants union said thousands of people traveling on commercial aircraft may have been exposed to these toxic fumes over the years, and still have the poisonous chemicals in their systems without being aware of it.   read more

Insecticide Still Used in U.S. Found to Cause Cancer by WHO

Lindane is used for livestock and pet treatment, and on fruit and vegetable crops. It is also used topically for the treatment of head and body lice. Small quantities are used in certain lotions, cream, and shampoos. Although the chemical has been detected in groundwater near hazardous waste sites, the most likely exposure in humans is oral ingestion of food that contains traces of the insecticide. “Exposure to lindane can increase one’s risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma by 60%,” said TIME.   read more

Obama Will no Longer Threaten to Prosecute Families who Pay Ransom to Hostage-Takers

An administration official said the White House felt it "needed to clarify that...we do not abandon families during a horrific ordeal." The official added that the threats of prosecution “should never have happened.” The administration has sent mixed signals on negotiating with hostage takers. It talked to the Taliban in Afghanistan to free Bergdahl but warned families of hostages held by the Islamic State and Al Qaeda that they won’t negotiate for their release or allow the families to do so.   read more

Recycling: Good for the Environment, Dangerous for Workers

The recycling industry’s on-the-job injury rate is more than twice as high as that of the average worker. That’s because many recycling centers have unsafe working conditions involving heavy machinery and exposure to hazardous items, such as hypodermic needles, toxic chemicals, and animal carcasses. Also, these centers rely on temporary workers who have fewer workplace protections, often get less training, and are less likely to know about their legal rights to have a safe workplace.   read more
1 to 16 of about 3661 News
1 2 3 ... 229 Next

Controversies

1 to 16 of about 3661 News
1 2 3 ... 229 Next

Oklahoma Supreme Court Gives Homeowners Go-Ahead to Sue Oil Companies over Fracking Earthquakes

Cooper’s case is a class action involving residents from nine counties, making the litigation worth potentially millions of dollars in damages. Six houses were destroyed and 172 others were damaged when three quakes of 5.0 magnitude or greater struck the Prague area from November 5-8, 2011, according to the Oklahoma Emergency Management Agency. The oil companies argued that the Oklahoma Corporation Commission should handle the lawsuits, not the courts—a position the state Supreme Court rejected.   read more

NSA Again Given Go-Ahead for Mass Phone Data Collection

On Tuesday, FISC Judge Michael W. Mosman rejected FreedomWorks’ challenge. Mosman also claimed that a previous ruling by the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, which said the surveillance program was illegal, did not apply to the FISC, “setting up a potential conflict between the two courts,” according to The New York Times. “Second Circuit rulings are not binding” on the surveillance court, Mosman wrote, “and this court respectfully disagrees with that court’s analysis...”   read more

New York City Bans “Poor Doors” to Mixed-Income Housing

New York Mayor Bill De Blasio crafted language that was put into state legislation signed Friday by Gov. Andrew Cuomo that requires developers of high rises that have a mix of affordable units and market-rate units to allow both groups to use the same doorways. "No taxpayer dollar should go to a program that further segregates our communities," said New York councilwoman Helen Brewer.   read more

States where Politicians have Vowed to Continue Fighting Same-Sex Marriage

Alabama’s chief justice, Roy Moore, has said he will resist the Supreme Court ruling, while his wife, Kayla Moore, head of The Foundation for Moral Law, wrote on Facebook that “the U.S. Supreme Court [has] no legal authority to redefine marriage.” Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton told county clerks to ignore the ruling and refuse to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples.   read more

Guantánamo Defense Lawyers Ask for Access to 14,000 CIA Photos of Secret Prisons

The images show both the interiors and exteriors of CIA secret locations where detainees were held and interrogated. They reportedly include detainee cells, bathrooms, naked prisoners at the time of transport, confinement boxes that held detainees, and a waterboard in the “Salt Pit,” the largest CIA detention facility in Afghanistan. Also said to be depicted are members of the CIA and foreign intelligence services, along with interrogation program architects James Mitchell and Bruce Jessen.   read more

Survey of 382 U.S. Law Enforcement Agencies Shows Far Greater Concern about Anti-Government Extremists than about Islamic Terrorists

Ask a cop what kind of extremist they’re most concerned about and the answer is likely to be those opposed to the government, not Muslim terrorists. Anti-government extremists were listed more than any other by far: 73.8%. Al Qaeda-inspired extremists came in a distant second, at 39.3%. The researchers also found that that law enforcement “perceive violent extremism to be a much more severe threat nationally than the threat of violent extremism in their own jurisdictions.”   read more

FBI Claims it Doesn’t Have to Share Records with Justice Dept. Inspector General

The FBI has contended since 2010 that the IG’s office lacks the legal authority to see documents related to certain matters, including grand juries, Title III electronic surveillances and Fair Credit Reporting Act information. FBI officials also claim they don’t have to share documents related to two investigations of alleged whistleblower retaliation, or those pertaining to an IG review of the FBI’s use of telephonic metadata.   read more

After 8 Years of Delay, EPA Finally Agrees to Test Dangers of Monsanto’s Favorite Pesticide

Glyphosate, which is the active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide, will finally undergo analysis for its effects on endangered species by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The EPA’s agreement is only the beginning of a long, slow process. The agency has agreed to complete its assessments by 2020.   read more

Manufacturers Press Congress to Halt Regulation of Recreational Off-Highway Vehicles

A bill now moving through both houses of Congress at the behest of ROV firms would mandate a study by the National Academy of Sciences—at a cost to the CPSC of $800,000 to $1 million—to investigate whether those standards are necessary. The study is beside the point, of course. Manufacturers are hoping that by the end of two years, there will be a Republican administration in the White House that will appoint a corporative majority to the CPSC and the rule changes will just go away.   read more

Internal Audit Blasts NHTSA’s Weak Regulation of Automakers

The smoking gun was a report from a Wisconsin State Trooper about a fatal accident involving a Cobalt in which the ignition switch had turned off, preventing airbags from being deployed after the driver lost control of the car. GM was finally forced to recall 2.6 million vehicles to remedy the problem, which is responsible for at least 114 deaths.   read more

Isn’t It Finally Time that Congressional Research Service Reports be Made Available to the Public?

The research arm of Congress spends $100 million a year informing lawmakers on key policy issues through reports that are mostly hidden from the public. Now some groups are trying to make these reports available to those who paid for them—U.S. taxpayers. The reports by the Congressional Research Service are not classified. But nor are they put up online. Third-party sources offer them for sale, but it’s unreasonable to expect Americans to pay again for something they already financed.   read more

Domestic Violence Victims Evicted for being “Nuisances”

As if getting beaten isn’t bad enough, some towns have adopted ordinances that punish victims for being nuisances. In one case, a woman who had been warned by police not to make another 911 call was attacked by her boyfriend, leaving a four-inch stab wound in her neck. Her neighbor called 911 in spite of her pleas not to. Police demanded the landlord evict her. “These laws threaten citizens’ fundamental right to call on the police for help,” said Matthew Desmond.   read more

Alaska Air Flight Attendants Sue Boeing over Toxic Airplane Cabins

Their lawsuit claims Boeing knows its airplane cabins can become filled with toxic air but won’t do anything to solve the problem. The plaintiffs claim this problem is “a previously hidden and ‘dirty little secret’ of the commercial airline industry.” A flight attendants union said thousands of people traveling on commercial aircraft may have been exposed to these toxic fumes over the years, and still have the poisonous chemicals in their systems without being aware of it.   read more

Insecticide Still Used in U.S. Found to Cause Cancer by WHO

Lindane is used for livestock and pet treatment, and on fruit and vegetable crops. It is also used topically for the treatment of head and body lice. Small quantities are used in certain lotions, cream, and shampoos. Although the chemical has been detected in groundwater near hazardous waste sites, the most likely exposure in humans is oral ingestion of food that contains traces of the insecticide. “Exposure to lindane can increase one’s risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma by 60%,” said TIME.   read more

Obama Will no Longer Threaten to Prosecute Families who Pay Ransom to Hostage-Takers

An administration official said the White House felt it "needed to clarify that...we do not abandon families during a horrific ordeal." The official added that the threats of prosecution “should never have happened.” The administration has sent mixed signals on negotiating with hostage takers. It talked to the Taliban in Afghanistan to free Bergdahl but warned families of hostages held by the Islamic State and Al Qaeda that they won’t negotiate for their release or allow the families to do so.   read more

Recycling: Good for the Environment, Dangerous for Workers

The recycling industry’s on-the-job injury rate is more than twice as high as that of the average worker. That’s because many recycling centers have unsafe working conditions involving heavy machinery and exposure to hazardous items, such as hypodermic needles, toxic chemicals, and animal carcasses. Also, these centers rely on temporary workers who have fewer workplace protections, often get less training, and are less likely to know about their legal rights to have a safe workplace.   read more
1 to 16 of about 3661 News
1 2 3 ... 229 Next