Controversies

1 to 16 of about 3313 News
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Obama Bans Oil Drilling in Alaskan Bay that Produces 40% of Wild-Caught Seafood in U.S.

Obama’s executive move protects a region that provides 40% of the nation’s wild-caught seafood and which supports up to $2 billion in commercial fishing every year. Bristol Bay is the natural habitat for numerous endangered species, including walruses, seals, sea otters, seals, and several species of whales. “It’s something that’s too precious for us just to be putting out to the highest bidder,” Obama said in announcing his decision. Environmental groups lauded the move.   read more

Federal Grand Jury Indicts Owners of Chemical Company that Contaminated West Virginia Water

Freedom declared bankruptcy after the accident in which 10,000 gallons of the industrial chemical MCHM leaked into the nearby Elk River. The toxic chemicals broke through an aging tank in the plant, which is on the river bank upstream from the county’s municipal water intake. “A survey by two state agencies and the [CDC] later concluded that a fifth of the area’s households that were surveyed had individuals who experienced symptoms consistent with exposure to the chemical,” said the Times.   read more

Education Dept. Approves Sale of Failing For-Profit Colleges to Debt Collection Company

Corinthian Colleges, described as “one of the most abusive and deceptive for-profit college companies” in the country, was on its way to going out of business when student loan collector ECMC said it wanted to buy it. Officials in the U.S. Department of Education approved the deal in which ECMC will pay $24 million for 56 campuses operating under the names Everest and WyoTech. David Halperin says that ECMC stepping in to assume control of the schools is a “terrible mistake.”   read more

New Law School Enrollment Continues to Plunge…to 41-Year Low

These days, many students are looking at the cost of a legal education and getting serious sticker shock. Top schools easily demand $55,000 a year for tuition, and the “low end” options cost in the $40,000 range. Furthermore, many law graduates aren’t getting jobs as lawyers after they finish school and pass the bar exam. Currently there are fewer U.S. jobs for attorneys, thanks to growing online legal services and outsourcing of positions to other countries.   read more

Sen. Coburn Blocks Funding for Veterans Suicide Prevention Web Site

“While we recognize Senator Coburn’s reputation as a budget hawk, clearly the minor cost of this bill would have a tremendous payoff to help save lives in our community," said IAVA founder Paul Reickhoff. "This isn’t about spending new money – it’s about honoring the commitment we owe to the men and women who put on the uniform. With the suicide crisis continuing, it is unconscionable for a lone Senator to block a fair vote and for Congress to leave Washington without dealing with this crisis.”   read more

Nominee for U.S. Ambassador to Norway Gives Up; Who Was George Tsunis?

New York businessman George Tsunis blundered his way through his Senate confirmation hearing earlier this year. Under questioning from senators, Tsunis mistakenly labeled Norway’s prime minister a “president” and insulted the Progress Party, accusing it of spewing “hatred” and being “fringe elements” in Norwegian politics. Senator John McCain, whom Tsunis supported in 2008 to the tune of $50,000, excoriated his former supporter during confirmation hearings.   read more

Lax Oversight of Americans Lobbying for Foreign Governments

One big problem is the Justice Department office that is supposed to keep updated records is actually “a record-keeping mess.” That has allowed nearly half of required disclosures to be filed late. The law also doesn’t require lobbyists to disclose when they disseminated the materials. Even when lobbyists are found to be in noncompliance with the law, they’re not likely to get into trouble. The Justice Department rarely seeks an injunction against the offender.   read more

U.S. Fertility Rate Hits All-Time Low

Last year, 3.93 million births were recorded in the country. That total represented a slight drop from 2012 but a much more significant one compared to 2007. The fertility rate has fallen 9% since then--an “all-time low,” according to the CDC. The agency also reported that birth rates reached record lows in 2013 among women under age 30. A demographic breakdown revealed that the number of births has dropped for whites, Hispanics and blacks since 2007.   read more

Canadian Energy Company Bullies Nebraska Residents over Pipeline Right-of-Way

A state law gives TransCanada the option until January 22, 2015 of using the power of eminent domain to gain right-of-way access to the lands of Nebraskans who oppose the pipeline that would run from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico carrying toxic tar sands oil for export. The law, the Nebraska Major Oil Pipeline Siting Act, is currently under legal challenge. A lower state court nullified the act, and now the Nebraska Supreme Court is reviewing the decision by a Lancaster County district judge.   read more

Dishonorable Discharges Will Now be Reviewed by Mental Health Specialists

The new defense authorization bill requires the military to add a mental health professional to boards that determine discharge status. The legislation was inspired by Army veteran Kristofer Goldsmith, who served in Iraq and was discharged for “Misconduct: Serious Offense” after he attempted to commit suicide. Two months later, he was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder. The discharge status made Goldsmith ineligible for GI Bill benefits and veterans medical care.   read more

Federal Judge Rejects Video Surveillance of Home without Warrant

Police mounted a camera on top of a utility pole near Vargas’ home and pointed it at his front door. They collected six weeks of footage, all without a warrant. Vargas was recorded shooting beer bottles in his backyard. Because he is an undocumented immigrant and thus prohibited from possessing firearms, police used the video to obtain a warrant to search the inside of Vargas’ house. He was then arrested for possessing guns and drugs.   read more

Should Right to an Attorney Extend to Eviction Cases?

According to Victoria Bekiempis of Newsweek, “In New York City, some 90 percent of tenants in housing court don’t have attorneys. Approximately 90 percent of landlords do.” The New York Legal Assistance Group found that 96% of those people they’re able to represent either get to stay in their homes or at least are able to stave off eviction long enough to make other arrangements.   read more

U.S.: 5% of World Population; 80% of Opioid Consumption

The report also showed that opioids are most often used in more rural areas. The states with the highest average prevalence of opioid use are Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia and Kentucky. more people in those regions suffer from diseases such as obesity and diabetes, two conditions that can result in needing pain medication.   read more

Federal Budget Forbids Spending to Oppose Medical Marijuana, but Congress Considers Overruling D.C. Vote to Legalize Recreational Marijuana

On page 213 of the spending plan, there is language barring the U.S. Department of Justice from taking actions against states that have approved marijuana for medicinal use. This prohibition would apply to operations by the DEA. But the news is not all good from the halls of Congress. One House member, Republican Andy Harris of Maryland, wants to prohibit the District of Columbia from implementing its new law legalizing recreational medical marijuana.   read more

Senate Report Rejects Claim that Torture Helped Search for Bin Laden

The key to the debate is a man named Abu Ahmed al-Kuwaiti, who served as bin Laden’s personal courier. The CIA, with the help of the “Zero Dark Thirty” filmmakers, have pushed the story that the torture program resulted in information about Kuwaiti, who ultimately led them to bin Laden. However, the Senate report says the “vast majority of the intelligence acquired on Abu Ahmed al-Kuwaiti was originally acquired from sources unrelated to the [torture] program."   read more

CIA Paid $81 Million to Hire Psychologists to Teach Torture Techniques

Jessen was a specialist in the military’s Survival, Evasion, Resistance Escape training program designed to help soldiers endure torture by foreign captors. The firm he and Mitchell founded only came about after they started talking to the CIA about leaving the Pentagon and going into business for themselves. Nonetheless, they helped the CIA develop 20 methods of torture to use on suspected terrorists. That list was cut to 10 after some of the procedures were deemed too severe.   read more
1 to 16 of about 3313 News
1 2 3 ... 208 Next

Controversies

1 to 16 of about 3313 News
1 2 3 ... 208 Next

Obama Bans Oil Drilling in Alaskan Bay that Produces 40% of Wild-Caught Seafood in U.S.

Obama’s executive move protects a region that provides 40% of the nation’s wild-caught seafood and which supports up to $2 billion in commercial fishing every year. Bristol Bay is the natural habitat for numerous endangered species, including walruses, seals, sea otters, seals, and several species of whales. “It’s something that’s too precious for us just to be putting out to the highest bidder,” Obama said in announcing his decision. Environmental groups lauded the move.   read more

Federal Grand Jury Indicts Owners of Chemical Company that Contaminated West Virginia Water

Freedom declared bankruptcy after the accident in which 10,000 gallons of the industrial chemical MCHM leaked into the nearby Elk River. The toxic chemicals broke through an aging tank in the plant, which is on the river bank upstream from the county’s municipal water intake. “A survey by two state agencies and the [CDC] later concluded that a fifth of the area’s households that were surveyed had individuals who experienced symptoms consistent with exposure to the chemical,” said the Times.   read more

Education Dept. Approves Sale of Failing For-Profit Colleges to Debt Collection Company

Corinthian Colleges, described as “one of the most abusive and deceptive for-profit college companies” in the country, was on its way to going out of business when student loan collector ECMC said it wanted to buy it. Officials in the U.S. Department of Education approved the deal in which ECMC will pay $24 million for 56 campuses operating under the names Everest and WyoTech. David Halperin says that ECMC stepping in to assume control of the schools is a “terrible mistake.”   read more

New Law School Enrollment Continues to Plunge…to 41-Year Low

These days, many students are looking at the cost of a legal education and getting serious sticker shock. Top schools easily demand $55,000 a year for tuition, and the “low end” options cost in the $40,000 range. Furthermore, many law graduates aren’t getting jobs as lawyers after they finish school and pass the bar exam. Currently there are fewer U.S. jobs for attorneys, thanks to growing online legal services and outsourcing of positions to other countries.   read more

Sen. Coburn Blocks Funding for Veterans Suicide Prevention Web Site

“While we recognize Senator Coburn’s reputation as a budget hawk, clearly the minor cost of this bill would have a tremendous payoff to help save lives in our community," said IAVA founder Paul Reickhoff. "This isn’t about spending new money – it’s about honoring the commitment we owe to the men and women who put on the uniform. With the suicide crisis continuing, it is unconscionable for a lone Senator to block a fair vote and for Congress to leave Washington without dealing with this crisis.”   read more

Nominee for U.S. Ambassador to Norway Gives Up; Who Was George Tsunis?

New York businessman George Tsunis blundered his way through his Senate confirmation hearing earlier this year. Under questioning from senators, Tsunis mistakenly labeled Norway’s prime minister a “president” and insulted the Progress Party, accusing it of spewing “hatred” and being “fringe elements” in Norwegian politics. Senator John McCain, whom Tsunis supported in 2008 to the tune of $50,000, excoriated his former supporter during confirmation hearings.   read more

Lax Oversight of Americans Lobbying for Foreign Governments

One big problem is the Justice Department office that is supposed to keep updated records is actually “a record-keeping mess.” That has allowed nearly half of required disclosures to be filed late. The law also doesn’t require lobbyists to disclose when they disseminated the materials. Even when lobbyists are found to be in noncompliance with the law, they’re not likely to get into trouble. The Justice Department rarely seeks an injunction against the offender.   read more

U.S. Fertility Rate Hits All-Time Low

Last year, 3.93 million births were recorded in the country. That total represented a slight drop from 2012 but a much more significant one compared to 2007. The fertility rate has fallen 9% since then--an “all-time low,” according to the CDC. The agency also reported that birth rates reached record lows in 2013 among women under age 30. A demographic breakdown revealed that the number of births has dropped for whites, Hispanics and blacks since 2007.   read more

Canadian Energy Company Bullies Nebraska Residents over Pipeline Right-of-Way

A state law gives TransCanada the option until January 22, 2015 of using the power of eminent domain to gain right-of-way access to the lands of Nebraskans who oppose the pipeline that would run from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico carrying toxic tar sands oil for export. The law, the Nebraska Major Oil Pipeline Siting Act, is currently under legal challenge. A lower state court nullified the act, and now the Nebraska Supreme Court is reviewing the decision by a Lancaster County district judge.   read more

Dishonorable Discharges Will Now be Reviewed by Mental Health Specialists

The new defense authorization bill requires the military to add a mental health professional to boards that determine discharge status. The legislation was inspired by Army veteran Kristofer Goldsmith, who served in Iraq and was discharged for “Misconduct: Serious Offense” after he attempted to commit suicide. Two months later, he was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder. The discharge status made Goldsmith ineligible for GI Bill benefits and veterans medical care.   read more

Federal Judge Rejects Video Surveillance of Home without Warrant

Police mounted a camera on top of a utility pole near Vargas’ home and pointed it at his front door. They collected six weeks of footage, all without a warrant. Vargas was recorded shooting beer bottles in his backyard. Because he is an undocumented immigrant and thus prohibited from possessing firearms, police used the video to obtain a warrant to search the inside of Vargas’ house. He was then arrested for possessing guns and drugs.   read more

Should Right to an Attorney Extend to Eviction Cases?

According to Victoria Bekiempis of Newsweek, “In New York City, some 90 percent of tenants in housing court don’t have attorneys. Approximately 90 percent of landlords do.” The New York Legal Assistance Group found that 96% of those people they’re able to represent either get to stay in their homes or at least are able to stave off eviction long enough to make other arrangements.   read more

U.S.: 5% of World Population; 80% of Opioid Consumption

The report also showed that opioids are most often used in more rural areas. The states with the highest average prevalence of opioid use are Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia and Kentucky. more people in those regions suffer from diseases such as obesity and diabetes, two conditions that can result in needing pain medication.   read more

Federal Budget Forbids Spending to Oppose Medical Marijuana, but Congress Considers Overruling D.C. Vote to Legalize Recreational Marijuana

On page 213 of the spending plan, there is language barring the U.S. Department of Justice from taking actions against states that have approved marijuana for medicinal use. This prohibition would apply to operations by the DEA. But the news is not all good from the halls of Congress. One House member, Republican Andy Harris of Maryland, wants to prohibit the District of Columbia from implementing its new law legalizing recreational medical marijuana.   read more

Senate Report Rejects Claim that Torture Helped Search for Bin Laden

The key to the debate is a man named Abu Ahmed al-Kuwaiti, who served as bin Laden’s personal courier. The CIA, with the help of the “Zero Dark Thirty” filmmakers, have pushed the story that the torture program resulted in information about Kuwaiti, who ultimately led them to bin Laden. However, the Senate report says the “vast majority of the intelligence acquired on Abu Ahmed al-Kuwaiti was originally acquired from sources unrelated to the [torture] program."   read more

CIA Paid $81 Million to Hire Psychologists to Teach Torture Techniques

Jessen was a specialist in the military’s Survival, Evasion, Resistance Escape training program designed to help soldiers endure torture by foreign captors. The firm he and Mitchell founded only came about after they started talking to the CIA about leaving the Pentagon and going into business for themselves. Nonetheless, they helped the CIA develop 20 methods of torture to use on suspected terrorists. That list was cut to 10 after some of the procedures were deemed too severe.   read more
1 to 16 of about 3313 News
1 2 3 ... 208 Next