Controversies

1 to 16 of about 3224 News
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Stonewalling in Georgia: As Election Day Nears, Judge Refuses to Force Secretary of State to Process 40,000 Missing Voter Registrations

Republican Secretary of State Brian Kemp has not processed registrations for at least 40,000 new voters who were signed up under a program to register minorities. A lawsuit forcing him to do so hit a wall in the form of Fulton Judge Christopher Brasher, who denied the plaintiffs’ petition. “All in all – a Republican appointed judge has backed the Republican Secretary of State to deny the right to vote to a largely African American and Latino population,” said NAACP's Dr. Francys Johnson.   read more

Media Credibility Threatened by FBI Falsification of AP News Story to Locate Bomb Suspect

“We are extremely concerned and find it unacceptable that the FBI misappropriated the name of The Associated Press and published a false story attributed to AP,” said AP's Paul Colford. “This ploy violated AP’s name and undermined AP’s credibility.” ACLU's Christopher Soghoian said the FBI’s actions demonstrate that the “ends do not justify the means. It’s a dangerous road impersonating the media. If people do not trust the news media, then our democracy cannot function properly.”   read more

MIT Releases Groundbreaking Report on Sexual Assaults on Its Campus

One of the nation’s leading universities has come forward with its own numbers on the disturbing problem of sexual assaults, which could spur fact-finding by other institutions. Massachusetts Institute of Technology reported that one in six female undergraduates had been sexually assaulted while attending the prestigious school. University President L. Rafael Reif said he was “disturbed by the extent and nature of the problem” at MIT. “Sexual assault violates our core MIT values."   read more

In Wake of Snowden, FBI Investigates “Second Leaker” Working for U.S. Fed Contractor

The FBI has identified a federal contractor suspected of leaking sensitive documents about the terrorist watch list to journalist Glenn Greenwald. Agents searched the suspect’s home, leading to an investigation by federal prosecutors in Northern Virginia. “It’s fair to say that there are people who have been inspired by Edward Snowden’s courage and by the great good and virtue that it has achieved,” said Greenwald.   read more

Breast Cancer Charity Accused of Partnering with Corporations Linked to Cancer-Causing Products

One example cited is Komen’s decision to accept $100,000 from Baker Hughes, supplier of equipment to the oil and gas industry. Baker Hughes has helped companies carry out hydraulic fracturing operations that use cancer-causing chemicals. In response to public pressure, Komen canceled founder Nancy Brinker's acceptance of the check. Komen has also partnered with water bottling companies that use BPAs, a carcinogen, and fast-food providers accused of selling food containing carcinogens.   read more

Nobel Peace Prize Winners Press Obama to Take Firmer Stand against Torture

Led by Archbishop Desmond Tutu of South Africa and former President José Ramos-Horta of East Timor, the Nobel laureates want Obama, who won the prize in 2009, to make “full disclosure to the American people of the extent and use of torture.” That would include releasing the Senate report on the CIA's use of torture last decade against al Qaeda members and others. “When a nation’s leaders condone and even order torture, that nation has lost its way,” wrote the laureates.   read more

Georgia’s Republican Secretary of State Fights to Delay Registration of Tens of Thousands of New Democratic Voters

State Rep. Stacy Abrams (D) led an effort to register those who've never voted before, mostly minorities, and added about 90,000 people to the rolls. About 40,000 of those registrations have been lost. Georgia’s top election official, Brian Kemp, has been unhelpful with the missing registrations. “We asked the Secretary of State to meet with us. We wanted to understand if we were doing something wrong, or if there was another database... But he refused...” said Abrams.   read more

Wells Fargo Accused of Death by Foreclosure

After making mortgage payments on her condo for 16 years, she refinanced with a “pick-a-payment” loan through World Savings. The next day, Kilgore realized she’d agreed to a bad loan and tried to get it rescinded, but World Savings wouldn’t agree. Kilgore’s loan was eventually acquired by Wells Fargo and was kicked out of her condo. That meant that Kilgore was unable to receive subsidies to run the oxygen concentrator she needed to breathe because she didn’t have a permanent address.   read more

University of Wisconsin Accused of Planning to Mentally Torture Baby Monkeys

University of Wisconsin researchers are planning to take newborns from their mothers, keep them isolated for six weeks except for feeding and cleaning, then put them with one other six-week-old and torture the pair with live snakes and intruders. If those newborns were human, people would be going to jail. Instead the subjects are rhesus monkeys, chosen because they’ll act and feel pretty much like a human would when subjected to those stresses.   read more

TV Attack Ads Average One Per Minute…in North Carolina Alone

In the fight for control of the U.S. Senate, the battle between incumbent Democrat Kay Hagan and Thom Tillis, Republican Speaker of the North Carolina House, has become ground zero for an onslaught of negative commercials. In one week, North Carolinians were subjected to an average of one attack ad for every minute of TV time. “Congratulations, North Carolina: You’ve become the year’s great state of political hate,” wrote Dave Levinthal.   read more

50% Increase in U.S. Cities Advancing Laws to Restrict the Sharing of Food with Homeless People

Every year, feeding the homeless is getting a little bit harder to do in the U.S. Since 2010 there has been close to a 50% increase in the number of American cities that have passed or introduced laws restricting the sharing of food with homeless people. Fort Lauderdale has become the latest to do so--the 22nd city since January 2013 to restrict such practices through community pressures. Another 10 U.S. cities are in the process of passing such legislation.   read more

Judge Gives Obama Administration until December to Justify Withholding 2,100 Photos of U.S. Use of Torture in Iraq and Afghanistan

Judge Hellerstein found the government’s declaration to be overreaching. “I have reviewed some of these photographs and I know that many…are relatively innocuous while others need more serious consideration,” he wrote. The judge rejected the Obama administration’s sweeping suppression of the 2,100 images and ordered the government to provide a written explanation for each photograph that justifies it being withheld from public disclosure.   read more

More Evidence that TV Ads in Judicial Elections Lead to Less Sympathy for Defendants back in the Courtroom

It's getting harder for criminal defendants to win their cases due to judges looking over their shoulders and worrying about political accusations of being soft on crime. This development stems from increases in campaign spending on races for judicial seats. “[State] justices, already the targets of sensationalist ads labeling them ‘soft on crime,’ are under increasing pressure to allow electoral politics to influence their decisions, even when fundamental rights are at stake.”   read more

Senators Coburn and Lee Fight to Halt Creation of a Women’s History Museum

Republican senators Tom Coburn and Mike Lee are blocking the measure from moving forward in the Senate. They say the plan could result in the federal government paying for a large portion of the museum at a time of trillion-dollar debts. Bill co-sponsor Carolyn Maloney (D-New York) says the holdup is “just outrageous.” She noted that other groups have established museums in Washington through the creation of a commission, which is what the bill calls for.   read more

If the Draft Ended 41 Years Ago, Why are Young Men Still Punished for not Registering?

Each year millions of teenage men are required to register for a draft that does not exist. Those who don’t sign up are barred from receiving federal financial aid, student loans, job training, or employment from certain public agencies. In 40 states, getting or renewing a driver’s license is linked to whether a person registered for the draft. Each violator is also at risk for spending five years in prison and being fined up to $250,000, if the Justice Department chooses to prosecute.   read more

Interior Dept. Inspector General Closed 457 Investigations Last Year, but Released only 3 to the Public

Acting Inspector General Mary Kendall said that the lack of disclosure stemmed from a policy requiring the agency to receive three separate Freedom of Information Act requests before releasing a report—an unrealistically high standard. Most of the cases "stayed hidden from public view," according to Greenwire. “Among them were cases exposing nepotism, contracting violations and allegations that BP America underpaid its gas royalties by millions of dollars.”   read more
1 to 16 of about 3224 News
1 2 3 ... 202 Next

Controversies

1 to 16 of about 3224 News
1 2 3 ... 202 Next

Stonewalling in Georgia: As Election Day Nears, Judge Refuses to Force Secretary of State to Process 40,000 Missing Voter Registrations

Republican Secretary of State Brian Kemp has not processed registrations for at least 40,000 new voters who were signed up under a program to register minorities. A lawsuit forcing him to do so hit a wall in the form of Fulton Judge Christopher Brasher, who denied the plaintiffs’ petition. “All in all – a Republican appointed judge has backed the Republican Secretary of State to deny the right to vote to a largely African American and Latino population,” said NAACP's Dr. Francys Johnson.   read more

Media Credibility Threatened by FBI Falsification of AP News Story to Locate Bomb Suspect

“We are extremely concerned and find it unacceptable that the FBI misappropriated the name of The Associated Press and published a false story attributed to AP,” said AP's Paul Colford. “This ploy violated AP’s name and undermined AP’s credibility.” ACLU's Christopher Soghoian said the FBI’s actions demonstrate that the “ends do not justify the means. It’s a dangerous road impersonating the media. If people do not trust the news media, then our democracy cannot function properly.”   read more

MIT Releases Groundbreaking Report on Sexual Assaults on Its Campus

One of the nation’s leading universities has come forward with its own numbers on the disturbing problem of sexual assaults, which could spur fact-finding by other institutions. Massachusetts Institute of Technology reported that one in six female undergraduates had been sexually assaulted while attending the prestigious school. University President L. Rafael Reif said he was “disturbed by the extent and nature of the problem” at MIT. “Sexual assault violates our core MIT values."   read more

In Wake of Snowden, FBI Investigates “Second Leaker” Working for U.S. Fed Contractor

The FBI has identified a federal contractor suspected of leaking sensitive documents about the terrorist watch list to journalist Glenn Greenwald. Agents searched the suspect’s home, leading to an investigation by federal prosecutors in Northern Virginia. “It’s fair to say that there are people who have been inspired by Edward Snowden’s courage and by the great good and virtue that it has achieved,” said Greenwald.   read more

Breast Cancer Charity Accused of Partnering with Corporations Linked to Cancer-Causing Products

One example cited is Komen’s decision to accept $100,000 from Baker Hughes, supplier of equipment to the oil and gas industry. Baker Hughes has helped companies carry out hydraulic fracturing operations that use cancer-causing chemicals. In response to public pressure, Komen canceled founder Nancy Brinker's acceptance of the check. Komen has also partnered with water bottling companies that use BPAs, a carcinogen, and fast-food providers accused of selling food containing carcinogens.   read more

Nobel Peace Prize Winners Press Obama to Take Firmer Stand against Torture

Led by Archbishop Desmond Tutu of South Africa and former President José Ramos-Horta of East Timor, the Nobel laureates want Obama, who won the prize in 2009, to make “full disclosure to the American people of the extent and use of torture.” That would include releasing the Senate report on the CIA's use of torture last decade against al Qaeda members and others. “When a nation’s leaders condone and even order torture, that nation has lost its way,” wrote the laureates.   read more

Georgia’s Republican Secretary of State Fights to Delay Registration of Tens of Thousands of New Democratic Voters

State Rep. Stacy Abrams (D) led an effort to register those who've never voted before, mostly minorities, and added about 90,000 people to the rolls. About 40,000 of those registrations have been lost. Georgia’s top election official, Brian Kemp, has been unhelpful with the missing registrations. “We asked the Secretary of State to meet with us. We wanted to understand if we were doing something wrong, or if there was another database... But he refused...” said Abrams.   read more

Wells Fargo Accused of Death by Foreclosure

After making mortgage payments on her condo for 16 years, she refinanced with a “pick-a-payment” loan through World Savings. The next day, Kilgore realized she’d agreed to a bad loan and tried to get it rescinded, but World Savings wouldn’t agree. Kilgore’s loan was eventually acquired by Wells Fargo and was kicked out of her condo. That meant that Kilgore was unable to receive subsidies to run the oxygen concentrator she needed to breathe because she didn’t have a permanent address.   read more

University of Wisconsin Accused of Planning to Mentally Torture Baby Monkeys

University of Wisconsin researchers are planning to take newborns from their mothers, keep them isolated for six weeks except for feeding and cleaning, then put them with one other six-week-old and torture the pair with live snakes and intruders. If those newborns were human, people would be going to jail. Instead the subjects are rhesus monkeys, chosen because they’ll act and feel pretty much like a human would when subjected to those stresses.   read more

TV Attack Ads Average One Per Minute…in North Carolina Alone

In the fight for control of the U.S. Senate, the battle between incumbent Democrat Kay Hagan and Thom Tillis, Republican Speaker of the North Carolina House, has become ground zero for an onslaught of negative commercials. In one week, North Carolinians were subjected to an average of one attack ad for every minute of TV time. “Congratulations, North Carolina: You’ve become the year’s great state of political hate,” wrote Dave Levinthal.   read more

50% Increase in U.S. Cities Advancing Laws to Restrict the Sharing of Food with Homeless People

Every year, feeding the homeless is getting a little bit harder to do in the U.S. Since 2010 there has been close to a 50% increase in the number of American cities that have passed or introduced laws restricting the sharing of food with homeless people. Fort Lauderdale has become the latest to do so--the 22nd city since January 2013 to restrict such practices through community pressures. Another 10 U.S. cities are in the process of passing such legislation.   read more

Judge Gives Obama Administration until December to Justify Withholding 2,100 Photos of U.S. Use of Torture in Iraq and Afghanistan

Judge Hellerstein found the government’s declaration to be overreaching. “I have reviewed some of these photographs and I know that many…are relatively innocuous while others need more serious consideration,” he wrote. The judge rejected the Obama administration’s sweeping suppression of the 2,100 images and ordered the government to provide a written explanation for each photograph that justifies it being withheld from public disclosure.   read more

More Evidence that TV Ads in Judicial Elections Lead to Less Sympathy for Defendants back in the Courtroom

It's getting harder for criminal defendants to win their cases due to judges looking over their shoulders and worrying about political accusations of being soft on crime. This development stems from increases in campaign spending on races for judicial seats. “[State] justices, already the targets of sensationalist ads labeling them ‘soft on crime,’ are under increasing pressure to allow electoral politics to influence their decisions, even when fundamental rights are at stake.”   read more

Senators Coburn and Lee Fight to Halt Creation of a Women’s History Museum

Republican senators Tom Coburn and Mike Lee are blocking the measure from moving forward in the Senate. They say the plan could result in the federal government paying for a large portion of the museum at a time of trillion-dollar debts. Bill co-sponsor Carolyn Maloney (D-New York) says the holdup is “just outrageous.” She noted that other groups have established museums in Washington through the creation of a commission, which is what the bill calls for.   read more

If the Draft Ended 41 Years Ago, Why are Young Men Still Punished for not Registering?

Each year millions of teenage men are required to register for a draft that does not exist. Those who don’t sign up are barred from receiving federal financial aid, student loans, job training, or employment from certain public agencies. In 40 states, getting or renewing a driver’s license is linked to whether a person registered for the draft. Each violator is also at risk for spending five years in prison and being fined up to $250,000, if the Justice Department chooses to prosecute.   read more

Interior Dept. Inspector General Closed 457 Investigations Last Year, but Released only 3 to the Public

Acting Inspector General Mary Kendall said that the lack of disclosure stemmed from a policy requiring the agency to receive three separate Freedom of Information Act requests before releasing a report—an unrealistically high standard. Most of the cases "stayed hidden from public view," according to Greenwire. “Among them were cases exposing nepotism, contracting violations and allegations that BP America underpaid its gas royalties by millions of dollars.”   read more
1 to 16 of about 3224 News
1 2 3 ... 202 Next