Controversies

1 to 16 of about 3066 News
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Appeals Court Ruling Challenges Legitimacy of Military Commissions For Guantánamo Prisoners

A military commission had found al-Bahlul guilty of supporting terrorism, solicitation and conspiracy. But the appellate court, in a unanimous decision, invalidated the first two convictions, saying they weren’t considered war crimes prior to the Military Commissions Act of 2006. and the court majority questioned the third.   read more

Sentencing Commission Gives 46,000 Federal Drug Prisoners a Shot at Reduced Sentences

Inmates will have to go before a judge and ask that their sentences be reduced. If the judge grants the maximum reduction, about two years will be shaved off the average inmate’s sentence. Prisoners shouldn’t start packing their bags yet though; they won’t be able to begin petitioning judges for the reductions until November 2015.   read more

California Shuts Down Fracking Waste Injection Sites as Threat to Water Supply

Oil producers have long injected fracking waste into aquifers that had been deemed by the state as having no potable water and are not protected from such practice. However, the maps delineating where waste aquifers are compared to useable water are often inaccurate.   read more

41% of American Women Report having been Touched, Followed or Sexually Assaulted in Public

41% of women reported experiencing “physically aggressive forms” of harassment, including “sexual touching (23%), following (20%), flashing (14%), and being forced to do something sexual (9%).” An even larger percentage (65%) said they have experienced at least one type of street harassment in their lifetimes.   read more

Navy Nurse Refuses to Force-Feed Guantánamo Prisoner

American officials confirmed the incident took place before the July 4 holiday, prompting the removal of the male nurse from the forced-feeding area. The nurse may be in his forties, Latino, holding the rank of either lieutenant or captain. He was quoted as having announced, “I have come to the decision that I refuse to participate in this criminal act.”   read more

Mother Arrested for Leaving 9-Year-Old Daughter at Park while She Worked at McDonalds

Debra Harrell of North Augusta was arrested after police learned she was regularly leaving her nine-year-old daughter at a nearby park for hours at a time while she worked at McDonald’s. The child was given a cell phone in case of emergencies and reportedly not harmed while alone in Summerfield.   read more

Beetles, Welcomed in Arizona to Help Save Water, May Also Wreak Environmental Havoc

The tamarisk beetle has been both a blessing and a curse in the American Southwest. The agricultural industry and state water officials in Arizona have welcomed the insect because of its appetite for the tamarisk tree, a non-native species that critics say uses too much water, up to 200 gallons a day. But ecologists argue the beetles will only cause other problems, demonstrating the complicated efforts by man to correct his interference with nature.   read more

Federal Court Knocks Out 1850s Indiana Law Forcing Non-Religious Couples to be Married by Clergy or Government Officials

“The court has gotten this exactly right,” said Reba Boyd Wooden, a humanist who was a plaintiff in the case. “Whether a person is atheist, agnostic, humanist, or simply doesn’t want a religious wedding, this decision means they can now have these wonderful occasions solemnized by a celebrant who shares their life-stance.” In having its law struck down, Indiana will join Florida, Maine and South Carolina as states that allow humanists to officiate at weddings.   read more

International Boom in Demand for California Almonds Threatens Water Supply in Times of Drought

The world has developed a craving for almonds, which is good for California farmers, who produce 80% of its global supply. But it’s also bad news for the water supply of the state, particularly as it goes through its worst drought on record. Almonds are a highly water-intensive crop, with more than a gallon of water used to produce each one. Multiply that by 2 billion pounds—the amount of almonds California grows each year—and there's a serious downside for the state.   read more

Alabama Government Approves Carrying Guns into Voting Booth

Alabama voters can now carry firearms into polling places. Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange announced last week that guns are allowed in the voting booth, regardless of what a local county decides. The announcement came after a sheriffs group called on the state’s counties to prohibit unconcealed guns from polling places. The group felt that weapons might intimidate some voters from casting ballots. Chambers County asked Strange for a legal opinion.   read more

Study Shows Organic Foods have more Antioxidants

A European study says organic foods are higher in antioxidants than conventional crops, lending weight to the claims that natural farming methods produce healthier things to eat. “It shows very clearly how you grow your food has an impact,” said ecological agriculture professor Carlo Leifert. “If you buy organic fruits and vegetables, you can be sure you have, on average, a higher amount of antioxidants at the same calorie level.”   read more

Federal Court Rules Minor Political Parties May Fight Law that makes them Pay Legal Costs of Major Party Lawsuits against Them

For more than 70 years, Pennsylvania law has allowed major parties to intimidate other parties by suing them, claiming their qualifying signatures are invalid. Furthermore, the third parties are liable for legal costs of defending their petitions. That has caused third-party politicians to pull out of races. But a federal court has ruled that the Green Party and others like it don’t necessarily have to foot the bill the next time the “big boys” threaten a lawsuit.   read more

Kansas Gov. Brownback Sued for Signing Law Criminalizing the Enforcement of Federal Gun Laws

Under this law, a U.S. government employee attempting to enforce federal regulations for firearms, accessories and ammunition that were manufactured and sold in Kansas could be charged with a felony. The law also allows those who would be prohibited by federal law from owning firearms to own such “Kansas-only” weapons, allows guns to be manufactured without serial numbers and permits the manufacture of guns designed to fool metal detectors.   read more

Agriculture Dept. Refuses to Divulge Details of New Poultry Inspection Rule

Earlier drafts of the rule proposed a 40% cut in USDA inspectors and a 20% increase in line speeds. Some of the government inspectors would be replaced by those working for the processing company. Those changes drew protests, both from the standpoint of food safety and that of workers’ rights. The USDA refuses to release the new rule to the public and has won’t say if those concerns have been addressed in the final proposal.   read more

Florida Judge Slams GOP for Illegal Redistricting

Judge Terry P. Lewis noted that in employing political operatives to craft Republican-friendly boundaries, the GOP had violated a state law intended to make the election process more balanced and fair. He even quoted George Washington in warning of the use of “cunning, ambitious and unprincipled men.”   read more

Tennessee Arrests Mother for Taking Meth while Pregnant

Mallory Loyola gave birth July 6 to a baby girl at the University of Tennessee Medical Center. She was arrested two days later when it was found that there was methamphetamine in her system while she was pregnant, and Loyola admitted to smoking meth a few days before giving birth. Methamphetamine, while an addictive drug, is not classified as a narcotic. Furthermore, there’s no evidence that Loyola’s baby was born addicted to drugs or harmed by Loyola’s drug use.   read more
1 to 16 of about 3066 News
1 2 3 ... 192 Next

Controversies

1 to 16 of about 3066 News
1 2 3 ... 192 Next

Appeals Court Ruling Challenges Legitimacy of Military Commissions For Guantánamo Prisoners

A military commission had found al-Bahlul guilty of supporting terrorism, solicitation and conspiracy. But the appellate court, in a unanimous decision, invalidated the first two convictions, saying they weren’t considered war crimes prior to the Military Commissions Act of 2006. and the court majority questioned the third.   read more

Sentencing Commission Gives 46,000 Federal Drug Prisoners a Shot at Reduced Sentences

Inmates will have to go before a judge and ask that their sentences be reduced. If the judge grants the maximum reduction, about two years will be shaved off the average inmate’s sentence. Prisoners shouldn’t start packing their bags yet though; they won’t be able to begin petitioning judges for the reductions until November 2015.   read more

California Shuts Down Fracking Waste Injection Sites as Threat to Water Supply

Oil producers have long injected fracking waste into aquifers that had been deemed by the state as having no potable water and are not protected from such practice. However, the maps delineating where waste aquifers are compared to useable water are often inaccurate.   read more

41% of American Women Report having been Touched, Followed or Sexually Assaulted in Public

41% of women reported experiencing “physically aggressive forms” of harassment, including “sexual touching (23%), following (20%), flashing (14%), and being forced to do something sexual (9%).” An even larger percentage (65%) said they have experienced at least one type of street harassment in their lifetimes.   read more

Navy Nurse Refuses to Force-Feed Guantánamo Prisoner

American officials confirmed the incident took place before the July 4 holiday, prompting the removal of the male nurse from the forced-feeding area. The nurse may be in his forties, Latino, holding the rank of either lieutenant or captain. He was quoted as having announced, “I have come to the decision that I refuse to participate in this criminal act.”   read more

Mother Arrested for Leaving 9-Year-Old Daughter at Park while She Worked at McDonalds

Debra Harrell of North Augusta was arrested after police learned she was regularly leaving her nine-year-old daughter at a nearby park for hours at a time while she worked at McDonald’s. The child was given a cell phone in case of emergencies and reportedly not harmed while alone in Summerfield.   read more

Beetles, Welcomed in Arizona to Help Save Water, May Also Wreak Environmental Havoc

The tamarisk beetle has been both a blessing and a curse in the American Southwest. The agricultural industry and state water officials in Arizona have welcomed the insect because of its appetite for the tamarisk tree, a non-native species that critics say uses too much water, up to 200 gallons a day. But ecologists argue the beetles will only cause other problems, demonstrating the complicated efforts by man to correct his interference with nature.   read more

Federal Court Knocks Out 1850s Indiana Law Forcing Non-Religious Couples to be Married by Clergy or Government Officials

“The court has gotten this exactly right,” said Reba Boyd Wooden, a humanist who was a plaintiff in the case. “Whether a person is atheist, agnostic, humanist, or simply doesn’t want a religious wedding, this decision means they can now have these wonderful occasions solemnized by a celebrant who shares their life-stance.” In having its law struck down, Indiana will join Florida, Maine and South Carolina as states that allow humanists to officiate at weddings.   read more

International Boom in Demand for California Almonds Threatens Water Supply in Times of Drought

The world has developed a craving for almonds, which is good for California farmers, who produce 80% of its global supply. But it’s also bad news for the water supply of the state, particularly as it goes through its worst drought on record. Almonds are a highly water-intensive crop, with more than a gallon of water used to produce each one. Multiply that by 2 billion pounds—the amount of almonds California grows each year—and there's a serious downside for the state.   read more

Alabama Government Approves Carrying Guns into Voting Booth

Alabama voters can now carry firearms into polling places. Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange announced last week that guns are allowed in the voting booth, regardless of what a local county decides. The announcement came after a sheriffs group called on the state’s counties to prohibit unconcealed guns from polling places. The group felt that weapons might intimidate some voters from casting ballots. Chambers County asked Strange for a legal opinion.   read more

Study Shows Organic Foods have more Antioxidants

A European study says organic foods are higher in antioxidants than conventional crops, lending weight to the claims that natural farming methods produce healthier things to eat. “It shows very clearly how you grow your food has an impact,” said ecological agriculture professor Carlo Leifert. “If you buy organic fruits and vegetables, you can be sure you have, on average, a higher amount of antioxidants at the same calorie level.”   read more

Federal Court Rules Minor Political Parties May Fight Law that makes them Pay Legal Costs of Major Party Lawsuits against Them

For more than 70 years, Pennsylvania law has allowed major parties to intimidate other parties by suing them, claiming their qualifying signatures are invalid. Furthermore, the third parties are liable for legal costs of defending their petitions. That has caused third-party politicians to pull out of races. But a federal court has ruled that the Green Party and others like it don’t necessarily have to foot the bill the next time the “big boys” threaten a lawsuit.   read more

Kansas Gov. Brownback Sued for Signing Law Criminalizing the Enforcement of Federal Gun Laws

Under this law, a U.S. government employee attempting to enforce federal regulations for firearms, accessories and ammunition that were manufactured and sold in Kansas could be charged with a felony. The law also allows those who would be prohibited by federal law from owning firearms to own such “Kansas-only” weapons, allows guns to be manufactured without serial numbers and permits the manufacture of guns designed to fool metal detectors.   read more

Agriculture Dept. Refuses to Divulge Details of New Poultry Inspection Rule

Earlier drafts of the rule proposed a 40% cut in USDA inspectors and a 20% increase in line speeds. Some of the government inspectors would be replaced by those working for the processing company. Those changes drew protests, both from the standpoint of food safety and that of workers’ rights. The USDA refuses to release the new rule to the public and has won’t say if those concerns have been addressed in the final proposal.   read more

Florida Judge Slams GOP for Illegal Redistricting

Judge Terry P. Lewis noted that in employing political operatives to craft Republican-friendly boundaries, the GOP had violated a state law intended to make the election process more balanced and fair. He even quoted George Washington in warning of the use of “cunning, ambitious and unprincipled men.”   read more

Tennessee Arrests Mother for Taking Meth while Pregnant

Mallory Loyola gave birth July 6 to a baby girl at the University of Tennessee Medical Center. She was arrested two days later when it was found that there was methamphetamine in her system while she was pregnant, and Loyola admitted to smoking meth a few days before giving birth. Methamphetamine, while an addictive drug, is not classified as a narcotic. Furthermore, there’s no evidence that Loyola’s baby was born addicted to drugs or harmed by Loyola’s drug use.   read more
1 to 16 of about 3066 News
1 2 3 ... 192 Next