Controversies

1 to 16 of about 3170 News
1 2 3 ... 199 Next

Big Tobacco’s Dire Health Warnings on E-Cigarette Packs Seen as Cynical Marketing Strategy

Big Tobacco discouraging Americans from buying its unhealthy products? Stanford professor Dr. Robert K. Jackler said he “nearly fell off my chair” when he saw the warnings on the e-cigarette packs. “Is this part of a noble effort for the betterment of public health, or a cynical business strategy? I suspect the latter.” The strategy might be intended to "curry favor with consumers” in order to “earn a kind of legitimacy [they've] sought for decades."   read more

Will Billing Rape Victims Thousands of Dollars for Medical Exams in Louisiana Finally Come to an End?

Victims are often billed $1,700 to $4,000 for evidence collection, HIV tests and ER fees. Interim LSU Hospital formerly did not charge victims. However, after the hospital control was transferred to private interests at the behest of Gov. Bobby Jindal (R), victims began to be billed. Some state lawmakers and health officials are now calling for a new law to change this longstanding policy. “Talk about being traumatized twice,” said state Democratic Representative Helena Moreno.   read more

Judicial Appointees of Obama and Clinton to Weigh in on Restrictive North Carolina Voting Law

The North Carolina bill is part of a pattern by Republican-led governors and state legislatures to change the voting rules in a way that results in making it more difficult for poor and minority citizens to vote. Some of the changes are made in the name of voter fraud prevention, but no one can point to any significant instances of such misconduct. During oral arguments, Judge James Wynn, an Obama appointee, asked, "Why does the state of North Carolina not want people to vote?"   read more

Amazon under Increasing Fire from Authors over Alleged Monopolistic E-Book Tactics

The group of 300 writers isn’t just pressuring Amazon’s board. It’s also pushing the Department of Justice to investigate it for alleged monopoly tactics. “We’re talking about...deliberately making a book hard or impossible to get, ‘disappearing’ an author,” said Ursula K. Le Guin. “Amazon is using censorship to gain total market control so they can dictate to publishers what they can publish, to authors what they can write, to readers what they can buy."   read more

Virginia Files Billion-Dollar Mortgage Fraud Lawsuit against Major Banks

“The message today is clear. It doesn’t matter if you’re a small-time con artist or a multi-billion dollar Wall Street bank. If you try to rip off or defraud Virginia consumers or Virginia taxpayers, you will be caught and you will be held responsible,” said state Attorney General Mark Herring. “Every Virginian was harmed by the financial crisis. Homes were lost, retirement accounts were devastated, small businesses saw their credit dry up almost overnight."   read more

Secret Service, in 2011, Was Unaware of Shots Fired at White House until Housekeeper Found Clues 4 Days Later

On the night of the shooting, supervisors immediately concluded there was no threat, even though agents on guard heard the shots and prepared to respond. They were told to “stand down” after their superiors wrongly assumed that a car had backfired near the White House. Then, Secret Service supervisors concluded there had been gunfire, but that it was the result of local gangs shooting at one another — “an unlikely scenario in a relatively quiet, touristy part of the nation’s capital."   read more

No Counsel, Convictions or Trials for Longtime Mississippi Jail Inmates

At least one Mississippi jurisdiction, Scott County, routinely keeps prisoners for months and sometimes more than a year at time without indicting them or providing legal counsel. That’s why the American Civil Liberties Union and the MacArthur Justice Center are suing the county alleging inmates’ constitutional rights are being violated by being “indefinitely detained” and “indefinitely denied counsel.”   read more

D.C. Passes Strict—and Unwanted—Gun Law Allowing Concealed Firearms

The Washington D.C. city council voted last Tuesday to establish a permitting process for carrying concealed firearms. It came as a result of a federal judge declaring the District’s laws forbidding civilians to carry weapons unconstitutional because of a 2008 Supreme Court ruling on the subject.   read more

Judge Criticizes Customs and Border Protection for Deporting 4-Year-Old U.S. Citizen

Emily Ruiz was 4 years old in 2011 when she went to Guatemala with her grandfather. Their flight home to New York was diverted to Washington. Emily cleared immigration, but officers found irregularities in her grandfather’s papers.Eventually the two were deported to Guatemala. In a suit Emily's father filed, the government is accused of claims of claims of false imprisonment, intentional infliction of emotional distress, and negligence.   read more

What Chemicals are on Cargo Trains in Minnesota? Don’t Ask

An MPR investigation found there were at least 18 incidents over three years in which BNSF Railway sent freight trains from Minneapolis with dangerous chemicals that weren’t on the train’s manifest. In some instances, the trains were hauling substances such as anhydrous ammonia, a toxic corrosive gas, while traveling through populated areas. “You’re sending fire and rescue in there...and they could literally walk into an extremely deadly situation,” a BNSF employee said.   read more

Majority of Western Voters Oppose State Takeover of National Parks and Forests

Most Americans living in the West don’t support a conservative idea that calls for transferring national parks and other federal lands to state control. Bipartisan polling found 59% of respondents disagree with the idea of states taking over public lands, fearing such a move would cause them to pay higher taxes and lose access to the lands themselves if they’re sold off to private interests.   read more

60 Percent of “Active” Shootings in U.S. End Before Police Arrive

Law enforcement plays no role in stopping the majority of “active shootings” in America, a new federal report shows. The FBI says that 60% of the time, active shootings end before officers arrive on the scene. In 23% of the incidents studied, the shooter committed suicide before police responded and in 13% of the incidents, unarmed bystanders subdued the shooter. Return fire accounted for few of the resolutions.   read more

Death Penalty Capital of U.S.: Harris County, Texas

Home to the city of Houston, Harris County has carried out more death penalty cases than any other county in the country. Since 1976, the year capital punishment was reinstated in the U.S., 122 people convicted in Harris County have been executed. Part of the reason was that its former District Attorney, Johnny Holmes, prosecuted many cases as capital murder. In the 21 years he was in office up to 2000, his office got more than 200 death sentences.   read more

Media, Bookstores and Photographers Claim Arizona Law Banning Publishing Nude Photos of People without Their Consent Goes Too Far

In the cases of nude model photos, some of the plaintiffs say the models “may have specifically consented to being photographed by the photographers, but not specifically to being distributed by said booksellers,” according to Sarah Jeong. “This law puts us at risk for prosecution,” said Gayle Shanks of Changing Hands Bookstore. “There are books on my shelves right now that might be illegal to sell under this law.”   read more

Homeland Security: A Good Department to Quit

The Department of Homeland Security is a wreck internally, making its job of thwarting terrorism and other threats that more difficult because of low employee morale and high turnover.   read more

Marriott Vacations Worldwide Fires Employee of 11 Years Because She’s Running for Office

Viviana Janer worked at Marriott Vacations Worldwide for 11 years as an internal auditor. But that came to an abrupt end this month after she won the Democratic primary for the Osceola County Commission’s District 2 seat. Her superiors told Janer she had a choice: keep her job, or quit the race. She chose to stay in the race.   read more
1 to 16 of about 3170 News
1 2 3 ... 199 Next

Controversies

1 to 16 of about 3170 News
1 2 3 ... 199 Next

Big Tobacco’s Dire Health Warnings on E-Cigarette Packs Seen as Cynical Marketing Strategy

Big Tobacco discouraging Americans from buying its unhealthy products? Stanford professor Dr. Robert K. Jackler said he “nearly fell off my chair” when he saw the warnings on the e-cigarette packs. “Is this part of a noble effort for the betterment of public health, or a cynical business strategy? I suspect the latter.” The strategy might be intended to "curry favor with consumers” in order to “earn a kind of legitimacy [they've] sought for decades."   read more

Will Billing Rape Victims Thousands of Dollars for Medical Exams in Louisiana Finally Come to an End?

Victims are often billed $1,700 to $4,000 for evidence collection, HIV tests and ER fees. Interim LSU Hospital formerly did not charge victims. However, after the hospital control was transferred to private interests at the behest of Gov. Bobby Jindal (R), victims began to be billed. Some state lawmakers and health officials are now calling for a new law to change this longstanding policy. “Talk about being traumatized twice,” said state Democratic Representative Helena Moreno.   read more

Judicial Appointees of Obama and Clinton to Weigh in on Restrictive North Carolina Voting Law

The North Carolina bill is part of a pattern by Republican-led governors and state legislatures to change the voting rules in a way that results in making it more difficult for poor and minority citizens to vote. Some of the changes are made in the name of voter fraud prevention, but no one can point to any significant instances of such misconduct. During oral arguments, Judge James Wynn, an Obama appointee, asked, "Why does the state of North Carolina not want people to vote?"   read more

Amazon under Increasing Fire from Authors over Alleged Monopolistic E-Book Tactics

The group of 300 writers isn’t just pressuring Amazon’s board. It’s also pushing the Department of Justice to investigate it for alleged monopoly tactics. “We’re talking about...deliberately making a book hard or impossible to get, ‘disappearing’ an author,” said Ursula K. Le Guin. “Amazon is using censorship to gain total market control so they can dictate to publishers what they can publish, to authors what they can write, to readers what they can buy."   read more

Virginia Files Billion-Dollar Mortgage Fraud Lawsuit against Major Banks

“The message today is clear. It doesn’t matter if you’re a small-time con artist or a multi-billion dollar Wall Street bank. If you try to rip off or defraud Virginia consumers or Virginia taxpayers, you will be caught and you will be held responsible,” said state Attorney General Mark Herring. “Every Virginian was harmed by the financial crisis. Homes were lost, retirement accounts were devastated, small businesses saw their credit dry up almost overnight."   read more

Secret Service, in 2011, Was Unaware of Shots Fired at White House until Housekeeper Found Clues 4 Days Later

On the night of the shooting, supervisors immediately concluded there was no threat, even though agents on guard heard the shots and prepared to respond. They were told to “stand down” after their superiors wrongly assumed that a car had backfired near the White House. Then, Secret Service supervisors concluded there had been gunfire, but that it was the result of local gangs shooting at one another — “an unlikely scenario in a relatively quiet, touristy part of the nation’s capital."   read more

No Counsel, Convictions or Trials for Longtime Mississippi Jail Inmates

At least one Mississippi jurisdiction, Scott County, routinely keeps prisoners for months and sometimes more than a year at time without indicting them or providing legal counsel. That’s why the American Civil Liberties Union and the MacArthur Justice Center are suing the county alleging inmates’ constitutional rights are being violated by being “indefinitely detained” and “indefinitely denied counsel.”   read more

D.C. Passes Strict—and Unwanted—Gun Law Allowing Concealed Firearms

The Washington D.C. city council voted last Tuesday to establish a permitting process for carrying concealed firearms. It came as a result of a federal judge declaring the District’s laws forbidding civilians to carry weapons unconstitutional because of a 2008 Supreme Court ruling on the subject.   read more

Judge Criticizes Customs and Border Protection for Deporting 4-Year-Old U.S. Citizen

Emily Ruiz was 4 years old in 2011 when she went to Guatemala with her grandfather. Their flight home to New York was diverted to Washington. Emily cleared immigration, but officers found irregularities in her grandfather’s papers.Eventually the two were deported to Guatemala. In a suit Emily's father filed, the government is accused of claims of claims of false imprisonment, intentional infliction of emotional distress, and negligence.   read more

What Chemicals are on Cargo Trains in Minnesota? Don’t Ask

An MPR investigation found there were at least 18 incidents over three years in which BNSF Railway sent freight trains from Minneapolis with dangerous chemicals that weren’t on the train’s manifest. In some instances, the trains were hauling substances such as anhydrous ammonia, a toxic corrosive gas, while traveling through populated areas. “You’re sending fire and rescue in there...and they could literally walk into an extremely deadly situation,” a BNSF employee said.   read more

Majority of Western Voters Oppose State Takeover of National Parks and Forests

Most Americans living in the West don’t support a conservative idea that calls for transferring national parks and other federal lands to state control. Bipartisan polling found 59% of respondents disagree with the idea of states taking over public lands, fearing such a move would cause them to pay higher taxes and lose access to the lands themselves if they’re sold off to private interests.   read more

60 Percent of “Active” Shootings in U.S. End Before Police Arrive

Law enforcement plays no role in stopping the majority of “active shootings” in America, a new federal report shows. The FBI says that 60% of the time, active shootings end before officers arrive on the scene. In 23% of the incidents studied, the shooter committed suicide before police responded and in 13% of the incidents, unarmed bystanders subdued the shooter. Return fire accounted for few of the resolutions.   read more

Death Penalty Capital of U.S.: Harris County, Texas

Home to the city of Houston, Harris County has carried out more death penalty cases than any other county in the country. Since 1976, the year capital punishment was reinstated in the U.S., 122 people convicted in Harris County have been executed. Part of the reason was that its former District Attorney, Johnny Holmes, prosecuted many cases as capital murder. In the 21 years he was in office up to 2000, his office got more than 200 death sentences.   read more

Media, Bookstores and Photographers Claim Arizona Law Banning Publishing Nude Photos of People without Their Consent Goes Too Far

In the cases of nude model photos, some of the plaintiffs say the models “may have specifically consented to being photographed by the photographers, but not specifically to being distributed by said booksellers,” according to Sarah Jeong. “This law puts us at risk for prosecution,” said Gayle Shanks of Changing Hands Bookstore. “There are books on my shelves right now that might be illegal to sell under this law.”   read more

Homeland Security: A Good Department to Quit

The Department of Homeland Security is a wreck internally, making its job of thwarting terrorism and other threats that more difficult because of low employee morale and high turnover.   read more

Marriott Vacations Worldwide Fires Employee of 11 Years Because She’s Running for Office

Viviana Janer worked at Marriott Vacations Worldwide for 11 years as an internal auditor. But that came to an abrupt end this month after she won the Democratic primary for the Osceola County Commission’s District 2 seat. Her superiors told Janer she had a choice: keep her job, or quit the race. She chose to stay in the race.   read more
1 to 16 of about 3170 News
1 2 3 ... 199 Next