Controversies

1 to 16 of about 4228 News
1 2 3 ... 265 Next

Police in U.S. Increasingly Oppose States’ Expanded Gun Rights

“We are a gun society...but we should be writing gun laws that make us safer,” said police chief Leonard Papania, “Do you want every incident on your street to escalate to acts of gun violence?” In more than a dozen states with long traditions of robust support for gun ownership rights, and where legislatures have relaxed gun laws, local police have been denouncing the measures. They say the new laws expose officers to greater danger and prevent them from doing their jobs effectively.   read more

New Federal Wind-Energy Rule Would Allow Killing of Thousands of Federally-Protected Eagles

Under the plan announced Wednesday, wind companies and other power providers could kill or injure up to 4,200 bald eagles a year without penalty — nearly four times the current limit. Golden eagles could only be killed if companies minimize the losses, such as by retrofitting power poles to reduce electrocution risk. Companies would pay a $36,000 fee for a long-term permit allowing them to kill or injure eagles, and would have to submit reports of how many eagles they kill.   read more

Congress Pushes Agriculture Dept. To Exempt Ag Industry from Public Scrutiny over Promo Campaigns

Congress is pushing the Agriculture Dept to exempt the groups behind promotional campaigns from public scrutiny of their internal operations despite recent controversy. The push comes after organizations representing eggs, pork, potatoes and even Christmas trees pressed for an exception from the federal Freedom of Information Act for programs that promote agricultural products. A provision supporting their push was part of spending legislation approved by a House panel last month.   read more

Widespread Damage Done to Florida’s Treasured Coral Reef by Dredging of Miami Port for Freighters

Reports found that 81% of the reef near the dredging site was buried in sediment, causing 93% partial coral death. Environmentalists have warned Congress and the state that the corps’ plan to lessen the damage to corals in that area is flawed. Coral reefs are critical to South Florida because they help lessen the damage from hurricanes, are crucial to marine biodiversity and lure tourists.   read more

Georgia Bill Allowing Guns on Campus Throws Governor into Second Hot-Button Controversy

Gov. Deal has received hundreds of letters, emails and calls. Most appear to lean toward him signing the bill, though sprinkled in among the appeals were notes from students and faculty members who objected to the legislation. "If approved, this law would result in those of us on campus feeling less safe, not more safe," read one faculty resolution. Teacher Nancy Jo Kirk warned such a law could deter top-notch professors fearful of campuses "potentially filled with hidden guns."   read more

15 States Wielding New or Stricter Voter ID Laws in Run-Up to Presidential Election

In Wisconsin, Todd Allbaugh resigned as chief of staff to a leading Republican state senator last year after attending a party caucus in which, he said, some legislators “were literally giddy” over the effect of the state’s voter ID law on minorities and college students. “I remember when Republicans were the ones who helped Johnson pass the civil rights bill in the ‘60s — not Democrats,” said Allbaugh. “I went down to the office and said, ‘I’m done. I can’t support this party anymore.’”   read more

Children’s Brain Injuries from Playground Accidents on Rise in U.S.

Only 3 percent of kids with concussions were hospitalized or transferred elsewhere for additional treatment; 95 percent were sent home after ER treatment. Half of the head injuries were in kids ages 5 to 9 and injuries were more common in boys. Playground equipment most commonly involved in concussions included monkey bars and swings. The study lacked details on how kids got hurt but many concussions result from falls.   read more

Mental Health Latest Casualty of Flint Water Poisoning Crisis

Health care workers are scrambling to help the people here cope with what many fear will be chronic consequences of the city’s water contamination crisis: profound stress, worry, depression and guilt. Uncertainty about their own health and the health of their children, the open-ended nature of the crisis, and raw anger over government’s role in both causing the lead contamination and trying to remedy it, are all taking their toll on Flint’s residents.   read more

Birmingham Officials Claim Discrimination by White Lawmakers in Minimum Wage Restriction

White GOP state lawmakers in Alabama blocked the Birmingham City Council from raising the minimum wage for its mostly black population, a lawsuit claims. In a federal complaint filed on Thursday, the NAACP, Greater Birmingham Ministries, and two black fast-food workers, claim the state lawmakers have repeatedly pre-empted any local regulation of matters touching upon private sector employment.   read more

Obama Promotes Smart Guns and Expanded Sharing of Mental Health Records with Background Checks

President Barack Obama announced new steps Friday to help curb gun violence, including by identifying the requirements that “smart guns” would have to meet for law enforcement agencies to buy and use them as well as sharing mental health records with the federal background check system. The president also called for more attention to be paid to the mentally ill.   read more

Texas Supreme Court Blocks Houston’s Clean Air Laws

Houston’s efforts to use local clean air laws to regulate pollution in the home of the nation’s largest petrochemical complex were halted Friday by a Texas Supreme Court ruling in favor of energy and chemical companies that claimed the city had overreached. The coalition made up of ExxonMobil Corp. and other companies with nearby refineries and plants had sued in 2008 after Houston passed ordinances that required businesses to pay registration fees.   read more

Fake News Story May Have Broken Rules, FBI Report Says

Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) officials say there’s no clear evidence the agency violated its own rules when it posed as The Associated Press to unmask a criminal, according to a report obtained through a public records lawsuit. However, the internal FBI report being made public by the AP and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press says “an argument can be made” that field agents bucked protocol by not informing senior brass in Washington of the 2007 operation.   read more

Armed Services Committee Votes to Require Women to Register for the Draft

Women would be required to register for the military draft under a House committee’s bill that comes just months after the Defense Department lifted all gender-based restrictions on front-line combat units. A divided Armed Services Committee backed the provision in a sweeping defense policy bill that the full House will consider next month, touching off a provocative debate about the role of women in the military.   read more

Native Americans’ Access to Health Care Difficult to Measure

Long wait times are a known problem at hospitals and health centers run by the Indian Health Service, particularly in rural areas where unemployment and poverty levels are high, the U.S. Government Accountability Office said Thursday. New patients waited up to four months to see a physician at a facility on the Navajo Nation and up to a month for a routine vision check at a clinic in the Billings, Montana, region, staff told federal investigators.   read more

U.S. Deploying Pre-Production F-35 Aircraft Unfit for Combat

Aircraft which can't be deployed is not a solution to the need for deployed aircraft. The Pentagon's Frank Kendall has called this "acquisition malpractice." Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James: "People believed we could go faster, cheaper, better" by designing and building the F-35 concurrently, "and that the degree of concurrency would work. Indeed it has not worked as well as we had hoped and that's probably the understatement of the day." The F-35 won't be combat capable any time soon.   read more

“Retaliatory Culture” at TSA has “Paralyzed” Agency and Compromised Security Goals, Say Whistleblowers

Brainard called these unprepared TSA executives "the biggest bullies in government," and said their past efforts to avoid punishment by coming down hard on employees who pointed out misconduct have left a broken, battered workforce with poor morale. "The same people who broke this agency are the same people who are essentially still running it," he added.   read more
1 to 16 of about 4228 News
1 2 3 ... 265 Next

Controversies

1 to 16 of about 4228 News
1 2 3 ... 265 Next

Police in U.S. Increasingly Oppose States’ Expanded Gun Rights

“We are a gun society...but we should be writing gun laws that make us safer,” said police chief Leonard Papania, “Do you want every incident on your street to escalate to acts of gun violence?” In more than a dozen states with long traditions of robust support for gun ownership rights, and where legislatures have relaxed gun laws, local police have been denouncing the measures. They say the new laws expose officers to greater danger and prevent them from doing their jobs effectively.   read more

New Federal Wind-Energy Rule Would Allow Killing of Thousands of Federally-Protected Eagles

Under the plan announced Wednesday, wind companies and other power providers could kill or injure up to 4,200 bald eagles a year without penalty — nearly four times the current limit. Golden eagles could only be killed if companies minimize the losses, such as by retrofitting power poles to reduce electrocution risk. Companies would pay a $36,000 fee for a long-term permit allowing them to kill or injure eagles, and would have to submit reports of how many eagles they kill.   read more

Congress Pushes Agriculture Dept. To Exempt Ag Industry from Public Scrutiny over Promo Campaigns

Congress is pushing the Agriculture Dept to exempt the groups behind promotional campaigns from public scrutiny of their internal operations despite recent controversy. The push comes after organizations representing eggs, pork, potatoes and even Christmas trees pressed for an exception from the federal Freedom of Information Act for programs that promote agricultural products. A provision supporting their push was part of spending legislation approved by a House panel last month.   read more

Widespread Damage Done to Florida’s Treasured Coral Reef by Dredging of Miami Port for Freighters

Reports found that 81% of the reef near the dredging site was buried in sediment, causing 93% partial coral death. Environmentalists have warned Congress and the state that the corps’ plan to lessen the damage to corals in that area is flawed. Coral reefs are critical to South Florida because they help lessen the damage from hurricanes, are crucial to marine biodiversity and lure tourists.   read more

Georgia Bill Allowing Guns on Campus Throws Governor into Second Hot-Button Controversy

Gov. Deal has received hundreds of letters, emails and calls. Most appear to lean toward him signing the bill, though sprinkled in among the appeals were notes from students and faculty members who objected to the legislation. "If approved, this law would result in those of us on campus feeling less safe, not more safe," read one faculty resolution. Teacher Nancy Jo Kirk warned such a law could deter top-notch professors fearful of campuses "potentially filled with hidden guns."   read more

15 States Wielding New or Stricter Voter ID Laws in Run-Up to Presidential Election

In Wisconsin, Todd Allbaugh resigned as chief of staff to a leading Republican state senator last year after attending a party caucus in which, he said, some legislators “were literally giddy” over the effect of the state’s voter ID law on minorities and college students. “I remember when Republicans were the ones who helped Johnson pass the civil rights bill in the ‘60s — not Democrats,” said Allbaugh. “I went down to the office and said, ‘I’m done. I can’t support this party anymore.’”   read more

Children’s Brain Injuries from Playground Accidents on Rise in U.S.

Only 3 percent of kids with concussions were hospitalized or transferred elsewhere for additional treatment; 95 percent were sent home after ER treatment. Half of the head injuries were in kids ages 5 to 9 and injuries were more common in boys. Playground equipment most commonly involved in concussions included monkey bars and swings. The study lacked details on how kids got hurt but many concussions result from falls.   read more

Mental Health Latest Casualty of Flint Water Poisoning Crisis

Health care workers are scrambling to help the people here cope with what many fear will be chronic consequences of the city’s water contamination crisis: profound stress, worry, depression and guilt. Uncertainty about their own health and the health of their children, the open-ended nature of the crisis, and raw anger over government’s role in both causing the lead contamination and trying to remedy it, are all taking their toll on Flint’s residents.   read more

Birmingham Officials Claim Discrimination by White Lawmakers in Minimum Wage Restriction

White GOP state lawmakers in Alabama blocked the Birmingham City Council from raising the minimum wage for its mostly black population, a lawsuit claims. In a federal complaint filed on Thursday, the NAACP, Greater Birmingham Ministries, and two black fast-food workers, claim the state lawmakers have repeatedly pre-empted any local regulation of matters touching upon private sector employment.   read more

Obama Promotes Smart Guns and Expanded Sharing of Mental Health Records with Background Checks

President Barack Obama announced new steps Friday to help curb gun violence, including by identifying the requirements that “smart guns” would have to meet for law enforcement agencies to buy and use them as well as sharing mental health records with the federal background check system. The president also called for more attention to be paid to the mentally ill.   read more

Texas Supreme Court Blocks Houston’s Clean Air Laws

Houston’s efforts to use local clean air laws to regulate pollution in the home of the nation’s largest petrochemical complex were halted Friday by a Texas Supreme Court ruling in favor of energy and chemical companies that claimed the city had overreached. The coalition made up of ExxonMobil Corp. and other companies with nearby refineries and plants had sued in 2008 after Houston passed ordinances that required businesses to pay registration fees.   read more

Fake News Story May Have Broken Rules, FBI Report Says

Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) officials say there’s no clear evidence the agency violated its own rules when it posed as The Associated Press to unmask a criminal, according to a report obtained through a public records lawsuit. However, the internal FBI report being made public by the AP and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press says “an argument can be made” that field agents bucked protocol by not informing senior brass in Washington of the 2007 operation.   read more

Armed Services Committee Votes to Require Women to Register for the Draft

Women would be required to register for the military draft under a House committee’s bill that comes just months after the Defense Department lifted all gender-based restrictions on front-line combat units. A divided Armed Services Committee backed the provision in a sweeping defense policy bill that the full House will consider next month, touching off a provocative debate about the role of women in the military.   read more

Native Americans’ Access to Health Care Difficult to Measure

Long wait times are a known problem at hospitals and health centers run by the Indian Health Service, particularly in rural areas where unemployment and poverty levels are high, the U.S. Government Accountability Office said Thursday. New patients waited up to four months to see a physician at a facility on the Navajo Nation and up to a month for a routine vision check at a clinic in the Billings, Montana, region, staff told federal investigators.   read more

U.S. Deploying Pre-Production F-35 Aircraft Unfit for Combat

Aircraft which can't be deployed is not a solution to the need for deployed aircraft. The Pentagon's Frank Kendall has called this "acquisition malpractice." Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James: "People believed we could go faster, cheaper, better" by designing and building the F-35 concurrently, "and that the degree of concurrency would work. Indeed it has not worked as well as we had hoped and that's probably the understatement of the day." The F-35 won't be combat capable any time soon.   read more

“Retaliatory Culture” at TSA has “Paralyzed” Agency and Compromised Security Goals, Say Whistleblowers

Brainard called these unprepared TSA executives "the biggest bullies in government," and said their past efforts to avoid punishment by coming down hard on employees who pointed out misconduct have left a broken, battered workforce with poor morale. "The same people who broke this agency are the same people who are essentially still running it," he added.   read more
1 to 16 of about 4228 News
1 2 3 ... 265 Next