Controversies

1 to 16 of about 3481 News
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FBI Begins Tracking Hate Crimes against Arabs, Hindus, Sikhs and Muslims

Until now, the Uniform Crime Report did not include hate crime data for any South Asian-American community. Instead, they were just lumped in with all Asian Americans. Supporters of the change said it was long overdue, noting that hate crimes against Hindus, Sikhs and Muslims have gone up since the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.   read more

Displaced by Nuclear Bomb Testing and then Flooded by Climate Change, Bikini Islanders want to Evacuate to U.S.

The atomic blasts rendered the Bikini atoll uninhabitable for decades, if not centuries. That didn’t stop the U.S. government from trying to resettle the Bikinians back home in the 1980s, only to discover the island was still too “hot” for anyone to live there. Now the Bikinians have a new problem: rising sea levels brought on by global warming. The Bikini Islanders have told the Interior Department that they want to move to the U.S. permanently.   read more

Supreme Court Votes 5-4 that Alabama’s Redistricting is Unfair to Black Voters

Those drawing the lines packed supermajorities of black voters into those districts, diluting their votes and removing the possibility of black voters having influence in more heavily white districts. Although 26% of Alabamans are black, only 5 of 35 state senators, or 14%, are black.   read more

Army Apologizes to Iraq Service Members and Promises to Screen more than 1,500 for Possible Chemical Weapons Exposure

Many of the troops never received proper treatment for their ailments related to the chemical exposure. The Army's Brad Carson said service personnel will now receive medical support for lingering health effects. “To me, the scandal is that we had protocols in place and the medical community knew what they were, and yet we failed in some cases to implement this across the theater. That was a mistake, and I apologize for that."   read more

Bipartisan House Bill would Repeal Patriot Act and Ban Mass Surveillance of Americans

The Surveillance State Repeal Act is the most far-reaching anti-surveillance legislation drafted to date. “This isn’t just tinkering around the edges, it’s a meaningful overhaul that makes sure the meaningless surveillance of emails and cell phones are done away with,” said bill co-author Rep. Mark Pocan. “All mass surveillance does is violate the rights and put a chilling effect on the American people," said CATO Insititute's Patrick Eddington.   read more

Rare Caribou Win Reprieve against Snowmobilers

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials decided to extend a public comment period on whether the agency should downgrade the classification of woodland caribou from endangered to threatened. The species has almost entirely disappeared from the lower 48 states, and currently numbers only 14 in areas near the Canadian border. Their numbers have dwindled in the face of habitat destruction by loggers and off-trail snowmobilers, and because of predation by wolves and mountain lions.   read more

Inspector General Report Accuses Homeland Security Official of “Unprecedented” Visa Intervention on Behalf of Harry Reid, Virginia’s Current Governor and Others

The investigation uncovered more than 15 whistleblowers within DHS who had concerns with Mayorkas’ actions—“an unusually large number of witnesses,” according to Government Executive. “Their allegations were unequivocal: Mr. Mayorkas gave special access and treatment to certain individuals and parties,” the report said. "Many employees concluded, not unreasonably, that the pressure exerted on them was because the individuals involved were politically connected.”   read more

Why are so many Babies Dying in Vernal, Utah?

A small Utah town located near a major oil and gas drilling operation has witnessed a recent spike in infant deaths. Neonatal mortality rates in Vernal, population 10,000, went up six-fold from 2010 to 2013, according to statistics compiled by local resident and midwife Donna Young. Young’s troubling conclusion seemed to be backed up by a government health report on baby deaths in a tri-county area that includes Vernal. “I believe they know a lot more than what they’re divulging,” said Young.   read more

FCC Issues First TV Station Nudity Fine in 7 Years

WDBJ got into trouble for showing a brief pornographic video clip on July 12, 2012, during a story on former porn star Tiffany Rose volunteering her time for a local rescue squad. The segment included three seconds from the woman’s website that featured an explicit video clip in a box on the side of the webpage. The fine of $325,000 against the station is the maximum amount that can be levied by the FCC.   read more

Has the Smithsonian Sold Itself to David Koch?

Koch gave $15 million to fund the Hall of Human Origins at the National Museum of Natural History. The exhibit suggests that humans can simply evolve to adapt to the changes brought about by climate change. One part of the exhibit asks visitors whether humans might develop bigger sweat glands or become tall and thin, like giraffes. Since the temperatures are increasing faster than humans could possibly develop those traits, the exhibit is misleading.   read more

New York TV Stations more likely to Report Violent Crimes if Suspects are Black

NYPD numbers revealed black suspects were arrested in 54% of murders, 55% of thefts, and 49% of assaults. But 74% of homicides reported by the four stations where race was identified had black suspects; suspects in 84% of thefts reported on were African-American and in assault cases mentioned by the stations, 73% of suspects were black.   read more

Nevada Chief Justice Complains that State Supreme Court will Go Broke unless Law Enforcement Officers Write more Tickets

Chief Justice James Hardesty testified before a joint senate subcommittee that the court needed $700,000 by May 1 or it will be out of money. Law enforcement is not generating the same amount of revenue from traffic tickets as it once did, he said, and that’s robbing the high court of funds for operations. “I’m not faulting law enforcement...[but] the truth is that we’re seeing less traffic violations because law enforcement’s priorities have changed...dramatically."   read more

Food Allergies are no Joke: Children Die from Eating Pancakes and a Cookie

While inside a Publix supermarket, Derek Wood, 11, wanted to eat a “Chocolate Chew” cookie. Due to the boy’s allergy to tree nuts, his relatives first asked if the cookie was nut-free. They were told the cookie was nut-free. Derek suffered a fatal asthma attack after eating the cookie. His family is now suing Publix, saying it should be held liable under the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act for not properly identifying allergens in the foods it sells.   read more

Revolving Door, Nuclear Power Edition

Daniel Poneman, the Energy Department’s second most powerful official for five years, will now become president and CEO of Centrus Energy Corp. with a salary of $1.7 million a year. “DOE has long had an improper relationship with USEC (now Centrus),” said Sen. John Barrasso. “Mr. Poneman’s appointment...only promises to make that record worse.” Said Public Citizen's Tyson Slocum, “[It’s] one of the more problematic revolving-door issues that I can remember.”   read more

The Clash over Police Body Cameras Heats Up

Without public records laws, police exercise unilateral control over body camera footage. They are responsible for making the recordings, archiving them, and deciding which footage to release to the public and which to keep under wraps. In many cases, their decisions are final. “I think it’s a fair concern and a fair criticism that people might cherry pick and release only the ones that show them in a favorable light,” said former Charlotte, North Carolina, police chief Darrel Stephens.   read more

Justice Dept. Files “Statement of Interest” in Case of “Assembly-Line Justice” for Juveniles in 4 Georgia Counties

The Cordele Circuit, said the lawsuit, has provided only “assembly-line justice” to juveniles. “For too long, the Supreme Court’s promise of fairness for young people accused of delinquency has gone unfulfilled in courts across our country,” said Eric Holder. “Every child has the right to a competent attorney who will provide the highest level of professional guidance and advocacy. It is time for courts to adequately fund indigent defense systems for children."   read more
1 to 16 of about 3481 News
1 2 3 ... 218 Next

Controversies

1 to 16 of about 3481 News
1 2 3 ... 218 Next

FBI Begins Tracking Hate Crimes against Arabs, Hindus, Sikhs and Muslims

Until now, the Uniform Crime Report did not include hate crime data for any South Asian-American community. Instead, they were just lumped in with all Asian Americans. Supporters of the change said it was long overdue, noting that hate crimes against Hindus, Sikhs and Muslims have gone up since the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.   read more

Displaced by Nuclear Bomb Testing and then Flooded by Climate Change, Bikini Islanders want to Evacuate to U.S.

The atomic blasts rendered the Bikini atoll uninhabitable for decades, if not centuries. That didn’t stop the U.S. government from trying to resettle the Bikinians back home in the 1980s, only to discover the island was still too “hot” for anyone to live there. Now the Bikinians have a new problem: rising sea levels brought on by global warming. The Bikini Islanders have told the Interior Department that they want to move to the U.S. permanently.   read more

Supreme Court Votes 5-4 that Alabama’s Redistricting is Unfair to Black Voters

Those drawing the lines packed supermajorities of black voters into those districts, diluting their votes and removing the possibility of black voters having influence in more heavily white districts. Although 26% of Alabamans are black, only 5 of 35 state senators, or 14%, are black.   read more

Army Apologizes to Iraq Service Members and Promises to Screen more than 1,500 for Possible Chemical Weapons Exposure

Many of the troops never received proper treatment for their ailments related to the chemical exposure. The Army's Brad Carson said service personnel will now receive medical support for lingering health effects. “To me, the scandal is that we had protocols in place and the medical community knew what they were, and yet we failed in some cases to implement this across the theater. That was a mistake, and I apologize for that."   read more

Bipartisan House Bill would Repeal Patriot Act and Ban Mass Surveillance of Americans

The Surveillance State Repeal Act is the most far-reaching anti-surveillance legislation drafted to date. “This isn’t just tinkering around the edges, it’s a meaningful overhaul that makes sure the meaningless surveillance of emails and cell phones are done away with,” said bill co-author Rep. Mark Pocan. “All mass surveillance does is violate the rights and put a chilling effect on the American people," said CATO Insititute's Patrick Eddington.   read more

Rare Caribou Win Reprieve against Snowmobilers

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials decided to extend a public comment period on whether the agency should downgrade the classification of woodland caribou from endangered to threatened. The species has almost entirely disappeared from the lower 48 states, and currently numbers only 14 in areas near the Canadian border. Their numbers have dwindled in the face of habitat destruction by loggers and off-trail snowmobilers, and because of predation by wolves and mountain lions.   read more

Inspector General Report Accuses Homeland Security Official of “Unprecedented” Visa Intervention on Behalf of Harry Reid, Virginia’s Current Governor and Others

The investigation uncovered more than 15 whistleblowers within DHS who had concerns with Mayorkas’ actions—“an unusually large number of witnesses,” according to Government Executive. “Their allegations were unequivocal: Mr. Mayorkas gave special access and treatment to certain individuals and parties,” the report said. "Many employees concluded, not unreasonably, that the pressure exerted on them was because the individuals involved were politically connected.”   read more

Why are so many Babies Dying in Vernal, Utah?

A small Utah town located near a major oil and gas drilling operation has witnessed a recent spike in infant deaths. Neonatal mortality rates in Vernal, population 10,000, went up six-fold from 2010 to 2013, according to statistics compiled by local resident and midwife Donna Young. Young’s troubling conclusion seemed to be backed up by a government health report on baby deaths in a tri-county area that includes Vernal. “I believe they know a lot more than what they’re divulging,” said Young.   read more

FCC Issues First TV Station Nudity Fine in 7 Years

WDBJ got into trouble for showing a brief pornographic video clip on July 12, 2012, during a story on former porn star Tiffany Rose volunteering her time for a local rescue squad. The segment included three seconds from the woman’s website that featured an explicit video clip in a box on the side of the webpage. The fine of $325,000 against the station is the maximum amount that can be levied by the FCC.   read more

Has the Smithsonian Sold Itself to David Koch?

Koch gave $15 million to fund the Hall of Human Origins at the National Museum of Natural History. The exhibit suggests that humans can simply evolve to adapt to the changes brought about by climate change. One part of the exhibit asks visitors whether humans might develop bigger sweat glands or become tall and thin, like giraffes. Since the temperatures are increasing faster than humans could possibly develop those traits, the exhibit is misleading.   read more

New York TV Stations more likely to Report Violent Crimes if Suspects are Black

NYPD numbers revealed black suspects were arrested in 54% of murders, 55% of thefts, and 49% of assaults. But 74% of homicides reported by the four stations where race was identified had black suspects; suspects in 84% of thefts reported on were African-American and in assault cases mentioned by the stations, 73% of suspects were black.   read more

Nevada Chief Justice Complains that State Supreme Court will Go Broke unless Law Enforcement Officers Write more Tickets

Chief Justice James Hardesty testified before a joint senate subcommittee that the court needed $700,000 by May 1 or it will be out of money. Law enforcement is not generating the same amount of revenue from traffic tickets as it once did, he said, and that’s robbing the high court of funds for operations. “I’m not faulting law enforcement...[but] the truth is that we’re seeing less traffic violations because law enforcement’s priorities have changed...dramatically."   read more

Food Allergies are no Joke: Children Die from Eating Pancakes and a Cookie

While inside a Publix supermarket, Derek Wood, 11, wanted to eat a “Chocolate Chew” cookie. Due to the boy’s allergy to tree nuts, his relatives first asked if the cookie was nut-free. They were told the cookie was nut-free. Derek suffered a fatal asthma attack after eating the cookie. His family is now suing Publix, saying it should be held liable under the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act for not properly identifying allergens in the foods it sells.   read more

Revolving Door, Nuclear Power Edition

Daniel Poneman, the Energy Department’s second most powerful official for five years, will now become president and CEO of Centrus Energy Corp. with a salary of $1.7 million a year. “DOE has long had an improper relationship with USEC (now Centrus),” said Sen. John Barrasso. “Mr. Poneman’s appointment...only promises to make that record worse.” Said Public Citizen's Tyson Slocum, “[It’s] one of the more problematic revolving-door issues that I can remember.”   read more

The Clash over Police Body Cameras Heats Up

Without public records laws, police exercise unilateral control over body camera footage. They are responsible for making the recordings, archiving them, and deciding which footage to release to the public and which to keep under wraps. In many cases, their decisions are final. “I think it’s a fair concern and a fair criticism that people might cherry pick and release only the ones that show them in a favorable light,” said former Charlotte, North Carolina, police chief Darrel Stephens.   read more

Justice Dept. Files “Statement of Interest” in Case of “Assembly-Line Justice” for Juveniles in 4 Georgia Counties

The Cordele Circuit, said the lawsuit, has provided only “assembly-line justice” to juveniles. “For too long, the Supreme Court’s promise of fairness for young people accused of delinquency has gone unfulfilled in courts across our country,” said Eric Holder. “Every child has the right to a competent attorney who will provide the highest level of professional guidance and advocacy. It is time for courts to adequately fund indigent defense systems for children."   read more
1 to 16 of about 3481 News
1 2 3 ... 218 Next