Controversies

1 to 16 of about 4278 News
1 2 3 ... 268 Next

Racist Portrayal of Mexican-Americans Seen in Text of Proposed Texas School Book

Chicanos are described as people who "that opposed Western civilization and wanted to destroy this society." Mexican-Americans are linked to undocumented immigrants. "Instead of a text that is respectful of the Mexican-American history, we have a book poorly written [and] racist..." said Tony Diaz. The book is produced by a company that appears to be run by Cynthia Dunbar, a right-wing Christian activist who questioned the constitutionality of public schools.   read more

Thousands of Inmates Held in Federal Prisons Longer than Sentencing Period

The findings by the Justice Dept’s inspector general are a potential embarrassment for the U.S. Bureau of Prisons at a time when the Obama administration has assailed what it says are unfair and unduly harsh sentences for many inmates, particularly minorities and nonviolent offenders. The consequences can be serious, the report said. The delayed releases “deprive inmates of their liberty,” and have led to millions of dollars in added prison costs and legal settlements with former inmates.   read more

High Unemployment Rate and Low Pay for U.S. Military Spouses

Wrestling with frequent moves, deployments and erratic schedules of their service member mates, military spouses have an unemployment rate of up to 18 percent, compared to last month's national jobless rate of 5%. The study found that up to 42% of military spouses — or as many as 95,000 — are jobless, compared to about 25% of a comparable civilian spouse population. In addition, it estimated that military spouses with a bachelor's degree earn 40% less than their civilian counterparts.   read more

National Intelligence Director Clapper Suspected of Creating New Obstacle to Release of Censored Pages from 9/11 Report

Last-minute obstacles, often by design, have a way of cropping up in Washington. Graham hopes he is not seeing an example of that, after suggestions from James Clapper, director of national intelligence, that Congress will ultimately be left to decide what to do with the pages once intelligence officials finish a review. That approach took Graham by surprise. It threatens to add a new layer of complexity to a process that those backing the release thought was reaching its long-sought end.   read more

Chicago Police Use of Computer-Predictions of Shooters and Victims Prompts Civil Liberties Concerns

Now on a fourth revision of the computer algorithm that generates the list, critics are raising questions about potential breaches to civil liberties, and the list’s efficacy remains in doubt as killings have continued to rise this year. The critics wonder whether there is value in predicting who is likely to shoot or be shot with seemingly little ability to prevent it, and they question the fairness and legality of creating a list of people deemed likely to commit crimes in some future time,   read more

Troubled TSA Seen as Making Superficial Fix in Replacement of Controversial Security Chief

Hoggan received $90,000 in bonuses over a 13-month period, even though a leaked report showed that auditors were able to get fake weapons and explosives past security screeners 95% of the time in 70 covert tests. Hoggan’s bonus was paid out in $10,000 increments, an arrangement that members of Congress have said was intended to disguise the payments. In addition, several employees who say they were punished after filing whistleblower complaints have alleged that Hoggan played a role.   read more

Republican House Panel Backs Bill Reducing Free and Low-Cost Meals for School Children

Hunger and nutrition advocates sharply criticized the legislation, saying it could mean that some children go hungry at school. "The bill would significantly weaken access to healthy, nutritious foods for our nation's children," said Dr. Benard Dreyer, president of AAP. The block grants "are an opening salvo in an aggressive, alarming attack on the future of school meals," said SNA's Jean Ronnei. Rep. Bobby Scott said the bill would "cut budgets instead of feeding our children."   read more

Oklahoma Governor’s Top Lawyer Told Prison to Proceed with Wrong Lethal Drug in Planned Execution

The top lawyer for Gov. Mary Fallin urged prison officials to go forward with a planned execution even though they received the wrong drug, telling a deputy attorney general to "Google it" to confirm it could be used. It faulted many officials for three botched execution attempts. The drug mix-ups followed a botched execution in which inmate Clayton Lockett struggled on a gurney before dying 43 minutes into his lethal injection — and after the state's prisons chief ordered executioners to stop.   read more

Accusations of Sanctioned Evidence Destruction Heat Up at Guantanamo Hearing

Army Maj. Wendall Hall noted that the Classified Information Procedures Act does not allow evidence destruction, but that the Military Commissions Act adds the word "delete," without defining it. "What they're authorized to do under the Military Commissions Act is a problem," Hall said. Does it mean delete, or does it mean physical destruction? The defense team does not know. "If you're asking questions about the definition, there's already an issue," Hall said.   read more

Justice Dept. Official Identifies Problems in Federal Law Targeting Violence against Native American Women

Tracy Toulou, director of the Office of Tribal Justice, brought the matter of whether tribes can charge a suspect accused of threatening or attempting to harm a woman but not actually injuring her. He cited a case in which a woman's boyfriend attempted to punch her while intoxicated but missed and fell. Since tribal authorities weren't sure whether that confrontation qualified as domestic violence under the law, they didn't bring charges. Later, the man returned to assault the victim again.   read more

EPA Tightens Limits on Industrial Chemical Found in Tap Water of Factory Towns

Trace amounts of PFOA and PFOS can be detected in the blood of almost every American as the result of exposure through food and consumer products. But of specific concern is the risk posed to residents in the relatively small number of communities where higher levels of PFOA and PFOS have been found in public drinking water. EPA now says long-term exposure to either chemical at concentrations above 70 parts per trillion could have adverse health impacts.   read more

Most Texans Favor Medicaid Expansion, Bucking Republican Leadership

The findings further resonate in a state that continues to lead the nation in the number of uninsured. Texas remains one of 19 states that has chosen not to expand Medicaid under the ACA. In Texas, 63% of those polled said they support an expanded Medicaid program. Similarly, 68% in Florida also favored a Medicaid expansion. These numbers are significant because of the states surveyed, only Florida and Texas did not expand the safety-net program.   read more

U.S. Taxpayers on Hook to Prevent Environmental Disasters at Mines Abandoned by Bankrupt Coal Companies

Many mines already operate at a loss, and there's not enough money in the fuel anymore to enable their owners to keep their promises to clean up the land. This reclamation crisis looms because of a practice called self-bonding, which allows coal companies to promise to eventually cover the cost of cleaning up abandoned mines without first setting aside the necessary money. Nationwide, self-bonding in the coal-mining industry tops $3.3 billion.   read more

Gay Rights Bill Shot Down by U.S. House Republicans

Democrats shouted "Shame! Shame!," but seven Republicans switched their votes under pressure from House leaders Thursday and defeated a measure to protect gay rights. Maloney and other Democrats were incensed. "They literally snatched discrimination from the jaws of equality," Maloney said. Democrats loudly chanted as their leader, Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California, yelled up from near the well of the House at her members, shouting at them to vote down the underlying bill.   read more

D.C. Gun Permit Applicants Don’t Need “Good Reason” to Carry Guns on Street, Rules Judge

Judge Richard J. Leon’s ruling reopens the district’s long fight over how much room the Second Amendment’s guarantee of the right to bear arms leaves for local regulation — and whether it applies only to firearms in the home, or to guns carried outside as well. The law gave the police the discretion to grant concealed-carry licenses only to those with “good reason to fear injury” or other specific reasons, such as having a job in which they carried large amounts of cash or valuables.   read more

House Republicans Strip Female Draft Sign-Up Requirement from Defense Bill

Including women in a potential mass mobilization has roiled social conservatives. They see such a mandate as another step toward blurring gender lines similar to allowing transgender people to use public lavatories of their choosing. But proponents see the requirement as a sensible step toward gender equality. They point to the Pentagon's decision late last year to open all front-line combat jobs to women as removing any justification for gender restrictions on draft registration.   read more
1 to 16 of about 4278 News
1 2 3 ... 268 Next

Controversies

1 to 16 of about 4278 News
1 2 3 ... 268 Next

Racist Portrayal of Mexican-Americans Seen in Text of Proposed Texas School Book

Chicanos are described as people who "that opposed Western civilization and wanted to destroy this society." Mexican-Americans are linked to undocumented immigrants. "Instead of a text that is respectful of the Mexican-American history, we have a book poorly written [and] racist..." said Tony Diaz. The book is produced by a company that appears to be run by Cynthia Dunbar, a right-wing Christian activist who questioned the constitutionality of public schools.   read more

Thousands of Inmates Held in Federal Prisons Longer than Sentencing Period

The findings by the Justice Dept’s inspector general are a potential embarrassment for the U.S. Bureau of Prisons at a time when the Obama administration has assailed what it says are unfair and unduly harsh sentences for many inmates, particularly minorities and nonviolent offenders. The consequences can be serious, the report said. The delayed releases “deprive inmates of their liberty,” and have led to millions of dollars in added prison costs and legal settlements with former inmates.   read more

High Unemployment Rate and Low Pay for U.S. Military Spouses

Wrestling with frequent moves, deployments and erratic schedules of their service member mates, military spouses have an unemployment rate of up to 18 percent, compared to last month's national jobless rate of 5%. The study found that up to 42% of military spouses — or as many as 95,000 — are jobless, compared to about 25% of a comparable civilian spouse population. In addition, it estimated that military spouses with a bachelor's degree earn 40% less than their civilian counterparts.   read more

National Intelligence Director Clapper Suspected of Creating New Obstacle to Release of Censored Pages from 9/11 Report

Last-minute obstacles, often by design, have a way of cropping up in Washington. Graham hopes he is not seeing an example of that, after suggestions from James Clapper, director of national intelligence, that Congress will ultimately be left to decide what to do with the pages once intelligence officials finish a review. That approach took Graham by surprise. It threatens to add a new layer of complexity to a process that those backing the release thought was reaching its long-sought end.   read more

Chicago Police Use of Computer-Predictions of Shooters and Victims Prompts Civil Liberties Concerns

Now on a fourth revision of the computer algorithm that generates the list, critics are raising questions about potential breaches to civil liberties, and the list’s efficacy remains in doubt as killings have continued to rise this year. The critics wonder whether there is value in predicting who is likely to shoot or be shot with seemingly little ability to prevent it, and they question the fairness and legality of creating a list of people deemed likely to commit crimes in some future time,   read more

Troubled TSA Seen as Making Superficial Fix in Replacement of Controversial Security Chief

Hoggan received $90,000 in bonuses over a 13-month period, even though a leaked report showed that auditors were able to get fake weapons and explosives past security screeners 95% of the time in 70 covert tests. Hoggan’s bonus was paid out in $10,000 increments, an arrangement that members of Congress have said was intended to disguise the payments. In addition, several employees who say they were punished after filing whistleblower complaints have alleged that Hoggan played a role.   read more

Republican House Panel Backs Bill Reducing Free and Low-Cost Meals for School Children

Hunger and nutrition advocates sharply criticized the legislation, saying it could mean that some children go hungry at school. "The bill would significantly weaken access to healthy, nutritious foods for our nation's children," said Dr. Benard Dreyer, president of AAP. The block grants "are an opening salvo in an aggressive, alarming attack on the future of school meals," said SNA's Jean Ronnei. Rep. Bobby Scott said the bill would "cut budgets instead of feeding our children."   read more

Oklahoma Governor’s Top Lawyer Told Prison to Proceed with Wrong Lethal Drug in Planned Execution

The top lawyer for Gov. Mary Fallin urged prison officials to go forward with a planned execution even though they received the wrong drug, telling a deputy attorney general to "Google it" to confirm it could be used. It faulted many officials for three botched execution attempts. The drug mix-ups followed a botched execution in which inmate Clayton Lockett struggled on a gurney before dying 43 minutes into his lethal injection — and after the state's prisons chief ordered executioners to stop.   read more

Accusations of Sanctioned Evidence Destruction Heat Up at Guantanamo Hearing

Army Maj. Wendall Hall noted that the Classified Information Procedures Act does not allow evidence destruction, but that the Military Commissions Act adds the word "delete," without defining it. "What they're authorized to do under the Military Commissions Act is a problem," Hall said. Does it mean delete, or does it mean physical destruction? The defense team does not know. "If you're asking questions about the definition, there's already an issue," Hall said.   read more

Justice Dept. Official Identifies Problems in Federal Law Targeting Violence against Native American Women

Tracy Toulou, director of the Office of Tribal Justice, brought the matter of whether tribes can charge a suspect accused of threatening or attempting to harm a woman but not actually injuring her. He cited a case in which a woman's boyfriend attempted to punch her while intoxicated but missed and fell. Since tribal authorities weren't sure whether that confrontation qualified as domestic violence under the law, they didn't bring charges. Later, the man returned to assault the victim again.   read more

EPA Tightens Limits on Industrial Chemical Found in Tap Water of Factory Towns

Trace amounts of PFOA and PFOS can be detected in the blood of almost every American as the result of exposure through food and consumer products. But of specific concern is the risk posed to residents in the relatively small number of communities where higher levels of PFOA and PFOS have been found in public drinking water. EPA now says long-term exposure to either chemical at concentrations above 70 parts per trillion could have adverse health impacts.   read more

Most Texans Favor Medicaid Expansion, Bucking Republican Leadership

The findings further resonate in a state that continues to lead the nation in the number of uninsured. Texas remains one of 19 states that has chosen not to expand Medicaid under the ACA. In Texas, 63% of those polled said they support an expanded Medicaid program. Similarly, 68% in Florida also favored a Medicaid expansion. These numbers are significant because of the states surveyed, only Florida and Texas did not expand the safety-net program.   read more

U.S. Taxpayers on Hook to Prevent Environmental Disasters at Mines Abandoned by Bankrupt Coal Companies

Many mines already operate at a loss, and there's not enough money in the fuel anymore to enable their owners to keep their promises to clean up the land. This reclamation crisis looms because of a practice called self-bonding, which allows coal companies to promise to eventually cover the cost of cleaning up abandoned mines without first setting aside the necessary money. Nationwide, self-bonding in the coal-mining industry tops $3.3 billion.   read more

Gay Rights Bill Shot Down by U.S. House Republicans

Democrats shouted "Shame! Shame!," but seven Republicans switched their votes under pressure from House leaders Thursday and defeated a measure to protect gay rights. Maloney and other Democrats were incensed. "They literally snatched discrimination from the jaws of equality," Maloney said. Democrats loudly chanted as their leader, Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California, yelled up from near the well of the House at her members, shouting at them to vote down the underlying bill.   read more

D.C. Gun Permit Applicants Don’t Need “Good Reason” to Carry Guns on Street, Rules Judge

Judge Richard J. Leon’s ruling reopens the district’s long fight over how much room the Second Amendment’s guarantee of the right to bear arms leaves for local regulation — and whether it applies only to firearms in the home, or to guns carried outside as well. The law gave the police the discretion to grant concealed-carry licenses only to those with “good reason to fear injury” or other specific reasons, such as having a job in which they carried large amounts of cash or valuables.   read more

House Republicans Strip Female Draft Sign-Up Requirement from Defense Bill

Including women in a potential mass mobilization has roiled social conservatives. They see such a mandate as another step toward blurring gender lines similar to allowing transgender people to use public lavatories of their choosing. But proponents see the requirement as a sensible step toward gender equality. They point to the Pentagon's decision late last year to open all front-line combat jobs to women as removing any justification for gender restrictions on draft registration.   read more
1 to 16 of about 4278 News
1 2 3 ... 268 Next