Controversies

1 to 16 of about 3427 News
1 2 3 ... 215 Next

Why Did Coast Guard Office in Alaska Allow Health Care Travel Program to be used for Undocumented Trips to Vail and Orlando?

The IG’s office received information that the Coast Guard was authorizing unnecessary healthcare travel. An audit found 94% of the records it reviewed for the Travel to Obtain Health Care program lacked documentation, such as doctors’ referrals and cost estimates, to justify trips. The Coast Guard in Alaska, for example, sent personnel or their relatives to such destinations as Vail, Colorado; Orlando, Florida; Savannah, Georgia; and Scottsdale, Arizona.   read more

Arab Dictatorships Pour Money into Clinton Foundation

In 2010, Algeria, which has been accused human rights violations, gave the foundation $500,000, which went to earthquake relief in Haiti. Clinton foundation officials now concede that they should have first gotten the approval of the State Department ethics office before accepting the funds. The United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia donated to the foundation only after Clinton resigned as secretary of state.   read more

Insurance Companies Brace for Financial Setbacks if Supreme Court Defunds Obamacare…Patients to Follow

If the Supreme Court sides with a conservative attack aimed at crippling Obamacare, the insurance industry could find itself drowning in red ink, while millions of Americans could lose their health coverage. "More healthy people are likely to drop out of the market. Which will cause premiums to go up again. Which will cause more people to drop their insurance. Which will cause premiums to go up. Such a death spiral could potentially collapse the individual insurance market in many states."   read more

Supreme Court Rules Dentists cannot have a Monopoly on Teeth Whitening

The North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners had tried to stop non-dentists from offering teeth-whitening in salons and at mall kiosks. But the high court agreed with the FTC, which challenged the board’s authority to restrict the service to dental offices. The court said the board rule was “anti-competitive and unfair." The state board is mostly made up of dentists, and it is funded by the dental industry. “They have an evident self-interest,” argued Deputy Solicitor General Stewart.   read more

Why is Congress Turning over Public Lands to Foreign Copper Mine Companies?

Resolution will be removing an estimated $130 billion worth of copper that’s now owned by the American people. The proposal has been around since 2005, but never got through Congress until senators McCain and Flake put it into the “must-pass” defense bill, which President Barack Obama signed in December. Members of the Apache and Yavapai tribes consider the land sacred and have started a sit-in protest on the site to stop the project.   read more

Duke Energy Admits Guilt in Coal Ash Spill Case

Duke agreed to pay $68.2 million in fines and restitution and $34 million for community service and mitigation projects. Environmental groups praised the settlement. “It’s not just a slap on the wrist,” said Cape Fear River Watch's Kemp Burdette. “A $100 million fine is a significant one. It confirms what we’ve been saying all along. It’s good to finally have somebody say, ‘You’re right. Duke was illegally polluting waterways across North Carolina and it was criminal. It wasn’t an accident.’”   read more

Uprising at Private Prison Leads to Transfer of Thousands of Prisoners

The prison was reportedly rendered “uninhabitable” following the uprising, which resulted in at least three of the prison’s 10 Kevlar-covered domes being set on fire. Two officers and as many as five inmates suffered minor injuries during the melee, which began as a complaint about medical services at the prison. Many local residents have expressed concerns that the prison may never reopen, which would cost the community about 400 jobs.   read more

Is Southern Illinois a Haven for Sexual Assaulters?

The newspaper examined more than a thousand police reports and found district attorneys routinely did not go after individuals accused of sex crimes. “As the Illinois data reveal, a stunningly small percentage of sexual assaults that are reported to police will eventually result in prosecution and conviction, and without meaningful data to portray that grim reality, there is no way for the public...to hold police departments and prosecutors’ offices accountable,” said EVAWI's Kim Lonsway.   read more

Federal Judge Orders Obama Administration to Stop Automatically Detaining Women and Children Seeking Asylum

Judge Boasberg ordered the administration to cease detaining immigrants solely “for the purpose of deterring future immigration.” “The court specifically rejected the government’s assertion that detention was necessary to protect national security,” said professor Benson. The lawsuit was brought “on behalf of mothers and children who have fled extreme violence, death threats, rape, and persecution...and come to the United States for safety."   read more

Kansas Judge Sues Gov. Brownback over Alleged Violation of Separation of Powers

“Judges should be free of political pressures and decide cases impartially based on the facts and the law," said Ryan Wright. "They should not have to worry that their decisions could be used against them for political gain.” Chief Judge Larry Solomon agreed and filed a lawsuit to have the law thrown out. The law is “a direct encroachment on the Kansas Supreme Court’s constitutional authority to administer the judiciary of the State,” states the lawsuit.   read more

Google Criticizes New FBI Surveillance Proposal

Google has come out against a new plan by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to authorize remote searches of computers by federal authorities, calling the effort legalized hacking. Google stated that the plan would raise “monumental and highly complex constitutional, legal and geopolitical concerns that should be left to Congress to decide.”   read more

Georgians Sue for Right to Carry Guns into Police Stations

The “guns everywhere” law was enacted at the urging of the National Rifle Association and other gun-rights activists even though 70% of Georgia residents were against the legislation. It was also opposed by the state’s police chiefs association, the restaurant association, the Episcopal and Catholic churches, and the Transportation Security Administration.   read more

58 California Cities Have Anti-Homeless Laws

Researchers gathered information from 58 California cities and found more than 500 anti-homeless laws between them. Ninety percent ban begging and panhandling and 20% ban food sharing. All but one of the 58 cities ban at least one nighttime activity, “like sleeping, camping, or lodging in public places, including in vehicles.”   read more

Is Releasing 2,000 Animals from a Mink Farm an Act of Terrorism? Federal Law Says it is

A law enacted during the George W. Bush administration that calls protests against animal treatment “terrorism” is being used to prosecute two men who released about 2,000 minks from an Illinois breeding operation. Kevin Johnson, 27, and Tyler Lang, 25, face up to 10 years in prison for charges brought under the 2006 Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act (AETA), which prohibits engaging in conduct “for the purpose of damaging or interfering with the operations of an animal enterprise.”   read more

College Freshmen: Less Partying. Self-Rated Emotional Health Lowest Ever Recorded

The study showed that from 1987 to 2014, students in their senior year of high school who said they partied six hours or more per week declined from 34.5% to 8.6%. The report says 2014 incoming students’ self-rated emotional health dropped to 50.7%, its lowest level ever, a drop of 2.3% from the freshmen class of 2013. The number of students admitting to “frequently” feeling depressed also went up by 9.5%, which was 3.4% higher than in 2009.   read more

Undocumented Immigrant Women with Children Rarely Allowed to Stay…Unless They have a Lawyer

Using federal documents obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, TRAC discovered that immigration courts under the Obama administration adopted rules last year that pushed cases involving women with children to the head of the line. TRAC’s analysis of 26,342 adults-with-children cases found that fewer than 30% of the families were able to find a lawyer to help them, and those immigrants were allowed to stay in the United States only 26.3% of the time.   read more
1 to 16 of about 3427 News
1 2 3 ... 215 Next

Controversies

1 to 16 of about 3427 News
1 2 3 ... 215 Next

Why Did Coast Guard Office in Alaska Allow Health Care Travel Program to be used for Undocumented Trips to Vail and Orlando?

The IG’s office received information that the Coast Guard was authorizing unnecessary healthcare travel. An audit found 94% of the records it reviewed for the Travel to Obtain Health Care program lacked documentation, such as doctors’ referrals and cost estimates, to justify trips. The Coast Guard in Alaska, for example, sent personnel or their relatives to such destinations as Vail, Colorado; Orlando, Florida; Savannah, Georgia; and Scottsdale, Arizona.   read more

Arab Dictatorships Pour Money into Clinton Foundation

In 2010, Algeria, which has been accused human rights violations, gave the foundation $500,000, which went to earthquake relief in Haiti. Clinton foundation officials now concede that they should have first gotten the approval of the State Department ethics office before accepting the funds. The United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia donated to the foundation only after Clinton resigned as secretary of state.   read more

Insurance Companies Brace for Financial Setbacks if Supreme Court Defunds Obamacare…Patients to Follow

If the Supreme Court sides with a conservative attack aimed at crippling Obamacare, the insurance industry could find itself drowning in red ink, while millions of Americans could lose their health coverage. "More healthy people are likely to drop out of the market. Which will cause premiums to go up again. Which will cause more people to drop their insurance. Which will cause premiums to go up. Such a death spiral could potentially collapse the individual insurance market in many states."   read more

Supreme Court Rules Dentists cannot have a Monopoly on Teeth Whitening

The North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners had tried to stop non-dentists from offering teeth-whitening in salons and at mall kiosks. But the high court agreed with the FTC, which challenged the board’s authority to restrict the service to dental offices. The court said the board rule was “anti-competitive and unfair." The state board is mostly made up of dentists, and it is funded by the dental industry. “They have an evident self-interest,” argued Deputy Solicitor General Stewart.   read more

Why is Congress Turning over Public Lands to Foreign Copper Mine Companies?

Resolution will be removing an estimated $130 billion worth of copper that’s now owned by the American people. The proposal has been around since 2005, but never got through Congress until senators McCain and Flake put it into the “must-pass” defense bill, which President Barack Obama signed in December. Members of the Apache and Yavapai tribes consider the land sacred and have started a sit-in protest on the site to stop the project.   read more

Duke Energy Admits Guilt in Coal Ash Spill Case

Duke agreed to pay $68.2 million in fines and restitution and $34 million for community service and mitigation projects. Environmental groups praised the settlement. “It’s not just a slap on the wrist,” said Cape Fear River Watch's Kemp Burdette. “A $100 million fine is a significant one. It confirms what we’ve been saying all along. It’s good to finally have somebody say, ‘You’re right. Duke was illegally polluting waterways across North Carolina and it was criminal. It wasn’t an accident.’”   read more

Uprising at Private Prison Leads to Transfer of Thousands of Prisoners

The prison was reportedly rendered “uninhabitable” following the uprising, which resulted in at least three of the prison’s 10 Kevlar-covered domes being set on fire. Two officers and as many as five inmates suffered minor injuries during the melee, which began as a complaint about medical services at the prison. Many local residents have expressed concerns that the prison may never reopen, which would cost the community about 400 jobs.   read more

Is Southern Illinois a Haven for Sexual Assaulters?

The newspaper examined more than a thousand police reports and found district attorneys routinely did not go after individuals accused of sex crimes. “As the Illinois data reveal, a stunningly small percentage of sexual assaults that are reported to police will eventually result in prosecution and conviction, and without meaningful data to portray that grim reality, there is no way for the public...to hold police departments and prosecutors’ offices accountable,” said EVAWI's Kim Lonsway.   read more

Federal Judge Orders Obama Administration to Stop Automatically Detaining Women and Children Seeking Asylum

Judge Boasberg ordered the administration to cease detaining immigrants solely “for the purpose of deterring future immigration.” “The court specifically rejected the government’s assertion that detention was necessary to protect national security,” said professor Benson. The lawsuit was brought “on behalf of mothers and children who have fled extreme violence, death threats, rape, and persecution...and come to the United States for safety."   read more

Kansas Judge Sues Gov. Brownback over Alleged Violation of Separation of Powers

“Judges should be free of political pressures and decide cases impartially based on the facts and the law," said Ryan Wright. "They should not have to worry that their decisions could be used against them for political gain.” Chief Judge Larry Solomon agreed and filed a lawsuit to have the law thrown out. The law is “a direct encroachment on the Kansas Supreme Court’s constitutional authority to administer the judiciary of the State,” states the lawsuit.   read more

Google Criticizes New FBI Surveillance Proposal

Google has come out against a new plan by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to authorize remote searches of computers by federal authorities, calling the effort legalized hacking. Google stated that the plan would raise “monumental and highly complex constitutional, legal and geopolitical concerns that should be left to Congress to decide.”   read more

Georgians Sue for Right to Carry Guns into Police Stations

The “guns everywhere” law was enacted at the urging of the National Rifle Association and other gun-rights activists even though 70% of Georgia residents were against the legislation. It was also opposed by the state’s police chiefs association, the restaurant association, the Episcopal and Catholic churches, and the Transportation Security Administration.   read more

58 California Cities Have Anti-Homeless Laws

Researchers gathered information from 58 California cities and found more than 500 anti-homeless laws between them. Ninety percent ban begging and panhandling and 20% ban food sharing. All but one of the 58 cities ban at least one nighttime activity, “like sleeping, camping, or lodging in public places, including in vehicles.”   read more

Is Releasing 2,000 Animals from a Mink Farm an Act of Terrorism? Federal Law Says it is

A law enacted during the George W. Bush administration that calls protests against animal treatment “terrorism” is being used to prosecute two men who released about 2,000 minks from an Illinois breeding operation. Kevin Johnson, 27, and Tyler Lang, 25, face up to 10 years in prison for charges brought under the 2006 Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act (AETA), which prohibits engaging in conduct “for the purpose of damaging or interfering with the operations of an animal enterprise.”   read more

College Freshmen: Less Partying. Self-Rated Emotional Health Lowest Ever Recorded

The study showed that from 1987 to 2014, students in their senior year of high school who said they partied six hours or more per week declined from 34.5% to 8.6%. The report says 2014 incoming students’ self-rated emotional health dropped to 50.7%, its lowest level ever, a drop of 2.3% from the freshmen class of 2013. The number of students admitting to “frequently” feeling depressed also went up by 9.5%, which was 3.4% higher than in 2009.   read more

Undocumented Immigrant Women with Children Rarely Allowed to Stay…Unless They have a Lawyer

Using federal documents obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, TRAC discovered that immigration courts under the Obama administration adopted rules last year that pushed cases involving women with children to the head of the line. TRAC’s analysis of 26,342 adults-with-children cases found that fewer than 30% of the families were able to find a lawyer to help them, and those immigrants were allowed to stay in the United States only 26.3% of the time.   read more
1 to 16 of about 3427 News
1 2 3 ... 215 Next