Controversies

1 to 16 of about 3718 News
1 2 3 ... 233 Next

73% of Inmates who Die in Jail Haven’t been Convicted of a Crime

A report by the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) shows that 73% of those who die in jail haven’t been convicted of a crime. In addition, 29% of those who die are African-American, more than double their percentage of the U.S. population at large. BJS found that 31.3% of all jail deaths in 2012 were by suicide.   read more

Divided Federal Court Rules Agriculture Dept. Improperly Exempted Nation’s Largest National Forest from Roadless Rule

The Bush administration attempted to exempt the Tongass from the Roadless Rule because it claimed it would harm local economies. The vote fell almost completely along party lines of the presidents who appointed the judges. Of the six who voted to keep the forest roadless, three were appointed by Barack Obama, two by Bill Clinton and one by Jimmy Carter. The five voting to keep the Bush exemption included three appointed by Bush, one appointed by Ronald Reagan and one by Clinton.   read more

Prosecutions of White-Collar Crimes Drop to Lowest in at Least 20 Years

Prosecutions for crimes such as mail fraud, healthcare fraud and other such offenses are off almost 37% from their peak during the Clinton administration. In 1995, the number of prosecutions was about 11,000 and that number has dropped steadily since then, with the exception of a spike during the first three years of the Obama administration.   read more

As Economy Improves, Army has Trouble Meeting Recruiting Goals…and so Does FBI

The FBI has found that it can’t match salaries offered by the private sector. In addition, its strict background checks weed out those who have smoked marijuana within three years or used other drugs within 10 years. One thing the Army isn’t doing to fill its ranks is cut its standards.   read more

Environmentalists Sue to Block California’s Suspiciously Rosy Fracking Report

The report, whose findings didn’t make it into the Environmental Impact Report, recommended that oil and gas development near homes, hospitals and schools be stopped. It warned of insufficient knowledge about the dangers of shallow fracking, used by 75% of the state’s frackers, and recommended that it be halted until more was known.   read more

50 Years since Passage of Voting Rights Act … and Birth of the Campaign to Reverse It

The law, signed in 1965 by President Johnson, was established to prevent attempts to keep blacks from voting. But in recent years, Republican-led legislatures have used the excuse of voter fraud to adopt laws that have instituted new ID requirements, rolled back early voting, and eliminated same-day registration. Conservatives on the Supreme Court have also participated by gutting the law's Section 5, which required certain jurisdictions to clear election law changes with the Justice Dept,   read more

To Bar Abortion, Alabama Appoints Lawyer for Fetus, Strips Incarcerated Mother of Parental Rights

The local district attorney, Chris Connolly, is fighting the woman's request and has even gone so far as to ask the juvenile court hearing the case to strip Doe of her parental rights, which would legally bar her from ending her pregnancy. “It appears to me that what the state is attempting to do is turn Jane Doe into a vessel, and control every aspect of her life, forcing her to give birth to a baby, which she has decided she does not want to do,” said one of Doe's attorneys, Randall Marshall.   read more

Bostonians Torn Over Olympics that Might Have Been: Deep Regret or Sigh of Relief?

Boston Globe columnist Shirley Leung says the decision came down to a tussle between the Old and New sides of Boston, with the former having “smothered” the latter. “Here’s the issue: New Boston acts a lot like Old Boston. We still put up a fierce fight when someone tries something novel. Given the chance to think big about our future, we tied ourselves up in the minutiae of tax breaks and traffic studies. Accusations quickly replaced ambitions,” she wrote.   read more

ACLU Sues California County where Each Public Defender Forced to Handle 700 Cases a Year

Public defenders in Fresno County, Calif., have an unwieldy caseload with each attorney averaging 700 felony cases a year, making it virtually impossible to give clients a decent defense. Now the American Civil Liberties Union has sued Fresno County and the state of California for shortchanging the local public defender’s office’s budget.   read more

DeKalb County, Georgia Accused of Raising Money by Prosecuting Violations Outside its Jurisdiction

Starting a few years ago, DeKalb County, Ga., officials began using its Recorder's Court to prosecute individuals who had broken state laws, even though the Recorder’s Court lacks the legal authority to do so. The county is now being sued in a class-action case claiming the court was used to bolster local revenues as part of a “scheme to generate revenue for a cash-strapped local government.”   read more

Justice Dept. Audit Criticizes DEA for Poor Oversight of Drug Informants

The IG found examples of informants who had broken the law and were being investigated while working with the DEA. “In some cases, the DEA continued to use, for up to six years without any (Justice Dept.) intervention, individuals who were involved in unauthorized illegal activities and who were under investigation by federal entities,” according to the report. The inspector general was stonewalled in his efforts to get information from DEA, delaying access to reports “for months at a time."   read more

Transportation Dept. Investigating Major Airlines for Price Gouging after Amtrak Crash

“The idea that any business would seek to take advantage of stranded rail passengers in the wake of such a tragic event is unacceptable,” said Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. The investigation is unusual for the agency, which hasn’t played a strong role in airline regulation since changes in federal law approved in the 1970s. “We have not investigated an airline for this type of conduct in at least the last 12 years, if ever,” said a department spokeswoman.   read more

Navy Accused of Endangering Health of Nearby Civilians with Excess Noise

The planes regularly fly low over the community, producing a loud noise. The EA-18s have been recorded producing noise at 130 decibels outside and 81 decibels inside homes. “Exposure to 140 decibels may cause immediate and permanent hearing damage or loss, as well as bleeding from the ears,” Dahr Jamail wrote at Truthout. Jamail added “the human health impacts from these levels of chronic jet noise include hearing loss, immune toxicity, insomnia, stroke, heart attacks and even death.”   read more

Justice Department Tries to Limit Inspectors General Access to Government Documents

The Justice Department has apparently decided that it gets to decide if it will be investigated. Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Karl Thompson, who runs the Office of Legal Counsel, released a 58-page ruling (pdf) Thursday saying that inspectors general must ask for permission for access to wiretaps, grand jury and credit information.   read more

In Missouri, Murderers are 7 Times more likely to be Executed if the Victim is White

--Homicides involving white victims are seven times more likely to result in an execution than that of a black victim. --Homicides involving white females are 14 times more likely to result in executions than those involving black male victims. --Although fewer than 40% of murder victims in Missouri were white, 81% of executed murderers killed a white victim.   read more

Did the DEA Help a Florida Task Force Hide and Launder Drug Money or Just Turn a Blind Eye?

Up to about $83 million was run through the operation. Task force records account for most of it, but as much as $12 million is unaccounted for. Large withdrawals were being made from task force bank accounts with no accounting for what the money was spent on. There were trips to Las Vegas and San Juan, Puerto Rico, with agents staying in luxurious accommodations. Money taken as commissions in the laundering business was also used to pay for task force members’ salaries.   read more
1 to 16 of about 3718 News
1 2 3 ... 233 Next

Controversies

1 to 16 of about 3718 News
1 2 3 ... 233 Next

73% of Inmates who Die in Jail Haven’t been Convicted of a Crime

A report by the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) shows that 73% of those who die in jail haven’t been convicted of a crime. In addition, 29% of those who die are African-American, more than double their percentage of the U.S. population at large. BJS found that 31.3% of all jail deaths in 2012 were by suicide.   read more

Divided Federal Court Rules Agriculture Dept. Improperly Exempted Nation’s Largest National Forest from Roadless Rule

The Bush administration attempted to exempt the Tongass from the Roadless Rule because it claimed it would harm local economies. The vote fell almost completely along party lines of the presidents who appointed the judges. Of the six who voted to keep the forest roadless, three were appointed by Barack Obama, two by Bill Clinton and one by Jimmy Carter. The five voting to keep the Bush exemption included three appointed by Bush, one appointed by Ronald Reagan and one by Clinton.   read more

Prosecutions of White-Collar Crimes Drop to Lowest in at Least 20 Years

Prosecutions for crimes such as mail fraud, healthcare fraud and other such offenses are off almost 37% from their peak during the Clinton administration. In 1995, the number of prosecutions was about 11,000 and that number has dropped steadily since then, with the exception of a spike during the first three years of the Obama administration.   read more

As Economy Improves, Army has Trouble Meeting Recruiting Goals…and so Does FBI

The FBI has found that it can’t match salaries offered by the private sector. In addition, its strict background checks weed out those who have smoked marijuana within three years or used other drugs within 10 years. One thing the Army isn’t doing to fill its ranks is cut its standards.   read more

Environmentalists Sue to Block California’s Suspiciously Rosy Fracking Report

The report, whose findings didn’t make it into the Environmental Impact Report, recommended that oil and gas development near homes, hospitals and schools be stopped. It warned of insufficient knowledge about the dangers of shallow fracking, used by 75% of the state’s frackers, and recommended that it be halted until more was known.   read more

50 Years since Passage of Voting Rights Act … and Birth of the Campaign to Reverse It

The law, signed in 1965 by President Johnson, was established to prevent attempts to keep blacks from voting. But in recent years, Republican-led legislatures have used the excuse of voter fraud to adopt laws that have instituted new ID requirements, rolled back early voting, and eliminated same-day registration. Conservatives on the Supreme Court have also participated by gutting the law's Section 5, which required certain jurisdictions to clear election law changes with the Justice Dept,   read more

To Bar Abortion, Alabama Appoints Lawyer for Fetus, Strips Incarcerated Mother of Parental Rights

The local district attorney, Chris Connolly, is fighting the woman's request and has even gone so far as to ask the juvenile court hearing the case to strip Doe of her parental rights, which would legally bar her from ending her pregnancy. “It appears to me that what the state is attempting to do is turn Jane Doe into a vessel, and control every aspect of her life, forcing her to give birth to a baby, which she has decided she does not want to do,” said one of Doe's attorneys, Randall Marshall.   read more

Bostonians Torn Over Olympics that Might Have Been: Deep Regret or Sigh of Relief?

Boston Globe columnist Shirley Leung says the decision came down to a tussle between the Old and New sides of Boston, with the former having “smothered” the latter. “Here’s the issue: New Boston acts a lot like Old Boston. We still put up a fierce fight when someone tries something novel. Given the chance to think big about our future, we tied ourselves up in the minutiae of tax breaks and traffic studies. Accusations quickly replaced ambitions,” she wrote.   read more

ACLU Sues California County where Each Public Defender Forced to Handle 700 Cases a Year

Public defenders in Fresno County, Calif., have an unwieldy caseload with each attorney averaging 700 felony cases a year, making it virtually impossible to give clients a decent defense. Now the American Civil Liberties Union has sued Fresno County and the state of California for shortchanging the local public defender’s office’s budget.   read more

DeKalb County, Georgia Accused of Raising Money by Prosecuting Violations Outside its Jurisdiction

Starting a few years ago, DeKalb County, Ga., officials began using its Recorder's Court to prosecute individuals who had broken state laws, even though the Recorder’s Court lacks the legal authority to do so. The county is now being sued in a class-action case claiming the court was used to bolster local revenues as part of a “scheme to generate revenue for a cash-strapped local government.”   read more

Justice Dept. Audit Criticizes DEA for Poor Oversight of Drug Informants

The IG found examples of informants who had broken the law and were being investigated while working with the DEA. “In some cases, the DEA continued to use, for up to six years without any (Justice Dept.) intervention, individuals who were involved in unauthorized illegal activities and who were under investigation by federal entities,” according to the report. The inspector general was stonewalled in his efforts to get information from DEA, delaying access to reports “for months at a time."   read more

Transportation Dept. Investigating Major Airlines for Price Gouging after Amtrak Crash

“The idea that any business would seek to take advantage of stranded rail passengers in the wake of such a tragic event is unacceptable,” said Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. The investigation is unusual for the agency, which hasn’t played a strong role in airline regulation since changes in federal law approved in the 1970s. “We have not investigated an airline for this type of conduct in at least the last 12 years, if ever,” said a department spokeswoman.   read more

Navy Accused of Endangering Health of Nearby Civilians with Excess Noise

The planes regularly fly low over the community, producing a loud noise. The EA-18s have been recorded producing noise at 130 decibels outside and 81 decibels inside homes. “Exposure to 140 decibels may cause immediate and permanent hearing damage or loss, as well as bleeding from the ears,” Dahr Jamail wrote at Truthout. Jamail added “the human health impacts from these levels of chronic jet noise include hearing loss, immune toxicity, insomnia, stroke, heart attacks and even death.”   read more

Justice Department Tries to Limit Inspectors General Access to Government Documents

The Justice Department has apparently decided that it gets to decide if it will be investigated. Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Karl Thompson, who runs the Office of Legal Counsel, released a 58-page ruling (pdf) Thursday saying that inspectors general must ask for permission for access to wiretaps, grand jury and credit information.   read more

In Missouri, Murderers are 7 Times more likely to be Executed if the Victim is White

--Homicides involving white victims are seven times more likely to result in an execution than that of a black victim. --Homicides involving white females are 14 times more likely to result in executions than those involving black male victims. --Although fewer than 40% of murder victims in Missouri were white, 81% of executed murderers killed a white victim.   read more

Did the DEA Help a Florida Task Force Hide and Launder Drug Money or Just Turn a Blind Eye?

Up to about $83 million was run through the operation. Task force records account for most of it, but as much as $12 million is unaccounted for. Large withdrawals were being made from task force bank accounts with no accounting for what the money was spent on. There were trips to Las Vegas and San Juan, Puerto Rico, with agents staying in luxurious accommodations. Money taken as commissions in the laundering business was also used to pay for task force members’ salaries.   read more
1 to 16 of about 3718 News
1 2 3 ... 233 Next