Controversies

1 to 16 of about 3076 News
1 2 3 ... 193 Next

Ominous Drying Up of Groundwater that Supplies Nine States

It’s easy to see the effects the prolonged drought in the Western U.S. is having on surface water supplies: many reservoirs have taken on a striped appearance from the difference between normal levels and the much lower levels now. But water supplies are also drying up in a place that’s not as obvious and can have more severe consequences. The groundwater levels in the Colorado River Basin, which covers parts of multiple states, have fallen faster than they can be replenished.   read more

Missouri Voters will Decide if Phone and Email Privacy Should be Added to State Constitution

Missouri residents may soon be able to say “Show me a warrant” when asked by law enforcement to produce their electronic devices. Both houses of the state’s legislature voted to put a proposed Amendment 9 on the ballot that would ensure "that the people shall be secure in their electronic...data from unreasonable searches and seizures..." The bill has “national implication,” said Tenth Amendment Center's Michael Maharrey.   read more

Largest Car Title Loan Company Avoids Interest-Rate Limits by Charging “Fees”

Florida legislators tried to keep the car title loan business out of their state in 2000. But where’s there’s a buck to be made, unscrupulous companies will find a way around pesky consumer-friendly laws, and TMX Finance appears to have done just that. TMX requires borrowers to purchase costly insurance on their cars from them. If a payment’s missed, TMX repossesses the borrower’s car. Sometimes borrowers get in so deep that they just give up.   read more

Government Sting Gains Health Care Coverage Using Fake Names

The Government Accountability Office (GAO) deliberately used fake identities and Social Security numbers to sign up phantom people under Obamacare. The sting operation involved a dozen fictitious applicants, all of whom save one managed to get subsidized health insurance. Six of the online applications were initially rejected, but when investigators used the call-in service, they were approved.   read more

If You Ask for a Public Defender in One Texas County, You Get a Sheriff’s Detective Instead

Starting late last year, McLennan County decided to send a sheriff’s detective to the home of any person requesting a court-appointed lawyer. The purpose: to see if the individual was poor enough to not afford their own legal counsel, or determine if they were lying.   read more

Missouri the only State to Refuse to Maintain a Prescription Drug Database

The state that’s home to the maker of oxycodone, one of the most abused painkillers in the United States, is also the only one in the nation that doesn’t have a government prescription drug database, thereby encouraging misuse of medications. Other Republicans have grown frustrated with Schaaf’s obstructionism, particularly those in neighboring states trying to stem their own drug abuse problems. With Missouri being so lax, drug addicts often cross the border and buy what they need.   read more

Beef Production Far Worse for the Environment than other Animal Products

The research revealed beef cattle utilized 28 times more land, required 11 times more irrigation water for feed, used six times more nitrogen fertilizer that pollutes waterways, and discharged five times more greenhouse gases, particularly methane. On average, eating beef is about ten times more costly to the environment than eating any other animal-based foods, according to the report.   read more

FBI Accused of Entrapping Muslims; ATF Accused of Entrapping Minorities

In one high-profile case (the “Newburgh Four”), New York District Judge Colleen McMahan, the federal judge overseeing the trial, characterized the government as having come “up with the crime, provided the means, and removed all relevant obstacles.” She added, “Only the government could have made a ‘terrorist’ out of [defendant] Mr. [James] Cromitie, whose buffoonery is positively Shakespearean in its scope.”   read more

Can Private Drones be Used to Counter “Ag-Gag” Laws in 7 States?

Using the online fundraising website Kickstarter, journalist Will Potter managed to raise $75,000 to purchase multiple drones for aerial surveillance of large livestock facilities. Potter told NPR’s The Salt that the move was necessary since seven states have adopted “ag-gag” bills that outlaw the collecting of images inside such operations that reveal neglect or abuse.   read more

House Republicans Fight to Stop City-Owned Internet Providers

Cities such as Chattanooga, Tennessee, have become groundbreaking examples of what local governments can do to provide high-speed fiber optic networks to residents and local businesses. That city created its “Gig City” operation that’s at least 50 times faster than the national average for $70 a month. But city officials there have been prohibited from expanding to nearby communities eager for the service because of a state law backed by telecommunications companies.   read more

Appeals Court Ruling Challenges Legitimacy of Military Commissions For Guantánamo Prisoners

A military commission had found al-Bahlul guilty of supporting terrorism, solicitation and conspiracy. But the appellate court, in a unanimous decision, invalidated the first two convictions, saying they weren’t considered war crimes prior to the Military Commissions Act of 2006. and the court majority questioned the third.   read more

Sentencing Commission Gives 46,000 Federal Drug Prisoners a Shot at Reduced Sentences

Inmates will have to go before a judge and ask that their sentences be reduced. If the judge grants the maximum reduction, about two years will be shaved off the average inmate’s sentence. Prisoners shouldn’t start packing their bags yet though; they won’t be able to begin petitioning judges for the reductions until November 2015.   read more

California Shuts Down Fracking Waste Injection Sites as Threat to Water Supply

Oil producers have long injected fracking waste into aquifers that had been deemed by the state as having no potable water and are not protected from such practice. However, the maps delineating where waste aquifers are compared to useable water are often inaccurate.   read more

41% of American Women Report having been Touched, Followed or Sexually Assaulted in Public

41% of women reported experiencing “physically aggressive forms” of harassment, including “sexual touching (23%), following (20%), flashing (14%), and being forced to do something sexual (9%).” An even larger percentage (65%) said they have experienced at least one type of street harassment in their lifetimes.   read more

Navy Nurse Refuses to Force-Feed Guantánamo Prisoner

American officials confirmed the incident took place before the July 4 holiday, prompting the removal of the male nurse from the forced-feeding area. The nurse may be in his forties, Latino, holding the rank of either lieutenant or captain. He was quoted as having announced, “I have come to the decision that I refuse to participate in this criminal act.”   read more

Mother Arrested for Leaving 9-Year-Old Daughter at Park while She Worked at McDonalds

Debra Harrell of North Augusta was arrested after police learned she was regularly leaving her nine-year-old daughter at a nearby park for hours at a time while she worked at McDonald’s. The child was given a cell phone in case of emergencies and reportedly not harmed while alone in Summerfield.   read more
1 to 16 of about 3076 News
1 2 3 ... 193 Next

Controversies

1 to 16 of about 3076 News
1 2 3 ... 193 Next

Ominous Drying Up of Groundwater that Supplies Nine States

It’s easy to see the effects the prolonged drought in the Western U.S. is having on surface water supplies: many reservoirs have taken on a striped appearance from the difference between normal levels and the much lower levels now. But water supplies are also drying up in a place that’s not as obvious and can have more severe consequences. The groundwater levels in the Colorado River Basin, which covers parts of multiple states, have fallen faster than they can be replenished.   read more

Missouri Voters will Decide if Phone and Email Privacy Should be Added to State Constitution

Missouri residents may soon be able to say “Show me a warrant” when asked by law enforcement to produce their electronic devices. Both houses of the state’s legislature voted to put a proposed Amendment 9 on the ballot that would ensure "that the people shall be secure in their electronic...data from unreasonable searches and seizures..." The bill has “national implication,” said Tenth Amendment Center's Michael Maharrey.   read more

Largest Car Title Loan Company Avoids Interest-Rate Limits by Charging “Fees”

Florida legislators tried to keep the car title loan business out of their state in 2000. But where’s there’s a buck to be made, unscrupulous companies will find a way around pesky consumer-friendly laws, and TMX Finance appears to have done just that. TMX requires borrowers to purchase costly insurance on their cars from them. If a payment’s missed, TMX repossesses the borrower’s car. Sometimes borrowers get in so deep that they just give up.   read more

Government Sting Gains Health Care Coverage Using Fake Names

The Government Accountability Office (GAO) deliberately used fake identities and Social Security numbers to sign up phantom people under Obamacare. The sting operation involved a dozen fictitious applicants, all of whom save one managed to get subsidized health insurance. Six of the online applications were initially rejected, but when investigators used the call-in service, they were approved.   read more

If You Ask for a Public Defender in One Texas County, You Get a Sheriff’s Detective Instead

Starting late last year, McLennan County decided to send a sheriff’s detective to the home of any person requesting a court-appointed lawyer. The purpose: to see if the individual was poor enough to not afford their own legal counsel, or determine if they were lying.   read more

Missouri the only State to Refuse to Maintain a Prescription Drug Database

The state that’s home to the maker of oxycodone, one of the most abused painkillers in the United States, is also the only one in the nation that doesn’t have a government prescription drug database, thereby encouraging misuse of medications. Other Republicans have grown frustrated with Schaaf’s obstructionism, particularly those in neighboring states trying to stem their own drug abuse problems. With Missouri being so lax, drug addicts often cross the border and buy what they need.   read more

Beef Production Far Worse for the Environment than other Animal Products

The research revealed beef cattle utilized 28 times more land, required 11 times more irrigation water for feed, used six times more nitrogen fertilizer that pollutes waterways, and discharged five times more greenhouse gases, particularly methane. On average, eating beef is about ten times more costly to the environment than eating any other animal-based foods, according to the report.   read more

FBI Accused of Entrapping Muslims; ATF Accused of Entrapping Minorities

In one high-profile case (the “Newburgh Four”), New York District Judge Colleen McMahan, the federal judge overseeing the trial, characterized the government as having come “up with the crime, provided the means, and removed all relevant obstacles.” She added, “Only the government could have made a ‘terrorist’ out of [defendant] Mr. [James] Cromitie, whose buffoonery is positively Shakespearean in its scope.”   read more

Can Private Drones be Used to Counter “Ag-Gag” Laws in 7 States?

Using the online fundraising website Kickstarter, journalist Will Potter managed to raise $75,000 to purchase multiple drones for aerial surveillance of large livestock facilities. Potter told NPR’s The Salt that the move was necessary since seven states have adopted “ag-gag” bills that outlaw the collecting of images inside such operations that reveal neglect or abuse.   read more

House Republicans Fight to Stop City-Owned Internet Providers

Cities such as Chattanooga, Tennessee, have become groundbreaking examples of what local governments can do to provide high-speed fiber optic networks to residents and local businesses. That city created its “Gig City” operation that’s at least 50 times faster than the national average for $70 a month. But city officials there have been prohibited from expanding to nearby communities eager for the service because of a state law backed by telecommunications companies.   read more

Appeals Court Ruling Challenges Legitimacy of Military Commissions For Guantánamo Prisoners

A military commission had found al-Bahlul guilty of supporting terrorism, solicitation and conspiracy. But the appellate court, in a unanimous decision, invalidated the first two convictions, saying they weren’t considered war crimes prior to the Military Commissions Act of 2006. and the court majority questioned the third.   read more

Sentencing Commission Gives 46,000 Federal Drug Prisoners a Shot at Reduced Sentences

Inmates will have to go before a judge and ask that their sentences be reduced. If the judge grants the maximum reduction, about two years will be shaved off the average inmate’s sentence. Prisoners shouldn’t start packing their bags yet though; they won’t be able to begin petitioning judges for the reductions until November 2015.   read more

California Shuts Down Fracking Waste Injection Sites as Threat to Water Supply

Oil producers have long injected fracking waste into aquifers that had been deemed by the state as having no potable water and are not protected from such practice. However, the maps delineating where waste aquifers are compared to useable water are often inaccurate.   read more

41% of American Women Report having been Touched, Followed or Sexually Assaulted in Public

41% of women reported experiencing “physically aggressive forms” of harassment, including “sexual touching (23%), following (20%), flashing (14%), and being forced to do something sexual (9%).” An even larger percentage (65%) said they have experienced at least one type of street harassment in their lifetimes.   read more

Navy Nurse Refuses to Force-Feed Guantánamo Prisoner

American officials confirmed the incident took place before the July 4 holiday, prompting the removal of the male nurse from the forced-feeding area. The nurse may be in his forties, Latino, holding the rank of either lieutenant or captain. He was quoted as having announced, “I have come to the decision that I refuse to participate in this criminal act.”   read more

Mother Arrested for Leaving 9-Year-Old Daughter at Park while She Worked at McDonalds

Debra Harrell of North Augusta was arrested after police learned she was regularly leaving her nine-year-old daughter at a nearby park for hours at a time while she worked at McDonald’s. The child was given a cell phone in case of emergencies and reportedly not harmed while alone in Summerfield.   read more
1 to 16 of about 3076 News
1 2 3 ... 193 Next