Unusual News

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11 No-Fly Zones in the United States

Government installations covered by overflight restrictions include the Kennedy Space Center, the sky over presidential retreat Camp David, and the Bush family compound in Maine. But then there’s restricted airspace over Disneyland and Disney World, brought about by a provision slipped into a 2003 spending bill. Aircraft are also barred, of course, from flying over the conspiratorially-rich secret government complex in Nevada, Area 51.   read more

Mysterious Voynich Manuscript Now Online Clearly…Good Luck Deciphering

“The 113 plant illustrations...seem to depict no flora found on Earth," wrote Allison Meier. There are also "visuals of the cosmos, a small army of naked women cavorting through pools of water, and the arcane alphabet that has so frustrated linguists and cryptographers." One theory is that the manuscript was created to serve as a medieval guide to creating medicinal drugs. A linguist in the UK devised sounds to match the book’s unusual symbols and claimed that he decoded 14 of them.   read more

Morning Shows, Wheel of Fortune and Jeopardy Ran the most Senate Ads

“The hard truth remains that people wake up in the morning and turn on their televisions — and political groups know this,” said Kantar Media's Elizabeth Wilner. “Good Morning America” proved the most popular with campaigns, which bought time for nearly 30,000 Senate ads there during the 2014 election cycle. “Today” and “CBS This Morning” came in second and third, respectively. “Wheel of Fortune” fans were subjected to 20,000 election ads, and “Jeopardy!” viewers 18,000.   read more

Yes, Sherri Ybarra Actually Got Elected

The Nov. 4 turnout was so Republican friendly that even Sherri Ybarra won her race. The much-maligned GOP candidate for Idaho superintendent for public instruction narrowly defeated her Democratic rival, Jana Jones. Numerous missteps plagued Ybarra’s campaign. These included plagiarsm, claiming non-existent endorsements, and failing to vote in 15 of the past 17 state elections. Her opponent, Jones, had nearly twice the experience, having served for two former superintendents.   read more

Rats! New York City’s Claim of 8 Million Rodents is 6 Million Too Many

Residents of the Big Apple have long (and proudly) claimed that there were so many rats in the city that the rodent population was on par with the human one. That meant the metropolis had about 8 million rats. Not so, says statistician Jonathan Auerbach, who calculated that New York’s rat population was closer to 2 million. Rat expert Robert Sullivan concurred. “But...everybody loves the idea of eight million rats," he said. "The one-rat-per-person scenario is too good.”   read more

As Americans Get Fatter, So do Crash Dummies

To help make cars and driving safer for larger Americans, manufacturers are now making obese-sized crash test dummies. “We’re still testing with a dummy that was created in the ’80s that weighs 170 pounds. It’s not representative of the population, and obviously it’s a much different load on the system,” said Chris O’Connor. “Obese people are 78% more likely to die in a crash. The reason is the way we get fat. We get fat in our middle range. And we get out of position in a typical seat.”   read more

4 Dumb School Responses to Ebola

The next case of school overreaction happened at Strong Elementary School in Maine. One of its teachers attended a conference in Dallas, which was the site of a U.S. Ebola case. Of course, the conference was about 10 miles from the hospital where the Ebola victim was treated and the teacher had no contact with anyone who’d been near the victim. That didn’t matter to the staff at Strong, who sent home the teacher for 21 days.   read more

Richest 2% Create 4 Times as many Greenhouse Gases Per Capita as Poorest 20%

The wealthy, often criticized for hogging too much of the nation’s wealth, also are disproportionate contributors to global warming. A new study from the Center for Global Development says the richest 2% of Americans are responsible for producing four times as much greenhouse gas emissions per person—53.5 metric tons of CO2 a year—as the bottom 20% of the population, which generates about 12.5 metric tons per person.   read more

Wisconsin County Uses Armored Vehicle and 24 Officers to Collect Judgment against “Argumentative” 75-Year-Old

After Roger Hoeppner refused to pay $80,000 to the city and come out of his house after 24 deputies showed up, the department sent in its military surplus vehicle, known as the MARV (Marathon County Response Vehicle). Hoeppner agreed to come out once he saw the MARV, and later paid the money he owed. “People may not always understand why, but an armored vehicle is almost a necessity now,” said Sheriff's Captain Greg Bean.   read more

Is Sherri Ybarra the Weirdest Candidate who Might Actually Get Elected?

Sherri Ybarra isn’t clear on how long she’s been married, figured she’d be able to get a Ph.D. in education in one semester and hasn’t voted in a general election since moving to Idaho 18 years ago. But she has a good chance of being elected the state’s superintendent of schools. Ybarra has also plagiarized material from the website of her competitor and has claimed endorsements from elected officials who are not supporting her.   read more

Chicago Woman Spent 675 Days in Jail for a Street Murder She Couldn’t have Committed…Because She was in Jail that Day

A woman Chicago police detectives accused of killing her son was jailed for almost two years before being freed because a defense attorney learned the defendant had been in prison at the time of her son’s death. Yesenia Santiago was accused by detectives Carlos Cortez and Roger Sandoval of killing her son Ismael Santana in 2007. They questioned her for 11 hours, feeding her information about the crime, then read Santiago her Miranda rights and videotaped her making a “confession.”   read more

Cigarette Giant Bans Smoking at the Office

Reynolds American, maker of Camel, Kool and other cigarettes, has decided to bar the smoking of tobacco products at its corporate headquarters. “We’re well aware that there will be folks who see this as an irony, but we believe it’s the right thing to do and the right time to do it,” said a Reynolds spokesman. The firm has put a big marketing effort behind its electronic cigarettes, and those have been excluded from the smoking ban.   read more

California County Tried to Seize Marijuana Plants without Warrant because Growing them Wasted Water

Officials insisted the plants had to go in order to help preserve water supplies, and the situation was so dire police need not obtain a court order first. Judge Thelton Henderson wrote: “The need to reduce water use, even during a drought, falls below the level of urgency associated with emergencies justifying a warrantless search in existing case law. The county’s inexperience in obtaining warrants...does not excuse the requirements of the [U.S.] Constitution."   read more

The 25-Year-Old Unsolved Kidnapping that Led to a Significant Increase in the Recovery of Missing Children

In 1989, 11-year-old Jacob Wetterling was abducted in St. Joseph, Minnesota. His parents, Jerry and Patty Wetterling have dedicated themselves to not only finding their lost child, but also helping other parents see their children come home safely. While Patty Wetterling has “helped change the landscape of missing children, from sex offender registries to police training,” the rate of missing children found has increased significantly—from 62% in 1990 to 97% today   read more

Tennessee Woman Jailed for Having Overgrown Lawn

Karen Holloway of Lenoir City had been cited by the city for the heinous crime of not pruning her bushes or mowing her lawn. When the yard wasn’t cleaned up, she had to appear in court with no lawyer. She asked the judge, Terry Vann, if she could perform five days of community service to avoid spending time “with child molesters, and people who’ve done real crimes.” Vann insisted she spend time in jail, but did reduce the sentence to six hours.   read more

Sex Offenders Run for Office in Minnesota

The Moose Lake Sex Offender Treatment Program (MSOP) is for sex offenders who have completed their criminal sentences, but are deemed too dangerous to live without supervision. So they’re confined to the Moose Lake facility and are restrained by handcuffs and leg irons during any trips to the outside world, such as to a doctor. The program’s residents would like to change the conditions under which they’re held. So they’re registering to vote.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1268 News
1 2 3 ... 80 Next

Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1268 News
1 2 3 ... 80 Next

11 No-Fly Zones in the United States

Government installations covered by overflight restrictions include the Kennedy Space Center, the sky over presidential retreat Camp David, and the Bush family compound in Maine. But then there’s restricted airspace over Disneyland and Disney World, brought about by a provision slipped into a 2003 spending bill. Aircraft are also barred, of course, from flying over the conspiratorially-rich secret government complex in Nevada, Area 51.   read more

Mysterious Voynich Manuscript Now Online Clearly…Good Luck Deciphering

“The 113 plant illustrations...seem to depict no flora found on Earth," wrote Allison Meier. There are also "visuals of the cosmos, a small army of naked women cavorting through pools of water, and the arcane alphabet that has so frustrated linguists and cryptographers." One theory is that the manuscript was created to serve as a medieval guide to creating medicinal drugs. A linguist in the UK devised sounds to match the book’s unusual symbols and claimed that he decoded 14 of them.   read more

Morning Shows, Wheel of Fortune and Jeopardy Ran the most Senate Ads

“The hard truth remains that people wake up in the morning and turn on their televisions — and political groups know this,” said Kantar Media's Elizabeth Wilner. “Good Morning America” proved the most popular with campaigns, which bought time for nearly 30,000 Senate ads there during the 2014 election cycle. “Today” and “CBS This Morning” came in second and third, respectively. “Wheel of Fortune” fans were subjected to 20,000 election ads, and “Jeopardy!” viewers 18,000.   read more

Yes, Sherri Ybarra Actually Got Elected

The Nov. 4 turnout was so Republican friendly that even Sherri Ybarra won her race. The much-maligned GOP candidate for Idaho superintendent for public instruction narrowly defeated her Democratic rival, Jana Jones. Numerous missteps plagued Ybarra’s campaign. These included plagiarsm, claiming non-existent endorsements, and failing to vote in 15 of the past 17 state elections. Her opponent, Jones, had nearly twice the experience, having served for two former superintendents.   read more

Rats! New York City’s Claim of 8 Million Rodents is 6 Million Too Many

Residents of the Big Apple have long (and proudly) claimed that there were so many rats in the city that the rodent population was on par with the human one. That meant the metropolis had about 8 million rats. Not so, says statistician Jonathan Auerbach, who calculated that New York’s rat population was closer to 2 million. Rat expert Robert Sullivan concurred. “But...everybody loves the idea of eight million rats," he said. "The one-rat-per-person scenario is too good.”   read more

As Americans Get Fatter, So do Crash Dummies

To help make cars and driving safer for larger Americans, manufacturers are now making obese-sized crash test dummies. “We’re still testing with a dummy that was created in the ’80s that weighs 170 pounds. It’s not representative of the population, and obviously it’s a much different load on the system,” said Chris O’Connor. “Obese people are 78% more likely to die in a crash. The reason is the way we get fat. We get fat in our middle range. And we get out of position in a typical seat.”   read more

4 Dumb School Responses to Ebola

The next case of school overreaction happened at Strong Elementary School in Maine. One of its teachers attended a conference in Dallas, which was the site of a U.S. Ebola case. Of course, the conference was about 10 miles from the hospital where the Ebola victim was treated and the teacher had no contact with anyone who’d been near the victim. That didn’t matter to the staff at Strong, who sent home the teacher for 21 days.   read more

Richest 2% Create 4 Times as many Greenhouse Gases Per Capita as Poorest 20%

The wealthy, often criticized for hogging too much of the nation’s wealth, also are disproportionate contributors to global warming. A new study from the Center for Global Development says the richest 2% of Americans are responsible for producing four times as much greenhouse gas emissions per person—53.5 metric tons of CO2 a year—as the bottom 20% of the population, which generates about 12.5 metric tons per person.   read more

Wisconsin County Uses Armored Vehicle and 24 Officers to Collect Judgment against “Argumentative” 75-Year-Old

After Roger Hoeppner refused to pay $80,000 to the city and come out of his house after 24 deputies showed up, the department sent in its military surplus vehicle, known as the MARV (Marathon County Response Vehicle). Hoeppner agreed to come out once he saw the MARV, and later paid the money he owed. “People may not always understand why, but an armored vehicle is almost a necessity now,” said Sheriff's Captain Greg Bean.   read more

Is Sherri Ybarra the Weirdest Candidate who Might Actually Get Elected?

Sherri Ybarra isn’t clear on how long she’s been married, figured she’d be able to get a Ph.D. in education in one semester and hasn’t voted in a general election since moving to Idaho 18 years ago. But she has a good chance of being elected the state’s superintendent of schools. Ybarra has also plagiarized material from the website of her competitor and has claimed endorsements from elected officials who are not supporting her.   read more

Chicago Woman Spent 675 Days in Jail for a Street Murder She Couldn’t have Committed…Because She was in Jail that Day

A woman Chicago police detectives accused of killing her son was jailed for almost two years before being freed because a defense attorney learned the defendant had been in prison at the time of her son’s death. Yesenia Santiago was accused by detectives Carlos Cortez and Roger Sandoval of killing her son Ismael Santana in 2007. They questioned her for 11 hours, feeding her information about the crime, then read Santiago her Miranda rights and videotaped her making a “confession.”   read more

Cigarette Giant Bans Smoking at the Office

Reynolds American, maker of Camel, Kool and other cigarettes, has decided to bar the smoking of tobacco products at its corporate headquarters. “We’re well aware that there will be folks who see this as an irony, but we believe it’s the right thing to do and the right time to do it,” said a Reynolds spokesman. The firm has put a big marketing effort behind its electronic cigarettes, and those have been excluded from the smoking ban.   read more

California County Tried to Seize Marijuana Plants without Warrant because Growing them Wasted Water

Officials insisted the plants had to go in order to help preserve water supplies, and the situation was so dire police need not obtain a court order first. Judge Thelton Henderson wrote: “The need to reduce water use, even during a drought, falls below the level of urgency associated with emergencies justifying a warrantless search in existing case law. The county’s inexperience in obtaining warrants...does not excuse the requirements of the [U.S.] Constitution."   read more

The 25-Year-Old Unsolved Kidnapping that Led to a Significant Increase in the Recovery of Missing Children

In 1989, 11-year-old Jacob Wetterling was abducted in St. Joseph, Minnesota. His parents, Jerry and Patty Wetterling have dedicated themselves to not only finding their lost child, but also helping other parents see their children come home safely. While Patty Wetterling has “helped change the landscape of missing children, from sex offender registries to police training,” the rate of missing children found has increased significantly—from 62% in 1990 to 97% today   read more

Tennessee Woman Jailed for Having Overgrown Lawn

Karen Holloway of Lenoir City had been cited by the city for the heinous crime of not pruning her bushes or mowing her lawn. When the yard wasn’t cleaned up, she had to appear in court with no lawyer. She asked the judge, Terry Vann, if she could perform five days of community service to avoid spending time “with child molesters, and people who’ve done real crimes.” Vann insisted she spend time in jail, but did reduce the sentence to six hours.   read more

Sex Offenders Run for Office in Minnesota

The Moose Lake Sex Offender Treatment Program (MSOP) is for sex offenders who have completed their criminal sentences, but are deemed too dangerous to live without supervision. So they’re confined to the Moose Lake facility and are restrained by handcuffs and leg irons during any trips to the outside world, such as to a doctor. The program’s residents would like to change the conditions under which they’re held. So they’re registering to vote.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1268 News
1 2 3 ... 80 Next