Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1699 News
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Obama Signs Bill to Remove Offensive Names for Minority Groups from U.S. Laws

Federal laws will no longer include outdated and offensive terms used to describe minority groups. President Barack Obama signed a bill striking the several terms, including "Negro" and "Oriental" on Friday, the White House said. Those terms will be replaced with "African American" and "Asian American." The bill removing the terms passed the House in February and the Senate last week. No one in either chamber objected.   read more

V.A. Cut off Benefits of 4,200 Veterans They Wrongly Claimed Were Dead

"We simply cannot have men and women who have sacrificed for this country see their rightful benefits wrongfully terminated because the VA mistakenly declares them dead," Rep. Jolly wrote. Now, when officials think a veteran is dead, the department will send a letter to his or her address and request confirmation of the death from a surviving family member. If the VA doesn't hear from the family — or from a veteran erroneously believed dead — only then will the department terminate payments.   read more

Federal Judge Issues Unusual Ruling Calling for Probation Instead of Prison in Drug Case, Citing Post-Conviction Consequences

Judge Block quoted legal scholar Michelle Alexander: “Today a criminal freed from prison has scarcely more rights, and arguably less respect, than a freed slave or a black person living ‘free’ in Mississippi at the height of Jim Crow.” Said Prof. Chin: “This is...the most careful and thorough judicial examination [of collateral consequences in sentencing]. It’s going to generate debate on a critical issue...the ability of people convicted of crimes to get on with their lives."   read more

Americans, Age 18-34, More Likely to Live with Parents than Romantic Partners

Young men have consistently been more likely to live with their parents than young women have, and that remains true, generally because women marry younger and move out. But now living with parents is on the cusp of becoming the dominant arrangement for young women as well. “What you tend to see is that racial and ethnic minorities...especially from disadvantaged backgrounds, are the most likely to be living in their parent’s home and the least likely to have a partner,” Fry said.   read more

Rate of Adult Smokers in U.S. Takes Biggest Plunge in 20 Years

Why the smoking rate fell so much in 2015 — and whether it will fall as fast again — is not quite clear. About 50 years ago, roughly 42% of U.S. adults smoked. It was common nearly everywhere. The smoking rate's gradual decline has coincided with an increased public understanding that smoking is a cause of cancer, heart disease and other lethal health problems. Experts attribute recent declines to the mounting impact of anti-smoking ad campaigns, cigarette taxes and smoking bans.   read more

Obama Administration Officials Say Atrocities Prevention Board not Responsible for Preventing Atrocities

When President Obama in 2011 announced he planned to establish an Atrocities Prevention Board, the mission of the board seemed straightforward: preventing atrocities. But faced with questions about atrocities that haven't been prevented, the administration had a curious response: That's not the point. Officials briefing reporters on a new executive order said the purpose of the board is to "look over the horizon" and identify potential conflicts that need to be kept on the government's radar.   read more

Congress Reaches Bipartisan Safety Standards Agreement for Dangerous Chemicals

"People believe when they go to the grocery store or the hardware store (and) get a product, that that product has been tested and it's been determined to be safe. That isn't the case," said Sen. Tom Udall, a lead sponsor of the bill. "Today we are stepping forward and we are putting a law in place that will protect American families and protect children from chemicals." The legislation is named after the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who pushed for chemical reform before his death in 2013.   read more

Evenly Split Supreme Court Finds Consensus in Modest Rulings

The court is not deadlocked so much as diminished. Many of the justices' decisions will be modest and ephemeral. Opinions vary about whether a Supreme Court that does little is good for the nation. Roberts has said he favors narrow decisions endorsed by large majorities, and it turns out that goal is easier to achieve on an eight-member court. The next term is thus shaping up to be a thin and quiet one. For now, the Supreme Court will remain on the sideline of American life.   read more

Private Debt-Collection Lawyers Allowed to Use State Letterheads when the State is Their Client, Rules Supreme Court

Private lawyers appointed by a state attorney general to collect debts can use the attorney general's official letterhead, the Supreme Court ruled Monday. The underlying case centered on whether special counsel - those appointed by attorney generals to collect a debt owed to the state - are state "officers" under federal law. The unanimous Supreme Court reversed the Sixth Circuit and ruled that special counsel's use of a state attorney general's letterhead does not violate the FDCPA.   read more

Black Americans See Gains in Life Expectancy, While Whites See Drop from Opioid Deaths

Blacks are still at a major health disadvantage compared with whites. But evidence of black gains has been building and has helped push up the ultimate measure — life expectancy. The gap between blacks and whites was seven years in 1990. By 2014, it had shrunk to 3.4 years, the smallest in history, with life expectancy at 75.6 years for blacks and 79 years for whites. Part of the reason has been the opioid crisis, which has hit harder in white communities, bringing down white life expectancy.   read more

$760,000 in Pocket Change Left Behind by Travelers at U.S. Airports in One Year

In the New York metropolitan area, Kennedy International Airport reported the highest total of unclaimed funds: $43,716. The lowest amount collected at a hub airport was $1.99, at the Pago Pago International Airport in American Samoa. What will the agency do with the money? In 2005, Congress gave the TSA the authority to use unclaimed money on security operations.   read more

White House Kicks Off Expanded Research Into Microbes

The Obama administration is beginning a major project to better understand microbes, and even control them. The National Microbiome Initiative announced by White House science officials Friday aims to bring together scientists who study the microbes that live in the human gut and in the oceans, in farm soil and in hospitals — to speed discoveries that could bring big payoffs.   read more

Google Employees Propose Emojis of Women in Professional Roles

When it comes to emojis, women can be brides or princesses, paint their fingernails and go dancing in a red dress. If those sound like roles determined by the patriarchy, well, it’s not a new complaint. But it may be changing. “Isn’t it time that emoji also reflect the reality that women play a key role in every walk of life and in every profession?” said a Google proposal. The proposed emojis include women in business and health care roles, at factories and on farms, among other things.   read more

Milestone Reached as a Million Texans Now Have Licenses to Carry Handguns

Texas now has one of the biggest citizenries in the country authorized to carry concealed and unconcealed firearms. The 1 million are made up of 268,200 women and 749,418 men, according to the Department of Public Safety. Most of those men and women — 873,166 — are white. Gov. Greg Abbott, a Republican, is one of them. More people are licensed to be armed in Harris County, Texas, than in the entire state of Louisiana.   read more

Top Three Republican Leaders in Three Branches of Alabama Government Embroiled in Scandal or Wrongdoing

All in all, it's some of the worst of times for Republicans who promised to clean up state government after seizing control from Democrats. "I never recall when the top leaders of all three branches of government were simultaneously accused of improper behavior," said retired political scientist Bill Stewart. It's hard for state government to concentrate on issues like Medicaid or the prison system when so many officials are fighting for their jobs, he said. "It's definitely a traumatic time."   read more

Air Rage Incidents more likely when Economy Passengers Pass Through First Class

Simply having a first-class compartment made an air rage incident nearly four times more likely, equivalent to the effect of a nine-hour flight delay, the study found. The bad behavior was higher not only for economy passengers, but those in first class too. The results have implications for any physical environment where differences in class or status are apparent. Using dual boarding gates, separating first-class from economy cabin, could help reduce rage incidents, says Prof. DeCelles.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1699 News
1 2 3 ... 107 Next

Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1699 News
1 2 3 ... 107 Next

Obama Signs Bill to Remove Offensive Names for Minority Groups from U.S. Laws

Federal laws will no longer include outdated and offensive terms used to describe minority groups. President Barack Obama signed a bill striking the several terms, including "Negro" and "Oriental" on Friday, the White House said. Those terms will be replaced with "African American" and "Asian American." The bill removing the terms passed the House in February and the Senate last week. No one in either chamber objected.   read more

V.A. Cut off Benefits of 4,200 Veterans They Wrongly Claimed Were Dead

"We simply cannot have men and women who have sacrificed for this country see their rightful benefits wrongfully terminated because the VA mistakenly declares them dead," Rep. Jolly wrote. Now, when officials think a veteran is dead, the department will send a letter to his or her address and request confirmation of the death from a surviving family member. If the VA doesn't hear from the family — or from a veteran erroneously believed dead — only then will the department terminate payments.   read more

Federal Judge Issues Unusual Ruling Calling for Probation Instead of Prison in Drug Case, Citing Post-Conviction Consequences

Judge Block quoted legal scholar Michelle Alexander: “Today a criminal freed from prison has scarcely more rights, and arguably less respect, than a freed slave or a black person living ‘free’ in Mississippi at the height of Jim Crow.” Said Prof. Chin: “This is...the most careful and thorough judicial examination [of collateral consequences in sentencing]. It’s going to generate debate on a critical issue...the ability of people convicted of crimes to get on with their lives."   read more

Americans, Age 18-34, More Likely to Live with Parents than Romantic Partners

Young men have consistently been more likely to live with their parents than young women have, and that remains true, generally because women marry younger and move out. But now living with parents is on the cusp of becoming the dominant arrangement for young women as well. “What you tend to see is that racial and ethnic minorities...especially from disadvantaged backgrounds, are the most likely to be living in their parent’s home and the least likely to have a partner,” Fry said.   read more

Rate of Adult Smokers in U.S. Takes Biggest Plunge in 20 Years

Why the smoking rate fell so much in 2015 — and whether it will fall as fast again — is not quite clear. About 50 years ago, roughly 42% of U.S. adults smoked. It was common nearly everywhere. The smoking rate's gradual decline has coincided with an increased public understanding that smoking is a cause of cancer, heart disease and other lethal health problems. Experts attribute recent declines to the mounting impact of anti-smoking ad campaigns, cigarette taxes and smoking bans.   read more

Obama Administration Officials Say Atrocities Prevention Board not Responsible for Preventing Atrocities

When President Obama in 2011 announced he planned to establish an Atrocities Prevention Board, the mission of the board seemed straightforward: preventing atrocities. But faced with questions about atrocities that haven't been prevented, the administration had a curious response: That's not the point. Officials briefing reporters on a new executive order said the purpose of the board is to "look over the horizon" and identify potential conflicts that need to be kept on the government's radar.   read more

Congress Reaches Bipartisan Safety Standards Agreement for Dangerous Chemicals

"People believe when they go to the grocery store or the hardware store (and) get a product, that that product has been tested and it's been determined to be safe. That isn't the case," said Sen. Tom Udall, a lead sponsor of the bill. "Today we are stepping forward and we are putting a law in place that will protect American families and protect children from chemicals." The legislation is named after the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who pushed for chemical reform before his death in 2013.   read more

Evenly Split Supreme Court Finds Consensus in Modest Rulings

The court is not deadlocked so much as diminished. Many of the justices' decisions will be modest and ephemeral. Opinions vary about whether a Supreme Court that does little is good for the nation. Roberts has said he favors narrow decisions endorsed by large majorities, and it turns out that goal is easier to achieve on an eight-member court. The next term is thus shaping up to be a thin and quiet one. For now, the Supreme Court will remain on the sideline of American life.   read more

Private Debt-Collection Lawyers Allowed to Use State Letterheads when the State is Their Client, Rules Supreme Court

Private lawyers appointed by a state attorney general to collect debts can use the attorney general's official letterhead, the Supreme Court ruled Monday. The underlying case centered on whether special counsel - those appointed by attorney generals to collect a debt owed to the state - are state "officers" under federal law. The unanimous Supreme Court reversed the Sixth Circuit and ruled that special counsel's use of a state attorney general's letterhead does not violate the FDCPA.   read more

Black Americans See Gains in Life Expectancy, While Whites See Drop from Opioid Deaths

Blacks are still at a major health disadvantage compared with whites. But evidence of black gains has been building and has helped push up the ultimate measure — life expectancy. The gap between blacks and whites was seven years in 1990. By 2014, it had shrunk to 3.4 years, the smallest in history, with life expectancy at 75.6 years for blacks and 79 years for whites. Part of the reason has been the opioid crisis, which has hit harder in white communities, bringing down white life expectancy.   read more

$760,000 in Pocket Change Left Behind by Travelers at U.S. Airports in One Year

In the New York metropolitan area, Kennedy International Airport reported the highest total of unclaimed funds: $43,716. The lowest amount collected at a hub airport was $1.99, at the Pago Pago International Airport in American Samoa. What will the agency do with the money? In 2005, Congress gave the TSA the authority to use unclaimed money on security operations.   read more

White House Kicks Off Expanded Research Into Microbes

The Obama administration is beginning a major project to better understand microbes, and even control them. The National Microbiome Initiative announced by White House science officials Friday aims to bring together scientists who study the microbes that live in the human gut and in the oceans, in farm soil and in hospitals — to speed discoveries that could bring big payoffs.   read more

Google Employees Propose Emojis of Women in Professional Roles

When it comes to emojis, women can be brides or princesses, paint their fingernails and go dancing in a red dress. If those sound like roles determined by the patriarchy, well, it’s not a new complaint. But it may be changing. “Isn’t it time that emoji also reflect the reality that women play a key role in every walk of life and in every profession?” said a Google proposal. The proposed emojis include women in business and health care roles, at factories and on farms, among other things.   read more

Milestone Reached as a Million Texans Now Have Licenses to Carry Handguns

Texas now has one of the biggest citizenries in the country authorized to carry concealed and unconcealed firearms. The 1 million are made up of 268,200 women and 749,418 men, according to the Department of Public Safety. Most of those men and women — 873,166 — are white. Gov. Greg Abbott, a Republican, is one of them. More people are licensed to be armed in Harris County, Texas, than in the entire state of Louisiana.   read more

Top Three Republican Leaders in Three Branches of Alabama Government Embroiled in Scandal or Wrongdoing

All in all, it's some of the worst of times for Republicans who promised to clean up state government after seizing control from Democrats. "I never recall when the top leaders of all three branches of government were simultaneously accused of improper behavior," said retired political scientist Bill Stewart. It's hard for state government to concentrate on issues like Medicaid or the prison system when so many officials are fighting for their jobs, he said. "It's definitely a traumatic time."   read more

Air Rage Incidents more likely when Economy Passengers Pass Through First Class

Simply having a first-class compartment made an air rage incident nearly four times more likely, equivalent to the effect of a nine-hour flight delay, the study found. The bad behavior was higher not only for economy passengers, but those in first class too. The results have implications for any physical environment where differences in class or status are apparent. Using dual boarding gates, separating first-class from economy cabin, could help reduce rage incidents, says Prof. DeCelles.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1699 News
1 2 3 ... 107 Next