Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1681 News
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U.S. Government Pays $48 Million to Resettle First American “Climate Change Refugees”

The Isle de Jean Charles resettlement plan is one of the first programs of its kind in the world, a test of how to respond to climate change in the most dramatic circumstances without tearing communities apart. Under the terms of the grant, the island’s residents are to be resettled to drier land and a community that as of now does not exist. “We see this as setting a precedent for the rest of the country, the rest of the world,” said Marion McFadden, who is running the program at the HUD.   read more

Discrimination Continues after Death at Texas “Whites-Only” Cemetery

"Mrs. Barrera, who is Anglo and a U.S. citizen, intended that she and her husband be buried together in the San Domingo Cemetery," the lawsuit states. "In response to her request...Mr. Bradford told Mrs. Barrera 'absolutely not. When Mrs. Barrera asked why 'the board' wanted to exclude her husband's remains from the San Domingo Cemetery, Mr. Bradford responded 'because he's a Mexican,' and that she could 'go up the road and bury him with the niggers and Mexicans."   read more

Senator Says Spying Billboards Are Invasion of Privacy, Wants Investigation

A U.S. senator is calling for a federal investigation into an outdoor advertising company’s latest effort to target billboard ads to specific consumers. Sen. Charles Schumer (D-New York) has dubbed Clear Channel Outdoor Americas’ so-called RADAR program “spying billboards,” warning the service may violate privacy rights by tracking people’s cell phone data via the ad space.   read more

Seattle’s Garbage-Searching Policy Ruled Unconstitutional

Seattle’s warrantless searches of garbage to enforce its recycling law is unconstitutional, a judge ruled. Though Seattle has one of the highest recycling and composting rates in the nation, the city passed a law in September 2014 that fines residents for discarding food or recyclables in their personal garbage bins. Garbage collectors and Seattle Public Utilities inspectors enforced the law by searching garbage cans without suspicion or warrants.   read more

Guided Missiles Missing from Guided Missile Containers Found Floating in Pacific Ocean

Clinton Cook Sr. tells Anchorage television KTUU he was on a boat that found one of the heavy, hard plastic containers. They were going to pass it, but noticed the unusual shape, about 8-feet by 2-feet. Troopers say an explosives ordinance team helped determine the boxes were "void of their original contents."   read more

FBI Approves of their Agents Killing Suspect, But Not of Shooting His Car Tire

The FBI took the unusual step of deeming part of that case a “bad shoot” in agents’ parlance. But the two agents who killed Harrison were not faulted. Instead, only the agent who shot the tire was blamed, recommending that the agent be suspended for a day without pay. The reason was that lethal force force policy forbids firing a gun to disable a vehicle. But the same policy permits firing a gun to protect people from danger, which they applied to Harrison's killing.   read more

Meet the Women Whose Faces Will Grace Your Currency

Isabella Baumfree, a slave born in 1797, changed her name to Sojourner Truth after she walked off an upstate farm in 1826 with her infant daughter. She became a Christian preacher and grew increasingly political in pressing for abolition, women’s suffrage and prison reform. She delivered her most famous address, “Ain’t I a Woman,” in 1851 in Ohio, where she said: “I could work as much and eat as much as a man — when I could get it — and bear the lash as well. And ain’t I a woman?”   read more

Fox News Monthly Election Coverage: 666 Minutes for GOP Candidates, 13 Minutes for Dems

Fueled by Trump fascination, the Republican race in general has gotten more coverage. Fox no doubt believes that its audience, dominated by Republicans, is more interested in the GOP campaign. For example, Sean Hannity's show had no Democratic candidates or surrogates on during the month-long period. A 2012 Pew Research Center study found that 78% of Hannity's audience identified themselves as conservative, and 5% as liberal.   read more

Late Political Party Registrants in New York Found 19th Century Law Stood in Their Way

Thousands of New Yorkers discovered they couldn’t vote in the primaries Tuesday. The reason: Under a New York law dating to the late 1800s, independent voters would have had to register last October in order to cast a vote in the primary. Some Bernie Sanders supporters suggested such rules were a way for party leaders to hamstring insurgents like the Vermont senator. But in fact the rules were originally intended as a strike against the manipulations of party bosses and political machines.   read more

More Adults, Not Minors, Smoking Pot in Colorado since Legalization

While use of the drug did not increase significantly among children, it did jump among adults. Relying on data from the national drug use survey, Colorado reported that nearly a third of Coloradans 18 to 25 in 2014 had used pot in the last 30 days, a rise of about 5 percent from the year before recreational pot was legalized. The survey showed a similar spike in adults over 26. Past 30-day marijuana use went from 7.6 percent in 2012 to 12.4 percent in 2014.   read more

Thousands of Independent-Minded California Voters Mistakenly Registered with Conservative Party Due to Name Confusion

Tens of thousands of people didn't realize they had enrolled in a political party that opposes abortion rights and same sex marriage. The mistake could prevent people from casting votes in the June 7 presidential primary, considered California's most competitive in recent years. The AIP's roots date to 1967 when George Wallace, a segregationist, launched his second run for the White House. Wallace, who had run as a Democrat in 1964, helped create the party and ran on its ticket.   read more

5,000 College Applicants Told They’ve Been Accepted! …Not.

University at Buffalo spokesman John DellaContrada says the mistaken email was sent Wednesday to students whose applications hadn't been fully reviewed. He says the university sent a second email about three to four hours later notifying the students of the gaffe and apologizing for it. The university posted a statement on its website saying the "miscommunication occurred when an incorrect email list was generated from an applicant database."   read more

Michigan Couple Faces 93 Days in Jail and $500 Fine for Lost Dr. Seuss Library Book

Cathy and Melvin Duren appeared in court on Thursday to each face a misdemeanor charge of failure to return rental property. They lost a Dr. Seuss book their teenage son borrowed for their granddaughter in 2014. In December, the Durens received a letter informing them they could be charged with a crime. "I can't image going to jail over it, but I certainly will fight these charges because I'm not guilty," Cathy Duren said. The couple said they probably will never check out a library book again.   read more

U.S. Presidents from the South More Likely to Use Force in Military Disputes

The authors analyzed the behavior of U.S. presidents during international conflicts from 1816 to 2010 that involved either the threat of force, a show of force, or the use of force. Their analysis shows that when militarized disputes occurred under Southern presidents, they were twice as likely to result in the use of force, lasted on average twice as long, and were three times as likely to result in an American victory.   read more

In a Twist, Activists Try to Stop Industrial Firm from Dropping Lawsuit against Them

Now the tables have turned--ChemRisk is trying to drop the lawsuit. But the writers are saying, not so fast, arguing that ChemRisk should not be allowed simply to withdraw its lawsuit. Instead, they say the company should pay their lawyers, who have represented them on a pro bono basis, and issue an apology for dragging them through years of litigation. “ChemRisk knows that Karen and Cherri will not be intimidated and will prevail if ChemRisk continues the action,” said one of their lawyers.   read more

Hit Broadway Musical May Keep Hamilton on $10 Bill, Dashing Hopes for Female Replacement

Alexander Hamilton has achieved unlikely heights in the lights on Broadway more than 200 years after his untimely death. The first Treasury secretary, in the 18th century, Hamilton has become a 21st-century rap-musical phenomenon, with adults shelling out up to thousands of dollars a ticket and teenagers rapping Hamilton’s life story at the dinner table. Now the fed is leaning toward keeping Hamilton on the $10 note and relegating a vignette of female historical figures on the bill's back side.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1681 News
1 2 3 ... 106 Next

Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1681 News
1 2 3 ... 106 Next

U.S. Government Pays $48 Million to Resettle First American “Climate Change Refugees”

The Isle de Jean Charles resettlement plan is one of the first programs of its kind in the world, a test of how to respond to climate change in the most dramatic circumstances without tearing communities apart. Under the terms of the grant, the island’s residents are to be resettled to drier land and a community that as of now does not exist. “We see this as setting a precedent for the rest of the country, the rest of the world,” said Marion McFadden, who is running the program at the HUD.   read more

Discrimination Continues after Death at Texas “Whites-Only” Cemetery

"Mrs. Barrera, who is Anglo and a U.S. citizen, intended that she and her husband be buried together in the San Domingo Cemetery," the lawsuit states. "In response to her request...Mr. Bradford told Mrs. Barrera 'absolutely not. When Mrs. Barrera asked why 'the board' wanted to exclude her husband's remains from the San Domingo Cemetery, Mr. Bradford responded 'because he's a Mexican,' and that she could 'go up the road and bury him with the niggers and Mexicans."   read more

Senator Says Spying Billboards Are Invasion of Privacy, Wants Investigation

A U.S. senator is calling for a federal investigation into an outdoor advertising company’s latest effort to target billboard ads to specific consumers. Sen. Charles Schumer (D-New York) has dubbed Clear Channel Outdoor Americas’ so-called RADAR program “spying billboards,” warning the service may violate privacy rights by tracking people’s cell phone data via the ad space.   read more

Seattle’s Garbage-Searching Policy Ruled Unconstitutional

Seattle’s warrantless searches of garbage to enforce its recycling law is unconstitutional, a judge ruled. Though Seattle has one of the highest recycling and composting rates in the nation, the city passed a law in September 2014 that fines residents for discarding food or recyclables in their personal garbage bins. Garbage collectors and Seattle Public Utilities inspectors enforced the law by searching garbage cans without suspicion or warrants.   read more

Guided Missiles Missing from Guided Missile Containers Found Floating in Pacific Ocean

Clinton Cook Sr. tells Anchorage television KTUU he was on a boat that found one of the heavy, hard plastic containers. They were going to pass it, but noticed the unusual shape, about 8-feet by 2-feet. Troopers say an explosives ordinance team helped determine the boxes were "void of their original contents."   read more

FBI Approves of their Agents Killing Suspect, But Not of Shooting His Car Tire

The FBI took the unusual step of deeming part of that case a “bad shoot” in agents’ parlance. But the two agents who killed Harrison were not faulted. Instead, only the agent who shot the tire was blamed, recommending that the agent be suspended for a day without pay. The reason was that lethal force force policy forbids firing a gun to disable a vehicle. But the same policy permits firing a gun to protect people from danger, which they applied to Harrison's killing.   read more

Meet the Women Whose Faces Will Grace Your Currency

Isabella Baumfree, a slave born in 1797, changed her name to Sojourner Truth after she walked off an upstate farm in 1826 with her infant daughter. She became a Christian preacher and grew increasingly political in pressing for abolition, women’s suffrage and prison reform. She delivered her most famous address, “Ain’t I a Woman,” in 1851 in Ohio, where she said: “I could work as much and eat as much as a man — when I could get it — and bear the lash as well. And ain’t I a woman?”   read more

Fox News Monthly Election Coverage: 666 Minutes for GOP Candidates, 13 Minutes for Dems

Fueled by Trump fascination, the Republican race in general has gotten more coverage. Fox no doubt believes that its audience, dominated by Republicans, is more interested in the GOP campaign. For example, Sean Hannity's show had no Democratic candidates or surrogates on during the month-long period. A 2012 Pew Research Center study found that 78% of Hannity's audience identified themselves as conservative, and 5% as liberal.   read more

Late Political Party Registrants in New York Found 19th Century Law Stood in Their Way

Thousands of New Yorkers discovered they couldn’t vote in the primaries Tuesday. The reason: Under a New York law dating to the late 1800s, independent voters would have had to register last October in order to cast a vote in the primary. Some Bernie Sanders supporters suggested such rules were a way for party leaders to hamstring insurgents like the Vermont senator. But in fact the rules were originally intended as a strike against the manipulations of party bosses and political machines.   read more

More Adults, Not Minors, Smoking Pot in Colorado since Legalization

While use of the drug did not increase significantly among children, it did jump among adults. Relying on data from the national drug use survey, Colorado reported that nearly a third of Coloradans 18 to 25 in 2014 had used pot in the last 30 days, a rise of about 5 percent from the year before recreational pot was legalized. The survey showed a similar spike in adults over 26. Past 30-day marijuana use went from 7.6 percent in 2012 to 12.4 percent in 2014.   read more

Thousands of Independent-Minded California Voters Mistakenly Registered with Conservative Party Due to Name Confusion

Tens of thousands of people didn't realize they had enrolled in a political party that opposes abortion rights and same sex marriage. The mistake could prevent people from casting votes in the June 7 presidential primary, considered California's most competitive in recent years. The AIP's roots date to 1967 when George Wallace, a segregationist, launched his second run for the White House. Wallace, who had run as a Democrat in 1964, helped create the party and ran on its ticket.   read more

5,000 College Applicants Told They’ve Been Accepted! …Not.

University at Buffalo spokesman John DellaContrada says the mistaken email was sent Wednesday to students whose applications hadn't been fully reviewed. He says the university sent a second email about three to four hours later notifying the students of the gaffe and apologizing for it. The university posted a statement on its website saying the "miscommunication occurred when an incorrect email list was generated from an applicant database."   read more

Michigan Couple Faces 93 Days in Jail and $500 Fine for Lost Dr. Seuss Library Book

Cathy and Melvin Duren appeared in court on Thursday to each face a misdemeanor charge of failure to return rental property. They lost a Dr. Seuss book their teenage son borrowed for their granddaughter in 2014. In December, the Durens received a letter informing them they could be charged with a crime. "I can't image going to jail over it, but I certainly will fight these charges because I'm not guilty," Cathy Duren said. The couple said they probably will never check out a library book again.   read more

U.S. Presidents from the South More Likely to Use Force in Military Disputes

The authors analyzed the behavior of U.S. presidents during international conflicts from 1816 to 2010 that involved either the threat of force, a show of force, or the use of force. Their analysis shows that when militarized disputes occurred under Southern presidents, they were twice as likely to result in the use of force, lasted on average twice as long, and were three times as likely to result in an American victory.   read more

In a Twist, Activists Try to Stop Industrial Firm from Dropping Lawsuit against Them

Now the tables have turned--ChemRisk is trying to drop the lawsuit. But the writers are saying, not so fast, arguing that ChemRisk should not be allowed simply to withdraw its lawsuit. Instead, they say the company should pay their lawyers, who have represented them on a pro bono basis, and issue an apology for dragging them through years of litigation. “ChemRisk knows that Karen and Cherri will not be intimidated and will prevail if ChemRisk continues the action,” said one of their lawyers.   read more

Hit Broadway Musical May Keep Hamilton on $10 Bill, Dashing Hopes for Female Replacement

Alexander Hamilton has achieved unlikely heights in the lights on Broadway more than 200 years after his untimely death. The first Treasury secretary, in the 18th century, Hamilton has become a 21st-century rap-musical phenomenon, with adults shelling out up to thousands of dollars a ticket and teenagers rapping Hamilton’s life story at the dinner table. Now the fed is leaning toward keeping Hamilton on the $10 note and relegating a vignette of female historical figures on the bill's back side.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1681 News
1 2 3 ... 106 Next