Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1261 News
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Richest 2% Create 4 Times as many Greenhouse Gases Per Capita as Poorest 20%

The wealthy, often criticized for hogging too much of the nation’s wealth, also are disproportionate contributors to global warming. A new study from the Center for Global Development says the richest 2% of Americans are responsible for producing four times as much greenhouse gas emissions per person—53.5 metric tons of CO2 a year—as the bottom 20% of the population, which generates about 12.5 metric tons per person.   read more

Wisconsin County Uses Armored Vehicle and 24 Officers to Collect Judgment against “Argumentative” 75-Year-Old

After Roger Hoeppner refused to pay $80,000 to the city and come out of his house after 24 deputies showed up, the department sent in its military surplus vehicle, known as the MARV (Marathon County Response Vehicle). Hoeppner agreed to come out once he saw the MARV, and later paid the money he owed. “People may not always understand why, but an armored vehicle is almost a necessity now,” said Sheriff's Captain Greg Bean.   read more

Is Sherri Ybarra the Weirdest Candidate who Might Actually Get Elected?

Sherri Ybarra isn’t clear on how long she’s been married, figured she’d be able to get a Ph.D. in education in one semester and hasn’t voted in a general election since moving to Idaho 18 years ago. But she has a good chance of being elected the state’s superintendent of schools. Ybarra has also plagiarized material from the website of her competitor and has claimed endorsements from elected officials who are not supporting her.   read more

Chicago Woman Spent 675 Days in Jail for a Street Murder She Couldn’t have Committed…Because She was in Jail that Day

A woman Chicago police detectives accused of killing her son was jailed for almost two years before being freed because a defense attorney learned the defendant had been in prison at the time of her son’s death. Yesenia Santiago was accused by detectives Carlos Cortez and Roger Sandoval of killing her son Ismael Santana in 2007. They questioned her for 11 hours, feeding her information about the crime, then read Santiago her Miranda rights and videotaped her making a “confession.”   read more

Cigarette Giant Bans Smoking at the Office

Reynolds American, maker of Camel, Kool and other cigarettes, has decided to bar the smoking of tobacco products at its corporate headquarters. “We’re well aware that there will be folks who see this as an irony, but we believe it’s the right thing to do and the right time to do it,” said a Reynolds spokesman. The firm has put a big marketing effort behind its electronic cigarettes, and those have been excluded from the smoking ban.   read more

California County Tried to Seize Marijuana Plants without Warrant because Growing them Wasted Water

Officials insisted the plants had to go in order to help preserve water supplies, and the situation was so dire police need not obtain a court order first. Judge Thelton Henderson wrote: “The need to reduce water use, even during a drought, falls below the level of urgency associated with emergencies justifying a warrantless search in existing case law. The county’s inexperience in obtaining warrants...does not excuse the requirements of the [U.S.] Constitution."   read more

The 25-Year-Old Unsolved Kidnapping that Led to a Significant Increase in the Recovery of Missing Children

In 1989, 11-year-old Jacob Wetterling was abducted in St. Joseph, Minnesota. His parents, Jerry and Patty Wetterling have dedicated themselves to not only finding their lost child, but also helping other parents see their children come home safely. While Patty Wetterling has “helped change the landscape of missing children, from sex offender registries to police training,” the rate of missing children found has increased significantly—from 62% in 1990 to 97% today   read more

Tennessee Woman Jailed for Having Overgrown Lawn

Karen Holloway of Lenoir City had been cited by the city for the heinous crime of not pruning her bushes or mowing her lawn. When the yard wasn’t cleaned up, she had to appear in court with no lawyer. She asked the judge, Terry Vann, if she could perform five days of community service to avoid spending time “with child molesters, and people who’ve done real crimes.” Vann insisted she spend time in jail, but did reduce the sentence to six hours.   read more

Sex Offenders Run for Office in Minnesota

The Moose Lake Sex Offender Treatment Program (MSOP) is for sex offenders who have completed their criminal sentences, but are deemed too dangerous to live without supervision. So they’re confined to the Moose Lake facility and are restrained by handcuffs and leg irons during any trips to the outside world, such as to a doctor. The program’s residents would like to change the conditions under which they’re held. So they’re registering to vote.   read more

Turning Guns and Bullets into Jewelry

The Cook County department seizes about 1,500 guns per year. The weapons usually come from drug houses, or are found during the serving of evictions. Typically the guns are taken to an incineration facility for destruction. The newly created jewelry is sold by Liberty for prices ranging from $35 to $1,600. From 20% to 25% of the profits from those sales will go to Children’s Home + Aid, a nonprofit working to stem violence in Chicago neighborhoods.   read more

Small Texas Fracking Company Earns Title of Worst Energy Sector Polluter

It’s not Chevron, ExxonMobil or Shell whose wells were found to leak the most methane in 2012. Instead it was a small company, Halcón Resources, which won the title for allowing the highest percentage of the gas to escape into the atmosphere. Halcón’s wells sent 6.5 metric tons of methane into the air for each million cubic feet of natural gas produced at its fracking wells in 2012. Second and third on the list were two other small producers, Bill Barrett Corp., and Unit Corp.   read more

See-Through Envelope Window Revealing Account Number Leads to Lawsuit

Convergent Outsourcing, collecting a debt allegedly owed to T-Mobile by Courtney Douglass, sent Douglass a collection letter. Such letters are regulated by the FDCPA, which states that the outside of the envelope can contain only the address of the collector. However, Convergent used an envelope with a glassine window which revealed Douglass’ account number and a symbol that could reveal how much money Douglass allegedly owed. Douglass sued, claiming the disclosure violated the FDCPA.   read more

Supreme Court Justices Ginsburg and Scalia in Rare Dissent Agreement

They are the legal equivalent of the Odd Couple on the U.S. Supreme Court: Liberal Ruth Bader Ginsburg and conservative Antonin Scalia. Rarely do these justices agree on much, but recently they found themselves on the same side in criticizing a decision by the court’s majority. Scalia and Ginsburg were joined by Justice Clarence Thomas in their dissent.   read more

Atheist Jailed for Refusing 12-Step Program Wins $2 Million Settlement

After a year in prison on a drug possession charge, Barry Hazle Jr. was ordered into a 12-step program run by Westcare. The program included references to a “higher power” and God. Hazle requested another program, but was told there were none. A federal judge ruled that Hazle’s civil rights were violated by making him attend a program that conflicted with his beliefs. He will receive $1 million from the state and $925,000 from Westcare.   read more

Political Campaigns find that Online Advertising Space—Just Like TV and Print—has Its Limits

There’s only so much of the best of anything and Internet advertising is no different, particularly for election campaigns. Election strategists around the country have been planning to use online ads as well as television in their campaigns. But in some markets, only campaign managers who thought ahead will be able to run their commercials without interruption on sites like YouTube. That’s because the most sought-after ads are limited in number.   read more

Privacy Expectations are Focus of Unusual Cell Phone “Pocket Dial” Eavesdropping Case

If a person accidentally calls someone from their cell phone, do they have a right to privacy protecting any conversation heard on the other end? The courts don’t think so. One man's pocketed phone made a call to a woman who listened in on his private conversation for 90 minutes. She passed what she heard to a third party. The man claimed violation of privacy and the case went to court, where justices so far haven't been sympathetic.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1261 News
1 2 3 ... 79 Next

Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1261 News
1 2 3 ... 79 Next

Richest 2% Create 4 Times as many Greenhouse Gases Per Capita as Poorest 20%

The wealthy, often criticized for hogging too much of the nation’s wealth, also are disproportionate contributors to global warming. A new study from the Center for Global Development says the richest 2% of Americans are responsible for producing four times as much greenhouse gas emissions per person—53.5 metric tons of CO2 a year—as the bottom 20% of the population, which generates about 12.5 metric tons per person.   read more

Wisconsin County Uses Armored Vehicle and 24 Officers to Collect Judgment against “Argumentative” 75-Year-Old

After Roger Hoeppner refused to pay $80,000 to the city and come out of his house after 24 deputies showed up, the department sent in its military surplus vehicle, known as the MARV (Marathon County Response Vehicle). Hoeppner agreed to come out once he saw the MARV, and later paid the money he owed. “People may not always understand why, but an armored vehicle is almost a necessity now,” said Sheriff's Captain Greg Bean.   read more

Is Sherri Ybarra the Weirdest Candidate who Might Actually Get Elected?

Sherri Ybarra isn’t clear on how long she’s been married, figured she’d be able to get a Ph.D. in education in one semester and hasn’t voted in a general election since moving to Idaho 18 years ago. But she has a good chance of being elected the state’s superintendent of schools. Ybarra has also plagiarized material from the website of her competitor and has claimed endorsements from elected officials who are not supporting her.   read more

Chicago Woman Spent 675 Days in Jail for a Street Murder She Couldn’t have Committed…Because She was in Jail that Day

A woman Chicago police detectives accused of killing her son was jailed for almost two years before being freed because a defense attorney learned the defendant had been in prison at the time of her son’s death. Yesenia Santiago was accused by detectives Carlos Cortez and Roger Sandoval of killing her son Ismael Santana in 2007. They questioned her for 11 hours, feeding her information about the crime, then read Santiago her Miranda rights and videotaped her making a “confession.”   read more

Cigarette Giant Bans Smoking at the Office

Reynolds American, maker of Camel, Kool and other cigarettes, has decided to bar the smoking of tobacco products at its corporate headquarters. “We’re well aware that there will be folks who see this as an irony, but we believe it’s the right thing to do and the right time to do it,” said a Reynolds spokesman. The firm has put a big marketing effort behind its electronic cigarettes, and those have been excluded from the smoking ban.   read more

California County Tried to Seize Marijuana Plants without Warrant because Growing them Wasted Water

Officials insisted the plants had to go in order to help preserve water supplies, and the situation was so dire police need not obtain a court order first. Judge Thelton Henderson wrote: “The need to reduce water use, even during a drought, falls below the level of urgency associated with emergencies justifying a warrantless search in existing case law. The county’s inexperience in obtaining warrants...does not excuse the requirements of the [U.S.] Constitution."   read more

The 25-Year-Old Unsolved Kidnapping that Led to a Significant Increase in the Recovery of Missing Children

In 1989, 11-year-old Jacob Wetterling was abducted in St. Joseph, Minnesota. His parents, Jerry and Patty Wetterling have dedicated themselves to not only finding their lost child, but also helping other parents see their children come home safely. While Patty Wetterling has “helped change the landscape of missing children, from sex offender registries to police training,” the rate of missing children found has increased significantly—from 62% in 1990 to 97% today   read more

Tennessee Woman Jailed for Having Overgrown Lawn

Karen Holloway of Lenoir City had been cited by the city for the heinous crime of not pruning her bushes or mowing her lawn. When the yard wasn’t cleaned up, she had to appear in court with no lawyer. She asked the judge, Terry Vann, if she could perform five days of community service to avoid spending time “with child molesters, and people who’ve done real crimes.” Vann insisted she spend time in jail, but did reduce the sentence to six hours.   read more

Sex Offenders Run for Office in Minnesota

The Moose Lake Sex Offender Treatment Program (MSOP) is for sex offenders who have completed their criminal sentences, but are deemed too dangerous to live without supervision. So they’re confined to the Moose Lake facility and are restrained by handcuffs and leg irons during any trips to the outside world, such as to a doctor. The program’s residents would like to change the conditions under which they’re held. So they’re registering to vote.   read more

Turning Guns and Bullets into Jewelry

The Cook County department seizes about 1,500 guns per year. The weapons usually come from drug houses, or are found during the serving of evictions. Typically the guns are taken to an incineration facility for destruction. The newly created jewelry is sold by Liberty for prices ranging from $35 to $1,600. From 20% to 25% of the profits from those sales will go to Children’s Home + Aid, a nonprofit working to stem violence in Chicago neighborhoods.   read more

Small Texas Fracking Company Earns Title of Worst Energy Sector Polluter

It’s not Chevron, ExxonMobil or Shell whose wells were found to leak the most methane in 2012. Instead it was a small company, Halcón Resources, which won the title for allowing the highest percentage of the gas to escape into the atmosphere. Halcón’s wells sent 6.5 metric tons of methane into the air for each million cubic feet of natural gas produced at its fracking wells in 2012. Second and third on the list were two other small producers, Bill Barrett Corp., and Unit Corp.   read more

See-Through Envelope Window Revealing Account Number Leads to Lawsuit

Convergent Outsourcing, collecting a debt allegedly owed to T-Mobile by Courtney Douglass, sent Douglass a collection letter. Such letters are regulated by the FDCPA, which states that the outside of the envelope can contain only the address of the collector. However, Convergent used an envelope with a glassine window which revealed Douglass’ account number and a symbol that could reveal how much money Douglass allegedly owed. Douglass sued, claiming the disclosure violated the FDCPA.   read more

Supreme Court Justices Ginsburg and Scalia in Rare Dissent Agreement

They are the legal equivalent of the Odd Couple on the U.S. Supreme Court: Liberal Ruth Bader Ginsburg and conservative Antonin Scalia. Rarely do these justices agree on much, but recently they found themselves on the same side in criticizing a decision by the court’s majority. Scalia and Ginsburg were joined by Justice Clarence Thomas in their dissent.   read more

Atheist Jailed for Refusing 12-Step Program Wins $2 Million Settlement

After a year in prison on a drug possession charge, Barry Hazle Jr. was ordered into a 12-step program run by Westcare. The program included references to a “higher power” and God. Hazle requested another program, but was told there were none. A federal judge ruled that Hazle’s civil rights were violated by making him attend a program that conflicted with his beliefs. He will receive $1 million from the state and $925,000 from Westcare.   read more

Political Campaigns find that Online Advertising Space—Just Like TV and Print—has Its Limits

There’s only so much of the best of anything and Internet advertising is no different, particularly for election campaigns. Election strategists around the country have been planning to use online ads as well as television in their campaigns. But in some markets, only campaign managers who thought ahead will be able to run their commercials without interruption on sites like YouTube. That’s because the most sought-after ads are limited in number.   read more

Privacy Expectations are Focus of Unusual Cell Phone “Pocket Dial” Eavesdropping Case

If a person accidentally calls someone from their cell phone, do they have a right to privacy protecting any conversation heard on the other end? The courts don’t think so. One man's pocketed phone made a call to a woman who listened in on his private conversation for 90 minutes. She passed what she heard to a third party. The man claimed violation of privacy and the case went to court, where justices so far haven't been sympathetic.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1261 News
1 2 3 ... 79 Next