Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1764 News
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U.S. May Add Speed-Capping Device to Trucks and Buses to Forcibly Slow Them Down

Regulators are considering a cap of 60, 65 or 68 mph. Whatever the speed limit, drivers would be physically prevented from exceeding it. The government said capping speeds for new large vehicles will reduce the 1,115 fatal crashes involving heavy trucks that occur each year and save $1 billion in fuel costs. While the news is welcomed by some safety advocates, many truckers said such changes could lead to dangerous scenarios where they are traveling at much lower speeds than everyone else.   read more

Republican Senator Says College Professors Could Be Replaced by Videos

U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson has an idea for making colleges cheaper — ditch the instructors and start playing online videos for students. "Why do you have to keep paying different lecturers to teach the same course? You get one solid lecturer and put it up online," Johnson said.   read more

Increase in Jailing of Women in U.S. Far Exceeds that of Men

The study found that a vast majority of the women are poor, African-American or Latino, and have drug or alcohol problems. About 80% have children. Most have been charged with low-level offenses, including drug or property crimes like shoplifting, but many are in jail for violating parole or for failed drug tests “Once a rarity, women are now held in jails in nearly every county — a stark contrast to 1970, when almost three-quarters of counties held not a single woman in jail,” the report said.   read more

Rising Funeral Costs Lead to Surge in Body Donations to U.S. Medical Schools

The increase has been a boon to medical students and researchers, who dissect cadavers in anatomy class or use them to practice surgical techniques or test new devices and procedures. "Not too long ago, it was taboo. Now we have thousands of registered donors," said Mark Zavoyna. "Funerals are expensive. That certainly has something to do with it. Of course, it almost has this snowball effect, where you get five people to donate, and then their families tell another 25 people."   read more

New Federal Rules Require 25% Reduction in Carbon Emissions from Heavy-Duty Trucks

Administration officials said the new rules would cut 1.1 billion metric tons of carbon emissions through 2027 and represent a global benchmark for reducing vehicle-exhaust pollutants linked to climate change. The carbon-reduction target is 10% more than when the rules were proposed last year. The trucking industry will save $170 billion in fuel costs through 2027 and reduce petroleum consumption by 2 billion barrels. “We are way out ahead of any other country,” said EPA chief Gina McCarthy.   read more

Maryland to Consider Wide Spectrum of Ailments and Health Practitioners in New Medical Marijuana Program

Medical marijuana will be available for any condition that is severe in which other medical treatments have been ineffective. Patients with a chronic medical condition that causes severe appetite loss, chronic pain, severe nausea, seizures or severe muscle spasms can have access, as well as people with PTSD. Further, Maryland will allow not only physicians but nurse practitioners, dentists, podiatrists and nurse midwives to certify patients as eligible to receive marijuana.   read more

Monkey Should Own Copyright to His Selfie, Argues Primate Expert in Case Appeal

Fuentes said Naruto "likely made the connection between manipulation of the camera as an item and the sound of the shutter and changing image in the lens as the shutter clicked." Although Naruto may not understand the concept of a photo, Fuentes said, the monkey intentionally engaged with the camera by observing human behavior and then using the device while making funny faces, clicking the shutter button and responding to camera noises.   read more

Computer Glitch Wrongly Portrayed Kansas Family Homestead as Mecca of Criminal Activity for 5 Years

They "were repeatedly awakened from their sleep or disturbed from their daily activities by local, state or federal officials looking for a runaway child or a missing person, or evidence of a computer fraud, or call of an attempted suicide," the family said. Police got "reports about fraud, scams, stolen accounts, missing persons and stolen vehicles all related to the residence." After five years of this digitally inspired hell, reporter Kashmir Hill figured it out...   read more

U.S. Mortality Rate Declines after Unusual 2015 Jump

The new data came as a relief to researchers, who had been taken aback by a rise in the nation’s death rate in 2015, an event that has happened only a few times in the past 25 years. It was propelled in part by an increase in mortality from drug overdoses. A flattening of the mortality rate from heart disease meant that rises in the death rate from drugs were no longer being offset. Last year was the first time since 1993 that the death rate from heart disease did not decline.   read more

Denver Police to Collect Racial Information at Traffic Stops for Racial Profiling Study

Denver police will begin collecting racial information about the people they contact following recent protests and complaints about a lack of accountability. Chief White said it's difficult to determine if racial profiling is an issue without the facts. "Officers need to know and citizens need to know how everyone's actions are going to be held accountable," he said. Community activists rejected claims by authorities it would be too time-consuming to collect information on traffic stops.   read more

Criminal Defendants Consistently Get Poor Representation before U.S. Supreme Court

Why are there so few expert lawyers arguing on behalf of criminal defendants? Justice Sotomayor said that the main factor is vanity: Many criminal defense lawyers are too reluctant to cede the glamour of Supreme Court arguments to specialists. “I think it’s malpractice for any lawyer who thinks, ‘This is my one shot before the Supreme Court, and I have to take it,'” she said. Also tilting the playing field against criminal defendants: The Supreme Court itself is dominated by former prosecutors.   read more

Local Power Companies Stepping Up to Bring Internet Service to Rural America

Now high-speed internet is finally reaching these remote places, but not through the telecom and cable companies. Instead, local power companies are more often the broadband suppliers — and to bring the service, they are borrowing techniques and infrastructure used to electrify the U.S. nearly a century ago. In some cases, rural municipalities are also using electrification laws from the early 1900s to obtain funds and regulatory permissions reserved for utilities.   read more

“Scary” Lucille Ball Statue that Tormented Her Hometown Gets Makeover by New Sculptor

What could be scarier than a statue of Lucille Ball that was so hated it was dubbed "Scary Lucy"? Being the sculptor hired to replace it. "It was completely intimidating," said Carolyn Palmer, whose new Lucy is to be unveiled today in the actress's hometown. Dave Poulin's 2009 version was heavily panned for looking nothing like the comic actress. Poulin said he ended up receiving hundreds of angry emails and even death threats for his piece, blasted by critics for its zombie-like face.   read more

Move Over Millennials. The Hottest Market for Startup Companies is … Baby Boomers.

With an estimated 74.9 million baby boomers, the biggest market opportunity for startups is older Americans rather than hip millennials. As members of the generation that defined rock ‘n’ roll grow older, they are adding a wide range of goods and services to their lifestyles. New business ideas that cater to boomers are nearly endless, and include chefs, online dating sites and yoga instructors for people with health issues.   read more

Pocket-Size U.S. Constitution Becomes Bestseller after Muslim-American Offers to Loan His Copy to Trump

The Constitution emerged as a best-seller after Muslim-American lawyer Khizr Khan flashed a pocket Constitution and offered to lend it to Trump at the Democratic Convention. “Have you even read the Constitution?” he asked Trump. To rapturous cheers, Khan fiercely attacked the billionaire businessman. Trump, Khan argued, was imperiling America's ideals with his smears of Muslims, women, judges and other groups. He urged Muslims, immigrants and all patriots "to not take this election lightly."   read more

Much Hated, Giant “Freak” Fish, Targeted for Extermination, is Now Valued Weapon against Carp

It's a toothy giant that can grow longer than a horse and heavier than a refrigerator, a fearsome-looking prehistoric fish. To many, it was a freak, a "trash fish" that threatened sportfish, something to be exterminated. But the once-reviled predator is now being seen as a valuable fish in its own right, and as a potentially potent weapon against a more threatening intruder: the invasive Asian carp. Efforts are now underway to reintroduce the alligator gar from Illinois to Tennessee.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1764 News
1 2 3 ... 111 Next

Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1764 News
1 2 3 ... 111 Next

U.S. May Add Speed-Capping Device to Trucks and Buses to Forcibly Slow Them Down

Regulators are considering a cap of 60, 65 or 68 mph. Whatever the speed limit, drivers would be physically prevented from exceeding it. The government said capping speeds for new large vehicles will reduce the 1,115 fatal crashes involving heavy trucks that occur each year and save $1 billion in fuel costs. While the news is welcomed by some safety advocates, many truckers said such changes could lead to dangerous scenarios where they are traveling at much lower speeds than everyone else.   read more

Republican Senator Says College Professors Could Be Replaced by Videos

U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson has an idea for making colleges cheaper — ditch the instructors and start playing online videos for students. "Why do you have to keep paying different lecturers to teach the same course? You get one solid lecturer and put it up online," Johnson said.   read more

Increase in Jailing of Women in U.S. Far Exceeds that of Men

The study found that a vast majority of the women are poor, African-American or Latino, and have drug or alcohol problems. About 80% have children. Most have been charged with low-level offenses, including drug or property crimes like shoplifting, but many are in jail for violating parole or for failed drug tests “Once a rarity, women are now held in jails in nearly every county — a stark contrast to 1970, when almost three-quarters of counties held not a single woman in jail,” the report said.   read more

Rising Funeral Costs Lead to Surge in Body Donations to U.S. Medical Schools

The increase has been a boon to medical students and researchers, who dissect cadavers in anatomy class or use them to practice surgical techniques or test new devices and procedures. "Not too long ago, it was taboo. Now we have thousands of registered donors," said Mark Zavoyna. "Funerals are expensive. That certainly has something to do with it. Of course, it almost has this snowball effect, where you get five people to donate, and then their families tell another 25 people."   read more

New Federal Rules Require 25% Reduction in Carbon Emissions from Heavy-Duty Trucks

Administration officials said the new rules would cut 1.1 billion metric tons of carbon emissions through 2027 and represent a global benchmark for reducing vehicle-exhaust pollutants linked to climate change. The carbon-reduction target is 10% more than when the rules were proposed last year. The trucking industry will save $170 billion in fuel costs through 2027 and reduce petroleum consumption by 2 billion barrels. “We are way out ahead of any other country,” said EPA chief Gina McCarthy.   read more

Maryland to Consider Wide Spectrum of Ailments and Health Practitioners in New Medical Marijuana Program

Medical marijuana will be available for any condition that is severe in which other medical treatments have been ineffective. Patients with a chronic medical condition that causes severe appetite loss, chronic pain, severe nausea, seizures or severe muscle spasms can have access, as well as people with PTSD. Further, Maryland will allow not only physicians but nurse practitioners, dentists, podiatrists and nurse midwives to certify patients as eligible to receive marijuana.   read more

Monkey Should Own Copyright to His Selfie, Argues Primate Expert in Case Appeal

Fuentes said Naruto "likely made the connection between manipulation of the camera as an item and the sound of the shutter and changing image in the lens as the shutter clicked." Although Naruto may not understand the concept of a photo, Fuentes said, the monkey intentionally engaged with the camera by observing human behavior and then using the device while making funny faces, clicking the shutter button and responding to camera noises.   read more

Computer Glitch Wrongly Portrayed Kansas Family Homestead as Mecca of Criminal Activity for 5 Years

They "were repeatedly awakened from their sleep or disturbed from their daily activities by local, state or federal officials looking for a runaway child or a missing person, or evidence of a computer fraud, or call of an attempted suicide," the family said. Police got "reports about fraud, scams, stolen accounts, missing persons and stolen vehicles all related to the residence." After five years of this digitally inspired hell, reporter Kashmir Hill figured it out...   read more

U.S. Mortality Rate Declines after Unusual 2015 Jump

The new data came as a relief to researchers, who had been taken aback by a rise in the nation’s death rate in 2015, an event that has happened only a few times in the past 25 years. It was propelled in part by an increase in mortality from drug overdoses. A flattening of the mortality rate from heart disease meant that rises in the death rate from drugs were no longer being offset. Last year was the first time since 1993 that the death rate from heart disease did not decline.   read more

Denver Police to Collect Racial Information at Traffic Stops for Racial Profiling Study

Denver police will begin collecting racial information about the people they contact following recent protests and complaints about a lack of accountability. Chief White said it's difficult to determine if racial profiling is an issue without the facts. "Officers need to know and citizens need to know how everyone's actions are going to be held accountable," he said. Community activists rejected claims by authorities it would be too time-consuming to collect information on traffic stops.   read more

Criminal Defendants Consistently Get Poor Representation before U.S. Supreme Court

Why are there so few expert lawyers arguing on behalf of criminal defendants? Justice Sotomayor said that the main factor is vanity: Many criminal defense lawyers are too reluctant to cede the glamour of Supreme Court arguments to specialists. “I think it’s malpractice for any lawyer who thinks, ‘This is my one shot before the Supreme Court, and I have to take it,'” she said. Also tilting the playing field against criminal defendants: The Supreme Court itself is dominated by former prosecutors.   read more

Local Power Companies Stepping Up to Bring Internet Service to Rural America

Now high-speed internet is finally reaching these remote places, but not through the telecom and cable companies. Instead, local power companies are more often the broadband suppliers — and to bring the service, they are borrowing techniques and infrastructure used to electrify the U.S. nearly a century ago. In some cases, rural municipalities are also using electrification laws from the early 1900s to obtain funds and regulatory permissions reserved for utilities.   read more

“Scary” Lucille Ball Statue that Tormented Her Hometown Gets Makeover by New Sculptor

What could be scarier than a statue of Lucille Ball that was so hated it was dubbed "Scary Lucy"? Being the sculptor hired to replace it. "It was completely intimidating," said Carolyn Palmer, whose new Lucy is to be unveiled today in the actress's hometown. Dave Poulin's 2009 version was heavily panned for looking nothing like the comic actress. Poulin said he ended up receiving hundreds of angry emails and even death threats for his piece, blasted by critics for its zombie-like face.   read more

Move Over Millennials. The Hottest Market for Startup Companies is … Baby Boomers.

With an estimated 74.9 million baby boomers, the biggest market opportunity for startups is older Americans rather than hip millennials. As members of the generation that defined rock ‘n’ roll grow older, they are adding a wide range of goods and services to their lifestyles. New business ideas that cater to boomers are nearly endless, and include chefs, online dating sites and yoga instructors for people with health issues.   read more

Pocket-Size U.S. Constitution Becomes Bestseller after Muslim-American Offers to Loan His Copy to Trump

The Constitution emerged as a best-seller after Muslim-American lawyer Khizr Khan flashed a pocket Constitution and offered to lend it to Trump at the Democratic Convention. “Have you even read the Constitution?” he asked Trump. To rapturous cheers, Khan fiercely attacked the billionaire businessman. Trump, Khan argued, was imperiling America's ideals with his smears of Muslims, women, judges and other groups. He urged Muslims, immigrants and all patriots "to not take this election lightly."   read more

Much Hated, Giant “Freak” Fish, Targeted for Extermination, is Now Valued Weapon against Carp

It's a toothy giant that can grow longer than a horse and heavier than a refrigerator, a fearsome-looking prehistoric fish. To many, it was a freak, a "trash fish" that threatened sportfish, something to be exterminated. But the once-reviled predator is now being seen as a valuable fish in its own right, and as a potentially potent weapon against a more threatening intruder: the invasive Asian carp. Efforts are now underway to reintroduce the alligator gar from Illinois to Tennessee.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1764 News
1 2 3 ... 111 Next