Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1227 News
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Can You be Charged with Murdering Someone You Didn’t Kill?

After Roach failed to comply with an order to lie down on the ground, Sanguino fired nine times at Roach, who had allegedly discharged his handgun inside the bar. Roach’s gun, however, was not loaded, police later determined. Five of Sanguino’s shots hit Roach, who was hospitalized and is expected to survive. But one of the officer’s bullets struck bystander Maria Fernanda Godinez Castillo, killing the 22-year-old university student.   read more

Appeals Court Rules Native American Skeletons Unearthed 38 Years Ago must be Returned to Tribes

The remains were discovered in 1976 at the Chancellor’s House at the University of California, San Diego by a university excavation team. UC San Diego had dragged its feet on giving up the remains, questioning which Native American group was the rightful owner. However, the university in 2012 agreed to return the remains to the Kumeyaay. But a lawsuit filed against the university by three scientists who wished to study the skeletons halted the repatriation.   read more

Federal Court Overturns Amish Hair and Beard Cutting Convictions

Samuel Mullet, leader of an Amish group in Berholz, was sentenced to 15 years in prison for violating federal anti-hate crimes law when he ordered the forced cutting of men’s beards and a woman’s long hair. Hair and beard cuttings are considered degrading and insulting in the Amish world, where being unshorn is a sign of holiness. But the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals threw out the hate crime convictions, saying the trial judge erred when instructing the jury on the definition of a hate crime.   read more

Latest in 3-D Printing: High-Quality Skeleton Keys

Duplicate keys that open high-security locks can now be made by anyone, thanks to 3-D printers. And they can do so without even having the original key to work from, according to Wired’s Andy Greenberg. With just photographs of keyholes on hand, experts can create “bump” keys that can open “millions of locks with a carefully practiced rap on its head with a hammer,” Greenberg reports.   read more

American Academy of Pediatrics Suggests School Should Start Later

The American Academy of Pediatrics says in a new paper that middle schools and high schools should push back start times to 8:30 a.m. or later so students can get more rest. Opponents of later school start times cite their effect on after-school employment, athletics and other extracurricular activities.   read more

Chicago Cubs’ Attempt to Avoid Obamacare Leads Giants to Gain First Major League Baseball Protest Victory in 28 Years

The Ricketts family, whose net worth is more than $1 billion, owns the Cubs, the most profitable team in baseball. Not profitable enough for the Ricketts, apparently. The family doesn’t want to pay for healthcare for all its employees, so they cut the hours of stadium personnel, including grounds crew, according to Gordon Wittenmyer of the Chicago Sun-Times. On the day of the rainout, upper management had sent home 10 members of the grounds crew without consulting the on-field supervisors.   read more

After Serving in the Navy for 12 Years, Sailor Booted for Refusing to Cut her Hair

A 12-year veteran has decided she’d rather leave the Navy than cut her hair or wear a wig as demanded by a new supervisor. Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Jessica Sims was by all accounts an exemplary sailor. She had been an instructor at Navy medical schools for the last several years and had kept her hair in natural locks with a bun for most of that time, as did other African-American female sailors at her duty stations.   read more

State Dept. Forbids Diplomats from Pouring Ice on their Heads

One ambassador snuck in under the wire before the State Department made its decision. Daniel Shapiro, the U.S. envoy to Israel, took the challenge and was drenched. He then challenged U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power, but she didn’t get a chance to participate before State sent its cable to U.S. missions. As of August 22, more than $53 million had been donated toward ALS research as a result of the Ice Bucket Challenge, according to the ALS Association.   read more

Los Angeles Considers Giving Citizens Lottery Tickets if they Vote

With as few as 8% of registered voters showing up to vote in some recent elections, the Los Angeles Ethics Commission has urged the City Council to consider improving turnout with a lottery pilot program. No actual vote would be required, but those participating would have to show up at the polls to participate. There was no decision on what the grand prize for participating in the democratic process.   read more

Legal Battle over Wording of Soda Tax Ballot Measure in Berkeley

A suit (pdf) was filed last week by two men, at least one of whom has ties to the No Berkeley Beverage Tax campaign, which receives funding from the American Beverage Association. It claims that the city substituted the phrase “high-calorie, sugary drinks” for “sugar-sweetened beverage” in the ballot language. The plaintiffs, Anthony Johnson and Leon Cain, would prefer the phrase “sugar-sweetened beverage products” to be used.   read more

98-Year-Old Seeks Exoneration for Espionage Conviction 64 Years Ago

Neither Moskowitz nor Brothman testified in their own defense because they didn’t want their affair to become known. Nevertheless, she was convicted in 1950 and served two years in prison. Moskowitz also had to pay a $10,000 fine (equal to nearly $100,000 today), and, after being released, she struggled to put her life back together with such a black mark against her during the Cold War.   read more

Facial Recognition Technology Leads to Capture of Child Sex Offender on the Run for 14 Years

an official with the Diplomatic Security Service (DSS), which provides protection for American diplomats and works to maintain the integrity of U.S. travel documents, decided to test new facial recognition software created to detect passport fraud. The DSS official happened to use an FBI wanted poster containing Stammer’s image for his experiment and found that it matched the photo of an American in Nepal going by the name of Kevin Hodges.   read more

Nevada Wildlife Dept. Saves Thousands of Fish from Drought…by Hand

Nevada Department of Wildlife personnel are gathering fish from ditches usually fed by the Truckee River near Reno to a hydroelectric generating station. Because of the drought, water is not being diverted into the ditches, which would normally result in a fishkill. But last week about 25 people waded into the ditches, electrically stunning then gathering fish to be transplanted back to the Truckee or into a nearby pond.   read more

Voter Impersonation: 31 Possible Cases out of 1 Billion Ballots Cast

Levitt’s research discovered only 31 instances of voter impersonation out of more than one billion ballots cast in general, primary, special, and municipal elections from 2000 through 2014. "The factor that really influences whether people think the elections are fair? Whether their preferred candidates win,” Levitt wrote.   read more

Pennsylvania Government Shuts Down Seed Library as Potential Source of Terrorism

The chair of the Cumberland County Board of Commissioners, Barbara Cross, said the move made sense because of the potential threat seed borrowing posed. “Agri-terrorism is a very, very real scenario,” she told the local newspaper. “Protecting and maintaining the food sources of America is an overwhelming challenge... so you’ve got agri-tourism on one side and agri-terrorism on the other.”   read more

California Inmates Paid $2 a Day to Fight Wildfires

With wildfire season here, California taxpayers will be glad to know that they’ve got a hard-working corps of firefighters they can call on day or night, who don’t take vacations and work cheap. Really cheap. California employs about 4,000 inmate firefighters. They’re “low-level” offenders who earn $2 a day in canteen credits, as well as two days off their sentences for each day they spend at fire camps.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1227 News
1 2 3 ... 77 Next

Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1227 News
1 2 3 ... 77 Next

Can You be Charged with Murdering Someone You Didn’t Kill?

After Roach failed to comply with an order to lie down on the ground, Sanguino fired nine times at Roach, who had allegedly discharged his handgun inside the bar. Roach’s gun, however, was not loaded, police later determined. Five of Sanguino’s shots hit Roach, who was hospitalized and is expected to survive. But one of the officer’s bullets struck bystander Maria Fernanda Godinez Castillo, killing the 22-year-old university student.   read more

Appeals Court Rules Native American Skeletons Unearthed 38 Years Ago must be Returned to Tribes

The remains were discovered in 1976 at the Chancellor’s House at the University of California, San Diego by a university excavation team. UC San Diego had dragged its feet on giving up the remains, questioning which Native American group was the rightful owner. However, the university in 2012 agreed to return the remains to the Kumeyaay. But a lawsuit filed against the university by three scientists who wished to study the skeletons halted the repatriation.   read more

Federal Court Overturns Amish Hair and Beard Cutting Convictions

Samuel Mullet, leader of an Amish group in Berholz, was sentenced to 15 years in prison for violating federal anti-hate crimes law when he ordered the forced cutting of men’s beards and a woman’s long hair. Hair and beard cuttings are considered degrading and insulting in the Amish world, where being unshorn is a sign of holiness. But the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals threw out the hate crime convictions, saying the trial judge erred when instructing the jury on the definition of a hate crime.   read more

Latest in 3-D Printing: High-Quality Skeleton Keys

Duplicate keys that open high-security locks can now be made by anyone, thanks to 3-D printers. And they can do so without even having the original key to work from, according to Wired’s Andy Greenberg. With just photographs of keyholes on hand, experts can create “bump” keys that can open “millions of locks with a carefully practiced rap on its head with a hammer,” Greenberg reports.   read more

American Academy of Pediatrics Suggests School Should Start Later

The American Academy of Pediatrics says in a new paper that middle schools and high schools should push back start times to 8:30 a.m. or later so students can get more rest. Opponents of later school start times cite their effect on after-school employment, athletics and other extracurricular activities.   read more

Chicago Cubs’ Attempt to Avoid Obamacare Leads Giants to Gain First Major League Baseball Protest Victory in 28 Years

The Ricketts family, whose net worth is more than $1 billion, owns the Cubs, the most profitable team in baseball. Not profitable enough for the Ricketts, apparently. The family doesn’t want to pay for healthcare for all its employees, so they cut the hours of stadium personnel, including grounds crew, according to Gordon Wittenmyer of the Chicago Sun-Times. On the day of the rainout, upper management had sent home 10 members of the grounds crew without consulting the on-field supervisors.   read more

After Serving in the Navy for 12 Years, Sailor Booted for Refusing to Cut her Hair

A 12-year veteran has decided she’d rather leave the Navy than cut her hair or wear a wig as demanded by a new supervisor. Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Jessica Sims was by all accounts an exemplary sailor. She had been an instructor at Navy medical schools for the last several years and had kept her hair in natural locks with a bun for most of that time, as did other African-American female sailors at her duty stations.   read more

State Dept. Forbids Diplomats from Pouring Ice on their Heads

One ambassador snuck in under the wire before the State Department made its decision. Daniel Shapiro, the U.S. envoy to Israel, took the challenge and was drenched. He then challenged U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power, but she didn’t get a chance to participate before State sent its cable to U.S. missions. As of August 22, more than $53 million had been donated toward ALS research as a result of the Ice Bucket Challenge, according to the ALS Association.   read more

Los Angeles Considers Giving Citizens Lottery Tickets if they Vote

With as few as 8% of registered voters showing up to vote in some recent elections, the Los Angeles Ethics Commission has urged the City Council to consider improving turnout with a lottery pilot program. No actual vote would be required, but those participating would have to show up at the polls to participate. There was no decision on what the grand prize for participating in the democratic process.   read more

Legal Battle over Wording of Soda Tax Ballot Measure in Berkeley

A suit (pdf) was filed last week by two men, at least one of whom has ties to the No Berkeley Beverage Tax campaign, which receives funding from the American Beverage Association. It claims that the city substituted the phrase “high-calorie, sugary drinks” for “sugar-sweetened beverage” in the ballot language. The plaintiffs, Anthony Johnson and Leon Cain, would prefer the phrase “sugar-sweetened beverage products” to be used.   read more

98-Year-Old Seeks Exoneration for Espionage Conviction 64 Years Ago

Neither Moskowitz nor Brothman testified in their own defense because they didn’t want their affair to become known. Nevertheless, she was convicted in 1950 and served two years in prison. Moskowitz also had to pay a $10,000 fine (equal to nearly $100,000 today), and, after being released, she struggled to put her life back together with such a black mark against her during the Cold War.   read more

Facial Recognition Technology Leads to Capture of Child Sex Offender on the Run for 14 Years

an official with the Diplomatic Security Service (DSS), which provides protection for American diplomats and works to maintain the integrity of U.S. travel documents, decided to test new facial recognition software created to detect passport fraud. The DSS official happened to use an FBI wanted poster containing Stammer’s image for his experiment and found that it matched the photo of an American in Nepal going by the name of Kevin Hodges.   read more

Nevada Wildlife Dept. Saves Thousands of Fish from Drought…by Hand

Nevada Department of Wildlife personnel are gathering fish from ditches usually fed by the Truckee River near Reno to a hydroelectric generating station. Because of the drought, water is not being diverted into the ditches, which would normally result in a fishkill. But last week about 25 people waded into the ditches, electrically stunning then gathering fish to be transplanted back to the Truckee or into a nearby pond.   read more

Voter Impersonation: 31 Possible Cases out of 1 Billion Ballots Cast

Levitt’s research discovered only 31 instances of voter impersonation out of more than one billion ballots cast in general, primary, special, and municipal elections from 2000 through 2014. "The factor that really influences whether people think the elections are fair? Whether their preferred candidates win,” Levitt wrote.   read more

Pennsylvania Government Shuts Down Seed Library as Potential Source of Terrorism

The chair of the Cumberland County Board of Commissioners, Barbara Cross, said the move made sense because of the potential threat seed borrowing posed. “Agri-terrorism is a very, very real scenario,” she told the local newspaper. “Protecting and maintaining the food sources of America is an overwhelming challenge... so you’ve got agri-tourism on one side and agri-terrorism on the other.”   read more

California Inmates Paid $2 a Day to Fight Wildfires

With wildfire season here, California taxpayers will be glad to know that they’ve got a hard-working corps of firefighters they can call on day or night, who don’t take vacations and work cheap. Really cheap. California employs about 4,000 inmate firefighters. They’re “low-level” offenders who earn $2 a day in canteen credits, as well as two days off their sentences for each day they spend at fire camps.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1227 News
1 2 3 ... 77 Next