Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1313 News
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Justice Dept. Pays $134,000 to Woman Who Sued Over Use of Her Identity in Fake Facebook Page for DEA Operation

Sondra Arquiett sued the government after learning photos of her were part of a social media sting operation run by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). Federal agents had obtained the images after confiscating her phone in 2010 as part of a drug arrest, which resulted in Arquiett pleading guilty to a drug conspiracy charge. But she never gave the DEA permission to use her photos to snare other people she knew who were using or trafficking in illegal drugs.   read more

Skulls of Unidentified Corpses Given Sculpted Faces in Search for Their Identities … and Their Killers

The 11 unsolved murders required considerable work on the part of sculptors to recreate what the people might have looked like before their deaths. All of the cases “had all met ugly deaths and were found as skeletons in desolate places across New York City — train tracks, wooded areas, in a basement,” wrote The New York Times. In some cases, the bodies were dismembered and the skulls crushed. This work is a last resort for investigators.   read more

Now Some Same-Sex Couples are Told They Have to Marry … to Keep Their Job Benefits

Same-sex marriage has gone from being a hard-won right to a requirement for many gay couples. With many states now authorizing (or at least not banning) gay marriage, some employers are phasing out domestic partnerships and telling couples they have to get married in order to keep their benefits. The way companies see it, there’s no point in keeping domestic partnership rules if marriage is legal. However, this could have implications for heterosexual couples' domestic arrangements.   read more

Immigrants Help Millennials Edge out Baby Boomers as Nation’s Largest Living Generation

Millennials continue to grow in number, even though the generation was born from 1981 to 1997, thanks to the continuing flow of immigrants, particularly younger foreign residents, into the country. The generation’s numbers will reach more than 75 million this year, surpassing the 74.9 million of Boomers, whose totals will continue to shrink as more die off in the coming years. The Millennial population won’t peak for another 21 years, when it will reach 81.1 million by 2036.   read more

More Americans Work for Solar Companies than for Coal Mining

The Solar Foundation, which supports solar power, claims in a new report that more than 173,000 people had solar-related jobs as of last year. The coal industry had only about 93,000 workers. Job growth in solar has been phenomenal, expanding by 20% or more in each of the last two years. In 2014, it added 31,000 new jobs and solar businesses plan to add another 36,000 employees this year. One out of 78 jobs created in the U.S.over the past year were created by the solar industry,   read more

California Tribe Building $10 Million Indoor Pot-Growing Facility

A month after the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) said it did not have an objection, in principle, to Indian tribes growing marijuana on their trust-held land, Mendocino, California’s Pinoleville Pomo Nation announced it was building a $10-million greenhouse facility on its 99-acre rancheria in Ukiah. . FoxBarry Cos. LLC announced that it was putting up $30 million as part of the United Cannabis deal to develop the growing facilities.   read more

Productivity Drops 1% for Every 1°F Rise in Temperature

If a new study is an indication, global warming will make human lives less productive. Tatyana Deryugina and Solomon M. Hsiang of the National Bureau of Economic Research used data collected from counties throughout the 48 contiguous U.S. states and compared increases in temperature with the output of human production. They determined that as things heat up, people slow down.   read more

41 Kentucky County Jailers Draw Salaries even though their Counties don’t have Jails

Jailer is an elected office in Kentucky, the only state where that’s the case. The jailer is responsible for maintaining the county jail, transporting prisoners to court and other related duties. But in 41 of Kentucky’s counties, there is no jail. Those counties with small populations use regional jails to house prisoners. So what do those jailers do with their time? In the case of Jeanette Miller Hughes, who received $69,000 a year as Perry County’s jailer, it’s babysitting her grandchild.   read more

Was Tammy Alois the Worst Police Detective Ever?

The failure of Tammy Kilgore Alois to fully investigate the crimes, many of which involved sexual offenses against children, from 2010 to 2012 prompted the Coconut Creek Police Department and the Broward State Attorney’s Office to look into Alois’ work. It was found that she failed to interview victims and witnesses, mishandled evidence and neglected to write reports or present cases to prosecutors. It took three internal affairs officers to investigate the cases due to the volume of work.   read more

5 Women Born in the 19th Century are Still Alive

The oldest known living person is Misao Okawa of Japan. She’s 116, born March 5, 1898. She lost her husband in 1931, and has been a widow for 83 years. Her secret to longevity is plenty of sleep and plenty of food, including sushi. The next oldest is Gertrude Weaver of the United States. Also 116, but a bit younger than Okawa, Weaver has the distinction of being the oldest living American. The Arkansas native has outlived her husband and three children, but has one son in his 90s.   read more

Fired for Telling Carmelo Anthony “You Stink” (and More), Knicks Fan Sues Madison Square Garden

There was half a minute left in the game and Anthony, his team having given up a 14-point lead, was called for an offensive foul. It was at that point that Rotondi let loose with his verbal barrage. After the next play, with 6.7 seconds left in the game, security personnel approached Rotondi to escort him from his seat. When the police arrived, security told them that Rotondi was ejected for interfering with the game and refusing to leave while being escorted out. Rotondi was then arrested.   read more

Rhode Island Leads Nation in Illegal Drug Use; New Hampshire #1 for Alcohol; Utah Most Depressed

According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 15.76% of Rhode Islanders used illicit drugs in 2012-2013. Right behind Rhode Island was the District of Columbia, with 15.17, and Colorado at 14.90. Rhode Island also was first for using marijuana at 20.22%, followed by Alaska (19.69), Vermont (19.10) and Oregon (19.03). As for alcohol consumption, no state was less sober than New Hampshire, where 65.19% of residents used alcohol in the past month.   read more

Homeland Security Dept. Blunder Opened Door to Cybersecurity Attacks on Power and Water Systems

A Freedom of Information Act request was filed with DHS for documents on Operation Aurora, which was a cyberattack on Google. The department responded with 800 pages of documents. However the documents weren’t about Operation Aurora, but were instead on the Aurora Project, which in 2007 demonstrated how easy it would be to disable the nation’s electric and water supply grids.   read more

Picturing the Enemy: Who do Soldiers Aim at during Target Practice?

A century ago, American soldiers attacked nothing more than sacks tied to a string before fighting in World War I. During the Cold War, U.S. troops took aim at human-shaped targets dressed in green, but wearing a red star on their helmets to represent Soviet soldiers. Now that the Red Menace has been replaced by a Middle-Eastern one, American military training uses targets dressed in “eastern-looking clothing” and sporting dark skin.   read more

Convicted…and Sentenced to High School

Wayne County Circuit Judge Deborah A. Thomas has ordered many of those who come before her to finish school or earn a GED. She even papers the wall behind her bench with the documents to encourage the offenders, usually young men ages 19-22, get their lives on a more positive track.   read more

Supreme Court Plans to Join 21st Century…in 2016, Maybe

The Supreme Court’s cautious approach is partially driven by its concern for security, said the Chief Justice. “Foreign and domestic hackers, whose motives may range from fishing for secrets to discrediting the government or impairing court operations,” is something to guard against, he wrote. The new online system will cover all court petitions, responses, briefs and other public documents. The change will fall far short of what many legal and media observers of the court desire.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1313 News
1 2 3 ... 83 Next

Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1313 News
1 2 3 ... 83 Next

Justice Dept. Pays $134,000 to Woman Who Sued Over Use of Her Identity in Fake Facebook Page for DEA Operation

Sondra Arquiett sued the government after learning photos of her were part of a social media sting operation run by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). Federal agents had obtained the images after confiscating her phone in 2010 as part of a drug arrest, which resulted in Arquiett pleading guilty to a drug conspiracy charge. But she never gave the DEA permission to use her photos to snare other people she knew who were using or trafficking in illegal drugs.   read more

Skulls of Unidentified Corpses Given Sculpted Faces in Search for Their Identities … and Their Killers

The 11 unsolved murders required considerable work on the part of sculptors to recreate what the people might have looked like before their deaths. All of the cases “had all met ugly deaths and were found as skeletons in desolate places across New York City — train tracks, wooded areas, in a basement,” wrote The New York Times. In some cases, the bodies were dismembered and the skulls crushed. This work is a last resort for investigators.   read more

Now Some Same-Sex Couples are Told They Have to Marry … to Keep Their Job Benefits

Same-sex marriage has gone from being a hard-won right to a requirement for many gay couples. With many states now authorizing (or at least not banning) gay marriage, some employers are phasing out domestic partnerships and telling couples they have to get married in order to keep their benefits. The way companies see it, there’s no point in keeping domestic partnership rules if marriage is legal. However, this could have implications for heterosexual couples' domestic arrangements.   read more

Immigrants Help Millennials Edge out Baby Boomers as Nation’s Largest Living Generation

Millennials continue to grow in number, even though the generation was born from 1981 to 1997, thanks to the continuing flow of immigrants, particularly younger foreign residents, into the country. The generation’s numbers will reach more than 75 million this year, surpassing the 74.9 million of Boomers, whose totals will continue to shrink as more die off in the coming years. The Millennial population won’t peak for another 21 years, when it will reach 81.1 million by 2036.   read more

More Americans Work for Solar Companies than for Coal Mining

The Solar Foundation, which supports solar power, claims in a new report that more than 173,000 people had solar-related jobs as of last year. The coal industry had only about 93,000 workers. Job growth in solar has been phenomenal, expanding by 20% or more in each of the last two years. In 2014, it added 31,000 new jobs and solar businesses plan to add another 36,000 employees this year. One out of 78 jobs created in the U.S.over the past year were created by the solar industry,   read more

California Tribe Building $10 Million Indoor Pot-Growing Facility

A month after the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) said it did not have an objection, in principle, to Indian tribes growing marijuana on their trust-held land, Mendocino, California’s Pinoleville Pomo Nation announced it was building a $10-million greenhouse facility on its 99-acre rancheria in Ukiah. . FoxBarry Cos. LLC announced that it was putting up $30 million as part of the United Cannabis deal to develop the growing facilities.   read more

Productivity Drops 1% for Every 1°F Rise in Temperature

If a new study is an indication, global warming will make human lives less productive. Tatyana Deryugina and Solomon M. Hsiang of the National Bureau of Economic Research used data collected from counties throughout the 48 contiguous U.S. states and compared increases in temperature with the output of human production. They determined that as things heat up, people slow down.   read more

41 Kentucky County Jailers Draw Salaries even though their Counties don’t have Jails

Jailer is an elected office in Kentucky, the only state where that’s the case. The jailer is responsible for maintaining the county jail, transporting prisoners to court and other related duties. But in 41 of Kentucky’s counties, there is no jail. Those counties with small populations use regional jails to house prisoners. So what do those jailers do with their time? In the case of Jeanette Miller Hughes, who received $69,000 a year as Perry County’s jailer, it’s babysitting her grandchild.   read more

Was Tammy Alois the Worst Police Detective Ever?

The failure of Tammy Kilgore Alois to fully investigate the crimes, many of which involved sexual offenses against children, from 2010 to 2012 prompted the Coconut Creek Police Department and the Broward State Attorney’s Office to look into Alois’ work. It was found that she failed to interview victims and witnesses, mishandled evidence and neglected to write reports or present cases to prosecutors. It took three internal affairs officers to investigate the cases due to the volume of work.   read more

5 Women Born in the 19th Century are Still Alive

The oldest known living person is Misao Okawa of Japan. She’s 116, born March 5, 1898. She lost her husband in 1931, and has been a widow for 83 years. Her secret to longevity is plenty of sleep and plenty of food, including sushi. The next oldest is Gertrude Weaver of the United States. Also 116, but a bit younger than Okawa, Weaver has the distinction of being the oldest living American. The Arkansas native has outlived her husband and three children, but has one son in his 90s.   read more

Fired for Telling Carmelo Anthony “You Stink” (and More), Knicks Fan Sues Madison Square Garden

There was half a minute left in the game and Anthony, his team having given up a 14-point lead, was called for an offensive foul. It was at that point that Rotondi let loose with his verbal barrage. After the next play, with 6.7 seconds left in the game, security personnel approached Rotondi to escort him from his seat. When the police arrived, security told them that Rotondi was ejected for interfering with the game and refusing to leave while being escorted out. Rotondi was then arrested.   read more

Rhode Island Leads Nation in Illegal Drug Use; New Hampshire #1 for Alcohol; Utah Most Depressed

According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 15.76% of Rhode Islanders used illicit drugs in 2012-2013. Right behind Rhode Island was the District of Columbia, with 15.17, and Colorado at 14.90. Rhode Island also was first for using marijuana at 20.22%, followed by Alaska (19.69), Vermont (19.10) and Oregon (19.03). As for alcohol consumption, no state was less sober than New Hampshire, where 65.19% of residents used alcohol in the past month.   read more

Homeland Security Dept. Blunder Opened Door to Cybersecurity Attacks on Power and Water Systems

A Freedom of Information Act request was filed with DHS for documents on Operation Aurora, which was a cyberattack on Google. The department responded with 800 pages of documents. However the documents weren’t about Operation Aurora, but were instead on the Aurora Project, which in 2007 demonstrated how easy it would be to disable the nation’s electric and water supply grids.   read more

Picturing the Enemy: Who do Soldiers Aim at during Target Practice?

A century ago, American soldiers attacked nothing more than sacks tied to a string before fighting in World War I. During the Cold War, U.S. troops took aim at human-shaped targets dressed in green, but wearing a red star on their helmets to represent Soviet soldiers. Now that the Red Menace has been replaced by a Middle-Eastern one, American military training uses targets dressed in “eastern-looking clothing” and sporting dark skin.   read more

Convicted…and Sentenced to High School

Wayne County Circuit Judge Deborah A. Thomas has ordered many of those who come before her to finish school or earn a GED. She even papers the wall behind her bench with the documents to encourage the offenders, usually young men ages 19-22, get their lives on a more positive track.   read more

Supreme Court Plans to Join 21st Century…in 2016, Maybe

The Supreme Court’s cautious approach is partially driven by its concern for security, said the Chief Justice. “Foreign and domestic hackers, whose motives may range from fishing for secrets to discrediting the government or impairing court operations,” is something to guard against, he wrote. The new online system will cover all court petitions, responses, briefs and other public documents. The change will fall far short of what many legal and media observers of the court desire.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1313 News
1 2 3 ... 83 Next