Unusual News

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Huge Congressional District Not Big Enough for Candidates

A West Texas congressional district sprawls 58,000-plus square miles and two time zones, from San Antonio to just outside El Paso. Yet neither the Republican who represents it nor the Democrat trying to reclaim the seat actually lives there. The home of Republican Rep. Will Hurd, 39, is in Helotes, just outside the borders of a district that is larger in land area than 29 states. The challenger, former Rep. Pete Gallego, spends most of his time away from the district in Austin.   read more

College Republicans Endure Criticism Because of Trump

For decades, College Republicans have drawn ridicule from — and defined themselves against — the more liberal masses on college campuses. But this year has been especially nightmarish for CRs, as they call themselves. The nomination of Donald Trump, who has attacked their conservative heroes and esteemed alumni, has prompted widespread mockery from their liberal classmates, dissension from within and something of an identity crisis.   read more

Sanders’ Brother Hopes for Better Electoral Luck in British Parliament Run

Larry Sanders, the brother of Sen. Bernie Sanders, is running to fill the seat being vacated by David Cameron, the former prime minister, in the British Parliament. Sanders, 82, was chosen on Thursday night by the Green Party as its nominee in an Oct. 20 special election in the constituency of Witney, about 67 miles west of London.   read more

Defense Attorney Backs Down, Removes “Black Lives Matter” Button in Courtroom

A deputy public defender in Las Vegas gave in to a judge’s request on Thursday to remove a “Black Lives Matter” pin in court, after a free-form discussion about the politics of protest and free speech amid a national debate over police brutality and race relations. In a new show of defiance that wasn’t directly addressed by the judge, Deputy Public Defender Erika Ballou and several attorneys in the audience behind her wore black arm bands.   read more

Final Wave of Veto Overrides in Store for Missouri’s Most Overridden Governor Ever

It's unknown where Nixon ranks of most overridden governors in U.S. history, but he appears unusual among contemporaries. His distinction is due partly to the rarity of Missouri's politically divided government. He's the only Missouri Democrat to govern opposite a Republican supermajority at least since Reconstruction. Since Nixon took office in 2009, lawmakers have overridden 83 of his vetoes — four times the combined total of all other governors' overrides dating back to the early 1800s.   read more

It’s Toddlers, Not Industrial Workers, Who Are At Highest Risk for Chemical Burns to the Eyes

Chemical eye burns from chemicals are usually considered a problem in industrial settings. But it turns out that toddlers have the highest risk for this potentially blinding injury at home. “Just about every eye doctor has seen this,” said Dr. Levin. “It’s a potentially blinding problem that is a completely preventable tragedy.” From 2010 to 2013, there were 144,000 chemical eye burns totaling $106.7 million in ER charges. It is "the tip of the iceberg,” said Dr. Osterhoudt.   read more

Oregon Sees Surge of New Voters from Law that Registers Voters with Driver’s License Renewals

Nearly 300,000 Oregonians have registered to vote in the past 12 months and more than 75 percent of them did so under the motor voter law. In addition, the state is on track to register 250,000 new voters under the law by the November election. The increase represents a 14 percent uptick in registered voters in the state since this time last year. Oregon was the first state to put such a law into effect and since then, California, Vermont and West Virginia have adopted similar laws.   read more

New Invention Allows You to Judge a Book by Its Cover

Leave it to the great minds at MIT and Georgia Tech to figure out a way to read the pages of a book without actually opening it. Heshmat said the project was inspired by the work 10 years ago of a group at MIT that showed you could look through a closed envelope with terahertz waves. With the new system, he said, "you can actually look deeper into multiple pages." It has already been used to to analyze mummies and find a hidden face behind a Roman fresco.   read more

Michigan Voter Fined, Loses Voting Right and May Face Prison Time for “Ballot Selfie”

"Many voters take ballot selfies and post them to social media sites like Facebook on Election Day, and it is a powerful form of free speech," said Crookston's attorney. "Instead of just telling people whom they voted for, voters can actually prove whom they voted for — there's just no other way to do that so convincingly. But the Secretary of State prohibits this. This is not just a case against silly rules; it's a case against unconstitutional censorship."   read more

Attention Bargain Hunters: $5-Billion Nuclear Power Plant on Sale for Only $36 Million (Needs Work)

TVA has set a minimum bid of $36.4 million for its power plant and the 1,600 surrounding acres of waterfront property. The buyer gets two unfinished nuclear reactors, transmission lines, buildings, eight miles of roads, and a 1,000-space parking lot. One company has expressed interest so far. TVA says it isn't particular about what the purchaser does — using the site for power production, recreation or even residences are all fine.   read more

California Enacts Nation’s Toughest Climate Law

The state's emissions have fallen 9.5% since peaking in 2004, and analysts now consider the 2020 goal well within reach. ``Here we are, 10 years later, emissions have gone down and the economy has gone up,'' said state Sen. Fran Pavley. ``It's a success story.'' Brown also signed a companion bill, AB197, to cut emissions in low-income or minority communities. Many are near facilities such as oil refineries and factories that produce both greenhouse gases and the toxic air pollution.   read more

Smoking and Drinking Among U.S. Teenagers Hit New Lows

The trends were encouraging, and long-running, experts said, and distinguished young Americans from their parents’ generation, which had much higher rates of smoking and drinking. Just 9.6 percent of adolescents, ages 12 to 17, reported using alcohol in 2015, down from 17.6 percent in 2002, according to the data. Far fewer American adolescents smoke every day: about 20 percent in 2015, down from 32 percent in 2002.   read more

Chase Bank Swamped by Applications for Its New High-Priced Credit Card…Because It’s Metallic

The demand has been so overwhelming that the manufacturer ran out of raw material in just a few days. Enthusiasts extol its virtues all over the internet. Millennials are clamoring for it. "I'm telling all my friends about it," said Maddy Novich, 33. Like so many crazes these days, this one has been fueled by social media, word of mouth and the internet. "I have never seen such interest in a credit card, and I've been doing this for 15 years," said Gary Leff.   read more

Growth of U.S. Latino Population Falls behind that of Asian Americans

Demographer William Frey said the slower growth is largely a factor of the economy. A slower economy is influencing families to hold off on having more children, and it's discouraging migration amid stronger border enforcement, he said. Kenneth M. Johnson, a senior demographer at the Carsey School of Public Policy, said U.S. Hispanic women between the ages of 20 to 24 have seen a 36% decline in birth rates. "That's by far the largest decline of any other group," Johnson said.   read more

Newly Discovered Parasite is named after Barack Obama … And it’s an Honor

It's no Nobel Peace Prize, but Barack Obama has a new honor to brag about. Scientists have named a parasite after him — and there's no worming out of it. Meet Baracktrema obamai, a tiny parasitic flatworm that lives in turtles' blood. A new study officially names the 2-inch, hair-thin creature after Obama. Thomas Platt, the newly retired biology professor at Saint Mary's College in Indiana who chose the name, says it's an honor, not an insult. Really.   read more

Increasingly Polarizing Political Rhetoric Turns More Millennials into Independent Voters

The study found more young adults are open to conservative ideology. Twenge said it's surprising as these same young people generally disagree with many traditional conservative viewpoints. "Given young people's support for same-sex marriage and legalizing marijuana, it's surprising that more now identify as political conservatives. Overall, millennials may not be as reliably liberal and Democrat as many had predicted, especially as they are likely to grow more conservative as they get older."   read more
1 to 16 of about 1793 News
1 2 3 ... 113 Next

Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1793 News
1 2 3 ... 113 Next

Huge Congressional District Not Big Enough for Candidates

A West Texas congressional district sprawls 58,000-plus square miles and two time zones, from San Antonio to just outside El Paso. Yet neither the Republican who represents it nor the Democrat trying to reclaim the seat actually lives there. The home of Republican Rep. Will Hurd, 39, is in Helotes, just outside the borders of a district that is larger in land area than 29 states. The challenger, former Rep. Pete Gallego, spends most of his time away from the district in Austin.   read more

College Republicans Endure Criticism Because of Trump

For decades, College Republicans have drawn ridicule from — and defined themselves against — the more liberal masses on college campuses. But this year has been especially nightmarish for CRs, as they call themselves. The nomination of Donald Trump, who has attacked their conservative heroes and esteemed alumni, has prompted widespread mockery from their liberal classmates, dissension from within and something of an identity crisis.   read more

Sanders’ Brother Hopes for Better Electoral Luck in British Parliament Run

Larry Sanders, the brother of Sen. Bernie Sanders, is running to fill the seat being vacated by David Cameron, the former prime minister, in the British Parliament. Sanders, 82, was chosen on Thursday night by the Green Party as its nominee in an Oct. 20 special election in the constituency of Witney, about 67 miles west of London.   read more

Defense Attorney Backs Down, Removes “Black Lives Matter” Button in Courtroom

A deputy public defender in Las Vegas gave in to a judge’s request on Thursday to remove a “Black Lives Matter” pin in court, after a free-form discussion about the politics of protest and free speech amid a national debate over police brutality and race relations. In a new show of defiance that wasn’t directly addressed by the judge, Deputy Public Defender Erika Ballou and several attorneys in the audience behind her wore black arm bands.   read more

Final Wave of Veto Overrides in Store for Missouri’s Most Overridden Governor Ever

It's unknown where Nixon ranks of most overridden governors in U.S. history, but he appears unusual among contemporaries. His distinction is due partly to the rarity of Missouri's politically divided government. He's the only Missouri Democrat to govern opposite a Republican supermajority at least since Reconstruction. Since Nixon took office in 2009, lawmakers have overridden 83 of his vetoes — four times the combined total of all other governors' overrides dating back to the early 1800s.   read more

It’s Toddlers, Not Industrial Workers, Who Are At Highest Risk for Chemical Burns to the Eyes

Chemical eye burns from chemicals are usually considered a problem in industrial settings. But it turns out that toddlers have the highest risk for this potentially blinding injury at home. “Just about every eye doctor has seen this,” said Dr. Levin. “It’s a potentially blinding problem that is a completely preventable tragedy.” From 2010 to 2013, there were 144,000 chemical eye burns totaling $106.7 million in ER charges. It is "the tip of the iceberg,” said Dr. Osterhoudt.   read more

Oregon Sees Surge of New Voters from Law that Registers Voters with Driver’s License Renewals

Nearly 300,000 Oregonians have registered to vote in the past 12 months and more than 75 percent of them did so under the motor voter law. In addition, the state is on track to register 250,000 new voters under the law by the November election. The increase represents a 14 percent uptick in registered voters in the state since this time last year. Oregon was the first state to put such a law into effect and since then, California, Vermont and West Virginia have adopted similar laws.   read more

New Invention Allows You to Judge a Book by Its Cover

Leave it to the great minds at MIT and Georgia Tech to figure out a way to read the pages of a book without actually opening it. Heshmat said the project was inspired by the work 10 years ago of a group at MIT that showed you could look through a closed envelope with terahertz waves. With the new system, he said, "you can actually look deeper into multiple pages." It has already been used to to analyze mummies and find a hidden face behind a Roman fresco.   read more

Michigan Voter Fined, Loses Voting Right and May Face Prison Time for “Ballot Selfie”

"Many voters take ballot selfies and post them to social media sites like Facebook on Election Day, and it is a powerful form of free speech," said Crookston's attorney. "Instead of just telling people whom they voted for, voters can actually prove whom they voted for — there's just no other way to do that so convincingly. But the Secretary of State prohibits this. This is not just a case against silly rules; it's a case against unconstitutional censorship."   read more

Attention Bargain Hunters: $5-Billion Nuclear Power Plant on Sale for Only $36 Million (Needs Work)

TVA has set a minimum bid of $36.4 million for its power plant and the 1,600 surrounding acres of waterfront property. The buyer gets two unfinished nuclear reactors, transmission lines, buildings, eight miles of roads, and a 1,000-space parking lot. One company has expressed interest so far. TVA says it isn't particular about what the purchaser does — using the site for power production, recreation or even residences are all fine.   read more

California Enacts Nation’s Toughest Climate Law

The state's emissions have fallen 9.5% since peaking in 2004, and analysts now consider the 2020 goal well within reach. ``Here we are, 10 years later, emissions have gone down and the economy has gone up,'' said state Sen. Fran Pavley. ``It's a success story.'' Brown also signed a companion bill, AB197, to cut emissions in low-income or minority communities. Many are near facilities such as oil refineries and factories that produce both greenhouse gases and the toxic air pollution.   read more

Smoking and Drinking Among U.S. Teenagers Hit New Lows

The trends were encouraging, and long-running, experts said, and distinguished young Americans from their parents’ generation, which had much higher rates of smoking and drinking. Just 9.6 percent of adolescents, ages 12 to 17, reported using alcohol in 2015, down from 17.6 percent in 2002, according to the data. Far fewer American adolescents smoke every day: about 20 percent in 2015, down from 32 percent in 2002.   read more

Chase Bank Swamped by Applications for Its New High-Priced Credit Card…Because It’s Metallic

The demand has been so overwhelming that the manufacturer ran out of raw material in just a few days. Enthusiasts extol its virtues all over the internet. Millennials are clamoring for it. "I'm telling all my friends about it," said Maddy Novich, 33. Like so many crazes these days, this one has been fueled by social media, word of mouth and the internet. "I have never seen such interest in a credit card, and I've been doing this for 15 years," said Gary Leff.   read more

Growth of U.S. Latino Population Falls behind that of Asian Americans

Demographer William Frey said the slower growth is largely a factor of the economy. A slower economy is influencing families to hold off on having more children, and it's discouraging migration amid stronger border enforcement, he said. Kenneth M. Johnson, a senior demographer at the Carsey School of Public Policy, said U.S. Hispanic women between the ages of 20 to 24 have seen a 36% decline in birth rates. "That's by far the largest decline of any other group," Johnson said.   read more

Newly Discovered Parasite is named after Barack Obama … And it’s an Honor

It's no Nobel Peace Prize, but Barack Obama has a new honor to brag about. Scientists have named a parasite after him — and there's no worming out of it. Meet Baracktrema obamai, a tiny parasitic flatworm that lives in turtles' blood. A new study officially names the 2-inch, hair-thin creature after Obama. Thomas Platt, the newly retired biology professor at Saint Mary's College in Indiana who chose the name, says it's an honor, not an insult. Really.   read more

Increasingly Polarizing Political Rhetoric Turns More Millennials into Independent Voters

The study found more young adults are open to conservative ideology. Twenge said it's surprising as these same young people generally disagree with many traditional conservative viewpoints. "Given young people's support for same-sex marriage and legalizing marijuana, it's surprising that more now identify as political conservatives. Overall, millennials may not be as reliably liberal and Democrat as many had predicted, especially as they are likely to grow more conservative as they get older."   read more
1 to 16 of about 1793 News
1 2 3 ... 113 Next