Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1242 News
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Looking for Revenue, Postal Service Proposes Delivering Groceries in the Early Morning

The U.S. Postal Service (USPS) delivers mail despite snow, rain, heat and gloom of night. Soon we’ll see if the same goes for a can of green beans. In a bid to bring in revenue to help it trim red ink, the USPS has been running a test, delivering groceries to homes in the early morning. So far the project has been attempted only in the San Francisco Bay Area, where it has averaged 160 food deliveries a day between 3 a.m. and 7 a.m. in conjunction with Amazon.com.   read more

VA Records Show Veteran Rescheduled Appointment after he Died

Either the Department of Veterans Affairs has again demonstrated some shady record keeping or it has a zombie problem on its hands. According to VA records, former Marine Jordan Buisman rescheduled his medical appointment four days after he died. He died of seizure disorder, the condition for which he sought treatment 24 days before the appointment. “I’m extremely troubled to hear reports that [VA] records may have been doctored. This is an unacceptable tragedy,” said Senator Al Franken.   read more

One Cop in Charge of 461 Sex Offenders

Officer Chris Poncia has 461 people in his case file, all the sex offenders in Providence. His beat includes 175 Level 2 and 3 offenders, who are classified this way because they’re considered likely to commit sex crimes again. Poncia is unique among his peers in Rhode Island, which has about 1,600 sex offenders. He is the only cop in the state who does nothing but patrol the sex offender beat.   read more

Florida Sheriffs Used SWAT-Style Attack to Enforce Barbershop License

“With some team members dressed in ballistic vests and masks, and with guns drawn, the deputies rushed into their target destinations, handcuffed the stunned occupants—and demanded to see their barbers’ licenses,” the court wrote. The raid was one of several deputies carried out against minority-owned barbershops and salons in 2010.   read more

Vermont City Achieves All-Renewable Energy

The Burlington Electric Department gets its power from three sources, according to Ari Phillips at ThinkProgress: One-third comes from wind energy operators, another third from the Winooski One and Hydro-Québec hydroelectric stations, and a final third from the Joseph C. McNeil Generating Station, which is a biomass installation that uses logging residue wood chips in its processing.   read more

In Population Shift, Majority of Adult Americans are now Single

Being a singles-majority nation marks quite a change from what the U.S. looked like during its bicentennial year, 1976, when only 37.4% were single. Those states with the highest percentages of single adults are Louisiana and Rhode Island (both 55.7%), New York (55.4%), Mississippi (54.9%), and New Mexico (53.6%).   read more

Is an Arkansas Republican Responsible for Spread of Ebola and did a Democrat Vote to Give Social Security Benefits to Illegal Immigrants? Of Course not…except in Campaign Ads

Cotton responded with his own misleading commercial that warned that Pryor wanted to give undocumented workers Social Security benefits for their employment while working under “forged identities.” The claim was based on a 2006 vote Pryor cast in the Senate “that has been repeatedly debunked by fact checkers,” The Washington Post’s Glenn Kessler wrote, noting that FactCheck.org made the lie one of the “Whoppers of 2006.”   read more

Minnesota Vikings Lead NFL in Player Arrests

45 Minnesota players have been arrested since January 2000. Arrests of NFL players are actually significantly down this year. The peak was in 2006, when 67 players were arrested. Only 38 players have been arrested so far this year. But as they say, it’s early in the season and anything can happen in the National Football League.   read more

Expert Witness in Bank Terrorism Financing Case Admits She can’t Read Arabic

Milton-Edwards testified during the civil case, which was brought by the families of 300 victims of suicide attacks in the West Bank, that she found no evidence while researching her book of Hamas being involved in regional charities. But prosecutors discovered that she couldn’t read Arabic. After being asked to read the printed text on a Hamas-sponsored image, Milton-Edwards admitted she could not.   read more

Trees Credited with Saving U.S. $6.8 Billion a Year in Health Costs

Scientists determined that the United States saves about $6.8 billion a year in healthcare costs by having trees in cities. In 2010 alone, the country avoided 850 deaths and 670,000 cases of acute respiratory symptoms, the researchers led by forester Dave Nowak found, thanks to 17 tons of air pollution being removed from the atmosphere by trees.   read more

Federal Government to Monitor Police Force Run by Polygamist Mormons

The ruling (pdf) comes in the case of the twin cities of Colorado City, Arizona and Hildale, Utah. The Colorado City Marshal’s Office and the Hildale City Police Department were found to have taken orders from the leader of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (FLDS), a Mormon sect practicing polygamy.   read more

“Mile High” Stadium Takes on New Meaning in Denver

Despite the growing popularity of pre-game toking, the Broncos organization is not yet ready to endorse this newer side of Sunday ritual. “Any form of marijuana consumption is prohibited on Sports Authority Field at Mile High property during public events, including in stadium parking lots,” the team’s website states, according to Powell. Colorado law specifies that recreational marijuana use is legal only in locations not open or accessible to the public.   read more

Florida Speed Trap Town of 1,000 Filed 11,603 Traffic Tickets in One Year

Last year, the seven-person police force for a community of 1,000 residents produced 11,603 traffic citations, according to the Gainesville Sun. About half the town’s $1 million budget comes from court fines. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement says it will investigate charges by Waldo officers that Police Chief Mike Szabo and City Manager Kim Worley ordered them each to write 12 tickets during each 12-hour shift.   read more

Armed Out-of-State Militia Slammed for Confronting Bat Researchers in Arizona

A self-appointed border militia from Colorado has been criticized by law enforcement in Arizona, where the group tried to detain scientists studying bats in the desert. Sheriff Tony Estrada expressed serious concern about the actions of the militiamen driving around the desert in ATVs with firearms and wearing camouflage. “These people . . . are completely out of their environment. They really don’t know the area. They don’t know the terrain."   read more

Divided Court Rules DNA Collected without Consent can be Used against Accused

After refusing to supply a DNA sample through a mouth swab, Raynor inadvertently did so anyway, providing officers with the opportunity to collect his DNA samples when he continually rubbed his arms on the chair he sat in while being interrogated.   read more

Can You be Charged with Murdering Someone You Didn’t Kill?

After Roach failed to comply with an order to lie down on the ground, Sanguino fired nine times at Roach, who had allegedly discharged his handgun inside the bar. Roach’s gun, however, was not loaded, police later determined. Five of Sanguino’s shots hit Roach, who was hospitalized and is expected to survive. But one of the officer’s bullets struck bystander Maria Fernanda Godinez Castillo, killing the 22-year-old university student.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1242 News
1 2 3 ... 78 Next

Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1242 News
1 2 3 ... 78 Next

Looking for Revenue, Postal Service Proposes Delivering Groceries in the Early Morning

The U.S. Postal Service (USPS) delivers mail despite snow, rain, heat and gloom of night. Soon we’ll see if the same goes for a can of green beans. In a bid to bring in revenue to help it trim red ink, the USPS has been running a test, delivering groceries to homes in the early morning. So far the project has been attempted only in the San Francisco Bay Area, where it has averaged 160 food deliveries a day between 3 a.m. and 7 a.m. in conjunction with Amazon.com.   read more

VA Records Show Veteran Rescheduled Appointment after he Died

Either the Department of Veterans Affairs has again demonstrated some shady record keeping or it has a zombie problem on its hands. According to VA records, former Marine Jordan Buisman rescheduled his medical appointment four days after he died. He died of seizure disorder, the condition for which he sought treatment 24 days before the appointment. “I’m extremely troubled to hear reports that [VA] records may have been doctored. This is an unacceptable tragedy,” said Senator Al Franken.   read more

One Cop in Charge of 461 Sex Offenders

Officer Chris Poncia has 461 people in his case file, all the sex offenders in Providence. His beat includes 175 Level 2 and 3 offenders, who are classified this way because they’re considered likely to commit sex crimes again. Poncia is unique among his peers in Rhode Island, which has about 1,600 sex offenders. He is the only cop in the state who does nothing but patrol the sex offender beat.   read more

Florida Sheriffs Used SWAT-Style Attack to Enforce Barbershop License

“With some team members dressed in ballistic vests and masks, and with guns drawn, the deputies rushed into their target destinations, handcuffed the stunned occupants—and demanded to see their barbers’ licenses,” the court wrote. The raid was one of several deputies carried out against minority-owned barbershops and salons in 2010.   read more

Vermont City Achieves All-Renewable Energy

The Burlington Electric Department gets its power from three sources, according to Ari Phillips at ThinkProgress: One-third comes from wind energy operators, another third from the Winooski One and Hydro-Québec hydroelectric stations, and a final third from the Joseph C. McNeil Generating Station, which is a biomass installation that uses logging residue wood chips in its processing.   read more

In Population Shift, Majority of Adult Americans are now Single

Being a singles-majority nation marks quite a change from what the U.S. looked like during its bicentennial year, 1976, when only 37.4% were single. Those states with the highest percentages of single adults are Louisiana and Rhode Island (both 55.7%), New York (55.4%), Mississippi (54.9%), and New Mexico (53.6%).   read more

Is an Arkansas Republican Responsible for Spread of Ebola and did a Democrat Vote to Give Social Security Benefits to Illegal Immigrants? Of Course not…except in Campaign Ads

Cotton responded with his own misleading commercial that warned that Pryor wanted to give undocumented workers Social Security benefits for their employment while working under “forged identities.” The claim was based on a 2006 vote Pryor cast in the Senate “that has been repeatedly debunked by fact checkers,” The Washington Post’s Glenn Kessler wrote, noting that FactCheck.org made the lie one of the “Whoppers of 2006.”   read more

Minnesota Vikings Lead NFL in Player Arrests

45 Minnesota players have been arrested since January 2000. Arrests of NFL players are actually significantly down this year. The peak was in 2006, when 67 players were arrested. Only 38 players have been arrested so far this year. But as they say, it’s early in the season and anything can happen in the National Football League.   read more

Expert Witness in Bank Terrorism Financing Case Admits She can’t Read Arabic

Milton-Edwards testified during the civil case, which was brought by the families of 300 victims of suicide attacks in the West Bank, that she found no evidence while researching her book of Hamas being involved in regional charities. But prosecutors discovered that she couldn’t read Arabic. After being asked to read the printed text on a Hamas-sponsored image, Milton-Edwards admitted she could not.   read more

Trees Credited with Saving U.S. $6.8 Billion a Year in Health Costs

Scientists determined that the United States saves about $6.8 billion a year in healthcare costs by having trees in cities. In 2010 alone, the country avoided 850 deaths and 670,000 cases of acute respiratory symptoms, the researchers led by forester Dave Nowak found, thanks to 17 tons of air pollution being removed from the atmosphere by trees.   read more

Federal Government to Monitor Police Force Run by Polygamist Mormons

The ruling (pdf) comes in the case of the twin cities of Colorado City, Arizona and Hildale, Utah. The Colorado City Marshal’s Office and the Hildale City Police Department were found to have taken orders from the leader of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (FLDS), a Mormon sect practicing polygamy.   read more

“Mile High” Stadium Takes on New Meaning in Denver

Despite the growing popularity of pre-game toking, the Broncos organization is not yet ready to endorse this newer side of Sunday ritual. “Any form of marijuana consumption is prohibited on Sports Authority Field at Mile High property during public events, including in stadium parking lots,” the team’s website states, according to Powell. Colorado law specifies that recreational marijuana use is legal only in locations not open or accessible to the public.   read more

Florida Speed Trap Town of 1,000 Filed 11,603 Traffic Tickets in One Year

Last year, the seven-person police force for a community of 1,000 residents produced 11,603 traffic citations, according to the Gainesville Sun. About half the town’s $1 million budget comes from court fines. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement says it will investigate charges by Waldo officers that Police Chief Mike Szabo and City Manager Kim Worley ordered them each to write 12 tickets during each 12-hour shift.   read more

Armed Out-of-State Militia Slammed for Confronting Bat Researchers in Arizona

A self-appointed border militia from Colorado has been criticized by law enforcement in Arizona, where the group tried to detain scientists studying bats in the desert. Sheriff Tony Estrada expressed serious concern about the actions of the militiamen driving around the desert in ATVs with firearms and wearing camouflage. “These people . . . are completely out of their environment. They really don’t know the area. They don’t know the terrain."   read more

Divided Court Rules DNA Collected without Consent can be Used against Accused

After refusing to supply a DNA sample through a mouth swab, Raynor inadvertently did so anyway, providing officers with the opportunity to collect his DNA samples when he continually rubbed his arms on the chair he sat in while being interrogated.   read more

Can You be Charged with Murdering Someone You Didn’t Kill?

After Roach failed to comply with an order to lie down on the ground, Sanguino fired nine times at Roach, who had allegedly discharged his handgun inside the bar. Roach’s gun, however, was not loaded, police later determined. Five of Sanguino’s shots hit Roach, who was hospitalized and is expected to survive. But one of the officer’s bullets struck bystander Maria Fernanda Godinez Castillo, killing the 22-year-old university student.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1242 News
1 2 3 ... 78 Next