Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1436 News
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NBA Player Traded 4 Times in One Week

Job-hopping generally doesn’t look good on a resume. But NBA player Luke Ridnour’s CV just got a lot longer in a short period of time. In the run-up to the June 25 NBA draft and its aftermath, Ridnour was traded four times, with three of those moves coming in one day. Fortunately, Ridnour didn’t have to leave his living room during all this maneuvering, but he might have appreciated the frequent-flier miles. The key to Ridnour’s virtual journey around North America is his contract.   read more

Oregonians Can Now Legally Smoke Marijuana…but they can’t Buy it or Sell it

For now, Oregon pot smokers will have to grow their own—they’re allowed to have four plants each—or rely on the kindness of others to give them some. Another option is to drive into neighboring Washington, but bringing marijuana across state lines is a federal crime. Last night, Portland’s NORML planned to give away marijuana to celebrate--“Where adults will be allowed to give it away rather than allowing the black market to thrive on our new legality,” said NORML's Russ Belville.   read more

Police Can Arrest You for Calling them Names, but They’ll Lose in Court

Calling a police officer unflattering names might not be polite but it is protected by the Constitution. The Marshall Project documented numerous cases demonstrating that police have exceeded their authority by arresting people for name-calling. In Washington State, a teenage boy called an officer a “motherfucker.” His conviction was overturned last week by the state Supreme Court. In Georgia, a woman won a $100,000 settlement after police arrested her for cursing at them.   read more

Pope Francis First Religious Leader to be Invited to Address Joint Session of Congress

Congress has invited dozens of world leaders to address U.S. lawmakers. But religious figures have never had the honor. Capitol Hill will be working overtime in maneuvering the logistics of this event, said the Post’s Michelle Boorstein. “Which presidential candidate gets close and who doesn’t? How much time should he spend in Boehner’s office and with whom? Will lawmakers stand and clap for lines they support and remain seated for those they oppose? Those are all elements under discussion."   read more

Washington State Supreme Court Rules that Swearing at the Police is not a Crime

E.J.J.’s attorney, Lila J. Silverstein, said her client was only trying to protect his sister. One of the justices agreed he was right to be concerned. In a concurring opinion, Supreme Court Justice Steven Gonzalez, wrote that E.J.J. had reason to be concerned for the safety of his relatives because he “is a young black man in a city where the police have been found by the United States Department of Justice to use excessive force against nonviolent black youth.”   read more

Generation Change: Millennials now Outnumber Baby Boomers…and Their Politics are Different

There are now 83.1 million millennials in the United States, according to the Census Bureau. That compares to 75.4 million baby boomers. A study by Gallup showed that 30% of adult millennials identify as liberal, with 28% saying they’re conservative and 40% claiming to be moderate. That compares to only 21% of baby boomers who say they’re liberal, compared to 44% conservative and 33% moderate.   read more

Republicans Have Chosen Presidential and Vice-Presidential Candidates from Western States in 17 Elections; Democrats 0

Since the mid-19th century, the Republican Party has nominated a westerner 17 times to pursue the presidency or vice presidency. In contrast to Republicans, Democrats have yet to choose a single westerner for the presidential ticket or as a running mate. None of the current Democrats running or thinking of running are from the West.   read more

White Families more likely to Live in Better Neighborhoods than Black Families with Same Income

The study looked at the median income of neighborhoods. For instance, the typical black family with an income of $50,000 lives in a neighborhood in which the median income is less than $43,000. But a typical white family with the same income lives in a neighborhood with a median income of almost $53,000. “When you look at the evidence of how important neighborhoods are, you really worry about the long-term consequences of these patterns of racial and economic segregation,” said Sean Reardon.   read more

In Unprecedented Change, No Death Sentences in Texas in First Half of Year

The adoption of a law in 2005 that gave state prosecutors the option of pursuing life-without-parole sentences in capital murder cases has clearly had an effect. Since then, the size of Texas’ death row has been shrinking. It currently stands at 260 individuals, down from 460 in 1999. The death row population is now dwarfed by the number of people serving a life-without-parole sentence in the state: 745.   read more

Obama Administration Ends 16-Year Rule Forcing Non-Federally-Funded Marijuana Research to be Approved by Government

Until now, non-federally funded research of marijuana had to undergo review by the Public Health Service. This rule was put into place years ago out of concern that government guidelines for such research weren’t strong enough. The Obama administration, however, has announced that the agency’s approval is no longer needed. Other rules affecting independent marijuana studies still apply, such as obtaining medical marijuana only from NIDA's Drug Supply Program in Mississippi.   read more

Defense Dept. Employees Used Government Charge Cards at “Adult Entertainment Establishments” 900 Times in One Year

One Air Force airman racked up $4,686 in charges on his government travel card at the VIP room in the Sapphire Gentlemen’s Club near Las Vegas. The Pentagon's inspector general recommended closer attention be paid to charges coming from strip clubs. Strip club trade exec Angelina Spencer urged respect for Pentagon employees' "right to pursue a moment of happiness in the type of entertainment they choose, whether it’s a martini, a good cigar, bearing arms or bare arms.”   read more

Chaos and Coup at Chemical Safety Board

CSB member Rick Engler claimed to have taken over the agency, delegating himself "Administrative Authority.” Engler then ordered the suspension of CSB’s entire executive staff, placing some on administrative leave. The staffers were marched out of the building under armed guard and barred from returning or talking to other CSB staff. In carrying out his actions, Engler “presided over the escalation from a toxic work environment to thermonuclear war,” said PEER's Jeff Ruch.   read more

At Least 224 Prison Escapees are Still Unaccounted For

Included in the figure are the two convicted killers who recently made a daring escape from the Clinton Correctional Facility in upstate New York. The manhunt involving 800 federal, state and local law enforcement officers has been ongoing. Other fugitives include a convicted murderer who broke out through prison ventilation ducts, and an Indiana murderer who escaped in a garbage truck. Another convict packaged himself inside a furniture crate being shipped out.   read more

Can 3-D Printed Rats Replace Animal Dissection and Experimentation?

Science instructors shouldn't worry that the artificial rats would not measure up to the real deal. NecropSynth says its 3-D animals would have “layers so that they feel like real tissue,” and simulate bones and muscles. Hollow conduits with colored gel would represent the vascular and nervous systems. More importantly, NecropSynth believes that its process could potentially save the lives of the 6 million to 12 million animals that are killed annually for use in biology classes.   read more

Border Patrol Agents Accused 3-Year-Old of Crossing Border in Search of Work

Agents interviewed Y.F. and wrote on the appropriate form that he said he was looking for work. "The impossibility of the interview, in spite of the DHS officers’ affirmations of veracity and the rule of government regularity is plain on the face of the writings themselves: Y-F- was three years old at the time he was interrogated,” the brief said.   read more

U.S. Repatriates U.S.-Born Orphans to Brazil (Note: They’re Boa Constrictors)

Nine years ago, a white boa constrictor named Lucy or Diamond Princess was smuggled from Brazil’s Niterói Zoo by Jeremy Stone, a collector, breeder and seller of reptiles. Lucy wound up in Utah, where she had eight offspring while kept by Stone. Stone was able to sell Lucy’s offspring for tens of thousands of dollars. The Federal Bureau of Investigation eventually seized eight snakes, while federal prosecutors charged Stone with unlawfully transporting wildlife in the U.S.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1436 News
1 2 3 ... 90 Next

Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1436 News
1 2 3 ... 90 Next

NBA Player Traded 4 Times in One Week

Job-hopping generally doesn’t look good on a resume. But NBA player Luke Ridnour’s CV just got a lot longer in a short period of time. In the run-up to the June 25 NBA draft and its aftermath, Ridnour was traded four times, with three of those moves coming in one day. Fortunately, Ridnour didn’t have to leave his living room during all this maneuvering, but he might have appreciated the frequent-flier miles. The key to Ridnour’s virtual journey around North America is his contract.   read more

Oregonians Can Now Legally Smoke Marijuana…but they can’t Buy it or Sell it

For now, Oregon pot smokers will have to grow their own—they’re allowed to have four plants each—or rely on the kindness of others to give them some. Another option is to drive into neighboring Washington, but bringing marijuana across state lines is a federal crime. Last night, Portland’s NORML planned to give away marijuana to celebrate--“Where adults will be allowed to give it away rather than allowing the black market to thrive on our new legality,” said NORML's Russ Belville.   read more

Police Can Arrest You for Calling them Names, but They’ll Lose in Court

Calling a police officer unflattering names might not be polite but it is protected by the Constitution. The Marshall Project documented numerous cases demonstrating that police have exceeded their authority by arresting people for name-calling. In Washington State, a teenage boy called an officer a “motherfucker.” His conviction was overturned last week by the state Supreme Court. In Georgia, a woman won a $100,000 settlement after police arrested her for cursing at them.   read more

Pope Francis First Religious Leader to be Invited to Address Joint Session of Congress

Congress has invited dozens of world leaders to address U.S. lawmakers. But religious figures have never had the honor. Capitol Hill will be working overtime in maneuvering the logistics of this event, said the Post’s Michelle Boorstein. “Which presidential candidate gets close and who doesn’t? How much time should he spend in Boehner’s office and with whom? Will lawmakers stand and clap for lines they support and remain seated for those they oppose? Those are all elements under discussion."   read more

Washington State Supreme Court Rules that Swearing at the Police is not a Crime

E.J.J.’s attorney, Lila J. Silverstein, said her client was only trying to protect his sister. One of the justices agreed he was right to be concerned. In a concurring opinion, Supreme Court Justice Steven Gonzalez, wrote that E.J.J. had reason to be concerned for the safety of his relatives because he “is a young black man in a city where the police have been found by the United States Department of Justice to use excessive force against nonviolent black youth.”   read more

Generation Change: Millennials now Outnumber Baby Boomers…and Their Politics are Different

There are now 83.1 million millennials in the United States, according to the Census Bureau. That compares to 75.4 million baby boomers. A study by Gallup showed that 30% of adult millennials identify as liberal, with 28% saying they’re conservative and 40% claiming to be moderate. That compares to only 21% of baby boomers who say they’re liberal, compared to 44% conservative and 33% moderate.   read more

Republicans Have Chosen Presidential and Vice-Presidential Candidates from Western States in 17 Elections; Democrats 0

Since the mid-19th century, the Republican Party has nominated a westerner 17 times to pursue the presidency or vice presidency. In contrast to Republicans, Democrats have yet to choose a single westerner for the presidential ticket or as a running mate. None of the current Democrats running or thinking of running are from the West.   read more

White Families more likely to Live in Better Neighborhoods than Black Families with Same Income

The study looked at the median income of neighborhoods. For instance, the typical black family with an income of $50,000 lives in a neighborhood in which the median income is less than $43,000. But a typical white family with the same income lives in a neighborhood with a median income of almost $53,000. “When you look at the evidence of how important neighborhoods are, you really worry about the long-term consequences of these patterns of racial and economic segregation,” said Sean Reardon.   read more

In Unprecedented Change, No Death Sentences in Texas in First Half of Year

The adoption of a law in 2005 that gave state prosecutors the option of pursuing life-without-parole sentences in capital murder cases has clearly had an effect. Since then, the size of Texas’ death row has been shrinking. It currently stands at 260 individuals, down from 460 in 1999. The death row population is now dwarfed by the number of people serving a life-without-parole sentence in the state: 745.   read more

Obama Administration Ends 16-Year Rule Forcing Non-Federally-Funded Marijuana Research to be Approved by Government

Until now, non-federally funded research of marijuana had to undergo review by the Public Health Service. This rule was put into place years ago out of concern that government guidelines for such research weren’t strong enough. The Obama administration, however, has announced that the agency’s approval is no longer needed. Other rules affecting independent marijuana studies still apply, such as obtaining medical marijuana only from NIDA's Drug Supply Program in Mississippi.   read more

Defense Dept. Employees Used Government Charge Cards at “Adult Entertainment Establishments” 900 Times in One Year

One Air Force airman racked up $4,686 in charges on his government travel card at the VIP room in the Sapphire Gentlemen’s Club near Las Vegas. The Pentagon's inspector general recommended closer attention be paid to charges coming from strip clubs. Strip club trade exec Angelina Spencer urged respect for Pentagon employees' "right to pursue a moment of happiness in the type of entertainment they choose, whether it’s a martini, a good cigar, bearing arms or bare arms.”   read more

Chaos and Coup at Chemical Safety Board

CSB member Rick Engler claimed to have taken over the agency, delegating himself "Administrative Authority.” Engler then ordered the suspension of CSB’s entire executive staff, placing some on administrative leave. The staffers were marched out of the building under armed guard and barred from returning or talking to other CSB staff. In carrying out his actions, Engler “presided over the escalation from a toxic work environment to thermonuclear war,” said PEER's Jeff Ruch.   read more

At Least 224 Prison Escapees are Still Unaccounted For

Included in the figure are the two convicted killers who recently made a daring escape from the Clinton Correctional Facility in upstate New York. The manhunt involving 800 federal, state and local law enforcement officers has been ongoing. Other fugitives include a convicted murderer who broke out through prison ventilation ducts, and an Indiana murderer who escaped in a garbage truck. Another convict packaged himself inside a furniture crate being shipped out.   read more

Can 3-D Printed Rats Replace Animal Dissection and Experimentation?

Science instructors shouldn't worry that the artificial rats would not measure up to the real deal. NecropSynth says its 3-D animals would have “layers so that they feel like real tissue,” and simulate bones and muscles. Hollow conduits with colored gel would represent the vascular and nervous systems. More importantly, NecropSynth believes that its process could potentially save the lives of the 6 million to 12 million animals that are killed annually for use in biology classes.   read more

Border Patrol Agents Accused 3-Year-Old of Crossing Border in Search of Work

Agents interviewed Y.F. and wrote on the appropriate form that he said he was looking for work. "The impossibility of the interview, in spite of the DHS officers’ affirmations of veracity and the rule of government regularity is plain on the face of the writings themselves: Y-F- was three years old at the time he was interrogated,” the brief said.   read more

U.S. Repatriates U.S.-Born Orphans to Brazil (Note: They’re Boa Constrictors)

Nine years ago, a white boa constrictor named Lucy or Diamond Princess was smuggled from Brazil’s Niterói Zoo by Jeremy Stone, a collector, breeder and seller of reptiles. Lucy wound up in Utah, where she had eight offspring while kept by Stone. Stone was able to sell Lucy’s offspring for tens of thousands of dollars. The Federal Bureau of Investigation eventually seized eight snakes, while federal prosecutors charged Stone with unlawfully transporting wildlife in the U.S.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1436 News
1 2 3 ... 90 Next