Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1150 News
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New FDA Food Safety Regulation may Drive up the Cost of Beer

The FDA wants to classify companies that distribute spent grain to farms as animal feed manufacturers. Breweries regularly sell or give their spent grain, which is left over from the beer-making process, to dairy farms, which feed it to cows. Breweries would have two choices: Pass this cost onto consumers in the form of higher beer prices, or stop selling the spent grain to farms and just dump it in landfills, which would be less environmentally friendly.   read more

Portland Dumps Millions of Gallons of Drinking Water after Young Man Urinates in Reservoir…Again

Officials in Portland, Oregon, have decided to empty nearly 40 million gallons from the city’s primary reservoir for drinking water because an individual urinated in it. The decision marks the second time in three years that the city has flushed large portions of its water supply because someone peed in it. The latest dump, delivered by 19-year-old Trey McDaniel, was caught on a video surveillance camera.   read more

Federal Agency Charges for Reports Available Free Online

Around since 1950, NTIS was set up as a clearinghouse for technical papers produced by the government. It has continued to sell these reports to the public even though many of them can be had for free through other agencies. For instance, anyone interested in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health’s handy report on chemical hazards can order a free copy here. Or they can pay the NTIS $30.   read more

U.S. Security Barriers on Border with Mexico May Disrupt Pumas more than Humans

“The suggestion is that the intermittent fencing present in this part of the world does affect some native species, but does not necessarily restrict the movement of humans (including illegal migrants), who may negatively impact native species.” In some study areas, pumas had largely abandoned habitats divided by a border wall. But coatis, which aren’t inclined to relocate like pumas, could be more impacted by the barriers and might experience a collapse in their population.   read more

Retired Supreme Court Justice Stevens Suggests Adding 5 Words to Second Amendment to Clarify Right to Bear Arms

Stevens proposes a five-word change to the Second Amendment. As he would write it, it reads: “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms when serving in the Militia shall not be infringed.” Those five words, which would clarify the Second Amendment to bring it in line with what Stevens says is the framers’ intent, could prove to do more to protect generations to come than all the armed guards in the world.   read more

North Dakota: The State that Loves Drones

Since May 2013, there have been nine instances in which drones have been used in the Grand Forks area. They include searching a flooded river for drowning victims, photographing a train collision, photographing river bank erosion and damage to historic buildings, searching for two suspects accused of auto theft and child molestation and taking photos of an outdoor murder scene.   read more

Baltimore County Solves its Homicides; North Richmond Doesn’t

Law enforcement in Baltimore County, Maryland, say they closed 100% of their homicide cases last year—a remarkable feat for any jurisdiction, even one that has only 20 killings a year. North Richmond, an unincorporated stretch of Contra Costa County measuring only 1.5 square miles, recorded 19 homicides last year. Most went unsolved, with charges being filed in only five of the cases.   read more

Hackers Break into Corporate Systems through Vending Machines and Online Restaurant Menus

When an employee uses a company computer to order food through an online menu, they can open up a cyber door for intruders to slip through and gain access to the local network of servers. Vending machines can provide a backdoor into a secure network. Many machines contain minicomputers that allow the vendor to remotely check on the supplies of soft drinks. But that system can be used by hackers to infiltrate the computers of the company hosting the vending machines.   read more

Religious Candy Cane Case Enters 10th Year

In 2003, a teacher refused to let third-grader Jonathan Morgan pass out the pens attached to cards describing “The Legend of the Candy Cane.” Some Christians believe that the “J” shape of candy canes stands for Jesus and that the red stripes symbolize Jesus’ blood. Jonathan’s parents and three other couples sued the school district in December 2004. Most of the claims were killed by a Fifth Circuit ruling in 2011.   read more

Supreme Court Says “Genug” to Kvetching Rabbi

A rabbi who frequently complained about service on his favorite airline has lost his case before the U.S. Supreme Court, which said enough-is-enough to the kvetching plaintiff. Rabbi Ginsberg brought suit against Northwest Airlines after it kicked him out of its frequent flyer program in 2008. The airline claimed he abused the program. In six months, the rabbi filed 24 complaints over travel problems, nine of which were related to his luggage arriving late at baggage pickup.   read more

Labor Dept. Rejects NFL Cheerleaders’ Request for Minimum Wage Protection

Even team mascots are paid better—much better—than cheerleaders: $23,000 a year. And the cheerleaders are required to pay for their travel and team-mandated cosmetics. The Raiderettes are also subject to fines for various infractions, such as wearing unapproved underwear or having the wrong shade of fake tan.   read more

Navy Gives up on $900 Million Nuclear Sub after Employee Set it on Fire So He Could Go Home Early

The USS Miami nuclear submarine survived military campaigns in the Middle East and the Balkans, but couldn’t overcome the petty sabotage of an American civilian worker who just wanted to go home early. Casey Fury started a blaze on the sub that grew into an inferno which raged for more than 12 hours before 100 firefighters put it out. The reason he set the fire, Fury said, was because he wanted to leave work early due to anxiety caused by heated text messages with his girlfriend.   read more

In Defense of Government Fonts

Font nerds have been upset since a 14-year-old student became a media darling for figuring out that the U.S. government could save half a billion dollars a year if it switched to a different font for printed materials. Suvir Mirchandani compared four different fonts to see if any one of them used less ink. He determined the Garamond font required 24% less. But experts in the world of fonts weren’t convinced. Thomas Phinney said the student’s conclusions were “a bit off-base.”   read more

Court Rules that Wells Fargo is a Citizen of South Dakota, not California

Citing the principle of “diversity jurisdiction,”—that when a civil case involves residents of different states, the case can be heard by a federal court—the bank had the case removed to federal court, where it was dismissed. McKeown noted “One might think that 150 years after Congress established national banks in 1863, the question of their citizenship for purposes of diversity jurisdiction would be well established. Not so."   read more

ABC Faces Continued Billion-Dollar Lawsuit for Calling “Lean, Finely Textured Beef” “Pink Slime”

The three meat companies filed a $1.2 billion suit in 2012 against ABC, claiming the network, including anchor Diane Sawyer, ran a “disinformation campaign” against the additive. According to the suit, “There is not a more offensive way of describing a food product than to call it ‘slime,’ which is a noxious, repulsive, and filthy fluid not safe for human consumption.”   read more

14-Year-Old Calculates U.S. Government could Save $136 Million a Year by Changing Fonts

The Pittsburgh-area student tested four fonts, Garamond, Times New Roman, Century Gothic and Comic Sans to see which used the least amount of ink in printing various letters. Garamond came up the winner. Based on the General Services Administration’s (GSA) estimated cost of ink, which is $467 million annually, Mirchandani found the federal government could save nearly 30% of its ink costs, or $136 million a year, if it used Garamond exclusively.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1150 News
1 2 3 ... 72 Next

Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1150 News
1 2 3 ... 72 Next

New FDA Food Safety Regulation may Drive up the Cost of Beer

The FDA wants to classify companies that distribute spent grain to farms as animal feed manufacturers. Breweries regularly sell or give their spent grain, which is left over from the beer-making process, to dairy farms, which feed it to cows. Breweries would have two choices: Pass this cost onto consumers in the form of higher beer prices, or stop selling the spent grain to farms and just dump it in landfills, which would be less environmentally friendly.   read more

Portland Dumps Millions of Gallons of Drinking Water after Young Man Urinates in Reservoir…Again

Officials in Portland, Oregon, have decided to empty nearly 40 million gallons from the city’s primary reservoir for drinking water because an individual urinated in it. The decision marks the second time in three years that the city has flushed large portions of its water supply because someone peed in it. The latest dump, delivered by 19-year-old Trey McDaniel, was caught on a video surveillance camera.   read more

Federal Agency Charges for Reports Available Free Online

Around since 1950, NTIS was set up as a clearinghouse for technical papers produced by the government. It has continued to sell these reports to the public even though many of them can be had for free through other agencies. For instance, anyone interested in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health’s handy report on chemical hazards can order a free copy here. Or they can pay the NTIS $30.   read more

U.S. Security Barriers on Border with Mexico May Disrupt Pumas more than Humans

“The suggestion is that the intermittent fencing present in this part of the world does affect some native species, but does not necessarily restrict the movement of humans (including illegal migrants), who may negatively impact native species.” In some study areas, pumas had largely abandoned habitats divided by a border wall. But coatis, which aren’t inclined to relocate like pumas, could be more impacted by the barriers and might experience a collapse in their population.   read more

Retired Supreme Court Justice Stevens Suggests Adding 5 Words to Second Amendment to Clarify Right to Bear Arms

Stevens proposes a five-word change to the Second Amendment. As he would write it, it reads: “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms when serving in the Militia shall not be infringed.” Those five words, which would clarify the Second Amendment to bring it in line with what Stevens says is the framers’ intent, could prove to do more to protect generations to come than all the armed guards in the world.   read more

North Dakota: The State that Loves Drones

Since May 2013, there have been nine instances in which drones have been used in the Grand Forks area. They include searching a flooded river for drowning victims, photographing a train collision, photographing river bank erosion and damage to historic buildings, searching for two suspects accused of auto theft and child molestation and taking photos of an outdoor murder scene.   read more

Baltimore County Solves its Homicides; North Richmond Doesn’t

Law enforcement in Baltimore County, Maryland, say they closed 100% of their homicide cases last year—a remarkable feat for any jurisdiction, even one that has only 20 killings a year. North Richmond, an unincorporated stretch of Contra Costa County measuring only 1.5 square miles, recorded 19 homicides last year. Most went unsolved, with charges being filed in only five of the cases.   read more

Hackers Break into Corporate Systems through Vending Machines and Online Restaurant Menus

When an employee uses a company computer to order food through an online menu, they can open up a cyber door for intruders to slip through and gain access to the local network of servers. Vending machines can provide a backdoor into a secure network. Many machines contain minicomputers that allow the vendor to remotely check on the supplies of soft drinks. But that system can be used by hackers to infiltrate the computers of the company hosting the vending machines.   read more

Religious Candy Cane Case Enters 10th Year

In 2003, a teacher refused to let third-grader Jonathan Morgan pass out the pens attached to cards describing “The Legend of the Candy Cane.” Some Christians believe that the “J” shape of candy canes stands for Jesus and that the red stripes symbolize Jesus’ blood. Jonathan’s parents and three other couples sued the school district in December 2004. Most of the claims were killed by a Fifth Circuit ruling in 2011.   read more

Supreme Court Says “Genug” to Kvetching Rabbi

A rabbi who frequently complained about service on his favorite airline has lost his case before the U.S. Supreme Court, which said enough-is-enough to the kvetching plaintiff. Rabbi Ginsberg brought suit against Northwest Airlines after it kicked him out of its frequent flyer program in 2008. The airline claimed he abused the program. In six months, the rabbi filed 24 complaints over travel problems, nine of which were related to his luggage arriving late at baggage pickup.   read more

Labor Dept. Rejects NFL Cheerleaders’ Request for Minimum Wage Protection

Even team mascots are paid better—much better—than cheerleaders: $23,000 a year. And the cheerleaders are required to pay for their travel and team-mandated cosmetics. The Raiderettes are also subject to fines for various infractions, such as wearing unapproved underwear or having the wrong shade of fake tan.   read more

Navy Gives up on $900 Million Nuclear Sub after Employee Set it on Fire So He Could Go Home Early

The USS Miami nuclear submarine survived military campaigns in the Middle East and the Balkans, but couldn’t overcome the petty sabotage of an American civilian worker who just wanted to go home early. Casey Fury started a blaze on the sub that grew into an inferno which raged for more than 12 hours before 100 firefighters put it out. The reason he set the fire, Fury said, was because he wanted to leave work early due to anxiety caused by heated text messages with his girlfriend.   read more

In Defense of Government Fonts

Font nerds have been upset since a 14-year-old student became a media darling for figuring out that the U.S. government could save half a billion dollars a year if it switched to a different font for printed materials. Suvir Mirchandani compared four different fonts to see if any one of them used less ink. He determined the Garamond font required 24% less. But experts in the world of fonts weren’t convinced. Thomas Phinney said the student’s conclusions were “a bit off-base.”   read more

Court Rules that Wells Fargo is a Citizen of South Dakota, not California

Citing the principle of “diversity jurisdiction,”—that when a civil case involves residents of different states, the case can be heard by a federal court—the bank had the case removed to federal court, where it was dismissed. McKeown noted “One might think that 150 years after Congress established national banks in 1863, the question of their citizenship for purposes of diversity jurisdiction would be well established. Not so."   read more

ABC Faces Continued Billion-Dollar Lawsuit for Calling “Lean, Finely Textured Beef” “Pink Slime”

The three meat companies filed a $1.2 billion suit in 2012 against ABC, claiming the network, including anchor Diane Sawyer, ran a “disinformation campaign” against the additive. According to the suit, “There is not a more offensive way of describing a food product than to call it ‘slime,’ which is a noxious, repulsive, and filthy fluid not safe for human consumption.”   read more

14-Year-Old Calculates U.S. Government could Save $136 Million a Year by Changing Fonts

The Pittsburgh-area student tested four fonts, Garamond, Times New Roman, Century Gothic and Comic Sans to see which used the least amount of ink in printing various letters. Garamond came up the winner. Based on the General Services Administration’s (GSA) estimated cost of ink, which is $467 million annually, Mirchandani found the federal government could save nearly 30% of its ink costs, or $136 million a year, if it used Garamond exclusively.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1150 News
1 2 3 ... 72 Next