Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1748 News
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Traffic Deaths Up 30% in Cities that Turned Off Red-Light Cameras at Traffic Signal Intersections

Many communities have ended their red-light camera programs in recent years amid complaints that they are designed to raise money through tickets rather than to enhance safety. Some courts have sided with motorists against the programs. "Debates over automated enforcement often center on the hassle of getting a ticket and paying a fine," said IIHS's Adrian Lund. "It's important to remember that there are hundreds of people walking around who wouldn't be here if not for red-light cameras."   read more

Republican and Democratic Lawmakers Speak in Different Languages

Perhaps what the researchers found is evidence of a technological advance in political communication, of both parties exerting more partisan discipline in keeping all their members using the same language. But even if it’s just communications strategy that’s driving the polarization of language, it still matters. In a world of complex challenges, it’s hard to come up with constructive solutions when the decision-makers can’t even agree on what words to use in talking about them.   read more

Government Scientists Want Volunteers to Submit Genetic, Lifestyle Information

Government scientists are seeking 1 million volunteers willing to share the innermost secrets of their genes and daily lives as part of an ambitious 10-year research project to understand the causes and cures of disease. Those selected will be asked to provide a detailed medical history and blood samples so researchers can extract DNA. They will also be asked to report information about themselves — including their age, race, income, education, sexual orientation and gender identity.   read more

Woodstock Producers Say Republicans Stole Their Logo for Convention

The presenters of the iconic Woodstock Music Festival, noticing a similarity between its original logo and the one plastered around Cleveland for the RNC, are calling on the Republican Party to adopt changes to its platform that come in line with the festival’s message.   read more

Colorado Town May Have THC in Water Supply

Officials announced Thursday that some field tests had found THC, marijuana’s psychoactive ingredient, in the water in Hugo, Colorado, but they were awaiting the results of more definitive laboratory tests Friday which would also tell how much THC is in the water, if its presence is confirmed. State health officials say it’s too soon to know whether THC in the water would intoxicate people who drink it. Experts doubt adding raw pot to water would make it intoxicating.   read more

Snowden’s New Mission: Protecting Journalists from Dangers of Trackable Smart Phones

Snowden said he was concerned that cellphones and smartphones serve as tracking devices that automatically create electronic dossiers that give third parties, including governments, detailed information on location. As an example of the dangers of location data, he cited the mortar attack in 2012 by the Syrian government that killed Marie Colvin, an American journalist who was reporting in Homs, Syria, for The Sunday Times of London.   read more

Federal Judge Opens Door to Gender-Neutral Passports

Government lawyers argued that moving beyond two gender choices for passports would upend officials' ability to verify identities and backgrounds because of reliance on drivers' licenses and birth certificates issued by states offering only male and female gender options. Judge Jackson appeared exasperated at times, saying the State Dept. needs to catch up to a new era in which gender identification is not as clear as it was in the past. "A lot of things are changing in our world," Jackson said.   read more

Philadelphia Experiment on Treating Gunshot Victims Could Impact Trauma Care Nationwide

Philadelphia hospitals will conduct an experiment that asks: When gunshot victims are being rushed to the ER, could paramedics do more to save them by doing less? It's an approach that could change practices at trauma centers across the country. And everyone in Philadelphia could become a study subject, though the biggest effect will probably be in the most violent neighborhoods — poor, mostly black sections where people are skeptical of essentially being experimented on.   read more

Court Excludes Mug Shots from Freedom of Information Requests

"Booking photos—snapped 'in the vulnerable and embarrassing moments immediately after [an individual is] accused, taken into custody, and deprived of most liberties'—fit squarely within this realm of embarrassing and humiliating information," Judge Cook wrote. "A disclosed booking photo casts a long, damaging shadow over the depicted individual." Despite the ruling, mug shots can still be released under a FOIA request if it serves the interests of the public at large.   read more

Overweight People Die Up to Three Years Early

Overweight people lose a year of life on average and moderately overweight people lose 3 years. The excess risk of premature death is about three times as big for a man who gets fat as for a woman who gets fat. Carrying too much weight is now second to smoking as a cause of premature death in North America and Europe; smoking causes about a quarter of all premature deaths there while being too heavy now causes about 14 to 20 percent of such deaths.   read more

8 Out of 10 American Motorists Confess to Road Rage

Eight million drivers engaged in bumping or ramming a vehicle on purpose or getting out of their cars to confront another driver. The most common behavior was purposely tailgating another vehicle. That translates to about 104 million drivers when spread over the national population of motorists. Nearly half of drivers reported yelling at another driver and honking their horn "to show annoyance or anger." About a third of drivers indicated they'd made angry gestures at another driver.   read more

NSA Claims Olympics Spying Allegation is “Implausible”… but No Denial

The NSA argues the claims are implausible speculation about a program that may never have existed. "These plaintiffs allege willful, intentional, unlawful conduct in violation of constitutional rights by our elected representatives at the highest levels and by our government," Judge Shelby said. Former Mayor Rocky Anderson said he confirmed the spying program with a source who worked for the NSA during the Olympics. "They have not denied these allegations," he said.   read more

Vietnam Vet Presented Purple Heart after 47 Years

Herman thought he would never see Fred again, and no idea that his long-lost friend had spent weeks burning up the phone lines to get Herman his Purple Heart — and to keep it a secret. "I'm almost crying, ya'll. I never thought this would happen," Herman said after Swan pinned the combat medal on him. He choked back tears. So did Swan. "It shocked me. Tears came into my eyes ... I never expected this," said Herman. "I'm honored. I appreciate everything they did for me. Everything."   read more

8 Texas Prison Inmates Break Out of Jail Cell to Aid Armed Guard Who Collapsed from Heart Attack

At least eight inmates were in a basement holding cell when the lone guard slumped and fell. Inmates yelled for help, broke out of the cell and banged on doors. Sheriff's deputies rushed to the basement, corralled the inmates back into the cell and summoned paramedics, who revived the guard. The June 23 incident was captured on surveillance video at the district courts building in Weatherford.   read more

Computers Auditioning to Replace Humans as Airport Carry-On Luggage Examiners

American will spend $5 million on the changes, said the airline's chief operating officer, Robert Isom, in a letter to employees. He said neither the increased automation nor CT scanners will solve TSA's problems, "but they are both huge steps in the right direction." The use of CT technology at airport checkpoints would eliminate the need for screeners to examine X-ray images of every bag. It could also let travelers leave liquids and laptops in their carry-on bags.   read more

Health Insurers’ Spending on Costly "Specialty" Prescription Drugs Quadrupled Over Decade

Prescription drug costs have spiked in the U.S. in the last decade, straining the budgets of insurers and state and federal health programs and becoming a hot issue in Congress and the presidential race. Specialty drugs were once a small niche, generally injected drugs for cancer and complex chronic conditions that required refrigeration, extra oversight by nurses and preauthorization for insurance coverage. That's changed amid the surge of very pricey treatments approved in recent years.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1748 News
1 2 3 ... 110 Next

Unusual News

1 to 16 of about 1748 News
1 2 3 ... 110 Next

Traffic Deaths Up 30% in Cities that Turned Off Red-Light Cameras at Traffic Signal Intersections

Many communities have ended their red-light camera programs in recent years amid complaints that they are designed to raise money through tickets rather than to enhance safety. Some courts have sided with motorists against the programs. "Debates over automated enforcement often center on the hassle of getting a ticket and paying a fine," said IIHS's Adrian Lund. "It's important to remember that there are hundreds of people walking around who wouldn't be here if not for red-light cameras."   read more

Republican and Democratic Lawmakers Speak in Different Languages

Perhaps what the researchers found is evidence of a technological advance in political communication, of both parties exerting more partisan discipline in keeping all their members using the same language. But even if it’s just communications strategy that’s driving the polarization of language, it still matters. In a world of complex challenges, it’s hard to come up with constructive solutions when the decision-makers can’t even agree on what words to use in talking about them.   read more

Government Scientists Want Volunteers to Submit Genetic, Lifestyle Information

Government scientists are seeking 1 million volunteers willing to share the innermost secrets of their genes and daily lives as part of an ambitious 10-year research project to understand the causes and cures of disease. Those selected will be asked to provide a detailed medical history and blood samples so researchers can extract DNA. They will also be asked to report information about themselves — including their age, race, income, education, sexual orientation and gender identity.   read more

Woodstock Producers Say Republicans Stole Their Logo for Convention

The presenters of the iconic Woodstock Music Festival, noticing a similarity between its original logo and the one plastered around Cleveland for the RNC, are calling on the Republican Party to adopt changes to its platform that come in line with the festival’s message.   read more

Colorado Town May Have THC in Water Supply

Officials announced Thursday that some field tests had found THC, marijuana’s psychoactive ingredient, in the water in Hugo, Colorado, but they were awaiting the results of more definitive laboratory tests Friday which would also tell how much THC is in the water, if its presence is confirmed. State health officials say it’s too soon to know whether THC in the water would intoxicate people who drink it. Experts doubt adding raw pot to water would make it intoxicating.   read more

Snowden’s New Mission: Protecting Journalists from Dangers of Trackable Smart Phones

Snowden said he was concerned that cellphones and smartphones serve as tracking devices that automatically create electronic dossiers that give third parties, including governments, detailed information on location. As an example of the dangers of location data, he cited the mortar attack in 2012 by the Syrian government that killed Marie Colvin, an American journalist who was reporting in Homs, Syria, for The Sunday Times of London.   read more

Federal Judge Opens Door to Gender-Neutral Passports

Government lawyers argued that moving beyond two gender choices for passports would upend officials' ability to verify identities and backgrounds because of reliance on drivers' licenses and birth certificates issued by states offering only male and female gender options. Judge Jackson appeared exasperated at times, saying the State Dept. needs to catch up to a new era in which gender identification is not as clear as it was in the past. "A lot of things are changing in our world," Jackson said.   read more

Philadelphia Experiment on Treating Gunshot Victims Could Impact Trauma Care Nationwide

Philadelphia hospitals will conduct an experiment that asks: When gunshot victims are being rushed to the ER, could paramedics do more to save them by doing less? It's an approach that could change practices at trauma centers across the country. And everyone in Philadelphia could become a study subject, though the biggest effect will probably be in the most violent neighborhoods — poor, mostly black sections where people are skeptical of essentially being experimented on.   read more

Court Excludes Mug Shots from Freedom of Information Requests

"Booking photos—snapped 'in the vulnerable and embarrassing moments immediately after [an individual is] accused, taken into custody, and deprived of most liberties'—fit squarely within this realm of embarrassing and humiliating information," Judge Cook wrote. "A disclosed booking photo casts a long, damaging shadow over the depicted individual." Despite the ruling, mug shots can still be released under a FOIA request if it serves the interests of the public at large.   read more

Overweight People Die Up to Three Years Early

Overweight people lose a year of life on average and moderately overweight people lose 3 years. The excess risk of premature death is about three times as big for a man who gets fat as for a woman who gets fat. Carrying too much weight is now second to smoking as a cause of premature death in North America and Europe; smoking causes about a quarter of all premature deaths there while being too heavy now causes about 14 to 20 percent of such deaths.   read more

8 Out of 10 American Motorists Confess to Road Rage

Eight million drivers engaged in bumping or ramming a vehicle on purpose or getting out of their cars to confront another driver. The most common behavior was purposely tailgating another vehicle. That translates to about 104 million drivers when spread over the national population of motorists. Nearly half of drivers reported yelling at another driver and honking their horn "to show annoyance or anger." About a third of drivers indicated they'd made angry gestures at another driver.   read more

NSA Claims Olympics Spying Allegation is “Implausible”… but No Denial

The NSA argues the claims are implausible speculation about a program that may never have existed. "These plaintiffs allege willful, intentional, unlawful conduct in violation of constitutional rights by our elected representatives at the highest levels and by our government," Judge Shelby said. Former Mayor Rocky Anderson said he confirmed the spying program with a source who worked for the NSA during the Olympics. "They have not denied these allegations," he said.   read more

Vietnam Vet Presented Purple Heart after 47 Years

Herman thought he would never see Fred again, and no idea that his long-lost friend had spent weeks burning up the phone lines to get Herman his Purple Heart — and to keep it a secret. "I'm almost crying, ya'll. I never thought this would happen," Herman said after Swan pinned the combat medal on him. He choked back tears. So did Swan. "It shocked me. Tears came into my eyes ... I never expected this," said Herman. "I'm honored. I appreciate everything they did for me. Everything."   read more

8 Texas Prison Inmates Break Out of Jail Cell to Aid Armed Guard Who Collapsed from Heart Attack

At least eight inmates were in a basement holding cell when the lone guard slumped and fell. Inmates yelled for help, broke out of the cell and banged on doors. Sheriff's deputies rushed to the basement, corralled the inmates back into the cell and summoned paramedics, who revived the guard. The June 23 incident was captured on surveillance video at the district courts building in Weatherford.   read more

Computers Auditioning to Replace Humans as Airport Carry-On Luggage Examiners

American will spend $5 million on the changes, said the airline's chief operating officer, Robert Isom, in a letter to employees. He said neither the increased automation nor CT scanners will solve TSA's problems, "but they are both huge steps in the right direction." The use of CT technology at airport checkpoints would eliminate the need for screeners to examine X-ray images of every bag. It could also let travelers leave liquids and laptops in their carry-on bags.   read more

Health Insurers’ Spending on Costly "Specialty" Prescription Drugs Quadrupled Over Decade

Prescription drug costs have spiked in the U.S. in the last decade, straining the budgets of insurers and state and federal health programs and becoming a hot issue in Congress and the presidential race. Specialty drugs were once a small niche, generally injected drugs for cancer and complex chronic conditions that required refrigeration, extra oversight by nurses and preauthorization for insurance coverage. That's changed amid the surge of very pricey treatments approved in recent years.   read more
1 to 16 of about 1748 News
1 2 3 ... 110 Next