Featured Story

FBI Criminal Database Includes 77 Million Americans

Thursday, August 21, 2014
But many of the Americans with a database entry are in the system only because they were arrested, even though they were never charged or convicted of a crime. Records are often not updated to reflect that an individual was found not guilty or guilty of a minor offense, such as trespassing while exercising free speech rights during a demonstration.   read more
Latest News

Top Stories

  • If Ferguson is 67% African-American, Why are the Mayor, the City Council Majority and 50 of 53 Police White?

    Wednesday, August 20, 2014
    Although the population of Ferguson is 67% African-American, the mayor is a white Republican and five of the six members of the city council are white, as are 50 of Ferguson’s 53 police officers. One of the main reasons for this disparity is that the city holds its local elections separate from state and federal balloting. Residents vote for governor or president in even-numbered years, but Ferguson residents go to the polls to elect the mayor and city council in April of odd-numbered years.   read more
  • Lawsuit Accuses White House of Setting Roadblocks to Freedom of Information Act Requests

    Tuesday, August 19, 2014
    The plaintiffs claim the trouble started in April 2009, when then-White House counsel Gregory Craig informed Executive Branch operations that any FOIA requests that might have “White House equities” should go through his office. The term has never been defined, but some agencies are taking it to mean any document that mentions the White House.   read more
  • Rick Perry First Texas Governor to be Indicted while in Office Since World War I

    Monday, August 18, 2014
    The Public Integrity Unit at the time was focused on one of Perry’s pet projects, the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. One of its executives, Jerry Cobbs, was indicted last December after an $11 million grant went through the agency without proper review, according to The Dallas Morning News. The money went to Peloton Therapeutics, one of whose investors had given $440,000 to the campaigns of Perry and Lt. Governor David Dewhurst.   read more

Unusual News

  • Los Angeles Considers Giving Citizens Lottery Tickets if they Vote

    Monday, August 18, 2014
    With as few as 8% of registered voters showing up to vote in some recent elections, the Los Angeles Ethics Commission has urged the City Council to consider improving turnout with a lottery pilot program. No actual vote would be required, but those participating would have to show up at the polls to participate. There was no decision on what the grand prize for participating in the democratic process.   read more
  • Legal Battle over Wording of Soda Tax Ballot Measure in Berkeley

    Sunday, August 17, 2014
    A suit (pdf) was filed last week by two men, at least one of whom has ties to the No Berkeley Beverage Tax campaign, which receives funding from the American Beverage Association. It claims that the city substituted the phrase “high-calorie, sugary drinks” for “sugar-sweetened beverage” in the ballot language. The plaintiffs, Anthony Johnson and Leon Cain, would prefer the phrase “sugar-sweetened beverage products” to be used.   read more
  • 98-Year-Old Seeks Exoneration for Espionage Conviction 64 Years Ago

    Saturday, August 16, 2014
    Neither Moskowitz nor Brothman testified in their own defense because they didn’t want their affair to become known. Nevertheless, she was convicted in 1950 and served two years in prison. Moskowitz also had to pay a $10,000 fine (equal to nearly $100,000 today), and, after being released, she struggled to put her life back together with such a black mark against her during the Cold War.   read more

Where is the Money Going?

  • 45% of Americans Try to Include Organic Foods in their Diet…and 15% Try to Avoid Them

    Wednesday, August 20, 2014
    Regionally, organic foods rated the highest in the West (54%), followed by 47% in the Midwest, 43% in the South and 39% in the East. Half of urbanities say they try to eat organic foods, while 46% of those in the suburbs said the same thing. Only 37% of rural and small-town residents try to include organic foods in their diets.   read more
  • Three-Quarters of Small Wind Turbines Produced in U.S. are Sold to other Countries

    Wednesday, August 20, 2014
    Producers of small wind turbines in the United States aren’t selling as many of their units to American operators, so they’ve shifted their sales efforts to foreign buyers. The move comes largely because Congress did not renew a $13 billion subsidy, the Wind Production Tax Credit (WPTC), designed to help the wind industry in the U.S.   read more
  • $3 Billion Job Training Program Can Lead to Debt instead of Work

    Tuesday, August 19, 2014
    A big mistake in developing the program, according to Williams, was a lack of proper government oversight. The feds provided money for the program, while the states took care of licensing training programs. However, officials are prohibited from recommending schools to prospective students, which leaves unscrupulous colleges an opening to exploit those looking for a new career.   read more

Controversies

  • This Obama-Appointed Judge Signed off on the CIA Killing of a U.S. Citizen

    Wednesday, August 20, 2014
    While serving in the Office of Legal Counsel, Barron and another lawyer, Marty Lederman, wrote the first of two memorandums that sought to rationalize how the administration could target and kill an American Islamic cleric, Anwar al-Aulaqi, in Yemen for his suspected ties to al-Qaeda. Their first attempt to explain how the Central Intelligence Agency could legally assassinate al-Aulaqi was only seven pages long.   read more
  • Justice Dept. Adds Money Laundering to Drug-Related Charges against FedEx

    Tuesday, August 19, 2014
    The U.S. Department of Justice contends that company officials were aware of illegal shipments from online pharmacies, but accepted them anyway, which if proven would make FedEx criminally liable. But now prosecutors have added money-laundering charges and the company could face a fine of $1.6 billion if found guilty on all counts.   read more
  • Energy Dept. to Make Thousands of Research Papers Available to Public for Free

    Tuesday, August 19, 2014
    In response to orders from the White House, the DOE has established a Web portal through which anyone can read research produced with public funds. The new site, known as PAGES (Public Access Gateway for Energy and Science), is expected to feature 20,000 to 30,000 additions annually on a wide range of scientific subjects. Papers will become available one year after their publication in a journal.   read more

U.S. and the World

  • Dramatic Rise in Attacks on Aid Workers

    Wednesday, August 20, 2014
    Humanitarian Outcomes says in its new report that there were 251 separate attacks in 30 nations last year involving 460 humanitarian workers. But about 75% of all these attacks occurred in just five countries: Afghanistan, Syria, South Sudan, Pakistan and Sudan. Afghanistan is by far the worst place for humanitarian missions, with 81 workers dying there in 2013.   read more
  • Mexico Opens Oil Reserves to Foreign Companies for First Time in 76 Years

    Monday, August 18, 2014
    The change in energy policy means Pemex, the state-run oil company, will cease to have complete control over oil and gas production for the first time since 1938. Foreign oil companies will now be able to bid on oil projects, particularly those in the Gulf of Mexico, where there has been almost no exploration south of the border.   read more
  • First Civil Case against Bank under 2001 Anti-Terrorism Act Opens

    Saturday, August 16, 2014
    Arab Bank “knowingly and willfully” financially helped Hamas and other “terrorists who have killed, injured and maimed civilians” and “aided and abetted and conspired to commit said acts of international terrorism,” according to the lawsuit filed by 297 Americans.   read more

Appointments and Resignations

  • 34 Foreign Service Ambassador Nominees Remain Unconfirmed

    Tuesday, August 19, 2014
    The Senate, charged with approving President Barack Obama’s ambassadorial choices, is sitting on 34 such nominations, as well as 20 political appointments of people selected to lead American embassies around the world. One area of particular concern is Africa, which has a 20% vacancy rate in its U.S. embassies. Nine career Foreign Service officers are awaiting confirmations for those jobs.   read more
  • U.S. Ambassador to Ireland: Who Is Kevin O’Malley?

    Monday, August 18, 2014
    O’Malley, an attorney in St. Louis, is a longtime supporter of President Barack Obama. O’Malley has strong Irish roots; all four of his grandparents were born in Westport, County Mayo, Ireland. Until being nominated for the Dublin post, O’Malley held dual Irish and American citizenship, but gave up his Irish citizenship to accept the ambassadorial position.   read more
  • For the Last 65 Years, Every U.S. Treasurer has been a Woman

    Sunday, August 17, 2014
    For the past 65 years presidents of both parties have continued a tradition started by Harry Truman—appointing a woman as U.S. Treasurer. No, not the Secretary of the Treasury; white men appear to have a lock on that job. The treasurer is responsible for “oversight” of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and of the U.S. gold reserves in Fort Knox. And her signature appears on the paper currency printed during her term.   read more

Featured Story

FBI Criminal Database Includes 77 Million Americans

Thursday, August 21, 2014
But many of the Americans with a database entry are in the system only because they were arrested, even though they were never charged or convicted of a crime. Records are often not updated to reflect that an individual was found not guilty or guilty of a minor offense, such as trespassing while exercising free speech rights during a demonstration.   read more
Latest News

Top Stories

  • If Ferguson is 67% African-American, Why are the Mayor, the City Council Majority and 50 of 53 Police White?

    Wednesday, August 20, 2014
    Although the population of Ferguson is 67% African-American, the mayor is a white Republican and five of the six members of the city council are white, as are 50 of Ferguson’s 53 police officers. One of the main reasons for this disparity is that the city holds its local elections separate from state and federal balloting. Residents vote for governor or president in even-numbered years, but Ferguson residents go to the polls to elect the mayor and city council in April of odd-numbered years.   read more
  • Lawsuit Accuses White House of Setting Roadblocks to Freedom of Information Act Requests

    Tuesday, August 19, 2014
    The plaintiffs claim the trouble started in April 2009, when then-White House counsel Gregory Craig informed Executive Branch operations that any FOIA requests that might have “White House equities” should go through his office. The term has never been defined, but some agencies are taking it to mean any document that mentions the White House.   read more
  • Rick Perry First Texas Governor to be Indicted while in Office Since World War I

    Monday, August 18, 2014
    The Public Integrity Unit at the time was focused on one of Perry’s pet projects, the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. One of its executives, Jerry Cobbs, was indicted last December after an $11 million grant went through the agency without proper review, according to The Dallas Morning News. The money went to Peloton Therapeutics, one of whose investors had given $440,000 to the campaigns of Perry and Lt. Governor David Dewhurst.   read more

Unusual News

  • Los Angeles Considers Giving Citizens Lottery Tickets if they Vote

    Monday, August 18, 2014
    With as few as 8% of registered voters showing up to vote in some recent elections, the Los Angeles Ethics Commission has urged the City Council to consider improving turnout with a lottery pilot program. No actual vote would be required, but those participating would have to show up at the polls to participate. There was no decision on what the grand prize for participating in the democratic process.   read more
  • Legal Battle over Wording of Soda Tax Ballot Measure in Berkeley

    Sunday, August 17, 2014
    A suit (pdf) was filed last week by two men, at least one of whom has ties to the No Berkeley Beverage Tax campaign, which receives funding from the American Beverage Association. It claims that the city substituted the phrase “high-calorie, sugary drinks” for “sugar-sweetened beverage” in the ballot language. The plaintiffs, Anthony Johnson and Leon Cain, would prefer the phrase “sugar-sweetened beverage products” to be used.   read more
  • 98-Year-Old Seeks Exoneration for Espionage Conviction 64 Years Ago

    Saturday, August 16, 2014
    Neither Moskowitz nor Brothman testified in their own defense because they didn’t want their affair to become known. Nevertheless, she was convicted in 1950 and served two years in prison. Moskowitz also had to pay a $10,000 fine (equal to nearly $100,000 today), and, after being released, she struggled to put her life back together with such a black mark against her during the Cold War.   read more

Where is the Money Going?

  • 45% of Americans Try to Include Organic Foods in their Diet…and 15% Try to Avoid Them

    Wednesday, August 20, 2014
    Regionally, organic foods rated the highest in the West (54%), followed by 47% in the Midwest, 43% in the South and 39% in the East. Half of urbanities say they try to eat organic foods, while 46% of those in the suburbs said the same thing. Only 37% of rural and small-town residents try to include organic foods in their diets.   read more
  • Three-Quarters of Small Wind Turbines Produced in U.S. are Sold to other Countries

    Wednesday, August 20, 2014
    Producers of small wind turbines in the United States aren’t selling as many of their units to American operators, so they’ve shifted their sales efforts to foreign buyers. The move comes largely because Congress did not renew a $13 billion subsidy, the Wind Production Tax Credit (WPTC), designed to help the wind industry in the U.S.   read more
  • $3 Billion Job Training Program Can Lead to Debt instead of Work

    Tuesday, August 19, 2014
    A big mistake in developing the program, according to Williams, was a lack of proper government oversight. The feds provided money for the program, while the states took care of licensing training programs. However, officials are prohibited from recommending schools to prospective students, which leaves unscrupulous colleges an opening to exploit those looking for a new career.   read more

Controversies

  • This Obama-Appointed Judge Signed off on the CIA Killing of a U.S. Citizen

    Wednesday, August 20, 2014
    While serving in the Office of Legal Counsel, Barron and another lawyer, Marty Lederman, wrote the first of two memorandums that sought to rationalize how the administration could target and kill an American Islamic cleric, Anwar al-Aulaqi, in Yemen for his suspected ties to al-Qaeda. Their first attempt to explain how the Central Intelligence Agency could legally assassinate al-Aulaqi was only seven pages long.   read more
  • Justice Dept. Adds Money Laundering to Drug-Related Charges against FedEx

    Tuesday, August 19, 2014
    The U.S. Department of Justice contends that company officials were aware of illegal shipments from online pharmacies, but accepted them anyway, which if proven would make FedEx criminally liable. But now prosecutors have added money-laundering charges and the company could face a fine of $1.6 billion if found guilty on all counts.   read more
  • Energy Dept. to Make Thousands of Research Papers Available to Public for Free

    Tuesday, August 19, 2014
    In response to orders from the White House, the DOE has established a Web portal through which anyone can read research produced with public funds. The new site, known as PAGES (Public Access Gateway for Energy and Science), is expected to feature 20,000 to 30,000 additions annually on a wide range of scientific subjects. Papers will become available one year after their publication in a journal.   read more

U.S. and the World

  • Dramatic Rise in Attacks on Aid Workers

    Wednesday, August 20, 2014
    Humanitarian Outcomes says in its new report that there were 251 separate attacks in 30 nations last year involving 460 humanitarian workers. But about 75% of all these attacks occurred in just five countries: Afghanistan, Syria, South Sudan, Pakistan and Sudan. Afghanistan is by far the worst place for humanitarian missions, with 81 workers dying there in 2013.   read more
  • Mexico Opens Oil Reserves to Foreign Companies for First Time in 76 Years

    Monday, August 18, 2014
    The change in energy policy means Pemex, the state-run oil company, will cease to have complete control over oil and gas production for the first time since 1938. Foreign oil companies will now be able to bid on oil projects, particularly those in the Gulf of Mexico, where there has been almost no exploration south of the border.   read more
  • First Civil Case against Bank under 2001 Anti-Terrorism Act Opens

    Saturday, August 16, 2014
    Arab Bank “knowingly and willfully” financially helped Hamas and other “terrorists who have killed, injured and maimed civilians” and “aided and abetted and conspired to commit said acts of international terrorism,” according to the lawsuit filed by 297 Americans.   read more

Appointments and Resignations

  • 34 Foreign Service Ambassador Nominees Remain Unconfirmed

    Tuesday, August 19, 2014
    The Senate, charged with approving President Barack Obama’s ambassadorial choices, is sitting on 34 such nominations, as well as 20 political appointments of people selected to lead American embassies around the world. One area of particular concern is Africa, which has a 20% vacancy rate in its U.S. embassies. Nine career Foreign Service officers are awaiting confirmations for those jobs.   read more
  • U.S. Ambassador to Ireland: Who Is Kevin O’Malley?

    Monday, August 18, 2014
    O’Malley, an attorney in St. Louis, is a longtime supporter of President Barack Obama. O’Malley has strong Irish roots; all four of his grandparents were born in Westport, County Mayo, Ireland. Until being nominated for the Dublin post, O’Malley held dual Irish and American citizenship, but gave up his Irish citizenship to accept the ambassadorial position.   read more
  • For the Last 65 Years, Every U.S. Treasurer has been a Woman

    Sunday, August 17, 2014
    For the past 65 years presidents of both parties have continued a tradition started by Harry Truman—appointing a woman as U.S. Treasurer. No, not the Secretary of the Treasury; white men appear to have a lock on that job. The treasurer is responsible for “oversight” of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and of the U.S. gold reserves in Fort Knox. And her signature appears on the paper currency printed during her term.   read more