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Secretary of Treasury: Who Is Steven Mnuchin?

Steven Mnuchin foreclosed on at least 50,000 homes during the Great Recession. In fact, in 2011, a federal investigation forced Mnuchin's bank to agree to the issuance of a Consent Order to remedy numerous abusive practices it was using to make money. Recently, a complaint filed with the Dept of Housing accused his bank of violating the Fair Housing Act by “redlining,” an illegal practice of not doing business in minority neighborhoods in order to avoid making home loans to minorities.   read more

Acting Administrator of the Administration for Community Living: Who Is Edwin Walker?

Walker worked for Missouri’s Dept of Social Services and in 1988 was named director of the Missouri Division of Aging. He pushed through a program that made it easier for the elderly to remain in their homes, instead of being forced into nursing facilities. Walker joined the Administration on Aging in 1992 as associate commissioner for State and Community Programs. He later moved up to be Director of Program Operations and Development, and by 2009 was Deputy Assistant Secretary at AoA.   read more

Director, National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Who Is Martin Keller?

A native of Germany, Keller came to the U.S. in 1994 as a consultant for biotech firm Diversa. He then joined the company full time and became director of screening and technology development. Diversa worked to turn organisms into enzymes that were used in chemicals. Keller even took organisms from boiling-hot thermal pools at Yellowstone National Park to be used in different compounds. Keller's work at Oak Ridge Lab centered on developing biological replacements for petroleum-based fuels.   read more

Acting Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services: Who Is Sue Swenson?

Swenson's background is in marketing, but she became interested in the plight of the disabled after one of her three sons, Charlie, was found not long after his birth to be profoundly disabled.She began learning how to advocate for her son’s needs and started to work for the rights of all disabled. She testified about the disabled before a U.S. Senate subcommittee in 1993 and, three years later, she found herself working with that subcommittee as a Kennedy Fellow in the Senate.   read more

Chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission: Who Is Norman Bay?

Bay became the first Chinese-American U.S. Attorney during the Wen Ho Lee case. The government was accused of prosecuting Lee due to his Chinese background and Lee was held without bail for months. Bay helped negotiate the plea deal that freed Lee. Bay's nomination to chair FERC brought pushback from a disgruntled energy industry and some senators who said a FERC employee shouldn’t jump to the chairmanship without having served on the commission. So Bay did so prior to taking over as chairman.   read more

Chief of the Army Corps of Engineers: Who Is Todd Semonite?

In 2004, Semonite was sent to Iraq and charged with restoring electricity to the country, whose infrastructure had been severely damaged in the fighting. He also worked to provide power on a fair basis, unlike former Iraqi Premier Saddam Hussein, who had favored Sunni Muslim areas when building power lines. Semonite was sent to Afghanistan in 2014 to head up the effort to rebuild not infrastructure, but that country’s armed forces and police department.   read more

Department of Transportation: Who Is Elaine Chao?

The GAO reported that Chao’s Wage and Hour Division had consistently failed to follow up on reports of wage theft, and that WHD staffers often failed to pick up the phone when called by those seeking help. Chao made $1.2 million as a director at Wells Fargo, which holds more than $400 million in Trump mortgages. As DOT secretary, she will be able to regulate the business of her father, who has given millions to his daughter and her husband, Sen. Mitch McConnell.   read more

Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency: Who Is Vincent Stewart?

Stewart is the first Marine, and the first African-American, to lead the Defense Intelligence Agency. Born in Kingston, Jamaica, he earned master’s degrees, including in national security and strategic studies from the Naval War College. His first specialty was tanks, but he moved into signals intelligence--the gathering of data from radio transmissions. Since taking over DIA, Stewart said he wants to build an information system that will facilitate sharing of data among intelligence services.   read more

Department of Health and Human Services: Who Is Tom Price?

Price has long been a member of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons, a right-wing group that has fought against anti-smoking campaigns; opposed mandatory vaccinations; linked vaccines to autism and abortion to breast cancer, in both cases without medical evidence; and denied that the HIV virus causes AIDS. In the Georgia Senate, he advocated for caps on medical malpractice awards and fought efforts to make it easier for Georgia’s undocumented immigrants to get drivers licenses.   read more

Department of Defense Inspector General: Who Is Glenn Fine?

Among his achievements was his documentation of George W. Bush administration firings of four U.S. Attorneys for partisan reasons and its packing of the Civil Rights Division with political appointees. His office also investigated the FBI’s handling of Zacarias Moussaoui, who had enrolled in a flight school as part of the 9/11 terror plot. Fine’s office was critical of the bureau for not taking the threat posed by Moussaoui seriously.   read more

Acting Under Secretary of the International Trade Administration: Who Is Kenneth Hyatt?

Hyatt attended Sidwell Friends School, where many children of presidents, other government figures and those in the media have gone. In 1983 he worked for Bain & Co. in Boston, London and Munich, then in 1989 became a principal and partner in a conflict management group. He founded a similar firm, CMI New York, in 1997. Among other things, that company trained negotiators involved in constitutional talks between the old South African government and the African National Congress.   read more

Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service: Who Is Elanor Starmer?

Starmer joined the USDA in 2011, initially helping develop the “Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food” program. In 2015, she was made a senior adviser to Secretary Tom Vilsack. Not long after starting at the Agricultural Marketing Service, Starmer had to defuse a controversy when the American Egg Board was accused of trying to thwart the sales of an eggless mayonnaise. The head of the egg board stepped down and was replaced by Starmer’s predecessor at the AMS, Anne Alonzo.   read more

Secretary of the Department of Education: Who Is Betsy DeVos?

The next Education Secretary, if Donald Trump gets his wish, will be a billionaire heiress with no training or experience in education who advocates privatizing the public school system despite having never attended public schools nor allowing her children to do so. She advocates gradually privatizing public schools and allowing them to be more religiously oriented. Devos has compared her work to a biblical battleground where she wants to “advance God’s Kingdom.”   read more

At $125,000 Per Dose, Will This Be the Most Expensive Drug in the World?

The FDA has approved Spinraza, the first drug to treat patients with spinal muscular atrophy, a disease that can kill infants before they turn 2. Biogen, which is licensing it from Ionis, said one dose will cost $125,000--equaling up to $750,000 to cover the the first year, and about $375,000 annually after that. Patients presumably take it the rest of their lives. The pricing could put it in the cross hairs of lawmakers and perhaps discourage insurers from covering it.   read more

Attorneys General of 15 States Plan Court Action if Trump Scraps Clean Power Plan

No sooner had President Obama called the Clean Power Plan “the single most important step that America has ever made in the fight against global climate change” than his Republican antagonists vowed to defeat it. But if If Donald Trump withdraws from the plan, his administration will meet 15 states battered by climate change in court. Trump has long attacked rising global temperatures as a hoax, and he has appointed fossil fuel executives and environmental opponents to top cabinet posts.   read more

Release of Nonviolent Drug Offenders Helps Bring U.S. Prison Population to 12-Year Low

The nation’s jail and prison population decreased in 2015, and the number of adults locked up or on parole or probation fell to a level not seen since 2002 while overall crime continued to drop. Reasons for the declining incarceration rates include the federal prison system releasing thousands of nonviolent drug offenders in 2015 and states seeking to save money by enacting legislation and policies to reduce prison populations. Total prison population: 1.5 million,the lowest level since 2005.   read more
33 to 48 of about 2952 News
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Top Stories

33 to 48 of about 2952 News
Prev 1 2 3 4 5 ... 185 Next

Secretary of Treasury: Who Is Steven Mnuchin?

Steven Mnuchin foreclosed on at least 50,000 homes during the Great Recession. In fact, in 2011, a federal investigation forced Mnuchin's bank to agree to the issuance of a Consent Order to remedy numerous abusive practices it was using to make money. Recently, a complaint filed with the Dept of Housing accused his bank of violating the Fair Housing Act by “redlining,” an illegal practice of not doing business in minority neighborhoods in order to avoid making home loans to minorities.   read more

Acting Administrator of the Administration for Community Living: Who Is Edwin Walker?

Walker worked for Missouri’s Dept of Social Services and in 1988 was named director of the Missouri Division of Aging. He pushed through a program that made it easier for the elderly to remain in their homes, instead of being forced into nursing facilities. Walker joined the Administration on Aging in 1992 as associate commissioner for State and Community Programs. He later moved up to be Director of Program Operations and Development, and by 2009 was Deputy Assistant Secretary at AoA.   read more

Director, National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Who Is Martin Keller?

A native of Germany, Keller came to the U.S. in 1994 as a consultant for biotech firm Diversa. He then joined the company full time and became director of screening and technology development. Diversa worked to turn organisms into enzymes that were used in chemicals. Keller even took organisms from boiling-hot thermal pools at Yellowstone National Park to be used in different compounds. Keller's work at Oak Ridge Lab centered on developing biological replacements for petroleum-based fuels.   read more

Acting Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services: Who Is Sue Swenson?

Swenson's background is in marketing, but she became interested in the plight of the disabled after one of her three sons, Charlie, was found not long after his birth to be profoundly disabled.She began learning how to advocate for her son’s needs and started to work for the rights of all disabled. She testified about the disabled before a U.S. Senate subcommittee in 1993 and, three years later, she found herself working with that subcommittee as a Kennedy Fellow in the Senate.   read more

Chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission: Who Is Norman Bay?

Bay became the first Chinese-American U.S. Attorney during the Wen Ho Lee case. The government was accused of prosecuting Lee due to his Chinese background and Lee was held without bail for months. Bay helped negotiate the plea deal that freed Lee. Bay's nomination to chair FERC brought pushback from a disgruntled energy industry and some senators who said a FERC employee shouldn’t jump to the chairmanship without having served on the commission. So Bay did so prior to taking over as chairman.   read more

Chief of the Army Corps of Engineers: Who Is Todd Semonite?

In 2004, Semonite was sent to Iraq and charged with restoring electricity to the country, whose infrastructure had been severely damaged in the fighting. He also worked to provide power on a fair basis, unlike former Iraqi Premier Saddam Hussein, who had favored Sunni Muslim areas when building power lines. Semonite was sent to Afghanistan in 2014 to head up the effort to rebuild not infrastructure, but that country’s armed forces and police department.   read more

Department of Transportation: Who Is Elaine Chao?

The GAO reported that Chao’s Wage and Hour Division had consistently failed to follow up on reports of wage theft, and that WHD staffers often failed to pick up the phone when called by those seeking help. Chao made $1.2 million as a director at Wells Fargo, which holds more than $400 million in Trump mortgages. As DOT secretary, she will be able to regulate the business of her father, who has given millions to his daughter and her husband, Sen. Mitch McConnell.   read more

Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency: Who Is Vincent Stewart?

Stewart is the first Marine, and the first African-American, to lead the Defense Intelligence Agency. Born in Kingston, Jamaica, he earned master’s degrees, including in national security and strategic studies from the Naval War College. His first specialty was tanks, but he moved into signals intelligence--the gathering of data from radio transmissions. Since taking over DIA, Stewart said he wants to build an information system that will facilitate sharing of data among intelligence services.   read more

Department of Health and Human Services: Who Is Tom Price?

Price has long been a member of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons, a right-wing group that has fought against anti-smoking campaigns; opposed mandatory vaccinations; linked vaccines to autism and abortion to breast cancer, in both cases without medical evidence; and denied that the HIV virus causes AIDS. In the Georgia Senate, he advocated for caps on medical malpractice awards and fought efforts to make it easier for Georgia’s undocumented immigrants to get drivers licenses.   read more

Department of Defense Inspector General: Who Is Glenn Fine?

Among his achievements was his documentation of George W. Bush administration firings of four U.S. Attorneys for partisan reasons and its packing of the Civil Rights Division with political appointees. His office also investigated the FBI’s handling of Zacarias Moussaoui, who had enrolled in a flight school as part of the 9/11 terror plot. Fine’s office was critical of the bureau for not taking the threat posed by Moussaoui seriously.   read more

Acting Under Secretary of the International Trade Administration: Who Is Kenneth Hyatt?

Hyatt attended Sidwell Friends School, where many children of presidents, other government figures and those in the media have gone. In 1983 he worked for Bain & Co. in Boston, London and Munich, then in 1989 became a principal and partner in a conflict management group. He founded a similar firm, CMI New York, in 1997. Among other things, that company trained negotiators involved in constitutional talks between the old South African government and the African National Congress.   read more

Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service: Who Is Elanor Starmer?

Starmer joined the USDA in 2011, initially helping develop the “Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food” program. In 2015, she was made a senior adviser to Secretary Tom Vilsack. Not long after starting at the Agricultural Marketing Service, Starmer had to defuse a controversy when the American Egg Board was accused of trying to thwart the sales of an eggless mayonnaise. The head of the egg board stepped down and was replaced by Starmer’s predecessor at the AMS, Anne Alonzo.   read more

Secretary of the Department of Education: Who Is Betsy DeVos?

The next Education Secretary, if Donald Trump gets his wish, will be a billionaire heiress with no training or experience in education who advocates privatizing the public school system despite having never attended public schools nor allowing her children to do so. She advocates gradually privatizing public schools and allowing them to be more religiously oriented. Devos has compared her work to a biblical battleground where she wants to “advance God’s Kingdom.”   read more

At $125,000 Per Dose, Will This Be the Most Expensive Drug in the World?

The FDA has approved Spinraza, the first drug to treat patients with spinal muscular atrophy, a disease that can kill infants before they turn 2. Biogen, which is licensing it from Ionis, said one dose will cost $125,000--equaling up to $750,000 to cover the the first year, and about $375,000 annually after that. Patients presumably take it the rest of their lives. The pricing could put it in the cross hairs of lawmakers and perhaps discourage insurers from covering it.   read more

Attorneys General of 15 States Plan Court Action if Trump Scraps Clean Power Plan

No sooner had President Obama called the Clean Power Plan “the single most important step that America has ever made in the fight against global climate change” than his Republican antagonists vowed to defeat it. But if If Donald Trump withdraws from the plan, his administration will meet 15 states battered by climate change in court. Trump has long attacked rising global temperatures as a hoax, and he has appointed fossil fuel executives and environmental opponents to top cabinet posts.   read more

Release of Nonviolent Drug Offenders Helps Bring U.S. Prison Population to 12-Year Low

The nation’s jail and prison population decreased in 2015, and the number of adults locked up or on parole or probation fell to a level not seen since 2002 while overall crime continued to drop. Reasons for the declining incarceration rates include the federal prison system releasing thousands of nonviolent drug offenders in 2015 and states seeking to save money by enacting legislation and policies to reduce prison populations. Total prison population: 1.5 million,the lowest level since 2005.   read more
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