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Czech Republic’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is Hynek Kmoníček?

In 2006, Kmoníček was appointed ambassador to India. Among his many responsibilities was helping a Czech scientist who had been arrested by Indian officials for illegally collecting rare beetles. The scientist later discovered a beetle in China, which he named Anthaxia Kmoníček--for Kmoníček. Kmoníček has predicted that “Donald Trump’s administration will be a combination of the aggressive isolationism of Andrew Jackson together with the strategy of Richard Nixon minus Kissinger.”   read more

Ambassador of Malaysia to the United States: Who Is Zulhasnan Rafique?

Zulhasnan became Federal Territories minister in 2006 after his predecessor was convicted of corruption charges. When a top Malaysian official, en route to address the UN General Assembly, was forced at L.A. Airport security to remove his shoes and belt, Zulhasnan demanded that U.S. government officials be subjected to the same treatment when they traveled to Malaysia. Later, Zulhasnan became executive director of a company specializing in property development and the production of palm oil.   read more

The Case for National Service

President Kennedy famously said “ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.” This was a rallying cry for over a million Americans to serve, and contributed to creation of services like Peace Corps. Today, President Trump proposes getting government out of the business of national service. Yet in today's divided nation, new research demonstrates that national service programs can bring people together.   read more

Ambassador of Pakistan to the United States: Who Is Aizaz Ahmad Chaudhry?

As Foreign Ministry spokesperson in 2013, Chaudhry found himself in an awkward position when secret documents were published showing that the Pakistani government had cooperated with the CIA’s drone bombing program inside Pakistan’s borders. Chaudhry was left to explain that even if this was true, the current government, installed four months earlier, would not continue the complicity, stating “We regard such strikes as a violation of our sovereignty as well as international law."   read more

Georgia’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is David Bakradze?

Bakradze was named ambassador to Greece in 2012. He returned home in 2014 to become state minister on European and Euro-Atlantic Integration. Early in his short tenure as ambassador to Greece, Bakradze, along with five other ambassadors, has requested U.S. help in stopping Russian interference in the countries’ internal affairs. Bakradze cited Russian broadcasts into Georgia, a former Soviet republic, urging its citizens to oppose Georgia becoming a member of NATO.   read more

Ambassador from Poland to the United States: Who Is Piotr Wilczek?

Wilczek, a literary scholar with no previous diplomatic experience, is no stranger to the U.S., having taught Polish literature and culture as a visiting professor. He belongs to the American Study Group at the Polish Institute of Int'l Affairs, where members discuss and analyze political and cultural developments in the U.S. Despite his lack of experience, Wilzcek earned praise back home for his defense of Poland’s right-populist government against a critical article in The Washington Post.   read more

The Hidden Cost of America’s Preference for Hiring Military Veterans

Nearly a third of recent veterans have federal jobs, many more than would have them in the absence of preferential hiring. This makes it an effective policy to express the nation’s thanks for veterans’ sacrifices. Yet all policies come with costs. Applicants without military service pay some of them by having a lower chance to get these jobs, and non-vets are concentrated among women and, to a lesser extent, Hispanic, Asian and gay men. The nation loses from a less diverse federal service.   read more

Cape Verde’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is Carlos Veiga?

As prime minister, Veiga in 1992 oversaw the creation of a new constitution and flag for the country. He also began to bring in private investment to the nation that is heavily dependent on foreign aid and remittances to keep its economy going. Veiga was known for moving his cabinet ministers around and sometimes firing them to keep from developing a power base from which they could challenge him. In 1998, Veiga was injured in a plane crash that killed one of his bodyguards.   read more

Assistant Secretary for Community Planning and Development: Who Is Neal Rackleff?

As director of the City of Houston Department of Housing and Community Development (HCDD), Rackleff was responsible for community development projects, affordable housing, and neighborhood revitalization. During his term as director, HCDD produced 7,800 multifamily housing units and helped 1,700 single-family homeowners with rebuilding hurricane-damaged homes. He also worked on the redevelopment of the historic downtown building now housing the J.W. Marriott Hotel.   read more

Director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency: Who Is Brock Long?

Long joined the George W. Bush administration in 2001 as a hurricane program manager in FEMA for six states—but, significantly, not Louisiana, which bore the brunt of Hurricane Katrina. One of his achievements was the distribution of an educational hurricane computer game for grade-schools. In 2008, Long became director of the Alabama Emergency Management Agency, where he directed the state’s response to incidents as different as the H1N1 flu virus and the BP Deepwater Horizon oil disaster.   read more

White Policeman Fired for not Killing Black Man with Gun

“I am not going to shoot you, brother.” In what world do those words being said by a police officer result in that officer being fired? You don’t have to go down the rabbit hole in search of a place where up is down, left is right, and war is peace. All you need do is go to Weirton, West Virginia. Police Officer Stephen Mader was fired from his job for not killing a Black man when he could have. He’s now in a battle that seems both absurd and highlights the absurdity of our times.   read more

Montenegro’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is Nebojša Kaluđerović?

When Serbia and Montenegro split in 2006, in June Kaluđerović became Montenegro’s representative at the United Nations, running his country’s mission out of his son’s bedroom, and ambassador after that country became a member. While serving as UN ambassador, Kaluđerović was invited to speak at a New York meeting of the Nero Wolfe society, the Wolfe Pack, because the fictional detective created by Rex Stout was said to have been born in Montenegro.   read more

Director of the United States Secret Service: Who Is Randolph Alles?

Alles is the first Secret Service director in more than 100 years who didn't come from within Secret Service ranks. In 2003, in spite of official denials, Alles defended the use of a napalm-like substance in the Iraq war, saying, “The generals love napalm. It has a big psychological effect.” Working for Border Protection in 2013, Alles defended the use of $18 million Predator drones, costing more than $12,000 an hour to operate, for drug interdictions when cheaper platforms were available.   read more

Ambassador of Jamaica to the United States: Who Is Audrey Marks?

Marks founded six businesses, including a banana plantation, a real estate development firm, a transportation company, and a venture capital operation. Her biggest success came in 1997, when she founded Paymaster (Jamaica) Ltd, the country’s first consolidated bill payment agency. It became a big success, with more than 1.4 million customers and more than $40 billion in annual transactions. She later sold 80% of her ownership in the company, but remained its chairman.   read more

Inter-American Commission Takes U.S. Human Rights Abuse Case for First Time

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has given the U.S. three months to respond to charges of abuse of human rights, from the family of a San Diego man who was beaten to death by Border Patrol agents in 2010. It is the first time the commission has taken up a claim for extrajudicial killing, torture and obstruction of justice in the U.S. Border watchers consider it a major test of the Trump administration’s stand on immigration, crime and law enforcement.   read more

Director of the Selective Service System: Who Is Don Benton?

Don Benton, a former Washington state senator, chaired Trump’s presidential campaign in the Pacific Northwest. Trump first rewarded Benton with a job in the EPA, but he quickly wore out his welcome. So in April 2017, with little fanfare, Trump made Benton, whose company sells sales motivation programs but who never served in the military, director of the Selective Service System. Like Trump, Benton has a talent for sucking money out of campaigns--including Trump's--and into his businesses.   read more
17 to 32 of about 3050 News
Prev 1 2 3 4 ... 191 Next

Top Stories

17 to 32 of about 3050 News
Prev 1 2 3 4 ... 191 Next

Czech Republic’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is Hynek Kmoníček?

In 2006, Kmoníček was appointed ambassador to India. Among his many responsibilities was helping a Czech scientist who had been arrested by Indian officials for illegally collecting rare beetles. The scientist later discovered a beetle in China, which he named Anthaxia Kmoníček--for Kmoníček. Kmoníček has predicted that “Donald Trump’s administration will be a combination of the aggressive isolationism of Andrew Jackson together with the strategy of Richard Nixon minus Kissinger.”   read more

Ambassador of Malaysia to the United States: Who Is Zulhasnan Rafique?

Zulhasnan became Federal Territories minister in 2006 after his predecessor was convicted of corruption charges. When a top Malaysian official, en route to address the UN General Assembly, was forced at L.A. Airport security to remove his shoes and belt, Zulhasnan demanded that U.S. government officials be subjected to the same treatment when they traveled to Malaysia. Later, Zulhasnan became executive director of a company specializing in property development and the production of palm oil.   read more

The Case for National Service

President Kennedy famously said “ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.” This was a rallying cry for over a million Americans to serve, and contributed to creation of services like Peace Corps. Today, President Trump proposes getting government out of the business of national service. Yet in today's divided nation, new research demonstrates that national service programs can bring people together.   read more

Ambassador of Pakistan to the United States: Who Is Aizaz Ahmad Chaudhry?

As Foreign Ministry spokesperson in 2013, Chaudhry found himself in an awkward position when secret documents were published showing that the Pakistani government had cooperated with the CIA’s drone bombing program inside Pakistan’s borders. Chaudhry was left to explain that even if this was true, the current government, installed four months earlier, would not continue the complicity, stating “We regard such strikes as a violation of our sovereignty as well as international law."   read more

Georgia’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is David Bakradze?

Bakradze was named ambassador to Greece in 2012. He returned home in 2014 to become state minister on European and Euro-Atlantic Integration. Early in his short tenure as ambassador to Greece, Bakradze, along with five other ambassadors, has requested U.S. help in stopping Russian interference in the countries’ internal affairs. Bakradze cited Russian broadcasts into Georgia, a former Soviet republic, urging its citizens to oppose Georgia becoming a member of NATO.   read more

Ambassador from Poland to the United States: Who Is Piotr Wilczek?

Wilczek, a literary scholar with no previous diplomatic experience, is no stranger to the U.S., having taught Polish literature and culture as a visiting professor. He belongs to the American Study Group at the Polish Institute of Int'l Affairs, where members discuss and analyze political and cultural developments in the U.S. Despite his lack of experience, Wilzcek earned praise back home for his defense of Poland’s right-populist government against a critical article in The Washington Post.   read more

The Hidden Cost of America’s Preference for Hiring Military Veterans

Nearly a third of recent veterans have federal jobs, many more than would have them in the absence of preferential hiring. This makes it an effective policy to express the nation’s thanks for veterans’ sacrifices. Yet all policies come with costs. Applicants without military service pay some of them by having a lower chance to get these jobs, and non-vets are concentrated among women and, to a lesser extent, Hispanic, Asian and gay men. The nation loses from a less diverse federal service.   read more

Cape Verde’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is Carlos Veiga?

As prime minister, Veiga in 1992 oversaw the creation of a new constitution and flag for the country. He also began to bring in private investment to the nation that is heavily dependent on foreign aid and remittances to keep its economy going. Veiga was known for moving his cabinet ministers around and sometimes firing them to keep from developing a power base from which they could challenge him. In 1998, Veiga was injured in a plane crash that killed one of his bodyguards.   read more

Assistant Secretary for Community Planning and Development: Who Is Neal Rackleff?

As director of the City of Houston Department of Housing and Community Development (HCDD), Rackleff was responsible for community development projects, affordable housing, and neighborhood revitalization. During his term as director, HCDD produced 7,800 multifamily housing units and helped 1,700 single-family homeowners with rebuilding hurricane-damaged homes. He also worked on the redevelopment of the historic downtown building now housing the J.W. Marriott Hotel.   read more

Director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency: Who Is Brock Long?

Long joined the George W. Bush administration in 2001 as a hurricane program manager in FEMA for six states—but, significantly, not Louisiana, which bore the brunt of Hurricane Katrina. One of his achievements was the distribution of an educational hurricane computer game for grade-schools. In 2008, Long became director of the Alabama Emergency Management Agency, where he directed the state’s response to incidents as different as the H1N1 flu virus and the BP Deepwater Horizon oil disaster.   read more

White Policeman Fired for not Killing Black Man with Gun

“I am not going to shoot you, brother.” In what world do those words being said by a police officer result in that officer being fired? You don’t have to go down the rabbit hole in search of a place where up is down, left is right, and war is peace. All you need do is go to Weirton, West Virginia. Police Officer Stephen Mader was fired from his job for not killing a Black man when he could have. He’s now in a battle that seems both absurd and highlights the absurdity of our times.   read more

Montenegro’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is Nebojša Kaluđerović?

When Serbia and Montenegro split in 2006, in June Kaluđerović became Montenegro’s representative at the United Nations, running his country’s mission out of his son’s bedroom, and ambassador after that country became a member. While serving as UN ambassador, Kaluđerović was invited to speak at a New York meeting of the Nero Wolfe society, the Wolfe Pack, because the fictional detective created by Rex Stout was said to have been born in Montenegro.   read more

Director of the United States Secret Service: Who Is Randolph Alles?

Alles is the first Secret Service director in more than 100 years who didn't come from within Secret Service ranks. In 2003, in spite of official denials, Alles defended the use of a napalm-like substance in the Iraq war, saying, “The generals love napalm. It has a big psychological effect.” Working for Border Protection in 2013, Alles defended the use of $18 million Predator drones, costing more than $12,000 an hour to operate, for drug interdictions when cheaper platforms were available.   read more

Ambassador of Jamaica to the United States: Who Is Audrey Marks?

Marks founded six businesses, including a banana plantation, a real estate development firm, a transportation company, and a venture capital operation. Her biggest success came in 1997, when she founded Paymaster (Jamaica) Ltd, the country’s first consolidated bill payment agency. It became a big success, with more than 1.4 million customers and more than $40 billion in annual transactions. She later sold 80% of her ownership in the company, but remained its chairman.   read more

Inter-American Commission Takes U.S. Human Rights Abuse Case for First Time

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has given the U.S. three months to respond to charges of abuse of human rights, from the family of a San Diego man who was beaten to death by Border Patrol agents in 2010. It is the first time the commission has taken up a claim for extrajudicial killing, torture and obstruction of justice in the U.S. Border watchers consider it a major test of the Trump administration’s stand on immigration, crime and law enforcement.   read more

Director of the Selective Service System: Who Is Don Benton?

Don Benton, a former Washington state senator, chaired Trump’s presidential campaign in the Pacific Northwest. Trump first rewarded Benton with a job in the EPA, but he quickly wore out his welcome. So in April 2017, with little fanfare, Trump made Benton, whose company sells sales motivation programs but who never served in the military, director of the Selective Service System. Like Trump, Benton has a talent for sucking money out of campaigns--including Trump's--and into his businesses.   read more
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