Controversies

17 to 32 of about 4782 News
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Old, Error-Prone Drug Test Kits Re-Marketed as “New” Tool for Nation’s Police

“NEW!” Sirchie asserted, describing the kit as an “industry first.” The only problem is that there is nothing new about it except its name. Sirchie’s records show the new kits are little more than a repurposed chemical test that has been used to detect all manner of substances for more than a century. There is, then, no special “design” to the product. And the reliability of the tests for the criminal justice system is exactly as it has always been: limited, and prone to error.   read more

Reports of Sexual Abuse by Nation’s Doctors Prompt Patient Protection Efforts

A culture of secrecy and deference to physicians allows many doctors to keep practicing after they've been disciplined for sexual abuse of patients. In the thousands of cases examined, more than half the doctors disciplined for sexual misconduct since 1999 were still licensed to practice. Regulators or lawmakers in at least four states are using the findings to explore how their laws or rules can be improved. Some have already increased consumers' access to information about individual doctors.   read more

How Many Lethal Injections Does it take to Legally Kill a Man in Arizona? Judge Says Execution Witnesses Must See for Themselves.

The ruling marks a partial legal win for a coalition of news organizations that filed a lawsuit over secrecy surrounding lethal injections. Snow's order requires the state to allow execution witnesses to view the entirety of an execution. Under current protocol, executioners are not seen administering the drug. Execution witnesses in the death of Wood were not aware until several days later that he was injected 15 times with the two-drug combination that was supposed to kill him with one dose.   read more

U.S. Privacy Board in Disarray, Ripe For Trump Influence

A federal board responsible for protecting Americans against abuses by spy agencies is in disarray just weeks before Trump takes office. The board was revitalized after Edward Snowden's disclosures on the scope of U.S. spying in 2013. It concluded that the NSA's phone surveillance program was illegal. It has been crucial in ensuring a window into the secretive world of intelligence agencies. Sen. Ron Wyden said the panel's role as a government watchdog is "absolutely critical now."   read more

Obama Relying on 1953 Law to Prevent Future Presidents from Reversing Permanent Oil Lease Ban

The move puts finishing touches on Obama's environmental legacy while also testing Trump's promise to unleash the nation's untapped energy reserves. The actions were announced in conjunction with Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau. The White House said it's confident the president's order will withstand legal challenge and said the language of the statute provides no authority for subsequent presidents to undo permanent withdrawals.   read more

U.S. Sees Lowest Number of Death Sentences in More than 40 Years

"I think we are watching a major political climate change concerning capital punishment and it's reflected among reduced death sentences across the country," said DPIC's Dunham. "As fewer states use the death penalty and as it's used more sparingly in the states that do, we can expect long-term numbers to remain low and perhaps continue to drop." On the Supreme Court, only Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer have questioned the constitutionality of the death penalty.   read more

Cold Weather Breeds Climate-Change Doubters

People living in areas with periods of freezing weather are more likely to doubt climate change, as local weather seems to shape a person’s views. Researchers surveyed 12,000 people in the U.S. to determine whether regional weather caused them to either reject or accept climate change. “If you’re living in a place where there’s been more record cold weather than record heat lately, you may doubt reports of climate change,” said study co-author Peter Howe.   read more

U.S. Women Increasingly Use Marijuana during Pregnancy in Spite of Risks to Fetus

In 2014, almost 4% of pregnant women said they'd recently used marijuana, up from 2.4% in 2002. Laws legalizing medical marijuana don't prohibit use by pregnant women and don't include warnings about possible harms to the fetus. But besides low birth weights, newborns may face increased risks for anemia and other problems requiring intensive care. Memory and attention problems also have been found in older children whose moms used marijuana in pregnancy.   read more

Newly Disclosed DEA Records Reveal Massive Influx of Painkiller Shipments to West Virginia, Top State for Overdose Deaths

The DEA records — which leading drug wholesalers had fought in court to keep secret — show the wholesalers shipped ever-higher doses of the pills — a telltale sign of growing addictions — even as the death toll climbed. "These numbers will shake even the most cynical observer," said former Delegate/pharmacist Don Perdue. "Distributors have fed their greed on human frailties and to criminal effect. There is no excuse and should be no forgiveness."   read more

NSA Watchdog Who Criticized Snowden for Not Using “Official” Channels Retaliated against Whistleblower Who Did Exactly That

The case could offer some credence to Edward Snowden's claim that he could not have reported the government's domestic surveillance program without facing reprisals. Ellard received attention in 2014 for criticizing Snowden, the former NSA contractor who had leaked secret documents about the surveillance program. Snowden says he went public because he feared retaliation from his superiors if he had raised his concerns with them. Ellard had said that Snowden could have safely come to him.   read more

GOP Lawmakers Vow to Overturn New Obama Rule Protecting Nation’s Streams from Coal Mine Dumping

Opponents said the rule supports the environmental movement's efforts to reduce use of fossil fuels that contribute to global warming. NMA's Quinn argued that it will put tens of thousands of Americans out of work. But an Interior official projected that fewer than 300 jobs would be lost after the regulation takes effect. Sierra Club called the rule "a long overdue step toward guaranteeing every community in America is protected from the toxic water pollution caused by surface coal mining."   read more

Wave of Anti-LGBT Bills Seen in Republican-Dominated State Legislatures

State lawmakers introduced more than 200 anti-LGBT bills this year and dozens more have been drafted. “Religious freedom is a fundamental right,” said ACLU's Esseks. “Everybody has the right to believe whatever they want about God and religion, but none of that gives anybody the right to discriminate against other people.” Republicans in Congress, who will hold a majority in both chambers under Trump, may try to pass a law meant to allow anyone to act with impunity based on religious belief.   read more

Trump’s Attacks on Press Serve to Rally Public to Its Support

As Trump tries to burn the media village down, he may just be saving it. His running campaign of Twitter attacks and vows to punish the traditional news media is threatening to put the industry on more solid economic footing, where customers are willing to pay for it more regularly. As the country and the world head into this confusing new era, news organizations are in a position to make a newly urgent pitch: Buying a subscription is tantamount to supporting the pillars of democracy.   read more

Religious Freedom Law, Heavily Relied on by Justice Dept. to Fight State Anti-Muslim Actions, May be Ignored by Trump’s Attorney General

Civil rights advocates see a growing wave of intolerance that has been amplified by the victory of Trump. Experts on religious freedom worry Trump’s inauguration leaves the future of the religious freedom law in doubt. The man he has nominated to lead the Justice Dept, Sen. Jeff Sessions, has endorsed Trump’s call for a temporary ban on Muslim immigration. As the nation’s chief law enforcement officer, Sessions might be less sympathetic to pursuing investigations involving Muslim rights.   read more

California County Fights Chevron and School District to Defend Voter-Approved Law Limiting Oil Production

The San Ardo Field is the 46th largest oil field in the U.S. The oil is “heavy” and has the consistency of ketchup, but by injecting steam it is heated and extracted more easily. Chevron is the largest operator on the site, producing about 11,000 barrels of oil per day. Measure Z, presented to voters as a ban on fracking and risky oil operations to protect the region’s water, passed with 56% approval on Nov. 8. It prohibits fracking and other procedures deemed a danger to groundwater.   read more

U.S. Justice Dept. Sues Michigan City for Religious Discrimination in Rejecting Mosque Application

The Justice Dept civil rights division based its lawsuit on a law meant to prohibit religious discrimination and prevent unjustified burdens on people exercising their religion. Vanita Gupta, the civil rights division's chief, said they would continue to “aggressively protect” the rights of communities to live, pray and worship. “We have definitely seen a spike in these cases, in problems when it comes to minority religions,” Azzam Elder, lead lawyer for the community center, said Friday.   read more
17 to 32 of about 4782 News
Prev 1 2 3 4 ... 299 Next

Controversies

17 to 32 of about 4782 News
Prev 1 2 3 4 ... 299 Next

Old, Error-Prone Drug Test Kits Re-Marketed as “New” Tool for Nation’s Police

“NEW!” Sirchie asserted, describing the kit as an “industry first.” The only problem is that there is nothing new about it except its name. Sirchie’s records show the new kits are little more than a repurposed chemical test that has been used to detect all manner of substances for more than a century. There is, then, no special “design” to the product. And the reliability of the tests for the criminal justice system is exactly as it has always been: limited, and prone to error.   read more

Reports of Sexual Abuse by Nation’s Doctors Prompt Patient Protection Efforts

A culture of secrecy and deference to physicians allows many doctors to keep practicing after they've been disciplined for sexual abuse of patients. In the thousands of cases examined, more than half the doctors disciplined for sexual misconduct since 1999 were still licensed to practice. Regulators or lawmakers in at least four states are using the findings to explore how their laws or rules can be improved. Some have already increased consumers' access to information about individual doctors.   read more

How Many Lethal Injections Does it take to Legally Kill a Man in Arizona? Judge Says Execution Witnesses Must See for Themselves.

The ruling marks a partial legal win for a coalition of news organizations that filed a lawsuit over secrecy surrounding lethal injections. Snow's order requires the state to allow execution witnesses to view the entirety of an execution. Under current protocol, executioners are not seen administering the drug. Execution witnesses in the death of Wood were not aware until several days later that he was injected 15 times with the two-drug combination that was supposed to kill him with one dose.   read more

U.S. Privacy Board in Disarray, Ripe For Trump Influence

A federal board responsible for protecting Americans against abuses by spy agencies is in disarray just weeks before Trump takes office. The board was revitalized after Edward Snowden's disclosures on the scope of U.S. spying in 2013. It concluded that the NSA's phone surveillance program was illegal. It has been crucial in ensuring a window into the secretive world of intelligence agencies. Sen. Ron Wyden said the panel's role as a government watchdog is "absolutely critical now."   read more

Obama Relying on 1953 Law to Prevent Future Presidents from Reversing Permanent Oil Lease Ban

The move puts finishing touches on Obama's environmental legacy while also testing Trump's promise to unleash the nation's untapped energy reserves. The actions were announced in conjunction with Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau. The White House said it's confident the president's order will withstand legal challenge and said the language of the statute provides no authority for subsequent presidents to undo permanent withdrawals.   read more

U.S. Sees Lowest Number of Death Sentences in More than 40 Years

"I think we are watching a major political climate change concerning capital punishment and it's reflected among reduced death sentences across the country," said DPIC's Dunham. "As fewer states use the death penalty and as it's used more sparingly in the states that do, we can expect long-term numbers to remain low and perhaps continue to drop." On the Supreme Court, only Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer have questioned the constitutionality of the death penalty.   read more

Cold Weather Breeds Climate-Change Doubters

People living in areas with periods of freezing weather are more likely to doubt climate change, as local weather seems to shape a person’s views. Researchers surveyed 12,000 people in the U.S. to determine whether regional weather caused them to either reject or accept climate change. “If you’re living in a place where there’s been more record cold weather than record heat lately, you may doubt reports of climate change,” said study co-author Peter Howe.   read more

U.S. Women Increasingly Use Marijuana during Pregnancy in Spite of Risks to Fetus

In 2014, almost 4% of pregnant women said they'd recently used marijuana, up from 2.4% in 2002. Laws legalizing medical marijuana don't prohibit use by pregnant women and don't include warnings about possible harms to the fetus. But besides low birth weights, newborns may face increased risks for anemia and other problems requiring intensive care. Memory and attention problems also have been found in older children whose moms used marijuana in pregnancy.   read more

Newly Disclosed DEA Records Reveal Massive Influx of Painkiller Shipments to West Virginia, Top State for Overdose Deaths

The DEA records — which leading drug wholesalers had fought in court to keep secret — show the wholesalers shipped ever-higher doses of the pills — a telltale sign of growing addictions — even as the death toll climbed. "These numbers will shake even the most cynical observer," said former Delegate/pharmacist Don Perdue. "Distributors have fed their greed on human frailties and to criminal effect. There is no excuse and should be no forgiveness."   read more

NSA Watchdog Who Criticized Snowden for Not Using “Official” Channels Retaliated against Whistleblower Who Did Exactly That

The case could offer some credence to Edward Snowden's claim that he could not have reported the government's domestic surveillance program without facing reprisals. Ellard received attention in 2014 for criticizing Snowden, the former NSA contractor who had leaked secret documents about the surveillance program. Snowden says he went public because he feared retaliation from his superiors if he had raised his concerns with them. Ellard had said that Snowden could have safely come to him.   read more

GOP Lawmakers Vow to Overturn New Obama Rule Protecting Nation’s Streams from Coal Mine Dumping

Opponents said the rule supports the environmental movement's efforts to reduce use of fossil fuels that contribute to global warming. NMA's Quinn argued that it will put tens of thousands of Americans out of work. But an Interior official projected that fewer than 300 jobs would be lost after the regulation takes effect. Sierra Club called the rule "a long overdue step toward guaranteeing every community in America is protected from the toxic water pollution caused by surface coal mining."   read more

Wave of Anti-LGBT Bills Seen in Republican-Dominated State Legislatures

State lawmakers introduced more than 200 anti-LGBT bills this year and dozens more have been drafted. “Religious freedom is a fundamental right,” said ACLU's Esseks. “Everybody has the right to believe whatever they want about God and religion, but none of that gives anybody the right to discriminate against other people.” Republicans in Congress, who will hold a majority in both chambers under Trump, may try to pass a law meant to allow anyone to act with impunity based on religious belief.   read more

Trump’s Attacks on Press Serve to Rally Public to Its Support

As Trump tries to burn the media village down, he may just be saving it. His running campaign of Twitter attacks and vows to punish the traditional news media is threatening to put the industry on more solid economic footing, where customers are willing to pay for it more regularly. As the country and the world head into this confusing new era, news organizations are in a position to make a newly urgent pitch: Buying a subscription is tantamount to supporting the pillars of democracy.   read more

Religious Freedom Law, Heavily Relied on by Justice Dept. to Fight State Anti-Muslim Actions, May be Ignored by Trump’s Attorney General

Civil rights advocates see a growing wave of intolerance that has been amplified by the victory of Trump. Experts on religious freedom worry Trump’s inauguration leaves the future of the religious freedom law in doubt. The man he has nominated to lead the Justice Dept, Sen. Jeff Sessions, has endorsed Trump’s call for a temporary ban on Muslim immigration. As the nation’s chief law enforcement officer, Sessions might be less sympathetic to pursuing investigations involving Muslim rights.   read more

California County Fights Chevron and School District to Defend Voter-Approved Law Limiting Oil Production

The San Ardo Field is the 46th largest oil field in the U.S. The oil is “heavy” and has the consistency of ketchup, but by injecting steam it is heated and extracted more easily. Chevron is the largest operator on the site, producing about 11,000 barrels of oil per day. Measure Z, presented to voters as a ban on fracking and risky oil operations to protect the region’s water, passed with 56% approval on Nov. 8. It prohibits fracking and other procedures deemed a danger to groundwater.   read more

U.S. Justice Dept. Sues Michigan City for Religious Discrimination in Rejecting Mosque Application

The Justice Dept civil rights division based its lawsuit on a law meant to prohibit religious discrimination and prevent unjustified burdens on people exercising their religion. Vanita Gupta, the civil rights division's chief, said they would continue to “aggressively protect” the rights of communities to live, pray and worship. “We have definitely seen a spike in these cases, in problems when it comes to minority religions,” Azzam Elder, lead lawyer for the community center, said Friday.   read more
17 to 32 of about 4782 News
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