U.S. and the World

113 to 128 of about 1850 News
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U.S. Lobster Industry Accuses Sweden of Feigning Disease Concerns to Hide Big-Business Motives

Exactly how 32 American lobsters wound up in Swedish waters isn't clear. But many suspect they were exported to Europe and then either escaped or were set free by animal rights activists. Whatever the case, their discovery has set off a high-stakes trade dispute between Sweden on one side and the U.S. and Canada on the other. The North Americans are recruiting members of Maine's congressional delegation and U.S. ambassadors and asking Secretary of State John Kerry and the White House for help.   read more

South Dakota Oil Spill Called “Small” by TransCanada Comes to 17,000 Gallons

The spill that TransCanada officials initially called “small in scope” released almost 17,000 gallons of oil into South Dakota farmland near the small town of Freeman, according to the company’s most recent estimates. TransCanada crews have been at the site of the spill around the clock since it was discovered last weekend by local landowner Loren Shultz. So far, they have excavated 100 miles of pipeline in search of the spill’s source, according to the Associated Press   read more

Why So Few Americans in Panama Papers? Firm “Defends” its Rejection of U.S. Clients

Ramon Fonseca, who started the firm with Jurgen Mossack, said their law firm has only a handful of American clients, most of them members of Panama's burgeoning expat retirement community. It's not out of any anti-Americanism or fear of the IRS. "My partner is German, and I lived in Europe, and our focus has always been the European and Latin American market," said Fonseca. "He loves the U.S. a lot, and I do, too. [But] as a policy we prefer not to have American clients."   read more

Militias Shop for Military Arms at Weapons Bazaars on Facebook

A terrorist hoping to buy an anti-aircraft weapon in recent years needed to look no further than Facebook, which has been hosting sprawling online arms bazaars to sell military weapons coveted by terrorists and militants. Among the weapons displayed have been heavy machine guns on mounts that are designed for anti-aircraft roles, and more sophisticated and menacing systems, including guided anti-tank missiles and an early generation of shoulder-fired heat-seeking anti-aircraft missiles.   read more

Bombs Supplied by U.S. Used in Saudi-Led Attack that Killed 97 Yemeni Civilians

The group said it found fragments of two U.S.-made bombs at the market, linking the U.S. for the first time to the airstrikes, which were believed to be the deadliest coalition bombings during Yemen’s yearlong civil war. The high death toll, along with images of children killed in the blasts, ignited international outrage. The debate in the U.S. over the airstrikes has been much more muted, in part because the Obama administration has provided few details about its role.   read more

Judge John Bates Rules that World Bank Can’t be Sued in U.S.

A federal court has ruled that the lending arm of the World Bank has absolute immunity and thus cannot be sued in the U.S. Fishing communities sued IFC over destruction of their livelihoods and property and health threats caused by a IFC-funded coal-fired power plant in India. The IFC argued that it is not subject to the authority of U.S. courts, no matter how harmful or illegal its actions may have been. The court found IFC is entitled to absolute immunity based on previous decisions.   read more

54% Increase in Executions around World; Texas Responsible for Half in U.S.

In the U.S., 28 people were executed in 2015, nearly half in Texas, the most active death penalty state, which put 13 people to death, the report said. Missouri executed six people, Georgia five, Florida two and Oklahoma and Virginia one each. Amnesty said 60% of those executed were black or Hispanic, double their percentage in the population. Executions in Saudi Arabia increased by 76% and in Iran they rose 31%. In China, data on the death penalty is considered a state secret.   read more

Treasury Dept. Sets New Rules to Stop Companies from Moving Headquarters Abroad to Avoid Paying U.S. Taxes

Tax inversions have sparked a political outcry. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew said Treasury's new rules are designed to make inversions less economically beneficial for companies. Several Democrats have announced bills to make it harder for U.S. corporations to invert. But prospects for passing such legislation in an election year are not deemed high, given the wide differences between Democrats and Republicans on taxes.   read more

Estimated Date for Melting of West Antarctic Ice Sheet Revised from Thousands of Years to Mere Decades

The total rise of the sea could reach 5 or 6 feet by 2100, the researchers found. That is roughly twice the increase reported as a plausible worst-case scenario by a U.N. panel just three years ago, and so high it would likely provoke a profound crisis within the lifetimes of children being born today. The situation would grow far worse beyond 2100, with the rise of the sea exceeding a pace of 1 foot per decade by the middle of the 22nd century.   read more

Saudi Arabia’s U.S. Farmland Purchases Trigger Debate over Water Laws Favoring Farmers over Consumers

The purchases totaling about 14,000 acres enable the Saudis to take advantage of farm-friendly U.S. water laws. The acquisitions have also rekindled debate over whether a patchwork of regulations and court rulings in the West favors farmers too heavily, especially those who grow thirsty, low-profit crops such as alfalfa at a time when cities are urging people to take shorter showers, skip car washes and tear out grass lawns.   read more

Adoption of Foreign Children by Americans Drops to Lowest Level in 35 Years

Concerns about corruption and child-trafficking have prompted the U.S. to suspend adoptions from several countries in recent years, including Vietnam and Cambodia. "The absolute reality is that unadopted children are the most likely to be trafficked," Johnson wrote. "There are tens of thousands of Americans...who want to open their hearts and homes to children... [Many countries] are begging the U.S. for help establishing intercountry adoption programs — and the U.S. has been slow to respond."   read more

U.S. Tech Giants’ Encryption Battle Heading to Europe

The recent terrorist attacks have pushed many Europeans to favor greater powers for law enforcement over privacy. But opponents say such measures should not undermine the region’s tough data protection rules. Major countries in the region have landed on opposite sides of the debate. A series of European proposals, if approved, would give intelligence agencies renewed powers to compel the likes of Apple, Google and Facebook to hand over encrypted information.   read more

Scientists Predict Perilous “Out of Control” Climate Shift within Decades

The likely consequences would include killer storms stronger than any in modern times, the disintegration of large parts of the polar ice sheets, and a sea level rise sufficient to begin drowning the world’s coastal cities before the end of this century. Scientist James Hansen argues that society is in such grave peril that he feels morally compelled to sound a clear warning.“We’re in danger of handing young people a situation that’s out of their control,” he said.   read more

U.S. Expands Tougher “Dolphin Safe” Tuna Labeling Rules around World

The dolphin-safe labels are supposed to ensure that canned, dried and frozen tuna has been caught without endangering dolphins. Schools of tuna tend to gather and swim with some species of dolphins. Fishermen often have located tuna by tracking dolphins with speedboats and helicopters, then circling them with nets to get at tuna underneath. To earn a 'dolphin-safe' label, tuna must have been caught on a fishing trip that did not involve harming, trapping or killing dolphins.   read more

Lawsuit Wants Candy Companies’ Alleged Dependence on Child Slave Labor Disclosed on Product Packaging

Two federal class actions claim the chocolate companies "turn a blind eye" to human rights abuses by cocoa suppliers in West Africa while falsely portraying themselves as socially and ethically responsible. Attorney Green told the judge that "we're dealing with very severe conditions on the Ivory Coast," where "something like 70% of the children who work on those cocoa farms are between the ages of five and eleven." He said if that information is not on the wrapper, "people won't see it."   read more

U.S. Calls for U.N. Vote on First-Ever Resolution Addressing Sexual Abuse by U.N. Peacekeepers

Power criticized the U.N. peacekeeping department for not quickly repatriating a Congolese contingent which had seven allegations of sex crimes in 2015. "How can we let this happen? All of us?," she asked council members, her voice rising with emotion. "...What if those soldiers were sent home sooner? How many kids could have been spared suffering unspeakable violations that no child should ever have to endure, and that they will have to carry with them for the rest of their lives?"   read more
113 to 128 of about 1850 News
Prev 1 ... 6 7 8 9 10 ... 116 Next

U.S. and the World

113 to 128 of about 1850 News
Prev 1 ... 6 7 8 9 10 ... 116 Next

U.S. Lobster Industry Accuses Sweden of Feigning Disease Concerns to Hide Big-Business Motives

Exactly how 32 American lobsters wound up in Swedish waters isn't clear. But many suspect they were exported to Europe and then either escaped or were set free by animal rights activists. Whatever the case, their discovery has set off a high-stakes trade dispute between Sweden on one side and the U.S. and Canada on the other. The North Americans are recruiting members of Maine's congressional delegation and U.S. ambassadors and asking Secretary of State John Kerry and the White House for help.   read more

South Dakota Oil Spill Called “Small” by TransCanada Comes to 17,000 Gallons

The spill that TransCanada officials initially called “small in scope” released almost 17,000 gallons of oil into South Dakota farmland near the small town of Freeman, according to the company’s most recent estimates. TransCanada crews have been at the site of the spill around the clock since it was discovered last weekend by local landowner Loren Shultz. So far, they have excavated 100 miles of pipeline in search of the spill’s source, according to the Associated Press   read more

Why So Few Americans in Panama Papers? Firm “Defends” its Rejection of U.S. Clients

Ramon Fonseca, who started the firm with Jurgen Mossack, said their law firm has only a handful of American clients, most of them members of Panama's burgeoning expat retirement community. It's not out of any anti-Americanism or fear of the IRS. "My partner is German, and I lived in Europe, and our focus has always been the European and Latin American market," said Fonseca. "He loves the U.S. a lot, and I do, too. [But] as a policy we prefer not to have American clients."   read more

Militias Shop for Military Arms at Weapons Bazaars on Facebook

A terrorist hoping to buy an anti-aircraft weapon in recent years needed to look no further than Facebook, which has been hosting sprawling online arms bazaars to sell military weapons coveted by terrorists and militants. Among the weapons displayed have been heavy machine guns on mounts that are designed for anti-aircraft roles, and more sophisticated and menacing systems, including guided anti-tank missiles and an early generation of shoulder-fired heat-seeking anti-aircraft missiles.   read more

Bombs Supplied by U.S. Used in Saudi-Led Attack that Killed 97 Yemeni Civilians

The group said it found fragments of two U.S.-made bombs at the market, linking the U.S. for the first time to the airstrikes, which were believed to be the deadliest coalition bombings during Yemen’s yearlong civil war. The high death toll, along with images of children killed in the blasts, ignited international outrage. The debate in the U.S. over the airstrikes has been much more muted, in part because the Obama administration has provided few details about its role.   read more

Judge John Bates Rules that World Bank Can’t be Sued in U.S.

A federal court has ruled that the lending arm of the World Bank has absolute immunity and thus cannot be sued in the U.S. Fishing communities sued IFC over destruction of their livelihoods and property and health threats caused by a IFC-funded coal-fired power plant in India. The IFC argued that it is not subject to the authority of U.S. courts, no matter how harmful or illegal its actions may have been. The court found IFC is entitled to absolute immunity based on previous decisions.   read more

54% Increase in Executions around World; Texas Responsible for Half in U.S.

In the U.S., 28 people were executed in 2015, nearly half in Texas, the most active death penalty state, which put 13 people to death, the report said. Missouri executed six people, Georgia five, Florida two and Oklahoma and Virginia one each. Amnesty said 60% of those executed were black or Hispanic, double their percentage in the population. Executions in Saudi Arabia increased by 76% and in Iran they rose 31%. In China, data on the death penalty is considered a state secret.   read more

Treasury Dept. Sets New Rules to Stop Companies from Moving Headquarters Abroad to Avoid Paying U.S. Taxes

Tax inversions have sparked a political outcry. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew said Treasury's new rules are designed to make inversions less economically beneficial for companies. Several Democrats have announced bills to make it harder for U.S. corporations to invert. But prospects for passing such legislation in an election year are not deemed high, given the wide differences between Democrats and Republicans on taxes.   read more

Estimated Date for Melting of West Antarctic Ice Sheet Revised from Thousands of Years to Mere Decades

The total rise of the sea could reach 5 or 6 feet by 2100, the researchers found. That is roughly twice the increase reported as a plausible worst-case scenario by a U.N. panel just three years ago, and so high it would likely provoke a profound crisis within the lifetimes of children being born today. The situation would grow far worse beyond 2100, with the rise of the sea exceeding a pace of 1 foot per decade by the middle of the 22nd century.   read more

Saudi Arabia’s U.S. Farmland Purchases Trigger Debate over Water Laws Favoring Farmers over Consumers

The purchases totaling about 14,000 acres enable the Saudis to take advantage of farm-friendly U.S. water laws. The acquisitions have also rekindled debate over whether a patchwork of regulations and court rulings in the West favors farmers too heavily, especially those who grow thirsty, low-profit crops such as alfalfa at a time when cities are urging people to take shorter showers, skip car washes and tear out grass lawns.   read more

Adoption of Foreign Children by Americans Drops to Lowest Level in 35 Years

Concerns about corruption and child-trafficking have prompted the U.S. to suspend adoptions from several countries in recent years, including Vietnam and Cambodia. "The absolute reality is that unadopted children are the most likely to be trafficked," Johnson wrote. "There are tens of thousands of Americans...who want to open their hearts and homes to children... [Many countries] are begging the U.S. for help establishing intercountry adoption programs — and the U.S. has been slow to respond."   read more

U.S. Tech Giants’ Encryption Battle Heading to Europe

The recent terrorist attacks have pushed many Europeans to favor greater powers for law enforcement over privacy. But opponents say such measures should not undermine the region’s tough data protection rules. Major countries in the region have landed on opposite sides of the debate. A series of European proposals, if approved, would give intelligence agencies renewed powers to compel the likes of Apple, Google and Facebook to hand over encrypted information.   read more

Scientists Predict Perilous “Out of Control” Climate Shift within Decades

The likely consequences would include killer storms stronger than any in modern times, the disintegration of large parts of the polar ice sheets, and a sea level rise sufficient to begin drowning the world’s coastal cities before the end of this century. Scientist James Hansen argues that society is in such grave peril that he feels morally compelled to sound a clear warning.“We’re in danger of handing young people a situation that’s out of their control,” he said.   read more

U.S. Expands Tougher “Dolphin Safe” Tuna Labeling Rules around World

The dolphin-safe labels are supposed to ensure that canned, dried and frozen tuna has been caught without endangering dolphins. Schools of tuna tend to gather and swim with some species of dolphins. Fishermen often have located tuna by tracking dolphins with speedboats and helicopters, then circling them with nets to get at tuna underneath. To earn a 'dolphin-safe' label, tuna must have been caught on a fishing trip that did not involve harming, trapping or killing dolphins.   read more

Lawsuit Wants Candy Companies’ Alleged Dependence on Child Slave Labor Disclosed on Product Packaging

Two federal class actions claim the chocolate companies "turn a blind eye" to human rights abuses by cocoa suppliers in West Africa while falsely portraying themselves as socially and ethically responsible. Attorney Green told the judge that "we're dealing with very severe conditions on the Ivory Coast," where "something like 70% of the children who work on those cocoa farms are between the ages of five and eleven." He said if that information is not on the wrapper, "people won't see it."   read more

U.S. Calls for U.N. Vote on First-Ever Resolution Addressing Sexual Abuse by U.N. Peacekeepers

Power criticized the U.N. peacekeeping department for not quickly repatriating a Congolese contingent which had seven allegations of sex crimes in 2015. "How can we let this happen? All of us?," she asked council members, her voice rising with emotion. "...What if those soldiers were sent home sooner? How many kids could have been spared suffering unspeakable violations that no child should ever have to endure, and that they will have to carry with them for the rest of their lives?"   read more
113 to 128 of about 1850 News
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