15 Democrats Join Republicans to Give Military Power to Imprison Suspects Indefinitely

Thursday, December 01, 2011
Sen. Mark Udall...thanks for trying
Democrats and Republicans joined together in the U.S. Senate this week to keep legislation intact that would expand the military’s power to go after terrorism suspects, including American citizens in the U.S., and confine them indefinitely without being charged or tried.
 
Opponents of the controversial plan, included in Senate bill 1867, tried to water it down by adding language calling for a study to be conducted first. But the amendment by Senator Mark Udall (D-Colorado) was defeated after 15 Democrats joined with most of the Republican caucus to vote against it (60 to 38).
 
The Democrats who voted for giving the military the power were Robert Casey of Pennsylvania, Kent Conrad of North Dakota, Kay Hagan of North Carolina, Daniel Inouye of Hawaii, Herb Kohl of Wisconsin, Carl Levin of Michigan, Joe Manchin of West Virginia, Claire McCaskill of Missouri, Ben Nelson of Nebraska, Mark Pryor of Arkansas, Jack Reed of Rhode Island, Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire and Debbie Stabenow of Michigan.
 
The two Republicans in favor of the Udall amendment were Mark Kirk of Illinois and Rand Paul of Kentucky.
 
President Barack Obama has threatened to veto the legislation, which is seen as a threat to the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s ability to arrest and interrogate terrorism suspects. FBI Director Robert Mueller tried to persuade members of Congress to back away from the legislation, which is seen as a usurpation of power by the military.
-David Wallechinsky, Noel Brinkerhoff
 
Senate Bill Allows Indefinite Imprisonment of Americans without Trial (by Noel Brinkerhoff and David Wallechinsky, AllGov)
Senate Vote Sets Up Fight over Terrorism Detainees (by Lisa Mascaro, Los Angeles Times)

Vote on Udall Amendment (U.S. Senate) 

Comments

anonymouse 6 years ago
the us military trained latin americans in the fine art of "disappearing" annoying leftists -- now those techniques may be used domestically. as gomer pyle used to say, "soo-prise, soo-prise."
Todd 6 years ago
north korea, here we come.

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