Architect of Arizona “Papers Please” Immigration Law to Face Recall Election

Monday, July 11, 2011
Russell Pearce
Arizona Senate President Russell Pearce, sponsor of the nation’s most controversial anti-immigration law, has become the first legislator in his state’s history to face a recall election.
 
Pearce was the author of SB 1070, Arizona’s law requiring law enforcement to pull over any motorist suspected of being an illegal immigrant and demand proof of legal residency or citizenship. It was signed into law in April 2010 by Governor Jan Brewer.
 
Opponents of Pearce collected more than 16,000 signatures from people in District 18 for a recall petition that required about 7,700 names. Local elections officials certified at least 10,300 signatures were valid, making the recall official.
 
Pearce now has two choices: resign from office within five days; or become a candidate for his seat in a special election slated for November.
 
Supporters of the Republican state senator expect him to fight for his seat. But he will do it with limited participation from corporate interests. The day before the recall signatures were certified, Arizona’s solicitor general informed Pearce that the law forbids direct contribution of corporate or union money to recall campaigns. However, the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2009 Citizen United ruling will allow contributions to his cause through third-party Super Pacs.
 
In addition to being the force behind SB 1070, Pearce unsuccessfully pushed other immigration measures, including a bill that would have changed how children born in the U.S. to illegal immigrants could become citizens.
 
Pearce also has been implicated along with other lawmakers in the Fiesta Bowl scandal. The Senate president has been accused of illegally accepting nearly $40,000 in perks from bowl officials, including free trips for him and his family.
-Noel Brinkerhoff
 
Russell Pearce Recall: Enough Signatures to Force Election (by Alia Beard Rau, The Arizona Republic)

Comments

Joan Baker 10 years ago
immigration reform would generate $4.5 to $5.4 billion in additional net tax revenue over three years,” the letter says. “the nonpartisan congressional budget office scored the bi-partisan 2007 comprehensive immigration reform bill that was proposed in the senate as increasing federal revenues by $15 billion over the 2008-2012 period and by $48 billion over the 2008-2017 period.” studies from groups across the political spectrum have proven the economic and fiscal benefits of comprehensive immigration reform. by requiring illegal immigrants to register with the government, pay fees and back taxes, and correct their status, we can drastically expand our tax base. a report by the center for american progress found that passing comprehensive immigration reform would generate $4.5 to $5.4 billion in additional net tax revenue over three years. the nonpartisan congressional budget office scored the bi-partisan 2007 comprehensive immigration reform bill that was proposed in the senate as increasing federal revenues by $15 billion over the 2008-2012 period and by $48 billion over the 2008-2017 period. in addition to expanding our tax base, economists have proven that comprehensive immigration reform would also increase wages for native workers, thereby boosting tax revenues generated by all workers. the cato institute found that forcing undocumented immigrants to get right with the law by registering with the government would boost the incomes of u.s. households by $180 billion in 2019, which would also lead to increased government revenues, without increasing tax rates. just like our budget deficit, immigration reform is an issue that we cannot afford to ignore. bipartisan proposals that are tough, fair, and practical have garnered support from across the ideological spectrum in congress, as well as from president bush and the current administration. comprehensive immigration reform would clearly help us reduce our deficit and debt, and would do so without raising tax rates.

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