Unusual News

1809 to 1824 of about 1843 News
Prev 1 ... 112 113 114 115 116 Next

Unsolved Homicides Playing Cards

In 2005, Tommy Ray, a special agent in Polk County, Florida, made decks of playing cards with information about local unsolved crimes. He passed out the decks in the Polk County jail, hoping that prisoners would gossip and reveal clues to these co...   read more

France Challenges Michigan over 330-Year-Old Sunken Ship

On September 18, 1679, the French explorer René-Robert Cavelier, sieur de La Salle sent a crew of six to sail his ship, Le Griffon, from Washington Island in Lake Michigan to Niagara with a load of furs and other goods. Although its fate is still ...   read more

Rejected Budget Amendments of Interest

We are so accustomed to thinking of amendments to spending bills as examples of waste and corruption, that it’s easy to forget that some rejected amendments are worth considering or are, at the very least, of interest. Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Califo...   read more

America’s Worst CEO

Former Merrill Lynch CEO John Thain has become the most visible symbol for all the Wall Street excesses that the financial crisis has exposed; in the words of Zachary Roth of Talking Points Memo, “not just greed, but callousness, obliviousness and...   read more

Nevada Brothels Ask to be Taxed

Whereas most industries complain about getting taxed too much, Nevada’s brothels are actually asking to pay taxes. The 25 legal brothels in the state currently generate a $50-million-a-year industry that pays significant amounts of tax to the rura...   read more

Black and White Unite…After 48 Years

On January 23, 2009, two white people and five black people sat in resolution at a table at the Old Town Bistro in Rock Hill, South Carolina.  But 48 years ago, on January 31, 1961, these people met under very different circumstances.  Elwin Wilso...   read more

Interior Department Challenges White House…to a Basketball Game

At a welcoming ceremony with the rank-and-file at the Department of the Interior, the new Interior Secretary, Ken Salazar, fielded questions, while sidestepping the controversial issue of whether he would support the Bush administration’s last-min...   read more

Good-Riddance Party for Labor Secretary Chao

The vast majority of Americans who go to work at the Department of Labor do so because they want to protect the rights and safety of workers. So it was a bitter blow for Labor Department employees to have to spend eight years taking orders from El...   read more

Getting Serious about an NCAA Football Playoff

In times of economic difficulty, many people find solace in entertainment. In the sports world, Barack Obama stirred interest with his explicit support for creating a playoff system for college football’s Division I. He told “60 Minutes,” I’m goin...   read more

Oops! A Look Back at Media Views of Iraq War “Success”

As the presidency of George W. Bush draws to a close, it is worth reviewing one of the lowlights of media coverage of the Bush II era. In 2006, FAIR: Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting, compiled a list of quotes from media pundits about the Iraq War...   read more

Tax Dollars at Work: U.S. Marshals Give Ride to Fox Sportscasters

At the 2008 Super Bowl in Phoenix, Joseph Band, a longtime attorney for the United States Marshals Service who moonlighted as a sports statistician for Fox Sports, arranged, with permission from superiors, to use a Marshals Service vehicle to brin...   read more

Senate Protects 2 Million Acres (and Bill Clinton’s Childhood Home)

A collection of 160 bills making its way through the Senate may possibly bestow the nation’s highest level of environmental protection on over 2 million acres of public land, the largest act of wilderness preservation in 25 years. The bill will al...   read more

Colombian Coffee Growers to Sue Cartoonist

Derogatory insinuations about Juan Valdez, the Colombian coffee industry’s mythical icon, have been a call to arms for the Colombia Coffee Growers Federation, which threatened to sue cartoonist Mike Peters for $20 million. The Valdez character was...   read more

Blagojevich’s 19th Century Role Model

The controversy surrounding embattled Governor Rod Blagojevich is nothing new for Illinois politics.  Five of the last 10 Illinois governors, including Blagojevich, faced criminal charges, but the tradition of paying for a Senate seat actually str...   read more

There’s a Bug in Your Yogurt

Eleven years after scientists determined that carmine and cochineal extracts from the female cochineal bug can cause severe allergic reactions, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a rule (PDF) requiring food companies to list the ext...   read more

New Congress is Oldest in History

When Barack Obama takes office on January 20th, he will be the fifth youngest president, and he will be working with the oldest Congress ever. The average age of 57 in the House and 63 in the Senate both represent historical highs. The age increas...   read more
1809 to 1824 of about 1843 News
Prev 1 ... 112 113 114 115 116 Next

Unusual News

1809 to 1824 of about 1843 News
Prev 1 ... 112 113 114 115 116 Next

Unsolved Homicides Playing Cards

In 2005, Tommy Ray, a special agent in Polk County, Florida, made decks of playing cards with information about local unsolved crimes. He passed out the decks in the Polk County jail, hoping that prisoners would gossip and reveal clues to these co...   read more

France Challenges Michigan over 330-Year-Old Sunken Ship

On September 18, 1679, the French explorer René-Robert Cavelier, sieur de La Salle sent a crew of six to sail his ship, Le Griffon, from Washington Island in Lake Michigan to Niagara with a load of furs and other goods. Although its fate is still ...   read more

Rejected Budget Amendments of Interest

We are so accustomed to thinking of amendments to spending bills as examples of waste and corruption, that it’s easy to forget that some rejected amendments are worth considering or are, at the very least, of interest. Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Califo...   read more

America’s Worst CEO

Former Merrill Lynch CEO John Thain has become the most visible symbol for all the Wall Street excesses that the financial crisis has exposed; in the words of Zachary Roth of Talking Points Memo, “not just greed, but callousness, obliviousness and...   read more

Nevada Brothels Ask to be Taxed

Whereas most industries complain about getting taxed too much, Nevada’s brothels are actually asking to pay taxes. The 25 legal brothels in the state currently generate a $50-million-a-year industry that pays significant amounts of tax to the rura...   read more

Black and White Unite…After 48 Years

On January 23, 2009, two white people and five black people sat in resolution at a table at the Old Town Bistro in Rock Hill, South Carolina.  But 48 years ago, on January 31, 1961, these people met under very different circumstances.  Elwin Wilso...   read more

Interior Department Challenges White House…to a Basketball Game

At a welcoming ceremony with the rank-and-file at the Department of the Interior, the new Interior Secretary, Ken Salazar, fielded questions, while sidestepping the controversial issue of whether he would support the Bush administration’s last-min...   read more

Good-Riddance Party for Labor Secretary Chao

The vast majority of Americans who go to work at the Department of Labor do so because they want to protect the rights and safety of workers. So it was a bitter blow for Labor Department employees to have to spend eight years taking orders from El...   read more

Getting Serious about an NCAA Football Playoff

In times of economic difficulty, many people find solace in entertainment. In the sports world, Barack Obama stirred interest with his explicit support for creating a playoff system for college football’s Division I. He told “60 Minutes,” I’m goin...   read more

Oops! A Look Back at Media Views of Iraq War “Success”

As the presidency of George W. Bush draws to a close, it is worth reviewing one of the lowlights of media coverage of the Bush II era. In 2006, FAIR: Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting, compiled a list of quotes from media pundits about the Iraq War...   read more

Tax Dollars at Work: U.S. Marshals Give Ride to Fox Sportscasters

At the 2008 Super Bowl in Phoenix, Joseph Band, a longtime attorney for the United States Marshals Service who moonlighted as a sports statistician for Fox Sports, arranged, with permission from superiors, to use a Marshals Service vehicle to brin...   read more

Senate Protects 2 Million Acres (and Bill Clinton’s Childhood Home)

A collection of 160 bills making its way through the Senate may possibly bestow the nation’s highest level of environmental protection on over 2 million acres of public land, the largest act of wilderness preservation in 25 years. The bill will al...   read more

Colombian Coffee Growers to Sue Cartoonist

Derogatory insinuations about Juan Valdez, the Colombian coffee industry’s mythical icon, have been a call to arms for the Colombia Coffee Growers Federation, which threatened to sue cartoonist Mike Peters for $20 million. The Valdez character was...   read more

Blagojevich’s 19th Century Role Model

The controversy surrounding embattled Governor Rod Blagojevich is nothing new for Illinois politics.  Five of the last 10 Illinois governors, including Blagojevich, faced criminal charges, but the tradition of paying for a Senate seat actually str...   read more

There’s a Bug in Your Yogurt

Eleven years after scientists determined that carmine and cochineal extracts from the female cochineal bug can cause severe allergic reactions, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a rule (PDF) requiring food companies to list the ext...   read more

New Congress is Oldest in History

When Barack Obama takes office on January 20th, he will be the fifth youngest president, and he will be working with the oldest Congress ever. The average age of 57 in the House and 63 in the Senate both represent historical highs. The age increas...   read more
1809 to 1824 of about 1843 News
Prev 1 ... 112 113 114 115 116 Next