Bookmark and Share
Overview:
As part of the Department of Justice (DOJ), the U.S. Marshals Service is the nation’s oldest federal law enforcement agency. Federal marshals have been serving the country since 1789, and today direct 94 individual federal judicial districts. Among the agency’s duties are apprehension of more than half of all federal fugitives, protection of the federal judiciary, operation of the Witness Security Program, transportation of federal prisoners and seizure of property illegally obtained by criminals. Marshals also have been accused of bending, and in some cases breaking, the law, resulting in numerous controversies.
 
more
History:

The U.S. Marshals Service (USMS) was created by the first Continental Congress in 1789. Marshals were given the power to recruit special deputies (typically local hires or temporary transfers in law enforcement) and swear in posses to help in manhunts. They were charged with assisting federal courts and carrying out orders from federal judges, members of Congress and the President. US Marshals also served subpoenas, summonses, writs, warrants and other documents created by the courts. They made arrests, handled transportation of federal prisoners and disbursed funds according to the dictates of the federal courts. Marshals could also be called upon to pay fees and expenses of the court’s clerks, attorneys, jurors and witnesses, rent courtrooms, procure jail space, hire bailiffs, town criers, and janitors, if necessary. They also made sure everyone was present at hearings, including the prisoners, jurors and witnesses.

 
In addition to these duties, Marshals took the census every decade until 1870. They collected statistical information on business and manufacturing practices and made sure Presidential proclamations made their way to the local level of government. In the West, U.S. Marshals were responsible for taming lawlessness, including helping to arrest the Dalton Gang in 1893, suppressing the Pullman Strike in 1894 and enforcing Prohibition in the 1920s. 
 
Other tasks assigned to U.S. Marshals over the years included recovery of escaped slaves as part of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 and protecting volunteers and African American schoolchildren during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. Throughout its history, the ranks of the Marshals Service have included such noted historical figures as Frederick Douglass, former slave and noted Abolitionist leader who was appointed U.S. Marshal for the District of Columbia in 1877; Wyatt Earp and his brother, Virgil, as deputy marshals for Tombstone, Arizona; Wild Bill Hickok, who served as a deputy marshal at Fort Riley, Kansas; and Bat Masterson, who served as deputy to the U.S. Marshal for the Southern District of New York.
 
More than 200 marshals have died in action, although most of these deaths occurred between 1872 and 1909. One recent fatality occurred during the infamous Ruby Ridge siege of 1992, which tarnished the reputation of the USMS. On August 21, six marshals dressed in camouflage and armed with machine guns entered Randy Weaver’s property in northern Idaho to arrest him for illegally selling sawed-off shotguns and refusal to show up at a subsequent court date in 1991. A gun battled ensued between marshals and Kevin Harris, a family friend, and the Weaver’s 14-year old son, Samuel, during which Samuel was shot in the back and US Marshal William Degan was killed. 
 
The marshals retreated and called in the FBI for help. Federal law enforcement officials laid siege to the cabin for 12 days. An FBI sniper injured Weaver and Harris and killed Vicki Weaver, Randy’s wife, who was holding her nursing baby in her arms. A negotiating team eventually convinced Harris and Weaver to surrender. Weaver was brought to trial, but he was eventually acquitted on all charges except missing his original court date and violating his bail. He served four months of an 18-month sentence and paid a fine of $10,000. Harris was acquitted on all charges. 
 
A lengthy investigation by Congressional and law enforcement officials resulted in the Marshals Service and the FBI being severely criticized for their actions at Ruby Ridge. The Justice Department found that the shot that killed Vicki Weaver, was unjustified because the Weavers were running for cover. The sniper was indicted for manslaughter in 1997 by the Boundary County, Idaho, prosecutor, but the charge was later dismissed in a federal court. 
 
The surviving members of the Weaver family filed a wrongful death suit and Randy Weaver received a $100,000 settlement. His daughters received $1 million each, and Kevin Harris received $380,000. FBI Director Louis Freeh disciplined twelve FBI agents for their handling of the incident.
 
Only one U.S. marshal, Peter P. Hillman, has been killed in the last 14 years. Deputy marshal Hillman was driving a prisoner van near Bakersfield, CA. in November 2001, when he was hit by a tractor trailer.          
 

Marshals Killed in the Line of Duty

more
What it Does:

The U.S. Marshals Service (USMS) is responsible for protecting and supporting U.S. courts and the judicial system. Among their court-related duties, marshals search businesses or residences for judicial purposes; seize evidence; make arrests; execute a judgment (deliver a court’s final decision); keep safe all places where federal judicial business is done; protect judges, jurors, witnesses and others from harm; and transport prisoners to and from court, as well as ensure their welfare, with food, access to medical care and humane confinement.

 
On any given day, USMS houses approximately 54,000 detainees in federal, state, local and private prisons throughout the country, and it manages more than 16,000 assets (primarily confiscated properties) with a value of more than $1.33 billion. In FY 2006, USMS arrested more than 38,000 federal fugitives (more than all other law enforcement agencies combined); reviewed and processed 1,111 threats/inappropriate communications made to federal judicial employees; protected more than 2,000 federal judges and 5,255 other members of the federal judiciary including U.S. Attorneys, Assistant U.S. Attorneys and jurors. USMS also installed more than 1,400 residential security systems in judges’ houses.
 
Programs carried out by the U.S. Marshals Service include:
  • The Fugitive Investigations program, which ensures that arrest warrants are managed and executed properly, and that escapees, parole violators and those who fail to appear in court are arrested and brought into custody. This sometimes extends to foreign countries where extradition orders are sought and prisoners brought back to the U.S. to face trial.
  • The Judicial Security program, which makes sure that federal judges, attorneys, witnesses, jurors and public observers are protected. Responsibilities also include protecting more than 400 federal courthouses and making sure judicial proceedings remain impartial and free form tampering, extortion and bribes.
  • The Witness Security program, which is charged with protecting government witnesses and their families, especially when they must testify against dangerous and violent criminals like drug traffickers, terrorist, organized crime figures and other criminals.
  • The Prisoner Services program, which helps to obtain services for nearly 44,000 federal prisoners. This often involves shepherding prisoners through the various stages of the court’s procedures, transportation and obtaining medical care if a prisoner becomes sick. 
  • The Asset Forfeiture program, which gives U.S. Marshals the power to seize and manage property seized by other federal agencies, including the FBI, Drug Enforcement Administration, Customs and Immigration Service and Internal Revenue Service. This power is usually related to cases involving money laundering, drug trafficking and terrorism.
  • The Special Operations Support program, which is responsible for providing temporary help to districts suffering from dangerous situations, national emergencies or any other situation deemed important by the U.S. Attorney General or the director of the Marshals Service. The Special Operations Group consists of a highly-trained team of deputy marshals that helps districts respond to high-risk trials, prisoner moves, unusually dangerous arrests and emergency situations where there is a violation of federal law or property.
 

U.S. Marshals 15 Most Wanted Fugitives

 

more
Where Does the Money Go:

The U.S. Marshals Service spent nearly $3.2 billion on 1,885 contractors this decade. According to USASpending.gov, the Marshals Service paid for a variety of services, from utilities and housekeeping services to transportation, travel and relocation services. The top 10 contractors were as follows:

 
Akal Security
$1,398,368,086
Corrections Corporation of America
$273,482,558
MVM, Inc.
$241,698,359
Tyco International, Ltd.
$219,416,604
The GEO Group, Inc.
$90,185,796
Small Business Consolidated Reporting
$90,133,731
United International Investigative Services
$87,754,000
Aviation Enterprises, Inc.
$70,691,020
USProtect Corporation
$68,153,671
CSI Aviation Services, Inc.
$63,851,506
 
 

Akal Security is a provider of security services for public and private institutions. It has been operational since 1980 and is currently the largest judicial security contractor in the United States. In 2003, Akal was awarded three contracts (

totaling $102 million

) to provide 1,500 security guards to protect US Army installations at Fort Hood, TX and Fort Stewart, GA. In 2005, Akal received a contract to provide armed guard services at 18 Air Force installations around the country. This contract provided more than 550 guards overseeing

entry control, vehicle inspections and searches, pass and badge verification, control and inspections of commercial traffic, operation of Visitor Control Centers and emergency and crisis response.

more
Controversies:

Top Contractor Sued

In September of 2003, Akal Security, one of the largest contractors for the US Marshals Service, was awarded a contract to provide fully trained and qualified security guards in accordance with military police firearms requirements. However, some of the guards provided by the firm failed to satisfy weapons qualification requirements and receive other training. Additionally, the contractor allegedly failed to satisfy contractual man-hour requirements. Three of the security guards working at the Fort Riley Army base in Kansas filed a qui tam lawsuit in October 2004. A qui tam lawsuit is usually filed by whistleblowers who have insider knowledge of a company’s fraudulent business practices. In July 2007, Akal agreed to pay the federal government $18 million to settle allegations that it violated a contract to provide qualified security guards to serve at eight Army bases in Kansas, Washington, Texas, Georgia, North Carolina and Alabama. 
 
Judges Used Marshals Service for Chores
In September 2007, Fox News reported that U.S. Marshals designated to protect two federal judges in New York over the past decade were asked to empty the trash, carry groceries and tote golf clubs, among other chores. One of the judges was Michael Mukasey, who now oversees the Marshals Service as the U.S. Attorney General.
 
Mukasey, another judge and their wives were named in a 2005 complaint by deputy marshals assigned to the judges’ security details. Marshals weren’t allowed to flush the toilet when working on the night shift, and one judge and his wife demanded to swap their coach airline seats with first-class fares when the tickets had been bought by marshals with taxpayer money. The deputy marshals complained of a hostile working environment and diversions from their primary mission: to protect the judiciary.

2005 Complaint: Judges Used Marshals Service for Chores (Associated Press)

more

Comments

Karen Lozano 10 months ago
Hi, My son is in prison under the marshals care.He was diagnosed with terminal cancer stage four last month. He was given 18 month to live. He was transported from a little unit in Bracketville Tx to a GEO unit in San Antonio TX. this facility is not equipped to care for a cancer patient. They do not give him his pills in a timely manner. He has to wait in his cell till the nursed remember to give him pills for pain. This unit is very inhumane. We call to complain about the nurses and know one listens. They tell my son that if we dont stop call the prison to complain they will ignore him and not give his pills at all. I want to learn more about who to contact about the compassionate release. I need to try to get my son out of there. He will surely die befor his 18 months if he stays in their care. I have emailed our senator to report this abuse. I will not stop there.
Charles Coombs 1 year ago
If I suspect that someone is impersonating a US Federal Marshall, who should I contact? Thank you. Charles Coombs 34 Jill Lane Cartersville, GA 30120 828 319-7662
Arthur Grisi 2 years ago
(... prior "comment" cut-off).... ...when you attended the N.J. Sheriffs' event in Lakehurst. You could have stopped in for another cup of coffee after LaBove Grande's! .... obviously, just kidding. It's been a few years since ... OFDT ..Louis Berger Associates ..&.. Bob Nardi's team working with you and your exec-team at OFDT. Again, all good wishes and hopes for you. Respectfully -&- Kindly Yours, Art Arthur J. Grisi Toms River, N.J. (??retired / consulting??) arthurgrisi@gmail.com 908.230.3822 cell
Wyat Earp 5 years ago
usms currently issues the glock model 22. on a special basis the glock 23 is also employed. usms still uses the remington 870 12 ga shotgun and numerous variants of the colt m4/ar15. some specialized units emply the mp5, m16 and other more discreet sub-guns. the usms issued the ruger gp100 until approximately 1999.
Outdrse 5 years ago
can u put somthig in here bout the wepons the us marshals use and what they have been issued in the past? please?
Randall Bergerud 6 years ago
dear sirs,i am involved in a civil lawsuit concerning the u.s.government.i intend to have the defendants served by the u.s. marshall's service.the problem is that i live in the phillippines and when i send the u.s. marshall form 285,i wish to include payment for their service of process.the currency over here is the peso and there are no money orders available to me in which to send to the u.s. marshall's service,when they serve process upon the defendants.how will i be able to pa...

Leave a comment

Founded: 1789
Annual Budget: $864 million
Employees: 4,700
U.S. Marshals Service
Harlow, David
Acting Director

David L. Harlow became deputy director of the U.S. Marshals Service (USMS) in February 2014, a tenure that included a temporary seven-month stint as acting director. USMS is the nation’s oldest federal law enforcement agency, responsible for apprehension of federal fugitives, protection of the federal judiciary, operation of the Witness Security Program, transportation of federal prisoners and seizure of property illegally obtained by criminals.

 

Harlow, who earned a B.A. degree in law enforcement administration from Western Illinois University, joined the U.S Marshals Service in 1983 as a deputy U.S. marshal. He served the agency as chief deputy for the northern district of Ohio until 2007. In the post, he was deputy commander of operation FALCON [Federal and Local Cops Organized Nationally] III and subsequently commander of operation FALCON 2007, for which he oversaw development of the Northern Ohio Violent Fugitive Task Force and Toledo’s first fugitive apprehension team made up of numerous law enforcement agencies. From 2007 to 2008, he served as chief deputy U.S. marshal for the eastern district of Virginia.

 

Between 2008 and 2011, Harlow was chief of USMS’s Sex Offender Investigations Branch, for which he oversaw the National Sex Offender Targeting Center and the Sex Offender Apprehension Program. He additionally developed the USMS Behavioral Analysis Unit, which helps target fugitive and non-compliant sex offenders.    

 

In mid-2011, Harlow was named acting deputy assistant director of USMS’s Investigative Operations Division (IOD). Then, in May 2012, he was made assistant director of IOD with a concurrent promotion to USMS’s Senior Executive Service.

 

From 2012 to 2014, Harlow served as associate director for operations, managing the agency’s Operational Directorate, the responsibilities of which include witness and judicial security; investigative, tactical and prisoner operations; and the justice prisoner and alien transportation system.

 

Eighteen months into his service as deputy director, Harlow was—on July 26, 2015—appointed acting director of the U.S. Marshals Service. That title expired on February 20, 2016, “in accordance with the Vacancies Reform Act,” according to the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ). However, on December 21, 2015, the DOJ ordered that Harlow be allowed to retain his position as deputy director until the end of the Obama administration in January 2017.

 

Harlow and his wife, Lisa, have two sons, Sean and Brian.

-Danny Biederman

 

To Learn More:

U.S. Marshals Service Balks at Use of Bodycams when they Work with Local Police (by Steve Straehley and Danny Biederman, AllGov)

U.S. Agencies’ Use of Invasive Aerial Cell Phone Surveillance Detailed in Newly Released Documents (by Nathan Freed Wessler, Staff Attorney, ACLU

Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project; ACLU)

Official Biography

more
Hylton, Stacia
Previous Director
On September 17, 2010, President Barack Obama nominated Stacia A. Hylton to take over as director of the U.S. Marshals Service. She was confirmed by the Senate on December 22.
 
Hylton earned her B.S. in Criminal Justice in 1983 at Boston’s Northeastern University, which she attended on a full athletic scholarship.
 
She began what is now a 30-year career in law enforcement in 1980, serving until 1991 as a member of the Marshals Service Special Operations Group dive team, helicopter repel and stabo team, and as a water survival instructor. She has also been Assistant Director for the United States Marshals Service Prisoner Operations; Chief Deputy for the District of Columbia; an instructor at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center; an inspector in the Witness Security Program; and Chief of the Marshals Service Court Security Program. Additionally, she served in field operations in the District of Columbia, the Southern District of Florida, and the Eastern District of Virginia.
 
From January to June 2001, Hylton was designated by the Attorney General to be Acting Deputy Director of the U.S. Marshals Service. Also in 2001, she was Operational Commander for the Vieques, Puerto Rico, operation, and Incident Commander for the Marshals Service Emergency Response Team at Ground Zero after the September 11th terrorist attacks. In 2003 she was designated by the Director of the Marshals Service as the Agency Deciding Official for all adverse actions. She was appointed Federal Detention Trustee by Attorney General John Ashcroft on June 14, 2004, and served until February 2010. In this position, she was in charge of federal detainees awaiting trial or immigration proceedings.
 
She then formed Hylton Kirk & Associates, a consulting firm. In 2010 she received $112,500 in consulting fees from The GEO Group Inc., a private prison company that does extensive business with the Marshals Service.
 
Hylton has been an active member of the Highlands Swim and Tennis Club in McLean, Virginia.
more
Bookmark and Share
Overview:
As part of the Department of Justice (DOJ), the U.S. Marshals Service is the nation’s oldest federal law enforcement agency. Federal marshals have been serving the country since 1789, and today direct 94 individual federal judicial districts. Among the agency’s duties are apprehension of more than half of all federal fugitives, protection of the federal judiciary, operation of the Witness Security Program, transportation of federal prisoners and seizure of property illegally obtained by criminals. Marshals also have been accused of bending, and in some cases breaking, the law, resulting in numerous controversies.
 
more
History:

The U.S. Marshals Service (USMS) was created by the first Continental Congress in 1789. Marshals were given the power to recruit special deputies (typically local hires or temporary transfers in law enforcement) and swear in posses to help in manhunts. They were charged with assisting federal courts and carrying out orders from federal judges, members of Congress and the President. US Marshals also served subpoenas, summonses, writs, warrants and other documents created by the courts. They made arrests, handled transportation of federal prisoners and disbursed funds according to the dictates of the federal courts. Marshals could also be called upon to pay fees and expenses of the court’s clerks, attorneys, jurors and witnesses, rent courtrooms, procure jail space, hire bailiffs, town criers, and janitors, if necessary. They also made sure everyone was present at hearings, including the prisoners, jurors and witnesses.

 
In addition to these duties, Marshals took the census every decade until 1870. They collected statistical information on business and manufacturing practices and made sure Presidential proclamations made their way to the local level of government. In the West, U.S. Marshals were responsible for taming lawlessness, including helping to arrest the Dalton Gang in 1893, suppressing the Pullman Strike in 1894 and enforcing Prohibition in the 1920s. 
 
Other tasks assigned to U.S. Marshals over the years included recovery of escaped slaves as part of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 and protecting volunteers and African American schoolchildren during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. Throughout its history, the ranks of the Marshals Service have included such noted historical figures as Frederick Douglass, former slave and noted Abolitionist leader who was appointed U.S. Marshal for the District of Columbia in 1877; Wyatt Earp and his brother, Virgil, as deputy marshals for Tombstone, Arizona; Wild Bill Hickok, who served as a deputy marshal at Fort Riley, Kansas; and Bat Masterson, who served as deputy to the U.S. Marshal for the Southern District of New York.
 
More than 200 marshals have died in action, although most of these deaths occurred between 1872 and 1909. One recent fatality occurred during the infamous Ruby Ridge siege of 1992, which tarnished the reputation of the USMS. On August 21, six marshals dressed in camouflage and armed with machine guns entered Randy Weaver’s property in northern Idaho to arrest him for illegally selling sawed-off shotguns and refusal to show up at a subsequent court date in 1991. A gun battled ensued between marshals and Kevin Harris, a family friend, and the Weaver’s 14-year old son, Samuel, during which Samuel was shot in the back and US Marshal William Degan was killed. 
 
The marshals retreated and called in the FBI for help. Federal law enforcement officials laid siege to the cabin for 12 days. An FBI sniper injured Weaver and Harris and killed Vicki Weaver, Randy’s wife, who was holding her nursing baby in her arms. A negotiating team eventually convinced Harris and Weaver to surrender. Weaver was brought to trial, but he was eventually acquitted on all charges except missing his original court date and violating his bail. He served four months of an 18-month sentence and paid a fine of $10,000. Harris was acquitted on all charges. 
 
A lengthy investigation by Congressional and law enforcement officials resulted in the Marshals Service and the FBI being severely criticized for their actions at Ruby Ridge. The Justice Department found that the shot that killed Vicki Weaver, was unjustified because the Weavers were running for cover. The sniper was indicted for manslaughter in 1997 by the Boundary County, Idaho, prosecutor, but the charge was later dismissed in a federal court. 
 
The surviving members of the Weaver family filed a wrongful death suit and Randy Weaver received a $100,000 settlement. His daughters received $1 million each, and Kevin Harris received $380,000. FBI Director Louis Freeh disciplined twelve FBI agents for their handling of the incident.
 
Only one U.S. marshal, Peter P. Hillman, has been killed in the last 14 years. Deputy marshal Hillman was driving a prisoner van near Bakersfield, CA. in November 2001, when he was hit by a tractor trailer.          
 

Marshals Killed in the Line of Duty

more
What it Does:

The U.S. Marshals Service (USMS) is responsible for protecting and supporting U.S. courts and the judicial system. Among their court-related duties, marshals search businesses or residences for judicial purposes; seize evidence; make arrests; execute a judgment (deliver a court’s final decision); keep safe all places where federal judicial business is done; protect judges, jurors, witnesses and others from harm; and transport prisoners to and from court, as well as ensure their welfare, with food, access to medical care and humane confinement.

 
On any given day, USMS houses approximately 54,000 detainees in federal, state, local and private prisons throughout the country, and it manages more than 16,000 assets (primarily confiscated properties) with a value of more than $1.33 billion. In FY 2006, USMS arrested more than 38,000 federal fugitives (more than all other law enforcement agencies combined); reviewed and processed 1,111 threats/inappropriate communications made to federal judicial employees; protected more than 2,000 federal judges and 5,255 other members of the federal judiciary including U.S. Attorneys, Assistant U.S. Attorneys and jurors. USMS also installed more than 1,400 residential security systems in judges’ houses.
 
Programs carried out by the U.S. Marshals Service include:
  • The Fugitive Investigations program, which ensures that arrest warrants are managed and executed properly, and that escapees, parole violators and those who fail to appear in court are arrested and brought into custody. This sometimes extends to foreign countries where extradition orders are sought and prisoners brought back to the U.S. to face trial.
  • The Judicial Security program, which makes sure that federal judges, attorneys, witnesses, jurors and public observers are protected. Responsibilities also include protecting more than 400 federal courthouses and making sure judicial proceedings remain impartial and free form tampering, extortion and bribes.
  • The Witness Security program, which is charged with protecting government witnesses and their families, especially when they must testify against dangerous and violent criminals like drug traffickers, terrorist, organized crime figures and other criminals.
  • The Prisoner Services program, which helps to obtain services for nearly 44,000 federal prisoners. This often involves shepherding prisoners through the various stages of the court’s procedures, transportation and obtaining medical care if a prisoner becomes sick. 
  • The Asset Forfeiture program, which gives U.S. Marshals the power to seize and manage property seized by other federal agencies, including the FBI, Drug Enforcement Administration, Customs and Immigration Service and Internal Revenue Service. This power is usually related to cases involving money laundering, drug trafficking and terrorism.
  • The Special Operations Support program, which is responsible for providing temporary help to districts suffering from dangerous situations, national emergencies or any other situation deemed important by the U.S. Attorney General or the director of the Marshals Service. The Special Operations Group consists of a highly-trained team of deputy marshals that helps districts respond to high-risk trials, prisoner moves, unusually dangerous arrests and emergency situations where there is a violation of federal law or property.
 

U.S. Marshals 15 Most Wanted Fugitives

 

more
Where Does the Money Go:

The U.S. Marshals Service spent nearly $3.2 billion on 1,885 contractors this decade. According to USASpending.gov, the Marshals Service paid for a variety of services, from utilities and housekeeping services to transportation, travel and relocation services. The top 10 contractors were as follows:

 
Akal Security
$1,398,368,086
Corrections Corporation of America
$273,482,558
MVM, Inc.
$241,698,359
Tyco International, Ltd.
$219,416,604
The GEO Group, Inc.
$90,185,796
Small Business Consolidated Reporting
$90,133,731
United International Investigative Services
$87,754,000
Aviation Enterprises, Inc.
$70,691,020
USProtect Corporation
$68,153,671
CSI Aviation Services, Inc.
$63,851,506
 
 

Akal Security is a provider of security services for public and private institutions. It has been operational since 1980 and is currently the largest judicial security contractor in the United States. In 2003, Akal was awarded three contracts (

totaling $102 million

) to provide 1,500 security guards to protect US Army installations at Fort Hood, TX and Fort Stewart, GA. In 2005, Akal received a contract to provide armed guard services at 18 Air Force installations around the country. This contract provided more than 550 guards overseeing

entry control, vehicle inspections and searches, pass and badge verification, control and inspections of commercial traffic, operation of Visitor Control Centers and emergency and crisis response.

more
Controversies:

Top Contractor Sued

In September of 2003, Akal Security, one of the largest contractors for the US Marshals Service, was awarded a contract to provide fully trained and qualified security guards in accordance with military police firearms requirements. However, some of the guards provided by the firm failed to satisfy weapons qualification requirements and receive other training. Additionally, the contractor allegedly failed to satisfy contractual man-hour requirements. Three of the security guards working at the Fort Riley Army base in Kansas filed a qui tam lawsuit in October 2004. A qui tam lawsuit is usually filed by whistleblowers who have insider knowledge of a company’s fraudulent business practices. In July 2007, Akal agreed to pay the federal government $18 million to settle allegations that it violated a contract to provide qualified security guards to serve at eight Army bases in Kansas, Washington, Texas, Georgia, North Carolina and Alabama. 
 
Judges Used Marshals Service for Chores
In September 2007, Fox News reported that U.S. Marshals designated to protect two federal judges in New York over the past decade were asked to empty the trash, carry groceries and tote golf clubs, among other chores. One of the judges was Michael Mukasey, who now oversees the Marshals Service as the U.S. Attorney General.
 
Mukasey, another judge and their wives were named in a 2005 complaint by deputy marshals assigned to the judges’ security details. Marshals weren’t allowed to flush the toilet when working on the night shift, and one judge and his wife demanded to swap their coach airline seats with first-class fares when the tickets had been bought by marshals with taxpayer money. The deputy marshals complained of a hostile working environment and diversions from their primary mission: to protect the judiciary.

2005 Complaint: Judges Used Marshals Service for Chores (Associated Press)

more

Comments

Karen Lozano 10 months ago
Hi, My son is in prison under the marshals care.He was diagnosed with terminal cancer stage four last month. He was given 18 month to live. He was transported from a little unit in Bracketville Tx to a GEO unit in San Antonio TX. this facility is not equipped to care for a cancer patient. They do not give him his pills in a timely manner. He has to wait in his cell till the nursed remember to give him pills for pain. This unit is very inhumane. We call to complain about the nurses and know one listens. They tell my son that if we dont stop call the prison to complain they will ignore him and not give his pills at all. I want to learn more about who to contact about the compassionate release. I need to try to get my son out of there. He will surely die befor his 18 months if he stays in their care. I have emailed our senator to report this abuse. I will not stop there.
Charles Coombs 1 year ago
If I suspect that someone is impersonating a US Federal Marshall, who should I contact? Thank you. Charles Coombs 34 Jill Lane Cartersville, GA 30120 828 319-7662
Arthur Grisi 2 years ago
(... prior "comment" cut-off).... ...when you attended the N.J. Sheriffs' event in Lakehurst. You could have stopped in for another cup of coffee after LaBove Grande's! .... obviously, just kidding. It's been a few years since ... OFDT ..Louis Berger Associates ..&.. Bob Nardi's team working with you and your exec-team at OFDT. Again, all good wishes and hopes for you. Respectfully -&- Kindly Yours, Art Arthur J. Grisi Toms River, N.J. (??retired / consulting??) arthurgrisi@gmail.com 908.230.3822 cell
Wyat Earp 5 years ago
usms currently issues the glock model 22. on a special basis the glock 23 is also employed. usms still uses the remington 870 12 ga shotgun and numerous variants of the colt m4/ar15. some specialized units emply the mp5, m16 and other more discreet sub-guns. the usms issued the ruger gp100 until approximately 1999.
Outdrse 5 years ago
can u put somthig in here bout the wepons the us marshals use and what they have been issued in the past? please?
Randall Bergerud 6 years ago
dear sirs,i am involved in a civil lawsuit concerning the u.s.government.i intend to have the defendants served by the u.s. marshall's service.the problem is that i live in the phillippines and when i send the u.s. marshall form 285,i wish to include payment for their service of process.the currency over here is the peso and there are no money orders available to me in which to send to the u.s. marshall's service,when they serve process upon the defendants.how will i be able to pa...

Leave a comment

Founded: 1789
Annual Budget: $864 million
Employees: 4,700
U.S. Marshals Service
Harlow, David
Acting Director

David L. Harlow became deputy director of the U.S. Marshals Service (USMS) in February 2014, a tenure that included a temporary seven-month stint as acting director. USMS is the nation’s oldest federal law enforcement agency, responsible for apprehension of federal fugitives, protection of the federal judiciary, operation of the Witness Security Program, transportation of federal prisoners and seizure of property illegally obtained by criminals.

 

Harlow, who earned a B.A. degree in law enforcement administration from Western Illinois University, joined the U.S Marshals Service in 1983 as a deputy U.S. marshal. He served the agency as chief deputy for the northern district of Ohio until 2007. In the post, he was deputy commander of operation FALCON [Federal and Local Cops Organized Nationally] III and subsequently commander of operation FALCON 2007, for which he oversaw development of the Northern Ohio Violent Fugitive Task Force and Toledo’s first fugitive apprehension team made up of numerous law enforcement agencies. From 2007 to 2008, he served as chief deputy U.S. marshal for the eastern district of Virginia.

 

Between 2008 and 2011, Harlow was chief of USMS’s Sex Offender Investigations Branch, for which he oversaw the National Sex Offender Targeting Center and the Sex Offender Apprehension Program. He additionally developed the USMS Behavioral Analysis Unit, which helps target fugitive and non-compliant sex offenders.    

 

In mid-2011, Harlow was named acting deputy assistant director of USMS’s Investigative Operations Division (IOD). Then, in May 2012, he was made assistant director of IOD with a concurrent promotion to USMS’s Senior Executive Service.

 

From 2012 to 2014, Harlow served as associate director for operations, managing the agency’s Operational Directorate, the responsibilities of which include witness and judicial security; investigative, tactical and prisoner operations; and the justice prisoner and alien transportation system.

 

Eighteen months into his service as deputy director, Harlow was—on July 26, 2015—appointed acting director of the U.S. Marshals Service. That title expired on February 20, 2016, “in accordance with the Vacancies Reform Act,” according to the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ). However, on December 21, 2015, the DOJ ordered that Harlow be allowed to retain his position as deputy director until the end of the Obama administration in January 2017.

 

Harlow and his wife, Lisa, have two sons, Sean and Brian.

-Danny Biederman

 

To Learn More:

U.S. Marshals Service Balks at Use of Bodycams when they Work with Local Police (by Steve Straehley and Danny Biederman, AllGov)

U.S. Agencies’ Use of Invasive Aerial Cell Phone Surveillance Detailed in Newly Released Documents (by Nathan Freed Wessler, Staff Attorney, ACLU

Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project; ACLU)

Official Biography

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Hylton, Stacia
Previous Director
On September 17, 2010, President Barack Obama nominated Stacia A. Hylton to take over as director of the U.S. Marshals Service. She was confirmed by the Senate on December 22.
 
Hylton earned her B.S. in Criminal Justice in 1983 at Boston’s Northeastern University, which she attended on a full athletic scholarship.
 
She began what is now a 30-year career in law enforcement in 1980, serving until 1991 as a member of the Marshals Service Special Operations Group dive team, helicopter repel and stabo team, and as a water survival instructor. She has also been Assistant Director for the United States Marshals Service Prisoner Operations; Chief Deputy for the District of Columbia; an instructor at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center; an inspector in the Witness Security Program; and Chief of the Marshals Service Court Security Program. Additionally, she served in field operations in the District of Columbia, the Southern District of Florida, and the Eastern District of Virginia.
 
From January to June 2001, Hylton was designated by the Attorney General to be Acting Deputy Director of the U.S. Marshals Service. Also in 2001, she was Operational Commander for the Vieques, Puerto Rico, operation, and Incident Commander for the Marshals Service Emergency Response Team at Ground Zero after the September 11th terrorist attacks. In 2003 she was designated by the Director of the Marshals Service as the Agency Deciding Official for all adverse actions. She was appointed Federal Detention Trustee by Attorney General John Ashcroft on June 14, 2004, and served until February 2010. In this position, she was in charge of federal detainees awaiting trial or immigration proceedings.
 
She then formed Hylton Kirk & Associates, a consulting firm. In 2010 she received $112,500 in consulting fees from The GEO Group Inc., a private prison company that does extensive business with the Marshals Service.
 
Hylton has been an active member of the Highlands Swim and Tennis Club in McLean, Virginia.
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