Monaco

Bookmark and Share
News
more less
Overview
<p>Monaco is a small country on the French Riviera, located near France&rsquo;s border with Italy. The region was associated with Hercules and was rumored to be a stopover on his historic journeys. Monaco was under Roman control until the collapse of the Holy Roman Empire and then was ravaged by barbarian tribes for close to three centuries. The Ligurians then populated the area, leading to the building of a fortress atop the Rock of Monaco, which became a strategic military stronghold that attracted settlers from Genoa. From 1297 to the present day, Monaco has been ruled by the House of Grimaldi, except for the years when the country was under French rule. Monaco was also ruled briefly by Sardinia, before achieving its independence in 1861. Perhaps the country&rsquo;s greatest fame came when American film actress Grace Kelly married Monaco&rsquo;s Prince Rainier in 1956. She served in this capacity until her death in 1982. Prince Rainier died in April 2005, and his son, Prince Albert II formally assumed the throne.</p>
more less
Basic Information
<p><b>Lay of the Land</b>: Nestled on the French Riviera east of Nice and a few miles west of the Italian border, Monaco is surrounded on three sides by France and on the fourth by the Mediterranean.</p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><b>Population</b>: 32,796</div> <div><b>&nbsp;</b></div> <div><b>Religions</b>: Christian (there are 5 Roman Catholic Churches, 2 Protestant Churches, and one Greek Orthodox Church) 86.8%, Jewish 1.7%, Muslim 0.4%, Baha&rsquo;i 0.2%, non-religious 10.8%.</div> <div><b>&nbsp;</b></div> <div><b>Ethnic Groups</b>: French 47%, Monegasque 16%, Italian 16%, other 21%.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><b>Languages</b>: French (official) 53.9%, Ligurian/Monagasque 15.8%, <span>Proven&ccedil;al 13.9%, English.</span></div>
more less
History
<p>Archeological evidence dates Monaco&rsquo;s earliest inhabitants to about 300,000 BC, when inhabitants of the Paleolithic era used the Rock of Monaco as shelter. The area&rsquo;s earliest inhabitants were mountain-dwelling Ligures, who emigrated from Genoa, Italy.</p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>The Phocaeans of Massalia founded the colony of Monoikos, named for its Ligurian inhabitants, in the 6th century BC in the area now known as Monaco. Monoikos was associated with Hercules, and many believed that he passed through Monaco on his travels. Today, the modern port is sometimes referred to as the &ldquo;Port of Hercules.&rdquo;</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Julius Caesar also stopped over in Monaco on his way to fight in Greece. Subsequently, Monaco fell under Roman control and remained that way until the collapse of the Roman Empire in 476.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>For several centuries the area was ravaged by Saracens and other barbarian tribes. The Saracens were expelled in 975, and by the 11th century, the area was again populated by Ligurians.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>On June 10, 1215, a detachment of Genoese Ghibellines led by Fulco del Cassello began the construction of a fortress atop the Rock of Monaco. This date is often cited as the beginning of Monaco&rsquo;s modern history.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>The Ghibellines intended their fortress to be a strategic military stronghold and center of control for the area. They created a settlement around the base of the rock to support the garrison. In order to lure residents from Genoa and the surrounding cities, they offered land grants and tax exemption to new settlers.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Monaco was founded in 1215 as a colony of Genoa. Beginning in 1297, the House of Grimaldi ruled over Monaco, except for a brief period of French control from 1789 to 1814.&nbsp;</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>In 1815, Monaco was designated as a protectorate of Sardinia. This lasted until 1860, according to the treaty of Versailles.&nbsp;In 1861, Monaco was granted sovereignty, under the Franco- Monegasque Treaty. The Prince of Monaco ruled the country from 1861 until 1911, when Monaco adopted a new constitution.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>In July 1918, Monaco signed a treaty with France, which gave Monaco limited French protection. The treaty established that Monaco&rsquo;s political policies would be aligned with French political, military, and economic interests.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>In 1956, American film actress Grace Kelly married Monaco&rsquo;s Prince Rainier, becoming Her Serene Highness of Monaco. Popularly, she was known as Princess Grace of Monaco.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>In 1962, Monaco adopted a new constitution that abolished capital punishment, provided women the right to vote, and established a supreme court to deal with judicial issues.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Monaco&rsquo;s Princess Grace died on September 14, 1982, when she suffered a stroke while driving home with her daughter, Stephanie, and crashed her car off a winding mountain road.&nbsp;</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>In 1993, Monaco became an official member of the United Nations with full voting rights. The country joined the Council of Europe in 2004.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Monaco&rsquo;s ruler, Prince Rainier III, died on April 6, 2005.&nbsp;Three months later, Prince Albert II formally acceded to the throne.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Besides its royal family, Monaco is also famous for the Monaco Grand Prix, which is a Formula One race held at the Circuit in Monaco. The Monaco Grand Prix has been in existence since 1929, and is considered one of the most prestigious racing events, comparable to the Indianapolis 500.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Monaco"><font color="#0000ff">History of Monaco</font></a> (Wikipedia)</div> <div><a href="http://www.everyculture.com/Ma-Ni/Monaco.html"><font color="#0000ff">Culture of Monaco</font></a> (EveryCulture.com)</div>
more less
Monaco's Newspapers
<p><a href="http://www.rivieratimes.com/monaco.html"><font color="#0000ff">The Monaco Times</font></a></p>
more less
History of U.S. Relations with Monaco
<p>The United States&rsquo;formal&nbsp;relations with Monaco began in 1993, when the country joined the United Nations. The two also participate in UNESCO and the World Health Organization together.</p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>American-born actress Grace Kelly especially helped create warm relations between the two nations when she married Prince Rainier in 1956. Kelly served as an informal ambassador during her time as princess as she was much-loved in both countries.</div>
more less
Current U.S. Relations with Monaco
<p>Although the United States does not have a diplomatic mission in Monaco (the embassy is located in France), the two countries enjoy excellent relations.&nbsp;</p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>In December 2006, the United States and Monaco upgraded from consular to full diplomatic relations. Shortly after, Ambassador Craig Stapleton (US ambassador to France) was accredited to Monaco, and Ambassador Gilles Noghes became the first Monegasque ambassador to the United States.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>In 2006, 26,772 Americans visited Monaco. Tourism dropped off 30% during 2002-2003, from 25,430 to 17,787 American tourists. Since 2003 the number of tourists has slowly climbed back up to its former levels.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>In 2006, 4,848 Monacans visited the US. The number of tourists has increased gradually every year since 2002, when 3,851 Monacans came to America.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><a href="http://france.usembassy.gov/monaco.html"><font color="#0000ff">US Diplomatic Mission to Monaco</font></a> (Embassy of the United States in France)</div> <div><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foreign_relations_of_Monaco"><font color="#0000ff">Foreign Relations of Monaco</font></a> (Wikipedia)</div>
more less
Where Does the Money Flow
<p>Given its tiny size, Monaco conducts a healthy amount of trade with the United States. The US imported a total of $38.7 million of goods from Monaco in 2009, and exported $16.8 million, leading to a trade deficit of -$21.9. By contrast, the US had a positive balance of trade $40.5 million in 2008.</p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>The top US import from Monaco in 2009 was artwork, antiques, stamps, and collectables, which totaled $23.2 million in 2009, up from $1.7 million in 2008. Toiletries and cosmetics were another popular import, totaling $6.1 million in 2009, down from $11.0 million the previous year. There was a significant rise in imports of passenger cars, from $25,000 in 2008 to $1.4 million in 2009.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>The largest US export to Monaco was meat and poultry, which increased from $302,000 in 2008 to $7.1 million 2009. There was a significant drop in exports of civilian aircraft, engines, equipments, and parts, which fell from $39.6 million in 2008 to $74,000 in 2009. Antiques and artwork, the largest US import from Monaco, saw a drop in exports from the US from $17.2 million in 2008 to $4.0 million in 2009.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>The US does not give security assistance or foreign aid to Monaco.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><a href="http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/product/enduse/imports/c4272.html"><font color="#0000ff">Imports from Monaco</font></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/product/enduse/exports/c4272.html"><font color="#0000ff">Exports to Monaco</font></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c4272.html"><font color="#0000ff">Trade in Goods (Imports, Exports and Trade Balance) with Monaco</font></a> (US Census Bureau)</div>
more less
Controversies
more less
Human Rights
<p>For the most part, the State Department does not have a lot to report about Monaco&rsquo;s human rights record, which overall is healthy. US officials do point out that citizens do not have the right to change their government under the monarchist form of government. The sole authority to change the government and initiate laws rests with the prince. The 1962 Constitution can be revised by common agreement between the prince and the elected National Council.</p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>The constitution and law provide for freedom of speech and of the press, and the government generally respected these rights. The Penal Code, however, prohibits public denunciations of the ruling family, a provision that the media respected in practice. During 2007 one person was convicted and fined for satirizing government officials on the Internet.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>The law provides criminal penalties for official corruption and the government generally implemented these laws effectively. There were isolated reports of government corruption during the year, but no formal proceedings against government officials were initiated. Public officials are not subject to financial disclosure laws.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Another isolated incident of a human rights violation was addressed July 16, 2009, when the European Court of Human Rights upheld a complaint filed because of extensive pretrial detention. The defendant was involved in a criminal bank embezzlement case.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Prostitution is illegal, and overt prostitution was uncommon, although it existed to an extent in a well-hidden form.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Naturalized women are not allowed to transmit citizenship to their children.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>The constitution and law provide for the right to strike, but government workers may not strike.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><a href="http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2009/eur/136047.htm"><font color="#0000ff">US State Department</font></a></div> <div>&nbsp;</div>
more less
Debate
more less
Past Ambassadors
more less
Monaco's Ambassador to the U.S.
ambassador-image Noghès, Gilles

Gilles Noghès is the first ambassador of the Prince of Monaco to the United States. He presented his credentials to President George W. Bush on December 8, 2006. He has also served as the Permanent Representative of Monaco to the United Nations since July 13, 2004.
                 
Noghès holds a Mechanical Engineering Degree from the Federal Institute of Technology of Zurich (Switzerland) and an MBA from INSEAD, (Fontainebleau, France). He speaks French, English, German and Italian.
 
He joined the administration of the Principality of Monaco in 1979 and was first secretary at the embassy of Monaco in Bonn, West Germany from 1983 to 1985. From 1985-1993, Gilles Noghès also served as Monaco’s director of tourism and conventions.
 
For 10 years (1993-2003), Gilles Noghès served in Paris as minister-counselor at the embassy in France. He was also deputy permanent delegate to UNESCO. While in Paris, Gilles Noghès represented his country to the Bureau International des Expositions (BIE), the intergovernmental body controlling the organization of world fairs.
 
Gilles Noghès was accredited from 2003 to 2004 as ambassador to Switzerland and to the Principality of Liechtenstein, as well as Permanent Representative of Monaco to the United Nations Office in Geneva.
 

more less
Monaco's Embassy Web Site in the U.S.
<p><a href="http://monaco-usa.org/embassy/?pageID=6"><font color="#0000ff">Monaco&rsquo;s Embassy in the US</font></a></p>
more less

Comments

Leave a comment

captcha

U.S. Ambassador to Monaco

Rivkin, Charles
ambassador-image

Who says President Barack Obama isn’t a traditionalist? The man who promised change in Washington has decided to continue the long-held habit of presidents reserving the post of ambassador to France for, well, anyone but career diplomats. Only one of the last twelve U.S. ambassadors to France (Arthur Hartman under Jimmy Carter) has been a Foreign Service officer. The others have all been what is politely known as “non-career appointees.” Both of President George W. Bush’s ambassadors, Howard Leach and Craig Roberts Stapleton, were major Republican Party fundraisers. Now, the ambassadorship goes to Charles Hammerman Rivkin, one-time head of the Muppets empire, who helped raise hundreds of thousands of dollars for Obama in 2008.

 
Rivkin, 47, is the son of the late William R. Rivkin, a lawyer and Democratic insider who was appointed ambassador to Luxembourg by President John F. Kennedy and ambassador to Senegal and Gambia by President Lyndon Johnson. Rivkin was only a child when his father died in Dakar in 1967. His family established the William R. Rivkin Award in 1968, which is awarded each year by the American Foreign Service Association to a mid-career Foreign Service officer who best exemplifies “constructive dissent” in their duties.
 
After growing up with his mother and three siblings (Julia, Laura, and Robert), Rivkin went on to attend college at Yale, receiving a B.A. in political science and international relations. He later earned an MBA from Harvard University.
 
Rivkin worked as a corporate finance analyst at Salomon Brothers, before joining The Jim Henson Company in 1988 as director of strategic planning. Two years later, he was made vice president, In 1990, he married Susan Melissa Tolson, an analyst at Capital Research Company.
 
Rivkin continued to rise at the company famous for creating the Muppets, becoming senior vice president and chief operating officer in 1991, executive vice president and COO in 1994, and president and COO in 1995, making him the first chief executive who was not a member of the Henson family. In 2000, he was given the title of CEO, and engineered the sale of the company to the German-owned EM.TV for $1 billion.
 
By the following year, EM.TV’s legal and financial troubles led to rumors that The Henson Company might again be sold, but after two years of struggling to find a buyer, German executives agreed to sell the company back to the Henson family in 2003, which in turn sold the Muppets franchise to the Walt Disney Company. Rivkin then stepped aside to allow the family to once again run the company, while retaining a position on the board.
 
During the 2004 presidential campaign, Rivkin was an active supporter of Democratic nominee John Kerry, and served as an at-large California delegate to the Democratic National Convention.
 
In 2005, Rivkin became president and chief executive officer of Wild Brain, a San-Francisco-based entertainment and animation production company whose television series include Yo Gabba Gabba! and Higglytown Heroes. Rivkin is an executive producer of Yo Gabba Gabba!, which airs on Nickelodeon and Noggin cable networks.
 
Outside of his business dealings, Rivkin is a member of the Homeland Security Advisory Council and the Pacific Council on International Policy.
 
When Obama shattered campaign fundraising records with a $150 million haul in September 2008, his bundlers in California played a key role in amassing so much cash. Rivkin was one of these major players, serving as Obama’s Southern California finance co-chair. According to OpenSecrets.org, he sent at least $500,000 towards Obama’s campaign committee as a bundler and another $300,000 toward his inaugural committee. Since the 1994 election cycle, Rivkin has personally contributed more than $97,500 to Democrats, including $6,600 to Obama.
 

Rivkin is not the only member of his family to receive an appointment from Obama. His brother, Robert, was selected to be general counsel for the Department of Transportation, and Robert’s wife, Cindy S. Moelis, a close friend of Michelle Obama, was chosen to direct the Commission on White House Fellows.

 

California Gives Most to Obama Camp (by Jeffrey Ressner, Politico)

 

more
Bookmark and Share
News
more less
Overview
<p>Monaco is a small country on the French Riviera, located near France&rsquo;s border with Italy. The region was associated with Hercules and was rumored to be a stopover on his historic journeys. Monaco was under Roman control until the collapse of the Holy Roman Empire and then was ravaged by barbarian tribes for close to three centuries. The Ligurians then populated the area, leading to the building of a fortress atop the Rock of Monaco, which became a strategic military stronghold that attracted settlers from Genoa. From 1297 to the present day, Monaco has been ruled by the House of Grimaldi, except for the years when the country was under French rule. Monaco was also ruled briefly by Sardinia, before achieving its independence in 1861. Perhaps the country&rsquo;s greatest fame came when American film actress Grace Kelly married Monaco&rsquo;s Prince Rainier in 1956. She served in this capacity until her death in 1982. Prince Rainier died in April 2005, and his son, Prince Albert II formally assumed the throne.</p>
more less
Basic Information
<p><b>Lay of the Land</b>: Nestled on the French Riviera east of Nice and a few miles west of the Italian border, Monaco is surrounded on three sides by France and on the fourth by the Mediterranean.</p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><b>Population</b>: 32,796</div> <div><b>&nbsp;</b></div> <div><b>Religions</b>: Christian (there are 5 Roman Catholic Churches, 2 Protestant Churches, and one Greek Orthodox Church) 86.8%, Jewish 1.7%, Muslim 0.4%, Baha&rsquo;i 0.2%, non-religious 10.8%.</div> <div><b>&nbsp;</b></div> <div><b>Ethnic Groups</b>: French 47%, Monegasque 16%, Italian 16%, other 21%.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><b>Languages</b>: French (official) 53.9%, Ligurian/Monagasque 15.8%, <span>Proven&ccedil;al 13.9%, English.</span></div>
more less
History
<p>Archeological evidence dates Monaco&rsquo;s earliest inhabitants to about 300,000 BC, when inhabitants of the Paleolithic era used the Rock of Monaco as shelter. The area&rsquo;s earliest inhabitants were mountain-dwelling Ligures, who emigrated from Genoa, Italy.</p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>The Phocaeans of Massalia founded the colony of Monoikos, named for its Ligurian inhabitants, in the 6th century BC in the area now known as Monaco. Monoikos was associated with Hercules, and many believed that he passed through Monaco on his travels. Today, the modern port is sometimes referred to as the &ldquo;Port of Hercules.&rdquo;</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Julius Caesar also stopped over in Monaco on his way to fight in Greece. Subsequently, Monaco fell under Roman control and remained that way until the collapse of the Roman Empire in 476.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>For several centuries the area was ravaged by Saracens and other barbarian tribes. The Saracens were expelled in 975, and by the 11th century, the area was again populated by Ligurians.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>On June 10, 1215, a detachment of Genoese Ghibellines led by Fulco del Cassello began the construction of a fortress atop the Rock of Monaco. This date is often cited as the beginning of Monaco&rsquo;s modern history.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>The Ghibellines intended their fortress to be a strategic military stronghold and center of control for the area. They created a settlement around the base of the rock to support the garrison. In order to lure residents from Genoa and the surrounding cities, they offered land grants and tax exemption to new settlers.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Monaco was founded in 1215 as a colony of Genoa. Beginning in 1297, the House of Grimaldi ruled over Monaco, except for a brief period of French control from 1789 to 1814.&nbsp;</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>In 1815, Monaco was designated as a protectorate of Sardinia. This lasted until 1860, according to the treaty of Versailles.&nbsp;In 1861, Monaco was granted sovereignty, under the Franco- Monegasque Treaty. The Prince of Monaco ruled the country from 1861 until 1911, when Monaco adopted a new constitution.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>In July 1918, Monaco signed a treaty with France, which gave Monaco limited French protection. The treaty established that Monaco&rsquo;s political policies would be aligned with French political, military, and economic interests.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>In 1956, American film actress Grace Kelly married Monaco&rsquo;s Prince Rainier, becoming Her Serene Highness of Monaco. Popularly, she was known as Princess Grace of Monaco.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>In 1962, Monaco adopted a new constitution that abolished capital punishment, provided women the right to vote, and established a supreme court to deal with judicial issues.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Monaco&rsquo;s Princess Grace died on September 14, 1982, when she suffered a stroke while driving home with her daughter, Stephanie, and crashed her car off a winding mountain road.&nbsp;</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>In 1993, Monaco became an official member of the United Nations with full voting rights. The country joined the Council of Europe in 2004.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Monaco&rsquo;s ruler, Prince Rainier III, died on April 6, 2005.&nbsp;Three months later, Prince Albert II formally acceded to the throne.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Besides its royal family, Monaco is also famous for the Monaco Grand Prix, which is a Formula One race held at the Circuit in Monaco. The Monaco Grand Prix has been in existence since 1929, and is considered one of the most prestigious racing events, comparable to the Indianapolis 500.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Monaco"><font color="#0000ff">History of Monaco</font></a> (Wikipedia)</div> <div><a href="http://www.everyculture.com/Ma-Ni/Monaco.html"><font color="#0000ff">Culture of Monaco</font></a> (EveryCulture.com)</div>
more less
Monaco's Newspapers
<p><a href="http://www.rivieratimes.com/monaco.html"><font color="#0000ff">The Monaco Times</font></a></p>
more less
History of U.S. Relations with Monaco
<p>The United States&rsquo;formal&nbsp;relations with Monaco began in 1993, when the country joined the United Nations. The two also participate in UNESCO and the World Health Organization together.</p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>American-born actress Grace Kelly especially helped create warm relations between the two nations when she married Prince Rainier in 1956. Kelly served as an informal ambassador during her time as princess as she was much-loved in both countries.</div>
more less
Current U.S. Relations with Monaco
<p>Although the United States does not have a diplomatic mission in Monaco (the embassy is located in France), the two countries enjoy excellent relations.&nbsp;</p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>In December 2006, the United States and Monaco upgraded from consular to full diplomatic relations. Shortly after, Ambassador Craig Stapleton (US ambassador to France) was accredited to Monaco, and Ambassador Gilles Noghes became the first Monegasque ambassador to the United States.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>In 2006, 26,772 Americans visited Monaco. Tourism dropped off 30% during 2002-2003, from 25,430 to 17,787 American tourists. Since 2003 the number of tourists has slowly climbed back up to its former levels.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>In 2006, 4,848 Monacans visited the US. The number of tourists has increased gradually every year since 2002, when 3,851 Monacans came to America.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><a href="http://france.usembassy.gov/monaco.html"><font color="#0000ff">US Diplomatic Mission to Monaco</font></a> (Embassy of the United States in France)</div> <div><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foreign_relations_of_Monaco"><font color="#0000ff">Foreign Relations of Monaco</font></a> (Wikipedia)</div>
more less
Where Does the Money Flow
<p>Given its tiny size, Monaco conducts a healthy amount of trade with the United States. The US imported a total of $38.7 million of goods from Monaco in 2009, and exported $16.8 million, leading to a trade deficit of -$21.9. By contrast, the US had a positive balance of trade $40.5 million in 2008.</p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>The top US import from Monaco in 2009 was artwork, antiques, stamps, and collectables, which totaled $23.2 million in 2009, up from $1.7 million in 2008. Toiletries and cosmetics were another popular import, totaling $6.1 million in 2009, down from $11.0 million the previous year. There was a significant rise in imports of passenger cars, from $25,000 in 2008 to $1.4 million in 2009.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>The largest US export to Monaco was meat and poultry, which increased from $302,000 in 2008 to $7.1 million 2009. There was a significant drop in exports of civilian aircraft, engines, equipments, and parts, which fell from $39.6 million in 2008 to $74,000 in 2009. Antiques and artwork, the largest US import from Monaco, saw a drop in exports from the US from $17.2 million in 2008 to $4.0 million in 2009.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>The US does not give security assistance or foreign aid to Monaco.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><a href="http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/product/enduse/imports/c4272.html"><font color="#0000ff">Imports from Monaco</font></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/product/enduse/exports/c4272.html"><font color="#0000ff">Exports to Monaco</font></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c4272.html"><font color="#0000ff">Trade in Goods (Imports, Exports and Trade Balance) with Monaco</font></a> (US Census Bureau)</div>
more less
Controversies
more less
Human Rights
<p>For the most part, the State Department does not have a lot to report about Monaco&rsquo;s human rights record, which overall is healthy. US officials do point out that citizens do not have the right to change their government under the monarchist form of government. The sole authority to change the government and initiate laws rests with the prince. The 1962 Constitution can be revised by common agreement between the prince and the elected National Council.</p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>The constitution and law provide for freedom of speech and of the press, and the government generally respected these rights. The Penal Code, however, prohibits public denunciations of the ruling family, a provision that the media respected in practice. During 2007 one person was convicted and fined for satirizing government officials on the Internet.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>The law provides criminal penalties for official corruption and the government generally implemented these laws effectively. There were isolated reports of government corruption during the year, but no formal proceedings against government officials were initiated. Public officials are not subject to financial disclosure laws.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Another isolated incident of a human rights violation was addressed July 16, 2009, when the European Court of Human Rights upheld a complaint filed because of extensive pretrial detention. The defendant was involved in a criminal bank embezzlement case.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Prostitution is illegal, and overt prostitution was uncommon, although it existed to an extent in a well-hidden form.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Naturalized women are not allowed to transmit citizenship to their children.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>The constitution and law provide for the right to strike, but government workers may not strike.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><a href="http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2009/eur/136047.htm"><font color="#0000ff">US State Department</font></a></div> <div>&nbsp;</div>
more less
Debate
more less
Past Ambassadors
more less
Monaco's Ambassador to the U.S.
ambassador-image Noghès, Gilles

Gilles Noghès is the first ambassador of the Prince of Monaco to the United States. He presented his credentials to President George W. Bush on December 8, 2006. He has also served as the Permanent Representative of Monaco to the United Nations since July 13, 2004.
                 
Noghès holds a Mechanical Engineering Degree from the Federal Institute of Technology of Zurich (Switzerland) and an MBA from INSEAD, (Fontainebleau, France). He speaks French, English, German and Italian.
 
He joined the administration of the Principality of Monaco in 1979 and was first secretary at the embassy of Monaco in Bonn, West Germany from 1983 to 1985. From 1985-1993, Gilles Noghès also served as Monaco’s director of tourism and conventions.
 
For 10 years (1993-2003), Gilles Noghès served in Paris as minister-counselor at the embassy in France. He was also deputy permanent delegate to UNESCO. While in Paris, Gilles Noghès represented his country to the Bureau International des Expositions (BIE), the intergovernmental body controlling the organization of world fairs.
 
Gilles Noghès was accredited from 2003 to 2004 as ambassador to Switzerland and to the Principality of Liechtenstein, as well as Permanent Representative of Monaco to the United Nations Office in Geneva.
 

more less
Monaco's Embassy Web Site in the U.S.
<p><a href="http://monaco-usa.org/embassy/?pageID=6"><font color="#0000ff">Monaco&rsquo;s Embassy in the US</font></a></p>
more less

Comments

Leave a comment

captcha

U.S. Ambassador to Monaco

Rivkin, Charles
ambassador-image

Who says President Barack Obama isn’t a traditionalist? The man who promised change in Washington has decided to continue the long-held habit of presidents reserving the post of ambassador to France for, well, anyone but career diplomats. Only one of the last twelve U.S. ambassadors to France (Arthur Hartman under Jimmy Carter) has been a Foreign Service officer. The others have all been what is politely known as “non-career appointees.” Both of President George W. Bush’s ambassadors, Howard Leach and Craig Roberts Stapleton, were major Republican Party fundraisers. Now, the ambassadorship goes to Charles Hammerman Rivkin, one-time head of the Muppets empire, who helped raise hundreds of thousands of dollars for Obama in 2008.

 
Rivkin, 47, is the son of the late William R. Rivkin, a lawyer and Democratic insider who was appointed ambassador to Luxembourg by President John F. Kennedy and ambassador to Senegal and Gambia by President Lyndon Johnson. Rivkin was only a child when his father died in Dakar in 1967. His family established the William R. Rivkin Award in 1968, which is awarded each year by the American Foreign Service Association to a mid-career Foreign Service officer who best exemplifies “constructive dissent” in their duties.
 
After growing up with his mother and three siblings (Julia, Laura, and Robert), Rivkin went on to attend college at Yale, receiving a B.A. in political science and international relations. He later earned an MBA from Harvard University.
 
Rivkin worked as a corporate finance analyst at Salomon Brothers, before joining The Jim Henson Company in 1988 as director of strategic planning. Two years later, he was made vice president, In 1990, he married Susan Melissa Tolson, an analyst at Capital Research Company.
 
Rivkin continued to rise at the company famous for creating the Muppets, becoming senior vice president and chief operating officer in 1991, executive vice president and COO in 1994, and president and COO in 1995, making him the first chief executive who was not a member of the Henson family. In 2000, he was given the title of CEO, and engineered the sale of the company to the German-owned EM.TV for $1 billion.
 
By the following year, EM.TV’s legal and financial troubles led to rumors that The Henson Company might again be sold, but after two years of struggling to find a buyer, German executives agreed to sell the company back to the Henson family in 2003, which in turn sold the Muppets franchise to the Walt Disney Company. Rivkin then stepped aside to allow the family to once again run the company, while retaining a position on the board.
 
During the 2004 presidential campaign, Rivkin was an active supporter of Democratic nominee John Kerry, and served as an at-large California delegate to the Democratic National Convention.
 
In 2005, Rivkin became president and chief executive officer of Wild Brain, a San-Francisco-based entertainment and animation production company whose television series include Yo Gabba Gabba! and Higglytown Heroes. Rivkin is an executive producer of Yo Gabba Gabba!, which airs on Nickelodeon and Noggin cable networks.
 
Outside of his business dealings, Rivkin is a member of the Homeland Security Advisory Council and the Pacific Council on International Policy.
 
When Obama shattered campaign fundraising records with a $150 million haul in September 2008, his bundlers in California played a key role in amassing so much cash. Rivkin was one of these major players, serving as Obama’s Southern California finance co-chair. According to OpenSecrets.org, he sent at least $500,000 towards Obama’s campaign committee as a bundler and another $300,000 toward his inaugural committee. Since the 1994 election cycle, Rivkin has personally contributed more than $97,500 to Democrats, including $6,600 to Obama.
 

Rivkin is not the only member of his family to receive an appointment from Obama. His brother, Robert, was selected to be general counsel for the Department of Transportation, and Robert’s wife, Cindy S. Moelis, a close friend of Michelle Obama, was chosen to direct the Commission on White House Fellows.

 

California Gives Most to Obama Camp (by Jeffrey Ressner, Politico)

 

more