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Overview:

The Armed Forces Retirement Home (AFRH) is an independent establishment of the Executive Branch of the federal government that oversees two Continuing Care Retirement Community campuses for qualified veterans, one in Washington D.C., the other in Gulfport, Mississippi. The Gulfport campus was decimated by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and the facility’s 351 residents had to be relocated. The campus was rebuilt and opened again in October 2010. In 2005, controversy about AFRH erupted when a group of veterans living at the Washington D.C. campus filed a class-action lawsuit claiming that continuing budget cuts there were affecting the quality of health care. The suit was initially dismissed, but the dismissal was overturned; in 2010, a settlement was reached giving residents increased access to medical and dental care and prescription medicines.

 
The National Defense Authorization Act of 2002 provided for a permanent change in the home’s management structure. The traditional governing board was abolished and replaced by a Chief Operating Officer to be chosen by the Secretary of Defense. Since that time, the AFRH workforce has been cut almost in half and the operating budget reduced by about $20 million.
more
History:

 

 

 

 

 

 

In 1811, with the promise of caring for the military aging, infirm, and financially strapped, a charter was passed to establish a place to live in Philadelphia for Navy officers, sailors, and Marines. Secretary of the Navy Paul Hamilton led the efforts to bring it about, and it opened in 1834. Seventeen years later, a home in Washington D.C. was created for old and disabled soldiers. AFRH’s Washington facility was the site of Anderson Cottage, a retreat for several 19th century U.S. presidents, including Abraham Lincoln. Then in the late 1960s, when it was determined the Philadelphia facility could not be economically modernized and expanded, the Naval home was moved to Gulfport, Mississippi. In 1991 Congress passed a law incorporating the two campuses into an independent establishment in the Executive Branch of the federal government, under the umbrella of AFRH.

 
But in 2005 Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulfport campus, and it had to be closed. Many of its residents were transferred to the D.C. home, and Congress provided supplemental funding for its rebuilding. The campus opened again in October 2010.
more
What it Does:

 

 

 

 

 

 

AFRH provides independent living, assisted living, and long-term care services in a community setting for qualified veterans. The only Continuing Care Retirement Community in the federal government, AFRH also operates a health and dental clinic for residents; provides an orderly transition when needed from independent living to assisted living or nursing care; serves meals; and offers a variety of other services, activities and recreation facilities, including a golf course and driving range, fitness room, banking center, post office, bowling alley, fishing ponds, auto shop, library, hair salon, theater, and bus tours to area attractions. Receiving no annual budget appropriation from Congress, AFRH is financed by a trust fund ($159 million at the end of 2007) made up of the 50 cent per month payroll deductions of active duty military personnel, fines and forfeitures from Armed Forces disciplinary actions, resident fees, and investment income from low-yield Treasury Bonds, with federal law prohibiting AFRH from soliciting contributions, applying for grants, or running capital fundraising campaigns.

 
As of April 2011, there were 582 residents at the Gulfport campus, with a waiting list of 393; and 568 residents at the D.C. campus, with a waiting list of 239. There is an 18-month wait to become a resident.

From the Web Site of the AFRH
more
Where Does the Money Go:
AFRH is the fifth lowest-paying agency in the federal government, averaging (as of September 2010) $59,070 annual salary per employee. For FY 2013, the average salary is expected to stand at $62,900. Approximately $57,000 is spent annually on each resident at both facilities.
 
more
Controversies:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Medical Employees Complain of Poor Conditions

In 2007 medical employees of the Washington D.C. home contacted the GAO with complaints that there was a variety of improper health conditions occurring there, including rooms spattered with blood, urine and feces, and patients with unusually severe pressure sores, as well as a rising death rate. However, a Defense Department inspection team, after interviewing doctors, nurses, and patients, reported that they could not substantiate the medical employees’ allegations. It did call for improvements in record-keeping methodology and processing as well as appointment scheduling and overall communication.   
Probe of Retirement Home Finds No Increase in Deaths (by Steve Vogel, Washington Post)
Pentagon Is Probing Veterans Home: Increased Deaths, Grim Conditions Reported by GAO (by Steve Vogel and Michael E. Ruane, Washington Post)
 
Funding Cuts Threaten Quality of Care
In 2005 a group of residents at the Washington D.C. campus filed a lawsuit on behalf of everyone living there, against AFHR’s Chief Operating Officer Timothy Cox and Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, claiming that funding cuts at the facility have caused neglect in the medical care they receive. The U.S. District Court for D.C. dismissed the lawsuit, and residents filed an appeal. The appeals case, Cody v. Cox, was argued from October 12 through December 14, 2007, and the U.S. Court of Appeals reversed the original judgment of the District Court.
Supporting Statement For Litigation (by John Robert Mallernee, Our Eternal Struggle)
Settlement Announcement (McKenna Long & Aldridge)
more
Former Directors:

Timothy Cox, who was named to the position by Donald Rumsfeld on August 12, 2002, received a BA from Bucknell in Lewisburg, PA, and a JD from Widener University in Wilmington, Delaware. Prior to becoming AFRH COO, Cox was senior vice-president of Operation Services at Sunrise Senior Living, which operates more than 440 assisted living homes in four countries. Cox has been embroiled in controversy ever since over the ways he has chosen to cut costs, from cutting staff to restructuring medical services and programs, to his choices on avenues to explore for expansion of the site to his raising the idea of seeking new routes for financing. Cox is also a member of the board of directors of Cultural Tourism DC.

 
Cox resigned effective January 15, 2011, and took over as CEO of The Washington Home and Community Hospices.
more

Comments

George Crown 4 years ago
I need to talk with Gregory Moore, AFRH public affairs specialist. Can someone furnish me his email address or his telephone number?
Sandie Becker 4 years ago
The latest IG Report dated July 23, 2014 is a step in the right direction to remove incompetent lying jerks. I have contacted several sitting Senators/Assembly folks/POGO group as others with this latest report and will be calling the IG hotline to report where the COO LIED to the inspectors....again. Proof is right on this page Steve. Busted again buddy. BTW folks, my father perished at the hands of these so called "professionals" Justice grinds slowly but WILL be served Steve...no threat, just fact.
Pat Stern 6 years ago
My aunt is 93 years old, she has lived in the Soliders Home AFRH in Washington DC for over 20 years. She has cancer and is in assistant living, which her care is very poor. It makes me sick that the staff has no compassion. They make her sit in soil depepends and when she asked if they could change her, they respond with, "you should of have told the other girl before swift changed." She served our COUNTRY USA and this is the care she is getting. The staff is rude to her and last night she sounded so over medicated she could hardly speak. What I wish for my Aunt is for her to be able to live her last days treated with respect. Who can help? All staff members should think that they to will become old one day!
Robert Moscato 6 years ago
I a 100% disabled veteran, single and was accepted to the Old Soldiers Home, appxo. one and a half years ago. I was told the waiting list is 18 to 24 months long. Now I checked back with Washington D.C., and was told it would be 27 months? Why post false statements about the waiting period? Should I open a Congressional hearing on this matter, too see what the true answer is?
Christie Odahlen 7 years ago
mr. mcmanus, sir, this comment is in regard to my father, joseph e. little, a resident of the afrh gulfport. he weathered katrina, was in dc for 5 years (he was secretary to the surgeon general of the navy in the 50's), and then happily moved back to the gulf that he so loves. he has also been a smoker for 77 years, and when he entered the new facility at gulfport - he was told of the new non-smoking policy and the 3 strikes and you're out penalty. joseph is 90-years-old, a rece...

Leave a comment

Founded: 1811
Annual Budget: $67.590 million (FY 2013 Request)
Employees: 336 (FY 2013 Estimate)
Official Website: http://www.afrh.gov/
Armed Forces Retirement Home
Kangas, Timothy
Armed Forces Retirement Home, Timothy Kangas

Timothy Kangas has been the head of the Armed Forces Retirement Home (AFRH) since April 18, 2016. An independent agency run by a chief operating officer responsible to the Secretary of Defense, AFRH oversees two retirement communities for veterans in Washington D.C., and Gulfport, Mississippi.

 

Born circa 1965, Timothy Jon Kangas earned a B.S. in Psychology at Northern Michigan University in 1988, a Masters’ of Public Administration in 1990, and a Ph.D. in Public Administration and Public Affairs at Western Michigan University in 2004. His dissertation was entitled, “Child Welfare and Devolving Federalism: An Analysis of the Effects of Federal Funding Schemes on Selected Child Welfare Outcomes in Michigan.”

 

Starting in 1993, Kangas worked for the State of Michigan for over 20 years in several different positions, including 9 years as a combat medic in the Michigan Army National Guard; service as Trauma Coordinator until September 2007, where he led efforts to create Michigan’s first statewide all-inclusive trauma system; and as Regional Healthcare Administrator for the Michigan Department of Corrections from 2008 to 2016.

 

Kangas interrupted his career in Michigan government to serve a one year stint in Iraq as an advisor to a Provisional Reconstruction Team for the State Department in 2007-2008. 

 

Kangas has been active in his local community. He was elected to the City Council in Dewitt, Michigan, for the first time in 2004 and, most recently, in 2010, and served on local boards and commissions, including the DeWitt Area Emergency Services Authority and the De​​Witt Area Recreation Authority.

 

Kangas served as a congressional aide to Congressman Bob Davis (R-Michigan).

 

Kangas has made his residence in DeWitt, Michigan, since 2002 with his wife, Debra Jean (Ojala). The couple has three children, Kortney, Ciara and Alec.

-Matt Bewig

 

To Learn More:

Official Biography

A War with the Defense Department over a Hidden Golf Course (Bonnie Jo Mount, Associated Press)

more
McManus, Steve
Previous Chief Operating Officer

Steven G. McManus officially assumed the role of Chief Operating Officer (COO) of the Armed Forces Retirement Home (AFRH) on Sept. 25, 2011. AFRH is an independent agency of the Executive Branch of the Federal government that oversees two Continuing Care Retirement Community campuses for qualified veterans, one in Washington D.C., the other in Gulfport, Mississippi. McManus had served as Acting COO since January 16, 2011. As COO, McManus is responsible for all aspects of AFRH’s operations.

 
A member of the Senior Executive Service, McManus holds a BS degree and an MBA with emphasis in Finance and Accounting. Joining the US Army circa 1976 as an enlisted man, McManus was promoted to the officer ranks, serving mainly in West Germany and stateside. After retiring from the Army in 2001, McManus worked as a senior consultant for the Navy and for a short period as the Deputy Director of the Army’s Working Capital Fund.
 
In 2002, he joined the Armed Forces Retirement Home and served at the Washington facility as its financial officer, and subsequently as the facility’s Associate Director of Resource Management. Between 2002 and 2008 he served in multiple roles at AFRH, working primarily as the Agency’s chief financial officer with associate roles including the agency’s first inspector general, its chief information officer, and its procurement head.
 
McManus served as the Interim Director for the Gulfport facility between May and August 2005, and personally led the safe evacuation of residents from Gulfport to Washington, DC, within 24 hours of Hurricane Katrina’s landfall. In March 2008, McManus left AFRH to serve as thecChief financial officer for the Federal Labor Relations Authority. In September 2009, he returned to the AFRH in the newly created Senior Executive Service position of Deputy COO/Chief Financial Officer. In January 2011, with the departure of the former COO, McManus assumed the role of AFRH Acting COO, and was made permanent in September 2011.
 
more
Bookmark and Share
Overview:

The Armed Forces Retirement Home (AFRH) is an independent establishment of the Executive Branch of the federal government that oversees two Continuing Care Retirement Community campuses for qualified veterans, one in Washington D.C., the other in Gulfport, Mississippi. The Gulfport campus was decimated by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and the facility’s 351 residents had to be relocated. The campus was rebuilt and opened again in October 2010. In 2005, controversy about AFRH erupted when a group of veterans living at the Washington D.C. campus filed a class-action lawsuit claiming that continuing budget cuts there were affecting the quality of health care. The suit was initially dismissed, but the dismissal was overturned; in 2010, a settlement was reached giving residents increased access to medical and dental care and prescription medicines.

 
The National Defense Authorization Act of 2002 provided for a permanent change in the home’s management structure. The traditional governing board was abolished and replaced by a Chief Operating Officer to be chosen by the Secretary of Defense. Since that time, the AFRH workforce has been cut almost in half and the operating budget reduced by about $20 million.
more
History:

 

 

 

 

 

 

In 1811, with the promise of caring for the military aging, infirm, and financially strapped, a charter was passed to establish a place to live in Philadelphia for Navy officers, sailors, and Marines. Secretary of the Navy Paul Hamilton led the efforts to bring it about, and it opened in 1834. Seventeen years later, a home in Washington D.C. was created for old and disabled soldiers. AFRH’s Washington facility was the site of Anderson Cottage, a retreat for several 19th century U.S. presidents, including Abraham Lincoln. Then in the late 1960s, when it was determined the Philadelphia facility could not be economically modernized and expanded, the Naval home was moved to Gulfport, Mississippi. In 1991 Congress passed a law incorporating the two campuses into an independent establishment in the Executive Branch of the federal government, under the umbrella of AFRH.

 
But in 2005 Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulfport campus, and it had to be closed. Many of its residents were transferred to the D.C. home, and Congress provided supplemental funding for its rebuilding. The campus opened again in October 2010.
more
What it Does:

 

 

 

 

 

 

AFRH provides independent living, assisted living, and long-term care services in a community setting for qualified veterans. The only Continuing Care Retirement Community in the federal government, AFRH also operates a health and dental clinic for residents; provides an orderly transition when needed from independent living to assisted living or nursing care; serves meals; and offers a variety of other services, activities and recreation facilities, including a golf course and driving range, fitness room, banking center, post office, bowling alley, fishing ponds, auto shop, library, hair salon, theater, and bus tours to area attractions. Receiving no annual budget appropriation from Congress, AFRH is financed by a trust fund ($159 million at the end of 2007) made up of the 50 cent per month payroll deductions of active duty military personnel, fines and forfeitures from Armed Forces disciplinary actions, resident fees, and investment income from low-yield Treasury Bonds, with federal law prohibiting AFRH from soliciting contributions, applying for grants, or running capital fundraising campaigns.

 
As of April 2011, there were 582 residents at the Gulfport campus, with a waiting list of 393; and 568 residents at the D.C. campus, with a waiting list of 239. There is an 18-month wait to become a resident.

From the Web Site of the AFRH
more
Where Does the Money Go:
AFRH is the fifth lowest-paying agency in the federal government, averaging (as of September 2010) $59,070 annual salary per employee. For FY 2013, the average salary is expected to stand at $62,900. Approximately $57,000 is spent annually on each resident at both facilities.
 
more
Controversies:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Medical Employees Complain of Poor Conditions

In 2007 medical employees of the Washington D.C. home contacted the GAO with complaints that there was a variety of improper health conditions occurring there, including rooms spattered with blood, urine and feces, and patients with unusually severe pressure sores, as well as a rising death rate. However, a Defense Department inspection team, after interviewing doctors, nurses, and patients, reported that they could not substantiate the medical employees’ allegations. It did call for improvements in record-keeping methodology and processing as well as appointment scheduling and overall communication.   
Probe of Retirement Home Finds No Increase in Deaths (by Steve Vogel, Washington Post)
Pentagon Is Probing Veterans Home: Increased Deaths, Grim Conditions Reported by GAO (by Steve Vogel and Michael E. Ruane, Washington Post)
 
Funding Cuts Threaten Quality of Care
In 2005 a group of residents at the Washington D.C. campus filed a lawsuit on behalf of everyone living there, against AFHR’s Chief Operating Officer Timothy Cox and Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, claiming that funding cuts at the facility have caused neglect in the medical care they receive. The U.S. District Court for D.C. dismissed the lawsuit, and residents filed an appeal. The appeals case, Cody v. Cox, was argued from October 12 through December 14, 2007, and the U.S. Court of Appeals reversed the original judgment of the District Court.
Supporting Statement For Litigation (by John Robert Mallernee, Our Eternal Struggle)
Settlement Announcement (McKenna Long & Aldridge)
more
Former Directors:

Timothy Cox, who was named to the position by Donald Rumsfeld on August 12, 2002, received a BA from Bucknell in Lewisburg, PA, and a JD from Widener University in Wilmington, Delaware. Prior to becoming AFRH COO, Cox was senior vice-president of Operation Services at Sunrise Senior Living, which operates more than 440 assisted living homes in four countries. Cox has been embroiled in controversy ever since over the ways he has chosen to cut costs, from cutting staff to restructuring medical services and programs, to his choices on avenues to explore for expansion of the site to his raising the idea of seeking new routes for financing. Cox is also a member of the board of directors of Cultural Tourism DC.

 
Cox resigned effective January 15, 2011, and took over as CEO of The Washington Home and Community Hospices.
more

Comments

George Crown 4 years ago
I need to talk with Gregory Moore, AFRH public affairs specialist. Can someone furnish me his email address or his telephone number?
Sandie Becker 4 years ago
The latest IG Report dated July 23, 2014 is a step in the right direction to remove incompetent lying jerks. I have contacted several sitting Senators/Assembly folks/POGO group as others with this latest report and will be calling the IG hotline to report where the COO LIED to the inspectors....again. Proof is right on this page Steve. Busted again buddy. BTW folks, my father perished at the hands of these so called "professionals" Justice grinds slowly but WILL be served Steve...no threat, just fact.
Pat Stern 6 years ago
My aunt is 93 years old, she has lived in the Soliders Home AFRH in Washington DC for over 20 years. She has cancer and is in assistant living, which her care is very poor. It makes me sick that the staff has no compassion. They make her sit in soil depepends and when she asked if they could change her, they respond with, "you should of have told the other girl before swift changed." She served our COUNTRY USA and this is the care she is getting. The staff is rude to her and last night she sounded so over medicated she could hardly speak. What I wish for my Aunt is for her to be able to live her last days treated with respect. Who can help? All staff members should think that they to will become old one day!
Robert Moscato 6 years ago
I a 100% disabled veteran, single and was accepted to the Old Soldiers Home, appxo. one and a half years ago. I was told the waiting list is 18 to 24 months long. Now I checked back with Washington D.C., and was told it would be 27 months? Why post false statements about the waiting period? Should I open a Congressional hearing on this matter, too see what the true answer is?
Christie Odahlen 7 years ago
mr. mcmanus, sir, this comment is in regard to my father, joseph e. little, a resident of the afrh gulfport. he weathered katrina, was in dc for 5 years (he was secretary to the surgeon general of the navy in the 50's), and then happily moved back to the gulf that he so loves. he has also been a smoker for 77 years, and when he entered the new facility at gulfport - he was told of the new non-smoking policy and the 3 strikes and you're out penalty. joseph is 90-years-old, a rece...

Leave a comment

Founded: 1811
Annual Budget: $67.590 million (FY 2013 Request)
Employees: 336 (FY 2013 Estimate)
Official Website: http://www.afrh.gov/
Armed Forces Retirement Home
Kangas, Timothy
Armed Forces Retirement Home, Timothy Kangas

Timothy Kangas has been the head of the Armed Forces Retirement Home (AFRH) since April 18, 2016. An independent agency run by a chief operating officer responsible to the Secretary of Defense, AFRH oversees two retirement communities for veterans in Washington D.C., and Gulfport, Mississippi.

 

Born circa 1965, Timothy Jon Kangas earned a B.S. in Psychology at Northern Michigan University in 1988, a Masters’ of Public Administration in 1990, and a Ph.D. in Public Administration and Public Affairs at Western Michigan University in 2004. His dissertation was entitled, “Child Welfare and Devolving Federalism: An Analysis of the Effects of Federal Funding Schemes on Selected Child Welfare Outcomes in Michigan.”

 

Starting in 1993, Kangas worked for the State of Michigan for over 20 years in several different positions, including 9 years as a combat medic in the Michigan Army National Guard; service as Trauma Coordinator until September 2007, where he led efforts to create Michigan’s first statewide all-inclusive trauma system; and as Regional Healthcare Administrator for the Michigan Department of Corrections from 2008 to 2016.

 

Kangas interrupted his career in Michigan government to serve a one year stint in Iraq as an advisor to a Provisional Reconstruction Team for the State Department in 2007-2008. 

 

Kangas has been active in his local community. He was elected to the City Council in Dewitt, Michigan, for the first time in 2004 and, most recently, in 2010, and served on local boards and commissions, including the DeWitt Area Emergency Services Authority and the De​​Witt Area Recreation Authority.

 

Kangas served as a congressional aide to Congressman Bob Davis (R-Michigan).

 

Kangas has made his residence in DeWitt, Michigan, since 2002 with his wife, Debra Jean (Ojala). The couple has three children, Kortney, Ciara and Alec.

-Matt Bewig

 

To Learn More:

Official Biography

A War with the Defense Department over a Hidden Golf Course (Bonnie Jo Mount, Associated Press)

more
McManus, Steve
Previous Chief Operating Officer

Steven G. McManus officially assumed the role of Chief Operating Officer (COO) of the Armed Forces Retirement Home (AFRH) on Sept. 25, 2011. AFRH is an independent agency of the Executive Branch of the Federal government that oversees two Continuing Care Retirement Community campuses for qualified veterans, one in Washington D.C., the other in Gulfport, Mississippi. McManus had served as Acting COO since January 16, 2011. As COO, McManus is responsible for all aspects of AFRH’s operations.

 
A member of the Senior Executive Service, McManus holds a BS degree and an MBA with emphasis in Finance and Accounting. Joining the US Army circa 1976 as an enlisted man, McManus was promoted to the officer ranks, serving mainly in West Germany and stateside. After retiring from the Army in 2001, McManus worked as a senior consultant for the Navy and for a short period as the Deputy Director of the Army’s Working Capital Fund.
 
In 2002, he joined the Armed Forces Retirement Home and served at the Washington facility as its financial officer, and subsequently as the facility’s Associate Director of Resource Management. Between 2002 and 2008 he served in multiple roles at AFRH, working primarily as the Agency’s chief financial officer with associate roles including the agency’s first inspector general, its chief information officer, and its procurement head.
 
McManus served as the Interim Director for the Gulfport facility between May and August 2005, and personally led the safe evacuation of residents from Gulfport to Washington, DC, within 24 hours of Hurricane Katrina’s landfall. In March 2008, McManus left AFRH to serve as thecChief financial officer for the Federal Labor Relations Authority. In September 2009, he returned to the AFRH in the newly created Senior Executive Service position of Deputy COO/Chief Financial Officer. In January 2011, with the departure of the former COO, McManus assumed the role of AFRH Acting COO, and was made permanent in September 2011.
 
more