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Overview:
VETS provides resources and services to help veterans locate grants, training and employment opportunities, and to assure their right to return to a job after completion of military service.
more
History:

A variety of broad U.S. employment-related measures for veterans have been instituted since 1940, when the Selective Training and Service Act was authorized, guaranteeing re-employment rights to everyone who left a position to join the Armed Forces, the most well-known being the G.I. Bill of Rights. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed it in 1944, and it has contributed more than any other program in history to the welfare of veterans, training, to some degree, 7.8 million individuals. Over the years many additional acts and bills have also been passed regarding veterans and training and employment, built around whichever war U.S. service people were engaged in at the time. In 1974, VETS was established, under the Employment Training Administration (ETA) umbrella, as an office to focus specifically on education and training for veterans, and ten years later it became an independent agency, with its own Assistant Secretary. Since then, it has been one of several government units, including the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Small Business Bureau, addressing and executing improvement of employment, training and other work-force issues and scenarios for veterans.

more
What it Does:
VETS works to secure the greatest number of employment opportunities possible for veterans, which it realizes through a variety of avenues and financial plans and policies, for veterans and those who hire them, including:
  • e-VETS Resource Advisor, an interactive webpage that contains job search tools and tips, employment openings, and information on rights and benefits, along with many other options to research for personalized results.
  • Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program, which provides employment assistance that specializes in outreach, supportive services, and training for homeless veterans, to guide them in making their way back into the workforce, and also provides funding for operators of the services.
  • Veterans’ Workforce Investment Program, which provides competitive grants geared toward focused training, re-training and employment opportunities for veterans, to meet the needs of employers for qualified workers in high demand industries.
  • The Recovery and Employment Assistance Lifelines (REALifelines) initiative, a joint project of the U.S. Department of Labor, the Bethesda Naval Medical Center, and the Walter Reed Army Medical Center, which provides personalized assistance to severely injured service members who cannot return to active duty, helping get them the proper counseling and training so they can effectively launch new careers in the private sector.
  • USERRA (Uniformed Services Employment and Re-Employment Rights Act of 1994), which sees to it that veterans and members of the National Guard and Reserve Forces can serve on active duty without harm later to their employment or benefits status.
  • Federal Veterans Preference Enforcement, which works to ensure veterans entitled preference over others for virtually all federal jobs.
  • Vets Guide to Competitive and Discretionary Grants (PDF), which explains what grants are available, who’s eligible, and how to apply.
  • Jobs for Veterans State Grants, which provides funds to support Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program specialists; Local Veteran’s Employment Representative Staff; Transition Assistance Program Employment Workshops; and emergency situations as they arise.

more
Where Does the Money Go:

more
Congressional Oversight:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

House Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity; Committee on Veterans’ Affairs

 

more

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Founded: 1974
Annual Budget: $228 million
Employees: 250
Official Website: http://www.dol.gov/vets
Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS)
Kelly, Keith
Assistant Secretary

President Obama has nominated an Army veteran who has been a state-level labor official to serve as the next Assistant Secretary of Labor for Veterans’ Employment and Training Services (VETS). Keith Kelly, who was awarded a Bronze Star for his service with the Army’s 101st Airborne Division, will serve as chief of VETS, an agency in the Department of Labor that provides resources and services to help veterans locate grants, training and employment opportunities, and to assure their right to return to a job after completion of military service. If confirmed by the Senate, Kelly will succeed Ray Jefferson, an Army veteran who served in the position from August 7, 2009, to July 26, 2011.

 

Born in Red Lodge, Montana, circa 1945, Kelly earned a B.S. in Agriculture Business and an M.S. in Economics and Agriculture Economics at Montana State University.

 

He served as director of the Montana Agriculture Department from 1983 to 1989, and as head of the Arizona Agriculture Department from 1990 to 1997. He served in the federal government from 1997 to 2001 as administrator of the Farm Service Agency and executive vice president of the Commodity Credit Corporation at the United States Department of Agriculture. Back in the private sector after the 2000 elections, Kelly was president of his own firm, Kelly & Associates, LLC, from 2001 to 2002.

 

He returned to Montana state government to serve as administrator for the Unemployment Insurance Division of the Montana Department of Labor & Industry (DLI) from 2002 to 2004. He has served as commissioner of the DLI since January 2005, when Governor Brian Schweitzer appointed him. Kelly’s grandfather, John Thomas Kelly, served as commissioner of DLI’s predecessor agency, Montana’s Department of Agriculture, Labor and Industry, from 1939-1941.

 

Kelly served as chair and vice chair of the Veterans Affairs Committee of the National Association of State Workforce Agencies from 2009 to 2010.

 

A Democrat, Kelly donated $500 to the Democratic National Committee in 2004 and $250 to the Montana Democratic Central Committee in 2009.

-Matt Bewig

 

Montana Message from Keith Kelly

more
Jefferson, Ray
Previous Assistant Secretary

President Obama chose an injured veteran to head the Department of Labor ’s Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS), which provides resources and services to help veterans locate grants, training and employment opportunities, and to assure their right to return to a job after completion of military service. Raymond M. Jefferson was confirmed by the Senate on August 7, 2009.He resigned on July 26, 2011, following a corruption investigation.

 
Born circa 1970 and raised in Guilderland, New York, Jefferson has considered Honolulu, Hawaii, his home since 1995. Jefferson graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1988 with a major in leadership. He served as an Army Officer with leadership positions in the Presidential Honor Guard, Army Rangers and Special Forces. In 1995, while attempting to protect his teammates from the premature detonation of a hand grenade during Special Forces training, he lost all five fingers on his left hand. After recuperating in Honolulu, Jefferson attended Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, earning an MPA in Strategic Management in 1998. He then earned an MBA in 2000 from Harvard Business School. Upon graduation, he was selected as a White House Fellow and worked as a Special Assistant to the Secretary of Commerce in 2000 and 2001. In 2001 and 2002, Jefferson used a Fulbright Fellowship to study in Singapore, where he focused on how public sector leadership is exercised in that city-state’s multicultural environment. 
 
Jefferson began his career in government in 2003, when he was named as the Deputy Director for the State of Hawaii’s Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT). He was the first person of African-American descent to serve in a cabinet-level appointed position in Hawaii. Serving at DBEDT through 2004, Jefferson co-led a major reorganization for the department, which had more than 230 employees and an operating budget of $182 million. In 2004, Jefferson left public service for private sector work as a leadership consultant, culminating in his work for McKinsey & Company in Singapore, from 2006 to 2008, where he created and delivered leadership training and development programs for clients and offices throughout Asia. His focus areas were organizational change, inspirational leadership, top team development and peak performance. He is a member of the Asia Society, the Fulbright Association, the NAACP and the Special Forces Association.  
 
Jefferson is conversant in Mandarin, French and Arabic. A Democrat, Jefferson donated $2,500 to Democratic causes in 2004 and 2008, including $250 to Democratic National Committee in 2004 and $2,250 to Barack Obama in 2008. 
 
Raymond M. Jefferson, Leadership on the Line (by Mary Ellen Gardner, Harvard Business Bulletin)
more
Bookmark and Share
Overview:
VETS provides resources and services to help veterans locate grants, training and employment opportunities, and to assure their right to return to a job after completion of military service.
more
History:

A variety of broad U.S. employment-related measures for veterans have been instituted since 1940, when the Selective Training and Service Act was authorized, guaranteeing re-employment rights to everyone who left a position to join the Armed Forces, the most well-known being the G.I. Bill of Rights. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed it in 1944, and it has contributed more than any other program in history to the welfare of veterans, training, to some degree, 7.8 million individuals. Over the years many additional acts and bills have also been passed regarding veterans and training and employment, built around whichever war U.S. service people were engaged in at the time. In 1974, VETS was established, under the Employment Training Administration (ETA) umbrella, as an office to focus specifically on education and training for veterans, and ten years later it became an independent agency, with its own Assistant Secretary. Since then, it has been one of several government units, including the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Small Business Bureau, addressing and executing improvement of employment, training and other work-force issues and scenarios for veterans.

more
What it Does:
VETS works to secure the greatest number of employment opportunities possible for veterans, which it realizes through a variety of avenues and financial plans and policies, for veterans and those who hire them, including:
  • e-VETS Resource Advisor, an interactive webpage that contains job search tools and tips, employment openings, and information on rights and benefits, along with many other options to research for personalized results.
  • Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program, which provides employment assistance that specializes in outreach, supportive services, and training for homeless veterans, to guide them in making their way back into the workforce, and also provides funding for operators of the services.
  • Veterans’ Workforce Investment Program, which provides competitive grants geared toward focused training, re-training and employment opportunities for veterans, to meet the needs of employers for qualified workers in high demand industries.
  • The Recovery and Employment Assistance Lifelines (REALifelines) initiative, a joint project of the U.S. Department of Labor, the Bethesda Naval Medical Center, and the Walter Reed Army Medical Center, which provides personalized assistance to severely injured service members who cannot return to active duty, helping get them the proper counseling and training so they can effectively launch new careers in the private sector.
  • USERRA (Uniformed Services Employment and Re-Employment Rights Act of 1994), which sees to it that veterans and members of the National Guard and Reserve Forces can serve on active duty without harm later to their employment or benefits status.
  • Federal Veterans Preference Enforcement, which works to ensure veterans entitled preference over others for virtually all federal jobs.
  • Vets Guide to Competitive and Discretionary Grants (PDF), which explains what grants are available, who’s eligible, and how to apply.
  • Jobs for Veterans State Grants, which provides funds to support Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program specialists; Local Veteran’s Employment Representative Staff; Transition Assistance Program Employment Workshops; and emergency situations as they arise.

more
Where Does the Money Go:

more
Congressional Oversight:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

House Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity; Committee on Veterans’ Affairs

 

more

Comments

Leave a comment

captcha

Founded: 1974
Annual Budget: $228 million
Employees: 250
Official Website: http://www.dol.gov/vets
Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS)
Kelly, Keith
Assistant Secretary

President Obama has nominated an Army veteran who has been a state-level labor official to serve as the next Assistant Secretary of Labor for Veterans’ Employment and Training Services (VETS). Keith Kelly, who was awarded a Bronze Star for his service with the Army’s 101st Airborne Division, will serve as chief of VETS, an agency in the Department of Labor that provides resources and services to help veterans locate grants, training and employment opportunities, and to assure their right to return to a job after completion of military service. If confirmed by the Senate, Kelly will succeed Ray Jefferson, an Army veteran who served in the position from August 7, 2009, to July 26, 2011.

 

Born in Red Lodge, Montana, circa 1945, Kelly earned a B.S. in Agriculture Business and an M.S. in Economics and Agriculture Economics at Montana State University.

 

He served as director of the Montana Agriculture Department from 1983 to 1989, and as head of the Arizona Agriculture Department from 1990 to 1997. He served in the federal government from 1997 to 2001 as administrator of the Farm Service Agency and executive vice president of the Commodity Credit Corporation at the United States Department of Agriculture. Back in the private sector after the 2000 elections, Kelly was president of his own firm, Kelly & Associates, LLC, from 2001 to 2002.

 

He returned to Montana state government to serve as administrator for the Unemployment Insurance Division of the Montana Department of Labor & Industry (DLI) from 2002 to 2004. He has served as commissioner of the DLI since January 2005, when Governor Brian Schweitzer appointed him. Kelly’s grandfather, John Thomas Kelly, served as commissioner of DLI’s predecessor agency, Montana’s Department of Agriculture, Labor and Industry, from 1939-1941.

 

Kelly served as chair and vice chair of the Veterans Affairs Committee of the National Association of State Workforce Agencies from 2009 to 2010.

 

A Democrat, Kelly donated $500 to the Democratic National Committee in 2004 and $250 to the Montana Democratic Central Committee in 2009.

-Matt Bewig

 

Montana Message from Keith Kelly

more
Jefferson, Ray
Previous Assistant Secretary

President Obama chose an injured veteran to head the Department of Labor ’s Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS), which provides resources and services to help veterans locate grants, training and employment opportunities, and to assure their right to return to a job after completion of military service. Raymond M. Jefferson was confirmed by the Senate on August 7, 2009.He resigned on July 26, 2011, following a corruption investigation.

 
Born circa 1970 and raised in Guilderland, New York, Jefferson has considered Honolulu, Hawaii, his home since 1995. Jefferson graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1988 with a major in leadership. He served as an Army Officer with leadership positions in the Presidential Honor Guard, Army Rangers and Special Forces. In 1995, while attempting to protect his teammates from the premature detonation of a hand grenade during Special Forces training, he lost all five fingers on his left hand. After recuperating in Honolulu, Jefferson attended Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, earning an MPA in Strategic Management in 1998. He then earned an MBA in 2000 from Harvard Business School. Upon graduation, he was selected as a White House Fellow and worked as a Special Assistant to the Secretary of Commerce in 2000 and 2001. In 2001 and 2002, Jefferson used a Fulbright Fellowship to study in Singapore, where he focused on how public sector leadership is exercised in that city-state’s multicultural environment. 
 
Jefferson began his career in government in 2003, when he was named as the Deputy Director for the State of Hawaii’s Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT). He was the first person of African-American descent to serve in a cabinet-level appointed position in Hawaii. Serving at DBEDT through 2004, Jefferson co-led a major reorganization for the department, which had more than 230 employees and an operating budget of $182 million. In 2004, Jefferson left public service for private sector work as a leadership consultant, culminating in his work for McKinsey & Company in Singapore, from 2006 to 2008, where he created and delivered leadership training and development programs for clients and offices throughout Asia. His focus areas were organizational change, inspirational leadership, top team development and peak performance. He is a member of the Asia Society, the Fulbright Association, the NAACP and the Special Forces Association.  
 
Jefferson is conversant in Mandarin, French and Arabic. A Democrat, Jefferson donated $2,500 to Democratic causes in 2004 and 2008, including $250 to Democratic National Committee in 2004 and $2,250 to Barack Obama in 2008. 
 
Raymond M. Jefferson, Leadership on the Line (by Mary Ellen Gardner, Harvard Business Bulletin)
more