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Overview:

The Administration on Aging (AoA) is responsible for home and community-based services and programs related to aging. It also focuses on helping empower Americans before and during their later years to make informed decisions about health care options; ensuring the rights of the elderly, to prevent their abuse, neglect and exploitation; and facilitating society to prepare for an aging population.    

 
more
History:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Although the AoA office was not established until 1965, U.S. government involvement in the specific concerns of the elderly began much earlier. In 1935 the Social Security Act provided for Old Age Assistance and Old Age Survivors Insurance. In 1950, President Truman held the first National Conference on Aging, and two years later the first federal funds for social service programs for the elderly were made available. In 1956 a Special Staff on Aging was established within the Office of the Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare, and a Federal Council on Aging was created by President Eisenhower. In 1961, the first White House Conference on Aging was held; in 1962 legislation was introduced in Congress to establish an independent and permanent Commission on Aging; and three years later AoA began. In 1965 Medicare and Medicaid were added to the Social Security Act, and in 1967 the Age Discrimination Act was signed into law. The Age Discrimination in Employment Act was established in 1990. Since then, an Older Americans Act Amendment was added to cover vulnerable elder American right activities, including neglect and exploitation and the role of local ombudsman programs. An additional amendment established a new National Family Caregiver Support Program.

 

more
What it Does:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AoA, funded by the Older Americans Act, is part of a federal, state, tribal and local partnership called the National Network on Aging, which currently helps about 7 million older people and their caregivers, via 29,000 service providers and thousands of volunteers. The work the network is divided into six core services:

  • Supportive, which helps provide a wide variety of programs, including adult day care, chore services, financial and legal assistance, and transportation to medical appointments.
  • Nutrition, which provides education and health screenings and counseling, along with hot meal delivery programs for the homebound, and meal services as well for additional at-risk older people, many of whom come together to receive the meals at senior settings or other group locations          .
  • Preventative health services, which educate about the benefits of regular screenings, positive lifestyle choices, and physical activities, to help prevent many chronic diseases. The guidance it offers also helps the elderly and their families make more informed choices with the goal to increase the length and quality of their lives.
  • The National Family Caregiver Support Program, which was funded for the first time in 2000, gives those responsible for the primary care of spouses, parents, older relatives and friends’ assistance in accessing relevant services, and knowledge about available support groups, to help them make decisions, solve problems and also take care of themselves in the process. Additionally, the program addresses grandparents caring for grandkids and caregivers of those 18 and under who are mentally retarded or have developmental difficulties.
  • Services that protect the rights of vulnerable older persons in the areas of abuse, neglect and exploitation, which includes programs that afford access to a long-term care ombudsman on-site at nursing homes, as an advocate to answer questions and investigate and resolve complaints; insurance and pension counseling; and Medicare patrol projects. AoA also awards grants to various groups across the country that carry out their mission, including States, territories, Hawaiian Americans, Native American tribes, and non-profit organizations.
  • Service to Native Americans, which is targeted to the specific needs of both Native Americans and native Hawaiians.   
 
AoA also helps the elderly and their families understand the varying housing options, including assisted living, nursing homes, and the viability of staying in one’s own house, and additionally provides information on an Elder Locator toll-free telephone which puts callers in touch with services in their local areas.
 

 

more

Comments

Zaina 1 year ago
Make the six core services more clear
Phyllis Bratcher 2 years ago
Hello everyone, my name is Phyllis Bratcher. I'm a senior residing in Yonkers, NY with my daughther and a family of nine people in a 2 bedroom apartment. I had brain surgery last year for a pituitary brain tumor. After surgery I tried to secure an apt which I found for 800.00 a month but couldn't take because they had no heat or hot water. this was the beginning of this year when I was dicharged from a hehab center in yonkers. I'm receiving social security diability and SSI benefits and trying so hard to find an affordable apt . I sleep with my grand kids which i love dearly but wish I could find an apt and I can invite them over to spend time with me. I've been looking online for senior housing in Mount Vernon NY where I resided before my surgery.I work for the Mount Vernon Board of EDucation for over 18 years as Substitute teacher and have a BA Degree and trying to get my Masters. It's very noisey here with my family and I cant study or concentrate well here. So many kids and there friends are constantly at my daughthers home. Please if at all poosible can you help me or guide to where I can find afforordable low income housing in Mount Vernon or Fleetwood area.My phone number for contact is (914) 562-1214. God bless you and I do hope to hear from you soon. Thank you.
debrah sims 2 years ago
There can't be an excuse leaving out some elderly people out of meals on wheels.There is no mileage radious when someone is hungry.We think were feeding them when we buy a lottery ticket.I am beginning to think how many in the wv area.Is it a heartless thing or misinterpretation without representation.
Dolores M. Casillas 3 years ago
My name is Dolores M. Casillas I need to find a place to live in the City of Culver City, CA I have been looking for a place to live for the last two months. I cannot locate an apartment, studio, etc. that I can afford. I get $930 a month from SS only. I need to find something I can afford. Please let me know if you can give me some information to help me find a place to live. My phone is (310) 498-8394 Thank you. Dolores M. Casillas
Dr. Melody Marshall 4 years ago
i am a member of the episcopal church older adult ministry task force. we are seeking publications about older americans month. does aoa have any such publications? thank you.
Dorothy E. Brooks 5 years ago
i don't know whether or not you can assist me in the issues i am facing. they are issues i am having with my landlord. i have been to housing, he said to sue him. i went on the last thursday of august the to hart center and spoke with sherry the representative of the senior legal hotline,916-930-4930. i received a message several weeks ago from a manny telling me the sherry suggested he give me a call. i returned his call several times of the past several weeks. he finally cal...
Dorothy Lancaster 6 years ago
does the aoa have educational funding (grants, scholarships, or other monetary donations) for seniors seeking higher education, i.e., aa, mba, phd degrees?
Mike G-Smith 6 years ago
I would like to obtain Kathy Greenlee's email address to discuss with her the funding issues that Public Guardian Programs in Virginia, and nationwide, are presently experiencing and what can be done to save these programs. Thanks-Mike

Leave a comment

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Founded: 1965
Annual Budget: $1.3 billion (2008)
Employees:
Official Website: http://www.acl.gov/
Administration for Community Living
Greenlee, Kathy
Assistant Secretary

If Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius ever longs for her days back in Kansas, she can always wander down the hall and visit with her old pal, Kathy J. Greenlee. The new head of the Administration on Aging is a longtime aide of Sebelius, having served under her while she was Kansas’s governor and state insurance commissioner.

 
A native of Topeka, Greenlee, 49, attended college at the University of Kansas where she received her bachelor’s in business administration in 1985. She received her Juris Doctor from the university’s law school in 1988, and was admitted to the Kansas bar that same year.
 
While finishing law school she went to work in 1987 for the Kansas Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence, and eventually became the organization’s executive director and first paid staff member. She concurrently served as a member of the state attorney general’s Victims’ Rights Task Force during this time.
 
In 1989 Greenlee left the coalition to become a staff attorney for the Legal Aid Society of Topeka, specializing in elder law and general civil law. She handled divorce, paternity, child custody and social security disability cases, as well as prepared simple wills and living wills and made presentations to senior citizen groups.
 
Greenlee joined the state attorney general’s office in April 1991 as an assistant attorney general working in the Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control for the Kansas Department of Revenue. Her primary duty was to enforce the Kansas Liquor Control Act. The following year she shifted to the AG’s Consumer Protection Division and developed expertise in areas of telemarketing fraud, puzzle contests and junk mail.
 
Her work in consumer protection led to her becoming the director of the Consumer Assistance Division in the Kansas Insurance Department in April 1995, which involved handling a staff of 25 and managing inquiries from consumers and state lawmakers. Four years later she was promoted to general counsel for the entire Kansas Insurance Department, where she supervised six attorneys and a support staff of nine employees. She advised the Commissioner of Insurance, who was then Kathleen Sebelius, on a range of regulatory and policy issues. She also led a team of regulators who evaluated the proposed sale of Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Kansas—which Sebelius eventually blocked—and chaired the National Association of Insurance Commissioners’ Managed Care Organizations working group.
 
Greenlee’s work for Sebelius paid off when the state insurance commissioner was elected governor of Kansas in 2002. Greenlee moved to the governor’s office to serve as Sebelius’ chief of staff, but this lasted only six months, before Sebelius reorganized her staff and moved Greenlee to director of operations in July 2003. This move only proved temporary as well, for in November 2003, Greenlee shifted over to the Kansas Department on Aging to become assistant secretary and serving as legislative liaison and chief budget officer.
 
Less than a year later she was selected to run the Office of the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman, which advocates for residents of long-term care facilities. Under Greenlee’s leadership, the office expanded its number of paid and volunteer workers.
 
Her last stop in Kansas state government was at the Department on Aging, which she took over as the Secretary of Aging in January 2006. As a member of Sebelius’ cabinet, Greenlee managed a state agency with a staff of 187 and a budget of $497 million. The department oversees the administration of Older American’s Act programs, distribution of Medicaid payments for nursing home residents, and regulation of nursing home licenses.
 
While serving as Secretary of Aging, Greenlee participated on the boards of directors for the Kansas Health Policy Authority and KansasWorks. She also served on the Health & Human Services sub-cabinet and on the State Employee Compensation Oversight Committee.
 
Greenlee’s other activities have included serving as co-chair of Equality Kansas, a gay and lesbian rights organization; on the executive committee (2002-2006) and as chair (2004-2006) of the Douglas County Democratic Party in Lawrence, Kansas; on the board of directors (1997-2002) and as president (2000-2002) of the Housing and Credit Counseling Inc. of Topeka; on the U.S. Attorney’s Hate Crimes Task Force (representing the district of Kansas, 1999-2000); and on the board of directors (1992-1997) and as president (1995-1996) of the Women Attorneys Association of Topeka.
 
Greenlee was sworn in as Assistant Secretary for Aging on June 29, 2009.
 
 
Biography (Kansas Department of Aging) (PDF)
more
Carbonell, Josefina
Previous Assistant Secretary
Josefina G. Carbonell, who was appointed Assistant Secretary for Aging by President Bush in 2001, was born in Cuba, emigrating to Miami, Florida in 1961. She attended Miami Dade Community College, studied Public Administration at Florida International University, and, with a Kellogg Fellowship in Health Management, graduated from Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. Then she spent nearly three decades working on improving the quality of life for Dade County Florida refugees and its elderly and handicapped, as a founder of the Little Havana Activities and Nutrition Centers (LHANC).When she helped start it, it was a meal center for seniors. Since then it has grown into the largest aging health and nutrition project in Florida, and the largest Hispanic geriatric health and human services organization in the country. She served until the end of George W. Bush's presidency and then entered the private sector as senior vice president for long-term care for Independent Living Systems, LLC.
 
more
Bookmark and Share
Overview:

The Administration on Aging (AoA) is responsible for home and community-based services and programs related to aging. It also focuses on helping empower Americans before and during their later years to make informed decisions about health care options; ensuring the rights of the elderly, to prevent their abuse, neglect and exploitation; and facilitating society to prepare for an aging population.    

 
more
History:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Although the AoA office was not established until 1965, U.S. government involvement in the specific concerns of the elderly began much earlier. In 1935 the Social Security Act provided for Old Age Assistance and Old Age Survivors Insurance. In 1950, President Truman held the first National Conference on Aging, and two years later the first federal funds for social service programs for the elderly were made available. In 1956 a Special Staff on Aging was established within the Office of the Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare, and a Federal Council on Aging was created by President Eisenhower. In 1961, the first White House Conference on Aging was held; in 1962 legislation was introduced in Congress to establish an independent and permanent Commission on Aging; and three years later AoA began. In 1965 Medicare and Medicaid were added to the Social Security Act, and in 1967 the Age Discrimination Act was signed into law. The Age Discrimination in Employment Act was established in 1990. Since then, an Older Americans Act Amendment was added to cover vulnerable elder American right activities, including neglect and exploitation and the role of local ombudsman programs. An additional amendment established a new National Family Caregiver Support Program.

 

more
What it Does:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AoA, funded by the Older Americans Act, is part of a federal, state, tribal and local partnership called the National Network on Aging, which currently helps about 7 million older people and their caregivers, via 29,000 service providers and thousands of volunteers. The work the network is divided into six core services:

  • Supportive, which helps provide a wide variety of programs, including adult day care, chore services, financial and legal assistance, and transportation to medical appointments.
  • Nutrition, which provides education and health screenings and counseling, along with hot meal delivery programs for the homebound, and meal services as well for additional at-risk older people, many of whom come together to receive the meals at senior settings or other group locations          .
  • Preventative health services, which educate about the benefits of regular screenings, positive lifestyle choices, and physical activities, to help prevent many chronic diseases. The guidance it offers also helps the elderly and their families make more informed choices with the goal to increase the length and quality of their lives.
  • The National Family Caregiver Support Program, which was funded for the first time in 2000, gives those responsible for the primary care of spouses, parents, older relatives and friends’ assistance in accessing relevant services, and knowledge about available support groups, to help them make decisions, solve problems and also take care of themselves in the process. Additionally, the program addresses grandparents caring for grandkids and caregivers of those 18 and under who are mentally retarded or have developmental difficulties.
  • Services that protect the rights of vulnerable older persons in the areas of abuse, neglect and exploitation, which includes programs that afford access to a long-term care ombudsman on-site at nursing homes, as an advocate to answer questions and investigate and resolve complaints; insurance and pension counseling; and Medicare patrol projects. AoA also awards grants to various groups across the country that carry out their mission, including States, territories, Hawaiian Americans, Native American tribes, and non-profit organizations.
  • Service to Native Americans, which is targeted to the specific needs of both Native Americans and native Hawaiians.   
 
AoA also helps the elderly and their families understand the varying housing options, including assisted living, nursing homes, and the viability of staying in one’s own house, and additionally provides information on an Elder Locator toll-free telephone which puts callers in touch with services in their local areas.
 

 

more

Comments

Zaina 1 year ago
Make the six core services more clear
Phyllis Bratcher 2 years ago
Hello everyone, my name is Phyllis Bratcher. I'm a senior residing in Yonkers, NY with my daughther and a family of nine people in a 2 bedroom apartment. I had brain surgery last year for a pituitary brain tumor. After surgery I tried to secure an apt which I found for 800.00 a month but couldn't take because they had no heat or hot water. this was the beginning of this year when I was dicharged from a hehab center in yonkers. I'm receiving social security diability and SSI benefits and trying so hard to find an affordable apt . I sleep with my grand kids which i love dearly but wish I could find an apt and I can invite them over to spend time with me. I've been looking online for senior housing in Mount Vernon NY where I resided before my surgery.I work for the Mount Vernon Board of EDucation for over 18 years as Substitute teacher and have a BA Degree and trying to get my Masters. It's very noisey here with my family and I cant study or concentrate well here. So many kids and there friends are constantly at my daughthers home. Please if at all poosible can you help me or guide to where I can find afforordable low income housing in Mount Vernon or Fleetwood area.My phone number for contact is (914) 562-1214. God bless you and I do hope to hear from you soon. Thank you.
debrah sims 2 years ago
There can't be an excuse leaving out some elderly people out of meals on wheels.There is no mileage radious when someone is hungry.We think were feeding them when we buy a lottery ticket.I am beginning to think how many in the wv area.Is it a heartless thing or misinterpretation without representation.
Dolores M. Casillas 3 years ago
My name is Dolores M. Casillas I need to find a place to live in the City of Culver City, CA I have been looking for a place to live for the last two months. I cannot locate an apartment, studio, etc. that I can afford. I get $930 a month from SS only. I need to find something I can afford. Please let me know if you can give me some information to help me find a place to live. My phone is (310) 498-8394 Thank you. Dolores M. Casillas
Dr. Melody Marshall 4 years ago
i am a member of the episcopal church older adult ministry task force. we are seeking publications about older americans month. does aoa have any such publications? thank you.
Dorothy E. Brooks 5 years ago
i don't know whether or not you can assist me in the issues i am facing. they are issues i am having with my landlord. i have been to housing, he said to sue him. i went on the last thursday of august the to hart center and spoke with sherry the representative of the senior legal hotline,916-930-4930. i received a message several weeks ago from a manny telling me the sherry suggested he give me a call. i returned his call several times of the past several weeks. he finally cal...
Dorothy Lancaster 6 years ago
does the aoa have educational funding (grants, scholarships, or other monetary donations) for seniors seeking higher education, i.e., aa, mba, phd degrees?
Mike G-Smith 6 years ago
I would like to obtain Kathy Greenlee's email address to discuss with her the funding issues that Public Guardian Programs in Virginia, and nationwide, are presently experiencing and what can be done to save these programs. Thanks-Mike

Leave a comment

captcha

Founded: 1965
Annual Budget: $1.3 billion (2008)
Employees:
Official Website: http://www.acl.gov/
Administration for Community Living
Greenlee, Kathy
Assistant Secretary

If Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius ever longs for her days back in Kansas, she can always wander down the hall and visit with her old pal, Kathy J. Greenlee. The new head of the Administration on Aging is a longtime aide of Sebelius, having served under her while she was Kansas’s governor and state insurance commissioner.

 
A native of Topeka, Greenlee, 49, attended college at the University of Kansas where she received her bachelor’s in business administration in 1985. She received her Juris Doctor from the university’s law school in 1988, and was admitted to the Kansas bar that same year.
 
While finishing law school she went to work in 1987 for the Kansas Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence, and eventually became the organization’s executive director and first paid staff member. She concurrently served as a member of the state attorney general’s Victims’ Rights Task Force during this time.
 
In 1989 Greenlee left the coalition to become a staff attorney for the Legal Aid Society of Topeka, specializing in elder law and general civil law. She handled divorce, paternity, child custody and social security disability cases, as well as prepared simple wills and living wills and made presentations to senior citizen groups.
 
Greenlee joined the state attorney general’s office in April 1991 as an assistant attorney general working in the Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control for the Kansas Department of Revenue. Her primary duty was to enforce the Kansas Liquor Control Act. The following year she shifted to the AG’s Consumer Protection Division and developed expertise in areas of telemarketing fraud, puzzle contests and junk mail.
 
Her work in consumer protection led to her becoming the director of the Consumer Assistance Division in the Kansas Insurance Department in April 1995, which involved handling a staff of 25 and managing inquiries from consumers and state lawmakers. Four years later she was promoted to general counsel for the entire Kansas Insurance Department, where she supervised six attorneys and a support staff of nine employees. She advised the Commissioner of Insurance, who was then Kathleen Sebelius, on a range of regulatory and policy issues. She also led a team of regulators who evaluated the proposed sale of Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Kansas—which Sebelius eventually blocked—and chaired the National Association of Insurance Commissioners’ Managed Care Organizations working group.
 
Greenlee’s work for Sebelius paid off when the state insurance commissioner was elected governor of Kansas in 2002. Greenlee moved to the governor’s office to serve as Sebelius’ chief of staff, but this lasted only six months, before Sebelius reorganized her staff and moved Greenlee to director of operations in July 2003. This move only proved temporary as well, for in November 2003, Greenlee shifted over to the Kansas Department on Aging to become assistant secretary and serving as legislative liaison and chief budget officer.
 
Less than a year later she was selected to run the Office of the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman, which advocates for residents of long-term care facilities. Under Greenlee’s leadership, the office expanded its number of paid and volunteer workers.
 
Her last stop in Kansas state government was at the Department on Aging, which she took over as the Secretary of Aging in January 2006. As a member of Sebelius’ cabinet, Greenlee managed a state agency with a staff of 187 and a budget of $497 million. The department oversees the administration of Older American’s Act programs, distribution of Medicaid payments for nursing home residents, and regulation of nursing home licenses.
 
While serving as Secretary of Aging, Greenlee participated on the boards of directors for the Kansas Health Policy Authority and KansasWorks. She also served on the Health & Human Services sub-cabinet and on the State Employee Compensation Oversight Committee.
 
Greenlee’s other activities have included serving as co-chair of Equality Kansas, a gay and lesbian rights organization; on the executive committee (2002-2006) and as chair (2004-2006) of the Douglas County Democratic Party in Lawrence, Kansas; on the board of directors (1997-2002) and as president (2000-2002) of the Housing and Credit Counseling Inc. of Topeka; on the U.S. Attorney’s Hate Crimes Task Force (representing the district of Kansas, 1999-2000); and on the board of directors (1992-1997) and as president (1995-1996) of the Women Attorneys Association of Topeka.
 
Greenlee was sworn in as Assistant Secretary for Aging on June 29, 2009.
 
 
Biography (Kansas Department of Aging) (PDF)
more
Carbonell, Josefina
Previous Assistant Secretary
Josefina G. Carbonell, who was appointed Assistant Secretary for Aging by President Bush in 2001, was born in Cuba, emigrating to Miami, Florida in 1961. She attended Miami Dade Community College, studied Public Administration at Florida International University, and, with a Kellogg Fellowship in Health Management, graduated from Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. Then she spent nearly three decades working on improving the quality of life for Dade County Florida refugees and its elderly and handicapped, as a founder of the Little Havana Activities and Nutrition Centers (LHANC).When she helped start it, it was a meal center for seniors. Since then it has grown into the largest aging health and nutrition project in Florida, and the largest Hispanic geriatric health and human services organization in the country. She served until the end of George W. Bush's presidency and then entered the private sector as senior vice president for long-term care for Independent Living Systems, LLC.
 
more