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Overview:

The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) is the research agent of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and is also referred to as NOAA Research. OAR and its scientists study different aspects of the environment in an effort to understand, protect, and predict climate variability, water resources, and the world’s different ecosystems. The Office has three main research areas: 1) climate, 2) oceans, great lakes, and coasts, and 3) weather and air quality. In 2007 OAR won the Nobel Peace Prize for its work with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and Al Gore in distributing information about its subject and immediacy. At that time, this advancement came in conflict with President George W. Bush’s original stance against the idea of climate change.. (See Controversies.)

more
History:

The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR)  was formed with the creation of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA in October 1970, which merged the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey, the Weather Bureau, and the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries into one agency. The NOAA was placed under the administration of the Department of Commerce by means of the Reorganization Plan No. 4 of 1970.

 

During the 1970s this research branch of the NOAA continued to expand its activities including accelerating research on hurricane intensity and movement, a federal-state cooperative program to evaluate the effectiveness of weather modification in Utah and North Dakota, and passing the National Climate Program Act in 1978 to develop a plan with federal and non-federal participants to estimate climate trends and predict future changes. Undersea research also expanded during this time, with the creation of the Manned Undersea Science and Technology Office in 1971; by 1977 they had established the first regional undersea research facility in St. Croix.

 

With its primary focuses being climate, oceans, great lakes, and coasts, and weather and air quality, the OAR continued to make gains in several fields. In 2007, its scientists’ climate model discovered that warming-induced wind shear changes could impact hurricane development and intensity. Also in 2007, NOAA Research scientists were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and Vice President Al Gore for their efforts to build up and distribute knowledge about man-made climate change. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change was represented by Dr. Susan Soloman of OAR’s Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) and Dr. Dan Albritton, former director of ESRL’s Chemical Sciences Division. Other 2007 achievements include launching the first buoy to measure acidification, measuring oceanic methane emissions for climate impact, and continued undersea exploration of the Ring-of-Fire.

more
What it Does:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Research Laboratories study and predict changes in the environment through its many components. The laboratories combine research, technology development, and services to improve our understanding of the world’s environment and how to predict changes. The laboratories have also established collaborative programs with universities and non-profit institutions that form joint research institutes relating to the Earth’s oceans, inland waters, intermountain west, atmosphere, and arctic environments.

 

The second component is the National Sea Grant College Program that connects the nation’s top universities and research institutions in conducting scientific research, education, and extension projects to understand and use our ocean, coastal and Great Lakes resources. Currently, there are 32 programs at locations including the University of Southern California, Scripps Institution at UC San Diego, Louisiana State University, University of Georgia, and the University of Florida.

 

In addition, the NOAA Undersea Research Program and its scientists explore, sample, and live under the ocean using advanced technologies and techniques. With one national office and six national undersea research centers, scientists use mixed gas scuba diving, underwater remotely operated vehicles and other technologies to study fisheries, diversity of life, and environmental change.

 

The OAR also has a Climate Program Office (CPO), created in 2005, which leads NOAA’s Climate and Global Change Program. The CPO incorporates the Office of Global Programs, the Arctic Research Office, and the Climate Observations and Monitoring Program in sponsoring research and climate activities across the NOAA aimed at predicting climate variability.

 

The OAR is also involved in many cooperative research partnerships with universities, research institutions, and other branches of NOAA including the Northern Gulf Institute in Mississippi, the Cooperative Institute for Climate Applications and Research in New York, the Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies in Oklahoma, and the Joint Institute for Marine Observations in California.

 

Research Programs

NOAA Research Laboratories

National Sea Grant College Program

Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

NOAA Climate Program Office

NOAA Unmanned Aircraft Systems

 

Research Partnerships

Cooperative Research Institutes

Sea Grant Programs

Undersea Research Centers

 

Additional Programs

Office of Weather and Air Quality

International Activities Office

 

From the Web Site of the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

Articles Archive

Backgrounders

Climate Research

Constituent Relations

Contact Information

Education Resources

Fact Sheets

History (pdf)

Lab Papers

Laboratory Reviews

News Release Archive

News Releases - Current

Ocean Acidification

Ocean, Great Lakes and Coastal Research

Partner Papers

Photos

Podcasts

Program Locations

Research Programs

Scientist Profiles

Special Reports

Strategic Plans

Weather and Air Quality Research

more
Where Does the Money Go:

The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) is the only line office of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) that received an increase in appropriation in the FY 2013 budget, to make up for cuts experienced in the FY 2012 appropriations bill. The OAR underwent a substantial reduction in budget for FY 2012, down $237.1 million from the FY 2010 enacted budget of $449.1 million. The reason was the planned launch of a new NOAA Climate Service line office, to which it had been proposed that $225.9 million be transferred for climate modeling, research, and service activities.

more
Controversies:

“Biggest Polluter” Creates Diversion and Shows Up for Dinner

When the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007 for its contributions toward distributing information about climate change, it came in conflict with President George W. Bush’s stance against the global warming issue. Indeed, after rejecting adoption of global climate change targets at the G8 Summit in July that year, Bush made a parting shot as he left the last summit session: “Goodbye from the world’s biggest polluter.”

 

At the time, there was speculation that the George W. Bush administration had changed and/or ignored data from government scientists regarding global warming and climate change. There was a major effort on the part of scientists and Congress to persuade President Bush to change his opinions and stop pressuring federal scientists to change their information. The following news articles address these issues, including reports that the Government Accountability Project found that 43% of surveyed federal scientists saw edits during review of their work that changed the meaning of their findings. However, suggesting that his administration’s position on the topic had possibly changed, President Bush subsequently invited 15 countries to a White House climate change summit, which was held in September 2007. The summit ended without any agreement among the participating nations, and European leaders castigated Bush for his failure to commit to any sort of action.

 

One senior diplomat called Bush’s speech a “charade,” and another said Bush’s lip service to the issue was a “diversion.” President Bush skipped the U.N. conference on global warming that was attended by dozens of world leaders that same week, only showing up for dinner.

Bush Administration in Hot Seat Over Warming (Associated Press/MSNBC)

Bush Aide Softened Greenhouse Gas Links to Global Warming (by Andrew C. Revkin, New York Times)

Bush Seeks Discussion of Climate Change (by Deb Riechmann, Associated Press)

US Prepared to Cut Greenhouse Emissions (CNN)

Europeans angry after Bush climate speech 'charade' (by Ewen MacAskill, The Guardian)

Bush To Skip U.N. Talks on Global Warming (By Steven Lee Myers, New York Times)

Global Warming: US government policies (History Commons)

 

more

Comments

Ehlnara 11 months ago
I would like to attend an onnlie course in LIDARd which takes me through:(a) Data Capture along a corrdior(b) Data Down Load(c) Processing of Data to segregate and plot as on a conventional 1:1000 map: (i) Topographical Details (ii) Utilities (iii) Vegitation types and attributes like height , Girth, Spread(d) Additional possibilities LIDAR throughsup in assessment of resources and management

Leave a comment

captcha

Founded: 1970
Annual Budget: $413.8 million (FY 2013 Request)
Employees: 758 (FY 2013 Estimate)
Official Website: http://www.noaa.gov/
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Sullivan, Kathryn
Administrator

On March 6, 2014, Kathryn D. Sullivan was confirmed by the U.S. Senate as undersecretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). In that post, Sullivan is responsible for the agency that makes weather forecasts, monitors climate change and supports marine commerce.

 

Sullivan was born October 3, 1951, in Patterson, New Jersey. Her family moved to California when she was six years old, settling in the San Fernando Valley near Los Angeles. She attended grade school with Sally Ride, a fact Sullivan didn’t realize until years later when both she and Ride were astronauts. Sullivan graduated from Taft High in Woodland Hills, California in 1969. 

 

Sullivan attended the University of California Santa Cruz, originally intending to study foreign languages. However, she was bitten by the science bug early on and graduated in 1973 with a B.S. in earth sciences. She then went to study at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, earning a Ph.D. in geology in 1978.

 

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) selected Sullivan to become an astronaut in January 1978. Her first space flight came in October 1984 as a mission specialist aboard the Challenger. On that flight, she became the first U.S. woman to walk in space. While serving in the space program, in 1988 Sullivan joined the U.S. Naval Reserve, from which she retired 18 years later as a captain.

 

In April 1990, Sullivan again went into space, this time aboard Discovery. On that mission, she helped launch the Hubble Space Telescope. Sullivan flew the shuttle once more, in 1992 on Atlantis, as payload commander. During her three flights she logged 532 hours in space.

 

She left NASA in 1993 to become chief scientist for NOAA. In that post, she oversaw research into climate change, marine biodiversity and satellite instrumentation.

 

Sullivan left federal service in 1996, when she was selected as president of the Center of Science and Industry museum in Columbus, Ohio. She remained in that post until 2005, when she left to become head of the Battelle Center for Mathematics and Science Education Policy at Ohio State University. The center works to increase the number of students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

 

President Barack Obama nominated Sullivan in 2011 to serve as assistant secretary of Commerce at NOAA. There, she helped direct weather and water services, climate science and services, integrated mapping services and Earth-observing capabilities. Sullivan became acting NOAA administrator in February 2013 and was nominated by Obama as administrator in August of that year.

 

Sullivan is a private pilot and was one of the first two female members of The Explorers Club.

 

To Learn More:

Official Biography

Astronaut Biography (NASA)

Five Amazing Facts About Dr. Kathryn Sullivan, Our Newly Confirmed Head of NOAA (by Jeff Watters, Ocean Conservancy)

more
Lubchenco, Jane
Previous Under Secretary

Jane Lubchenco, one of the nation’s most prominent marine biologists, has devoted much of her career to encouraging scientists to become more engaged in public policy debates, and is a vocal proponent of curbing greenhouse gases linked to global warming.

 
Born on December 4, 1947, Lubchenco grew up in Denver with her five younger sisters. Her father was a surgeon and her mother a pediatrician. She attended a Catholic girls’ high school, St. Mary’s Academy, where, like so many Obama appointees, she played basketball. Lubchenco attended Colorado College, where she fell in love with the ocean during a summer course in invertebrate zoology at Woods Hole, Massachusetts. After earning her BA in biology in 1969, she received her MS in zoology from the University of Washington in 1971, and her PhD in ecology from Harvard University in 1975.
 
From 1975-1977, Lubchenco served as assistant professor at Harvard, sandwiched around a one-year visiting professorship in 1976 at the University of the West Indies in Kingston, Jamaica. She then moved on to Oregon State University, beginning her more than 30-year career there. She worked as an assistant professor (1977-1982) and then associate professor (1982-88). Concurrently, she was a research associate at the Smithsonian Institution (1978-1984), spent time in 1986 at the Universidad Catolica in Santiago, Chile, and part of 1987 at the Institute of Oceanography, Academica Sinica, Qingdao, China.
 
In 1988, Lubchenco was made a full professor at Oregon State. She chaired the Department of Zoology from 1989 to 1992. In 1993, she was made a distinguished professor, and two years later, she was given the new title of Wayne and Gladys Valley Professor of Marine Biology. Also in 1995, she began her teaching relationship at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand (1995-96, 1999-2000, 2002-2003).
 
Lubchenco’s expertise includes interactions between humans and the environment: biodiversity, climate change, sustainability science, ecosystem services, marine reserves, coastal marine ecosystems, the state of the oceans and of the planet. She has led an interdisciplinary team of scientists studying the marine ecosystem off the west coast of the United States.
 
She has served as president of the International Council for Science (the first woman to do so), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the Ecological Society of America. She was a presidential appointee to two terms on the National Science Board (1996-2006), which advises the President and Congress and oversees the National Science Foundation. She co-chaired an Oregon gubernatorial advisory group on global warming that recommended actions the state should take to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
 
Lubchenco founded the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program that teaches environmental scientists to be leaders and communicators of scientific information to the public, policy makers, the media and the private sector. She currently serves as chair of the program’s advisory board. She also participated in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA), a five-year, international scientific assessment of the consequences of environmental changes to human well-being, and co-chaired the MA’s Synthesis for Business and Industry (PDF). She is also a Founding Principal of COMPASS (the Communication Partnership for Science and the Sea), a collaboration among academic scientists, communication and media specialists that communicates academic marine conservation science to policy makers, the media, managers and the public.
 
Lubchenco served on the Pew Oceans Commission and now the Joint Ocean Commission Initiative (a merger of the Pew Oceans Commission and the US Commission on Ocean Policy). She is a director, co-chair or trustee of the Monterey Bay Aquarium, SeaWeb and the Environmental Defense Fund; Trustee Emerita of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation and a former trustee of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences’ Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics and the World Resources Institute.
 
Lubchenco is married to Bruce Menge, also a marine biologist, and the couple has two sons.
Jane Lubchenco (Mother Jones Profile)
Conversations with Outstanding Americans; Jane Lubchenco (by Brad Knickerbocker, Christian Science Monitor)
more
Bookmark and Share
Overview:

The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) is the research agent of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and is also referred to as NOAA Research. OAR and its scientists study different aspects of the environment in an effort to understand, protect, and predict climate variability, water resources, and the world’s different ecosystems. The Office has three main research areas: 1) climate, 2) oceans, great lakes, and coasts, and 3) weather and air quality. In 2007 OAR won the Nobel Peace Prize for its work with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and Al Gore in distributing information about its subject and immediacy. At that time, this advancement came in conflict with President George W. Bush’s original stance against the idea of climate change.. (See Controversies.)

more
History:

The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR)  was formed with the creation of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA in October 1970, which merged the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey, the Weather Bureau, and the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries into one agency. The NOAA was placed under the administration of the Department of Commerce by means of the Reorganization Plan No. 4 of 1970.

 

During the 1970s this research branch of the NOAA continued to expand its activities including accelerating research on hurricane intensity and movement, a federal-state cooperative program to evaluate the effectiveness of weather modification in Utah and North Dakota, and passing the National Climate Program Act in 1978 to develop a plan with federal and non-federal participants to estimate climate trends and predict future changes. Undersea research also expanded during this time, with the creation of the Manned Undersea Science and Technology Office in 1971; by 1977 they had established the first regional undersea research facility in St. Croix.

 

With its primary focuses being climate, oceans, great lakes, and coasts, and weather and air quality, the OAR continued to make gains in several fields. In 2007, its scientists’ climate model discovered that warming-induced wind shear changes could impact hurricane development and intensity. Also in 2007, NOAA Research scientists were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and Vice President Al Gore for their efforts to build up and distribute knowledge about man-made climate change. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change was represented by Dr. Susan Soloman of OAR’s Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) and Dr. Dan Albritton, former director of ESRL’s Chemical Sciences Division. Other 2007 achievements include launching the first buoy to measure acidification, measuring oceanic methane emissions for climate impact, and continued undersea exploration of the Ring-of-Fire.

more
What it Does:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Research Laboratories study and predict changes in the environment through its many components. The laboratories combine research, technology development, and services to improve our understanding of the world’s environment and how to predict changes. The laboratories have also established collaborative programs with universities and non-profit institutions that form joint research institutes relating to the Earth’s oceans, inland waters, intermountain west, atmosphere, and arctic environments.

 

The second component is the National Sea Grant College Program that connects the nation’s top universities and research institutions in conducting scientific research, education, and extension projects to understand and use our ocean, coastal and Great Lakes resources. Currently, there are 32 programs at locations including the University of Southern California, Scripps Institution at UC San Diego, Louisiana State University, University of Georgia, and the University of Florida.

 

In addition, the NOAA Undersea Research Program and its scientists explore, sample, and live under the ocean using advanced technologies and techniques. With one national office and six national undersea research centers, scientists use mixed gas scuba diving, underwater remotely operated vehicles and other technologies to study fisheries, diversity of life, and environmental change.

 

The OAR also has a Climate Program Office (CPO), created in 2005, which leads NOAA’s Climate and Global Change Program. The CPO incorporates the Office of Global Programs, the Arctic Research Office, and the Climate Observations and Monitoring Program in sponsoring research and climate activities across the NOAA aimed at predicting climate variability.

 

The OAR is also involved in many cooperative research partnerships with universities, research institutions, and other branches of NOAA including the Northern Gulf Institute in Mississippi, the Cooperative Institute for Climate Applications and Research in New York, the Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies in Oklahoma, and the Joint Institute for Marine Observations in California.

 

Research Programs

NOAA Research Laboratories

National Sea Grant College Program

Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

NOAA Climate Program Office

NOAA Unmanned Aircraft Systems

 

Research Partnerships

Cooperative Research Institutes

Sea Grant Programs

Undersea Research Centers

 

Additional Programs

Office of Weather and Air Quality

International Activities Office

 

From the Web Site of the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

Articles Archive

Backgrounders

Climate Research

Constituent Relations

Contact Information

Education Resources

Fact Sheets

History (pdf)

Lab Papers

Laboratory Reviews

News Release Archive

News Releases - Current

Ocean Acidification

Ocean, Great Lakes and Coastal Research

Partner Papers

Photos

Podcasts

Program Locations

Research Programs

Scientist Profiles

Special Reports

Strategic Plans

Weather and Air Quality Research

more
Where Does the Money Go:

The Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) is the only line office of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) that received an increase in appropriation in the FY 2013 budget, to make up for cuts experienced in the FY 2012 appropriations bill. The OAR underwent a substantial reduction in budget for FY 2012, down $237.1 million from the FY 2010 enacted budget of $449.1 million. The reason was the planned launch of a new NOAA Climate Service line office, to which it had been proposed that $225.9 million be transferred for climate modeling, research, and service activities.

more
Controversies:

“Biggest Polluter” Creates Diversion and Shows Up for Dinner

When the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007 for its contributions toward distributing information about climate change, it came in conflict with President George W. Bush’s stance against the global warming issue. Indeed, after rejecting adoption of global climate change targets at the G8 Summit in July that year, Bush made a parting shot as he left the last summit session: “Goodbye from the world’s biggest polluter.”

 

At the time, there was speculation that the George W. Bush administration had changed and/or ignored data from government scientists regarding global warming and climate change. There was a major effort on the part of scientists and Congress to persuade President Bush to change his opinions and stop pressuring federal scientists to change their information. The following news articles address these issues, including reports that the Government Accountability Project found that 43% of surveyed federal scientists saw edits during review of their work that changed the meaning of their findings. However, suggesting that his administration’s position on the topic had possibly changed, President Bush subsequently invited 15 countries to a White House climate change summit, which was held in September 2007. The summit ended without any agreement among the participating nations, and European leaders castigated Bush for his failure to commit to any sort of action.

 

One senior diplomat called Bush’s speech a “charade,” and another said Bush’s lip service to the issue was a “diversion.” President Bush skipped the U.N. conference on global warming that was attended by dozens of world leaders that same week, only showing up for dinner.

Bush Administration in Hot Seat Over Warming (Associated Press/MSNBC)

Bush Aide Softened Greenhouse Gas Links to Global Warming (by Andrew C. Revkin, New York Times)

Bush Seeks Discussion of Climate Change (by Deb Riechmann, Associated Press)

US Prepared to Cut Greenhouse Emissions (CNN)

Europeans angry after Bush climate speech 'charade' (by Ewen MacAskill, The Guardian)

Bush To Skip U.N. Talks on Global Warming (By Steven Lee Myers, New York Times)

Global Warming: US government policies (History Commons)

 

more

Comments

Ehlnara 11 months ago
I would like to attend an onnlie course in LIDARd which takes me through:(a) Data Capture along a corrdior(b) Data Down Load(c) Processing of Data to segregate and plot as on a conventional 1:1000 map: (i) Topographical Details (ii) Utilities (iii) Vegitation types and attributes like height , Girth, Spread(d) Additional possibilities LIDAR throughsup in assessment of resources and management

Leave a comment

captcha

Founded: 1970
Annual Budget: $413.8 million (FY 2013 Request)
Employees: 758 (FY 2013 Estimate)
Official Website: http://www.noaa.gov/
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Sullivan, Kathryn
Administrator

On March 6, 2014, Kathryn D. Sullivan was confirmed by the U.S. Senate as undersecretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). In that post, Sullivan is responsible for the agency that makes weather forecasts, monitors climate change and supports marine commerce.

 

Sullivan was born October 3, 1951, in Patterson, New Jersey. Her family moved to California when she was six years old, settling in the San Fernando Valley near Los Angeles. She attended grade school with Sally Ride, a fact Sullivan didn’t realize until years later when both she and Ride were astronauts. Sullivan graduated from Taft High in Woodland Hills, California in 1969. 

 

Sullivan attended the University of California Santa Cruz, originally intending to study foreign languages. However, she was bitten by the science bug early on and graduated in 1973 with a B.S. in earth sciences. She then went to study at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, earning a Ph.D. in geology in 1978.

 

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) selected Sullivan to become an astronaut in January 1978. Her first space flight came in October 1984 as a mission specialist aboard the Challenger. On that flight, she became the first U.S. woman to walk in space. While serving in the space program, in 1988 Sullivan joined the U.S. Naval Reserve, from which she retired 18 years later as a captain.

 

In April 1990, Sullivan again went into space, this time aboard Discovery. On that mission, she helped launch the Hubble Space Telescope. Sullivan flew the shuttle once more, in 1992 on Atlantis, as payload commander. During her three flights she logged 532 hours in space.

 

She left NASA in 1993 to become chief scientist for NOAA. In that post, she oversaw research into climate change, marine biodiversity and satellite instrumentation.

 

Sullivan left federal service in 1996, when she was selected as president of the Center of Science and Industry museum in Columbus, Ohio. She remained in that post until 2005, when she left to become head of the Battelle Center for Mathematics and Science Education Policy at Ohio State University. The center works to increase the number of students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

 

President Barack Obama nominated Sullivan in 2011 to serve as assistant secretary of Commerce at NOAA. There, she helped direct weather and water services, climate science and services, integrated mapping services and Earth-observing capabilities. Sullivan became acting NOAA administrator in February 2013 and was nominated by Obama as administrator in August of that year.

 

Sullivan is a private pilot and was one of the first two female members of The Explorers Club.

 

To Learn More:

Official Biography

Astronaut Biography (NASA)

Five Amazing Facts About Dr. Kathryn Sullivan, Our Newly Confirmed Head of NOAA (by Jeff Watters, Ocean Conservancy)

more
Lubchenco, Jane
Previous Under Secretary

Jane Lubchenco, one of the nation’s most prominent marine biologists, has devoted much of her career to encouraging scientists to become more engaged in public policy debates, and is a vocal proponent of curbing greenhouse gases linked to global warming.

 
Born on December 4, 1947, Lubchenco grew up in Denver with her five younger sisters. Her father was a surgeon and her mother a pediatrician. She attended a Catholic girls’ high school, St. Mary’s Academy, where, like so many Obama appointees, she played basketball. Lubchenco attended Colorado College, where she fell in love with the ocean during a summer course in invertebrate zoology at Woods Hole, Massachusetts. After earning her BA in biology in 1969, she received her MS in zoology from the University of Washington in 1971, and her PhD in ecology from Harvard University in 1975.
 
From 1975-1977, Lubchenco served as assistant professor at Harvard, sandwiched around a one-year visiting professorship in 1976 at the University of the West Indies in Kingston, Jamaica. She then moved on to Oregon State University, beginning her more than 30-year career there. She worked as an assistant professor (1977-1982) and then associate professor (1982-88). Concurrently, she was a research associate at the Smithsonian Institution (1978-1984), spent time in 1986 at the Universidad Catolica in Santiago, Chile, and part of 1987 at the Institute of Oceanography, Academica Sinica, Qingdao, China.
 
In 1988, Lubchenco was made a full professor at Oregon State. She chaired the Department of Zoology from 1989 to 1992. In 1993, she was made a distinguished professor, and two years later, she was given the new title of Wayne and Gladys Valley Professor of Marine Biology. Also in 1995, she began her teaching relationship at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand (1995-96, 1999-2000, 2002-2003).
 
Lubchenco’s expertise includes interactions between humans and the environment: biodiversity, climate change, sustainability science, ecosystem services, marine reserves, coastal marine ecosystems, the state of the oceans and of the planet. She has led an interdisciplinary team of scientists studying the marine ecosystem off the west coast of the United States.
 
She has served as president of the International Council for Science (the first woman to do so), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the Ecological Society of America. She was a presidential appointee to two terms on the National Science Board (1996-2006), which advises the President and Congress and oversees the National Science Foundation. She co-chaired an Oregon gubernatorial advisory group on global warming that recommended actions the state should take to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
 
Lubchenco founded the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program that teaches environmental scientists to be leaders and communicators of scientific information to the public, policy makers, the media and the private sector. She currently serves as chair of the program’s advisory board. She also participated in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA), a five-year, international scientific assessment of the consequences of environmental changes to human well-being, and co-chaired the MA’s Synthesis for Business and Industry (PDF). She is also a Founding Principal of COMPASS (the Communication Partnership for Science and the Sea), a collaboration among academic scientists, communication and media specialists that communicates academic marine conservation science to policy makers, the media, managers and the public.
 
Lubchenco served on the Pew Oceans Commission and now the Joint Ocean Commission Initiative (a merger of the Pew Oceans Commission and the US Commission on Ocean Policy). She is a director, co-chair or trustee of the Monterey Bay Aquarium, SeaWeb and the Environmental Defense Fund; Trustee Emerita of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation and a former trustee of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences’ Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics and the World Resources Institute.
 
Lubchenco is married to Bruce Menge, also a marine biologist, and the couple has two sons.
Jane Lubchenco (Mother Jones Profile)
Conversations with Outstanding Americans; Jane Lubchenco (by Brad Knickerbocker, Christian Science Monitor)
more