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Overview:

The Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation is a Tucson, Arizona-based independent Federal agency within the Executive Branch of the United States Government, dedicated to increasing awareness of the importance of America’s natural resources, promoting the principles and practices of environmental conflict resolution, and educating Native Americans and Alaska natives in the fields of health care and public policy, and helping facilitate Native Nations in their pursuit of successful nation building. The Foundation provides scholarships, fellowships, and internships, seeking future leaders across a wide spectrum of environmental fields, including business, education, engineering, health, justice, and urban planning and renewal. It also supports the Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management and Policy (NNI) at the University of Arizona, which provides tribal decision makers with professional training to assist them in building economically and socially sustainable sovereign governments. In addition, the Foundation operates the U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution, an independent Federal program that helps parties find workable solutions to environmental disputes.

more
History:

The Morris K. Udall Scholarship and Excellence in National Environmental Policy Foundation was established by Congress on March 19, 1992, to honor Udall’s service in the U.S. House of Representatives, where from 1961 through 1991 a great amount of his work focused on natural resources and the environment, governmental reforms, and Native American issues. The bill that created the Foundation, which was signed into law by President George H.W. Bush, came about because of efforts of two of Udall’s Arizona colleagues, Democratic Senator Dennis DeConcini, and Republican Senator John McCain. In 1988, Congress amended the Udall Foundation legislation with the Environmental Policy and Conflict Resolution Act, which created the U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution as a new part of the Foundation, and in 2001 the Udall Foundation and the University of Arizona co-founded the Native Nations Institute. In January 2006 the foundation’s education team was looking for a way to commemorate the previous decade of its programs and decided to put on a yearlong “Celebration of Public Service” that would showcase some of their work, and culminate in a cross-country public service-focused biodiesel bus trip, to highlight the legacy of Morris Udall. It became the Udall Legacy Bus Tour, traveling 8,606 miles, for 54 days, to 26 cities, six national parks, and six Native American communities, sharing solutions to America’s pressing environmental and Native American issues.

 

In 2009, Congress enacted legislation to honor Morris’s brother, Stewart L. Udall, by adding his name to the Foundation. Stewart served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1955 until 1961, when President John F. Kennedy appointed him Secretary of the Interior. During the eight years he served in that post, he made an important impact in the environmental arena, overseeing

the addition of four parks, six national monuments, eight seashores and lakeshores, nine recreation areas, 20 historic sites, and 56 wildlife refuges to the National Park system. His best-selling book, The Quiet Crisis (1963), is said to have contributed to the emergence of the national environmental movement.

more
What it Does:

The Foundation is organized into two divisions: Educational programs, and the U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution.

 

Among the functions of the educational programs:

  • Grant undergraduate scholarships (80 in 2008) on the basis of merit for students committed to a career related to the environment, or Native Americans and Alaskan Natives committed to a career in tribal public policy or Native American health care.
  • Award two yearly one-year dissertation fellowships, to cover both academic and living expenses, to doctoral candidates who are entering their final year of writing a dissertation on a topic that concerns U.S. environmental public policy and/or environmental conflict resolution.
  • Administer a Native American Congressional Internship Program which each summer provides 10 weeks in Washington D.C. for 12 Native Americans and Alaskan Natives. The university juniors, seniors, or law students who apply are chosen on merit, and must have demonstrated an interest in fields related to tribal public policy, natural resource protection, or Native American education, health, justice, or economic development. Those selected are placed in Senate and House offices, committees, Cabinet departments, and the White House, to be able to observe the government decision-making process first-hand.
  • Support the Native Nations Institute, which provides executive leadership training and policy analysis assistance for American Indian Tribes. The institute is part of the Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy at the University of Arizona, and based on work of the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. The Native Nations Institute also conducts a Native American Youth Entrepreneur Camp on the University of Arizona campus, where instructors teach the basics of getting into business, and students meet and are able to seek advice from Native American business professionals. Then near the end of the camp, at a Youth Marketplace, they get to experience running their own businesses, based on what they’ve learned in the program.
  • Put on, through the Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy, conferences and discussions of contemporary environmental or Native American issues.
  • Present the Parks in Focus program, which gives selected young people, often under-served Boys and Girls Club members in different cities across the country, a camera and field guide, and escorts them to scenic local sites they might never explore otherwise, to instill in them a sustainable appreciation for the environment through the art of photography.

 

The other division of the Udall Foundation runs the U. S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution, which helps entities resolve environmental conflicts involving the United States government by providing impartial third party mediation, facilitation, and assessment. It also offers training programs and referrals to environmental conflict resolution practitioners.

 

From the Web Site of the Udall Foundation:

About Morris K. Udall

About Stewart L. Udall

Annual Report (pdf)

Contact Information

Dissertation Fellowship

E-Newsletter

Native American Internship

Native Nations Institute

News & Announcements

Parks In Focus Blog

 Program Videos

Stewart L. Udall Exhibit

Udall Center

Udall Scholarship

Udall Scholarship Video

Undergraduate Scholarship

more
Where Does the Money Go:

According to the 2010 Expenditures and Audit Report of U.S. Code Title 20, Chapter 66, the Udall Foundation specifies the following types of organizational expenditures: Up to $5,000 per fiscal year to carry out code provisions, including official receptions and representation expenses; sums determined by the Board to operate the Foundation, including salaries, administration, mediation services and other expenses, including up to $1,000 for receptions and representation; and various services provided for the Environmental Dispute Resolution Fund.

 

The foundation’s most recent published budget accounting appears in the Udall Foundation 2010 Annual Report (pdf), which details distribution of Trust Fund expenses as follows: 29% of budget to Educational Program Support; 29% to Scholarships; 20% to the Udall Center; 15% to Administration; 4% to Parks in Focus; and 3% to Fellowships. Distributions of expenses for Udall’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution include: 52% to External Service Providers; 35% to Personnel; 5% to Rent and Facilities; 2% to Computing; 2% to Conferences and Meetings; 1% to Staff Outreach; and 3% to Other.

 

Udall Foundation FY 2011 Performance and Accountability Report (pdf)

more

Comments

N Kyle 8 years ago
gene mccarthy you must have had a message but your composition was too hard to follow. i read it twice and still don't know what you said. i thought we already had five entities dealing with native americans. this group makes six. nobody thinks the indians were treated fairly. but how can six different entities expect to accomplish anything. one agency has been tryng to relocate two tribes for twenty years. when will it end. how about just giving new york back. throw in cal...
Gene McCarthy 8 years ago
l this is a game changer i thought you would enjoy the e-mail i sent to washington this week members of the transportation and infrastrucre committee with all the current talk on wall street and in washington concerning the state of our economy, maybe it’s time to stop looking at individual plans and think about what we really want and need… what if ...

Leave a comment

Founded: 1992
Annual Budget: $6 million (FY 2013 Estimate) The Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation’s educational activities are supported by the interest accrued in a federal trust fund created by a $40 million appropriation Congress authorized when it established the Foundation, and by donations. So far the Foundation has received $47.6 million, and transferred, with Congressional approval, $8 million of that to the Native Nations Institute that it co-founded in 2001. The U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution component of the Udall Foundation receives annual appropriations, and is also financed by fees it charges for services. Its 2011 appropriation was $3.8 million.
Employees: The Foundation has 3; the Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution 6 (FY 2013 Estimate).
Official Website: http://www.udall.gov/
Udall Foundation
Eberhard, Eric
Chairman

Eric D. Eberhard, an attorney who has spent the majority of his career working on issues pertaining to Native Americans, was first elected chairman of the Udall Foundation in October 2011 and was re-elected to the post in 2016. Established in 1992, the Udall Foundation is an independent federal agency specializing in aid for American Indians and Alaska Natives that provides scholarships, fellowships, and internships, seeking future leaders across a wide spectrum of environmental fields, including business, education, engineering, health, justice, and urban planning and renewal.

 

Eberhard graduated from Western Reserve University in 1967 with a B.A. in political science. He then earned a J.D. at the University of Cincinnati in 1970 and an LL.M. from George Washington in 1972.

 

Beginning in 1973, he provided legal services on the Navajo, Hopi and White Mountain Apache reservations. Eberhard served as deputy attorney of the Navajo Nation from 1983 to 1985, when he became director of the nation’s Washington office; in essence, its chief lobbyist.

 

In 1989, Eberhard began a stint working for Sen. John McCain (R-Arizona) as general counsel and staffer on the Senate Indian Affairs Committee. Eberhard has spoken glowingly of McCain’s affinity for issues concerning Native Americans. “He loved to engage in discussion about Indian issues,” Eberhard told the San Jose Mercury News in 2000. “Anybody who wanted to take part, from senior staffers to the guy sorting the mail, had complete access to him.”

 

Eberhard left government service in 1995 to become a partner in the Seattle office of the Dorsey and Whitney law firm, still working on Native American concerns including representation of Indian tribes, tribal organizations and entities doing business with tribes. He remained there until 2009, when he was named distinguished Indian law practitioner at Seattle University.

 

Eberhard was first named to the Udall board of trustees in December 2000 and was subsequently reappointed by Democratic and Republican presidents. From 2001 to 2011 he led its Committee on the Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management and Policy at the University of Arizona, which provides tribal decision makers with professional training to assist them in building economically and socially sustainable sovereign governments.

 

The Udall Foundation endured some controversy in 2014 when the Arizona Daily Star reported that a 2012 audit by the Interior Department’s inspector general “found the agency wasn’t meeting federal requirements to monitor and assess its spending and lacked key procedures to check for efficiency and guard against fraud or mistakes in personnel and contracting.” Eberhard, serving as chairman, said in a Udall Foundation annual report that the organization was implementing changes that “will ultimately result in greater accountability and improved performance across the foundation’s programs.” 

 

Eberhard teaches Indian law at the University of Washington.

-Steve Straehley

 

To Learn More:

Significant Lapses Found at Udall Foundation (by Becky Pallack, Arizona Daily Star)

Official Biography

more
Bracy, Terry
Previous Chairman
Terrence Bracy has been the only Chairman of the Foundation. Bracy’s father, Webb Brennan Bracy, taught English Literature and also wrote jokes for comedians Bob Newhart and Henny Youngman. Terrence Bracy received a B.S. from St. Louis University with a double major in Political Science and Creative Writing in 1964 and a Master of Arts in Government from the University of Arizona in 1966. During graduate school, from 1965 to 1966, he was News Editor at KVOA, the NBC affiliate in Tuscon, Arizona, and from 1964 to 1966 he taught courses in American Government at the University of Arizona. From 1966 to 1976 he was a Legislative Assistant to Congressman Udall, and also worked on Udall’s unsuccessful run to become the Democratic candidate for the presidency in 1976. In January 1977 incoming Secretary of Transportation Brock Adams appointed Bracy to the post of assistant secretary fpr Congressional liaison. In July 1977, Bracy resigned, along with his immediate superiors, Adams and deputy secretary Alan Butchman. In 1982 Bracy co-founded the lobbying firm, Bracy, Williams & Company, now Bracy Tucker Brown & Valanzano, where Bracy is the Chief Executive Officer. His clients have included Phelps Dodge Development Corporation, the cities of Tucson, St. Louis and Atlanta and the Canadian National Railroad. In 1984, Bracy worked on the presidential campaign of Democrat Gary Hart. Bracy was a member of the board of trustees of the Grand Canyon Trust when President Bill Clinton named him to the board of trustees of the Morris Udall Foundation in 1994, and Bracy was elected its Chairman.
 
Bracy is a long-time contributor to both the Democratic and Republican Parties. Among the Democrats he’s contributed to: For President, Bill Bradley, Richard A. Gephardt, and John Kerry; for Congress, Bill Anoatubby, Oklahoma; David Bonior, Michigan; Norman D. Dicks, Washington; Karan English, Arizona; Raul M. Grijalva, Arizona; Edward L. Pastor, Arizona; Tom Udall, New Mexico; For Senate, Charles S. Robb, Virginia, and Mark E. Udall, Colorado. The Republicans to whom he’s made contributions are: For Congress, Lisa Ann Atkins, Arizona; Kay Granger, Texas; James T. Kolbe, Arizona; and Donald E. Young, Alaska.
 
 
 
more
Bookmark and Share
Overview:

The Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation is a Tucson, Arizona-based independent Federal agency within the Executive Branch of the United States Government, dedicated to increasing awareness of the importance of America’s natural resources, promoting the principles and practices of environmental conflict resolution, and educating Native Americans and Alaska natives in the fields of health care and public policy, and helping facilitate Native Nations in their pursuit of successful nation building. The Foundation provides scholarships, fellowships, and internships, seeking future leaders across a wide spectrum of environmental fields, including business, education, engineering, health, justice, and urban planning and renewal. It also supports the Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management and Policy (NNI) at the University of Arizona, which provides tribal decision makers with professional training to assist them in building economically and socially sustainable sovereign governments. In addition, the Foundation operates the U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution, an independent Federal program that helps parties find workable solutions to environmental disputes.

more
History:

The Morris K. Udall Scholarship and Excellence in National Environmental Policy Foundation was established by Congress on March 19, 1992, to honor Udall’s service in the U.S. House of Representatives, where from 1961 through 1991 a great amount of his work focused on natural resources and the environment, governmental reforms, and Native American issues. The bill that created the Foundation, which was signed into law by President George H.W. Bush, came about because of efforts of two of Udall’s Arizona colleagues, Democratic Senator Dennis DeConcini, and Republican Senator John McCain. In 1988, Congress amended the Udall Foundation legislation with the Environmental Policy and Conflict Resolution Act, which created the U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution as a new part of the Foundation, and in 2001 the Udall Foundation and the University of Arizona co-founded the Native Nations Institute. In January 2006 the foundation’s education team was looking for a way to commemorate the previous decade of its programs and decided to put on a yearlong “Celebration of Public Service” that would showcase some of their work, and culminate in a cross-country public service-focused biodiesel bus trip, to highlight the legacy of Morris Udall. It became the Udall Legacy Bus Tour, traveling 8,606 miles, for 54 days, to 26 cities, six national parks, and six Native American communities, sharing solutions to America’s pressing environmental and Native American issues.

 

In 2009, Congress enacted legislation to honor Morris’s brother, Stewart L. Udall, by adding his name to the Foundation. Stewart served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1955 until 1961, when President John F. Kennedy appointed him Secretary of the Interior. During the eight years he served in that post, he made an important impact in the environmental arena, overseeing

the addition of four parks, six national monuments, eight seashores and lakeshores, nine recreation areas, 20 historic sites, and 56 wildlife refuges to the National Park system. His best-selling book, The Quiet Crisis (1963), is said to have contributed to the emergence of the national environmental movement.

more
What it Does:

The Foundation is organized into two divisions: Educational programs, and the U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution.

 

Among the functions of the educational programs:

  • Grant undergraduate scholarships (80 in 2008) on the basis of merit for students committed to a career related to the environment, or Native Americans and Alaskan Natives committed to a career in tribal public policy or Native American health care.
  • Award two yearly one-year dissertation fellowships, to cover both academic and living expenses, to doctoral candidates who are entering their final year of writing a dissertation on a topic that concerns U.S. environmental public policy and/or environmental conflict resolution.
  • Administer a Native American Congressional Internship Program which each summer provides 10 weeks in Washington D.C. for 12 Native Americans and Alaskan Natives. The university juniors, seniors, or law students who apply are chosen on merit, and must have demonstrated an interest in fields related to tribal public policy, natural resource protection, or Native American education, health, justice, or economic development. Those selected are placed in Senate and House offices, committees, Cabinet departments, and the White House, to be able to observe the government decision-making process first-hand.
  • Support the Native Nations Institute, which provides executive leadership training and policy analysis assistance for American Indian Tribes. The institute is part of the Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy at the University of Arizona, and based on work of the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. The Native Nations Institute also conducts a Native American Youth Entrepreneur Camp on the University of Arizona campus, where instructors teach the basics of getting into business, and students meet and are able to seek advice from Native American business professionals. Then near the end of the camp, at a Youth Marketplace, they get to experience running their own businesses, based on what they’ve learned in the program.
  • Put on, through the Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy, conferences and discussions of contemporary environmental or Native American issues.
  • Present the Parks in Focus program, which gives selected young people, often under-served Boys and Girls Club members in different cities across the country, a camera and field guide, and escorts them to scenic local sites they might never explore otherwise, to instill in them a sustainable appreciation for the environment through the art of photography.

 

The other division of the Udall Foundation runs the U. S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution, which helps entities resolve environmental conflicts involving the United States government by providing impartial third party mediation, facilitation, and assessment. It also offers training programs and referrals to environmental conflict resolution practitioners.

 

From the Web Site of the Udall Foundation:

About Morris K. Udall

About Stewart L. Udall

Annual Report (pdf)

Contact Information

Dissertation Fellowship

E-Newsletter

Native American Internship

Native Nations Institute

News & Announcements

Parks In Focus Blog

 Program Videos

Stewart L. Udall Exhibit

Udall Center

Udall Scholarship

Udall Scholarship Video

Undergraduate Scholarship

more
Where Does the Money Go:

According to the 2010 Expenditures and Audit Report of U.S. Code Title 20, Chapter 66, the Udall Foundation specifies the following types of organizational expenditures: Up to $5,000 per fiscal year to carry out code provisions, including official receptions and representation expenses; sums determined by the Board to operate the Foundation, including salaries, administration, mediation services and other expenses, including up to $1,000 for receptions and representation; and various services provided for the Environmental Dispute Resolution Fund.

 

The foundation’s most recent published budget accounting appears in the Udall Foundation 2010 Annual Report (pdf), which details distribution of Trust Fund expenses as follows: 29% of budget to Educational Program Support; 29% to Scholarships; 20% to the Udall Center; 15% to Administration; 4% to Parks in Focus; and 3% to Fellowships. Distributions of expenses for Udall’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution include: 52% to External Service Providers; 35% to Personnel; 5% to Rent and Facilities; 2% to Computing; 2% to Conferences and Meetings; 1% to Staff Outreach; and 3% to Other.

 

Udall Foundation FY 2011 Performance and Accountability Report (pdf)

more

Comments

N Kyle 8 years ago
gene mccarthy you must have had a message but your composition was too hard to follow. i read it twice and still don't know what you said. i thought we already had five entities dealing with native americans. this group makes six. nobody thinks the indians were treated fairly. but how can six different entities expect to accomplish anything. one agency has been tryng to relocate two tribes for twenty years. when will it end. how about just giving new york back. throw in cal...
Gene McCarthy 8 years ago
l this is a game changer i thought you would enjoy the e-mail i sent to washington this week members of the transportation and infrastrucre committee with all the current talk on wall street and in washington concerning the state of our economy, maybe it’s time to stop looking at individual plans and think about what we really want and need… what if ...

Leave a comment

Founded: 1992
Annual Budget: $6 million (FY 2013 Estimate) The Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation’s educational activities are supported by the interest accrued in a federal trust fund created by a $40 million appropriation Congress authorized when it established the Foundation, and by donations. So far the Foundation has received $47.6 million, and transferred, with Congressional approval, $8 million of that to the Native Nations Institute that it co-founded in 2001. The U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution component of the Udall Foundation receives annual appropriations, and is also financed by fees it charges for services. Its 2011 appropriation was $3.8 million.
Employees: The Foundation has 3; the Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution 6 (FY 2013 Estimate).
Official Website: http://www.udall.gov/
Udall Foundation
Eberhard, Eric
Chairman

Eric D. Eberhard, an attorney who has spent the majority of his career working on issues pertaining to Native Americans, was first elected chairman of the Udall Foundation in October 2011 and was re-elected to the post in 2016. Established in 1992, the Udall Foundation is an independent federal agency specializing in aid for American Indians and Alaska Natives that provides scholarships, fellowships, and internships, seeking future leaders across a wide spectrum of environmental fields, including business, education, engineering, health, justice, and urban planning and renewal.

 

Eberhard graduated from Western Reserve University in 1967 with a B.A. in political science. He then earned a J.D. at the University of Cincinnati in 1970 and an LL.M. from George Washington in 1972.

 

Beginning in 1973, he provided legal services on the Navajo, Hopi and White Mountain Apache reservations. Eberhard served as deputy attorney of the Navajo Nation from 1983 to 1985, when he became director of the nation’s Washington office; in essence, its chief lobbyist.

 

In 1989, Eberhard began a stint working for Sen. John McCain (R-Arizona) as general counsel and staffer on the Senate Indian Affairs Committee. Eberhard has spoken glowingly of McCain’s affinity for issues concerning Native Americans. “He loved to engage in discussion about Indian issues,” Eberhard told the San Jose Mercury News in 2000. “Anybody who wanted to take part, from senior staffers to the guy sorting the mail, had complete access to him.”

 

Eberhard left government service in 1995 to become a partner in the Seattle office of the Dorsey and Whitney law firm, still working on Native American concerns including representation of Indian tribes, tribal organizations and entities doing business with tribes. He remained there until 2009, when he was named distinguished Indian law practitioner at Seattle University.

 

Eberhard was first named to the Udall board of trustees in December 2000 and was subsequently reappointed by Democratic and Republican presidents. From 2001 to 2011 he led its Committee on the Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management and Policy at the University of Arizona, which provides tribal decision makers with professional training to assist them in building economically and socially sustainable sovereign governments.

 

The Udall Foundation endured some controversy in 2014 when the Arizona Daily Star reported that a 2012 audit by the Interior Department’s inspector general “found the agency wasn’t meeting federal requirements to monitor and assess its spending and lacked key procedures to check for efficiency and guard against fraud or mistakes in personnel and contracting.” Eberhard, serving as chairman, said in a Udall Foundation annual report that the organization was implementing changes that “will ultimately result in greater accountability and improved performance across the foundation’s programs.” 

 

Eberhard teaches Indian law at the University of Washington.

-Steve Straehley

 

To Learn More:

Significant Lapses Found at Udall Foundation (by Becky Pallack, Arizona Daily Star)

Official Biography

more
Bracy, Terry
Previous Chairman
Terrence Bracy has been the only Chairman of the Foundation. Bracy’s father, Webb Brennan Bracy, taught English Literature and also wrote jokes for comedians Bob Newhart and Henny Youngman. Terrence Bracy received a B.S. from St. Louis University with a double major in Political Science and Creative Writing in 1964 and a Master of Arts in Government from the University of Arizona in 1966. During graduate school, from 1965 to 1966, he was News Editor at KVOA, the NBC affiliate in Tuscon, Arizona, and from 1964 to 1966 he taught courses in American Government at the University of Arizona. From 1966 to 1976 he was a Legislative Assistant to Congressman Udall, and also worked on Udall’s unsuccessful run to become the Democratic candidate for the presidency in 1976. In January 1977 incoming Secretary of Transportation Brock Adams appointed Bracy to the post of assistant secretary fpr Congressional liaison. In July 1977, Bracy resigned, along with his immediate superiors, Adams and deputy secretary Alan Butchman. In 1982 Bracy co-founded the lobbying firm, Bracy, Williams & Company, now Bracy Tucker Brown & Valanzano, where Bracy is the Chief Executive Officer. His clients have included Phelps Dodge Development Corporation, the cities of Tucson, St. Louis and Atlanta and the Canadian National Railroad. In 1984, Bracy worked on the presidential campaign of Democrat Gary Hart. Bracy was a member of the board of trustees of the Grand Canyon Trust when President Bill Clinton named him to the board of trustees of the Morris Udall Foundation in 1994, and Bracy was elected its Chairman.
 
Bracy is a long-time contributor to both the Democratic and Republican Parties. Among the Democrats he’s contributed to: For President, Bill Bradley, Richard A. Gephardt, and John Kerry; for Congress, Bill Anoatubby, Oklahoma; David Bonior, Michigan; Norman D. Dicks, Washington; Karan English, Arizona; Raul M. Grijalva, Arizona; Edward L. Pastor, Arizona; Tom Udall, New Mexico; For Senate, Charles S. Robb, Virginia, and Mark E. Udall, Colorado. The Republicans to whom he’s made contributions are: For Congress, Lisa Ann Atkins, Arizona; Kay Granger, Texas; James T. Kolbe, Arizona; and Donald E. Young, Alaska.
 
 
 
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