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Overview:
Art in Embassies Program (AIEP) promotes the cultural identity of America’s art and artists by borrowing original works of art by U.S. citizens for display in approximately 180 U.S. embassy residences worldwide. These exhibitions are collections of art loaned from galleries, museums, individual artists, and corporate and private collections. Each exhibition is developed collaboratively between a United States ambassador and one of AIEP’s curators.
 
more
History:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AIEP was established within the United States Department of State in 1964 by President John F. Kennedy and his wife Jackie. President Kennedy had the goal of promoting national pride and a sense of cultural identity by displaying America’s art and its artists throughout the world. According to the program's first director, Nancy Kefauver, the group's original goal was to cover "those bare white walls in embassies abroad." Today the program places more than 5,000 works of art, including original paintings, sculptures and prints, in the public rooms of the ambassadors’ homes of nearly 170 U.S. Embassies worldwide.
 

At Home with Art in Embassies

(by Julie Keller, Art Business News)

 

more
What it Does:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Art in Embassies has a team of curators in charge of organizing exhibitions. "We try to create thematic exhibitions so they can tell a story in themselves" said Gwen Berlin, director of AIEP. For example, in Paris, the U.S. Ambassador to France has hosted an exhibition of U.S. women artists who have lived and worked in France. AIEP organizes exhibitions in collaboration with each ambassador. The team also negotiates all loans, and, once all loans are secured and the art is insured, AIEP’s registrars coordinate with professional art handlers for the assembling, packing, crating and safe shipment of each exhibition to post. The length of the loans is usually two and a half to three years, which coincides with the average length of an ambassador’s tenure. Lenders are not compensated financially, but a collection catalog is compiled from each embassy, which documents the collection, promotes the artists and acknowledges the lender. A wall label accompanies each work of art and identifies both the artists and lender. 
"I don't know that there's any other country that is as free and open to express themselves as our artists are and we want to make sure everybody in the world understands that," said Gwen Berlin, director of the AIEP.
 
American Artists Abroad was initiated in 2002 and was created to extend art in embassies’ exhibitions beyond the walls of the U.S diplomatic residents into local communities. Participating American artists travel to countries where their work is exhibited and engage in public cultural programming activities, such as lectures, workshops, and studio visits. 

Art in Embassies Program Celebrates its 40th Anniversary

(Press Release)

 

more
Former Directors:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

more
See all 26 comments

Comments

Jeanne Myers 9 months ago
Application for Russian Tourist VISA requires info on past employment. Phone number does not seem to be included in Art in Embassies sites. My employment there was in 1985, phone numbers have likely changed since then. Can you provide a phone number for AIEP??
Joyce Owens 4 years ago
When I learned of the program I could not believe it! What a great concept! Spread Democracy through the visual arts...the work is loaned by artists or institutions for free. The costs, compared to the potential to visually support the idea of multiculturalism, are minimal. The US constantly attempts to encourage the world to lean towards fairness for all citizens in all countries. This is one way to prove we are an egalitarian country...and of course it is a way to decorate our embassies for events and to boost the artists who are selected. Recognizing the value of art and artists while they are living and when they have died encourages future artists to pursue a career that seems to get little reward compared to some others. The diplomatic, educational, historic and cultural pluses and many. I think the embassies program can expand. Suppose all living artists selected were invited to create online programming about their own work? Bringing some to the host countries would be ideal, but in lieu of that an online interactive space could be used in schools abroad and at home.
Patricia O Shea 4 years ago
Returning to the US after working in several different UK museums. Watching a program on CSPAN on Art in Washington DC. I am dismayed to see the lack of interest of how we treat our history. The lack of knowledge of the importance archive history is amazing. The National Portrait Gallery in London would be a good example for us to follow.
Robert Bensick 5 years ago
I am an American artist that creates healing mandala art that bridges the Western and Eastern art modalities through mandala art. Please see www.gosumjoy.com and send me email contact information to begin a dialogue on how I can share this important message in our Embassies. Thanks Robert Bensick References at Robert Bensick on Linkedin
Evelyn Nitzberg 6 years ago
the art in embassies program is a wonderful and important opportunity to bridglanguage ae cultures and to expand the exhibiting potential of artists. the arts are critical in the expression of culture. i am an exhibiting artists and public school art teacher in california. the art budget continues to be cut. the arts are as essential as math and language arts. i would love to be included in the embassies program as an exhibiting artist. i hope the program continues. how does one a...
Art of John Barge III 6 years ago
hello i have joined aiep a year ago an would like to know the protocal for submitting works of art to the curatorial art team for future exhibition in your varied number of exhibitions. i have been apart of this awesome program for american artists but would like to know if there is a submission process, thank you art of john barge iii www.artofjohnbarge3.weebly.com
Roberta Brown Shader 6 years ago
i would like to submit my artwork to your exhibition program
Joseph Lawrence 7 years ago
to ms. nay and those who advocate cutting off art in embasies: about a year or so ago vanity fair published an article about the art in embasies program. the program was begun during the cold war to counter the negative impression of the u.s. in the developing world. the u.s. wanted to emphasize how much freedome our citizens had to express new ideas. i believe this is still an important goal. now the new cold war is against fundamentalist islam. the art in embasies program...
Marilyn H. Hochhauser 7 years ago
information on how i can submit 'art in embassies program.' thank you m.h.hochhauser
Artist Lew Wilson 7 years ago
to whom it may concern, i have been a professional working artist in photography and painting since the early '70's and i went through college at that time under the gi bill as a vietnam ear veteran, uscg. as part of my career for the last 17 years, i have worked on a national non-profit project under the belief that the fine arts can make a difference to young and old alike fostering a good earth through the sustainable majestic. the project's journey ended during 2010 with reach...

Leave a comment

Founded:
Annual Budget:
Employees:
Official Website: http://art.state.gov/
Art in Embassies Program
Susman, Ellen
Director

Ellen Spencer Susman was appointed in 2013 as director of the U.S. State Department’s Art in Embassies Program, which manages the collection of paintings and other fine art created by U.S. citizens that are on display in U.S. embassies around the world.

 

Her father, Gordon Spencer, was the president of the family business, Spencer Industries, which supplied large retail chains. He and his wife, Babette, Ellen Susman’s mother, also established Glenburn Valley Farm.

 

Susman attended the Long Island women’s university, Briarcliffe College (now Pace University), from 1968 to 1972, earning a B.A. in English.

 

In 1977, Susman was hired to host “Evening/PM Magazine,” which aired on station KYW-TV in Philadelphia. Five years later, she turned producer after founding a Bermuda-based speakers bureau that produced conferences for multinational corporations. 

 

In 1994, Susman created, produced and hosted “The Aspen Institute Television Show,” which featured guests from government, business and media for discussions about leadership. In 1996, she moderated “Experience Teaches,” a monthly two-hour program that was broadcast live on Executive Education Network. The series featured open-forum discussions with hundreds of participants, including business leaders and experts.

 

From 1998 to 2002, Susman moderated “Leaders Forum,” a monthly live conference that streamed live on the Internet. The program worked with a variety of clients—including the Veteran’s Administration, insurance companies and clothing retailers—to provide insights into leadership development and techniques.

 

In January 2002, Susman founded Ellen Susman Enterprises, specializes “in creating, moderating and facilitating programs and seminars for the corporate marketplace.”

 

In September 2001, Susman produced a conference, “The Myth of Superwoman,” which focused on the challenges facing women in the workplace. She followed up on that theme in 2005 with production of a 13-week series, “Superwoman Central,” which aired on PBS in Houston, Texas.

 

The November 2008 publication of a book Susman edited,  Danger Pay: Memoir of a Photojournalist in the Middle East, 1984-1994, offered a memoir of the life of her late sister, Carol Spencer Mitchell, who had worked as a photojournalist in the Middle East. Susman subsequently returned to PBS to produce and host a nationally broadcast TV series, “Balancing Your Life with Ellen Susman,” which addressed challenges facing women in the areas of career and family.

 

On September 6, 2011, President Barack Obama appointed Susman as a member of the President's Advisory Committee on the Arts for the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Cited by the Houston Chronicle as the top female Texas bundler for Obama, she donated $100,000 to the Obama super PAC, Priorities USA Action, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. The “Texas philanthropist [Susman]…has alerted people involved in the decision-making of her interest in serving as director of the State Department’s Art in Embassies program,” wrote The New York Times’ Nicholas Confessore and Sheryl Gay Stolberg in their 2013 article on the relationship between Obama donors and State Department appointments. The Obama administration clearly took notice of Susman’s interest and gave her the job.

 

Susman makes her political donations through Democracy Alliance, which distributes its contributors’ donations to such Democratic-leaning groups as Center for American Progress, Media Matters, and Priorities USA, and keeps a lid on the identities of both its donors and recipients, according to Washington Free Beacon.

 

Susman’s husband, Stephen, whom she married in 1999, is a prominent trial attorney and a founding partner of the law firm Susman Godfrey LLP. He has won some of the largest cases in U.S. history, including a $1.1 billion settlement on behalf of Texas Instruments in Samsung Electronics v. Texas Instruments; and a $536 million jury verdict in El Paso Natural Gas Co., et al., v. GHR Energy Corp. In 2010, he was part of the legal team that represented L.A. Dodgers owner Frank McCourt in his high-profile divorce trial.

 

The Susmans have donated millions of dollars to charitable causes, including an $11 million gift in 2011 to Yale University for new exhibition space at the Yale Art Gallery, and $5 million to the University of Texas Law School in 2010.

 

The couple has four children and several grandchildren.

-Danny Biederman

 

To Learn More:

 Ellen Susman: Stand By Your Man (by Bill McMorris, Washington Free Beacon)

 Ellen Susman Remarks at 2015 Medal of Arts Ceremony (video—ARTinEmbassies)

  Ellen Susman Web Site

  Ellen Spencer Susman Resume

more
Dozoretz, Beth
Previous Director

Beth Dozoretz does not lack for powerful political connections. Chosen to be director of the Art in Embassies Program in December 2010, she is a longtime Democratic fundraiser with close ties to Bill and Hillary Clinton, who also was the first woman to serve as finance chair of the Democratic National Committee, in 1999. The program provides works of art to be displayed in U.S. embassies around the world.

 
Dozoretz grew up in Worcester, Massachusetts. Her father, Melvin Goldman, was a dentist who specialized in root canal work, a teacher and a part-time inventor. Her mother, Sylvia, was a homemaker. Dozoretz graduated from Doherty High School in 1969 and then completed college at the age of 20 and married her high school sweetheart, Dick Schwartz.
 
She worked as a model and a first-grade teacher before settling into retail clothing sales. She moved up to buyer for a sportswear company and, at the age of 31, she became president of Clyde’s Sportswear. Dozonetz then worked her way up to become president of Casual Corner, a women’s clothier, president of the apparel manufacturing firm, S&T Industries, and in 2000, she joined the board of directors of U.S. Technologies Inc.
 
Meanwhile, she divorced, married an apparels executive and divorced again. She met her third, and current, husband, Ron Dozoretz, the founder of FHC Health Systems, at a political fundraiser in Virginia. His estimated net worth is $250 million. The couple married in September 1990, and Beth became senior vice president of FHC.
 
Dozoretz became politically active after her husband took her to the 1992 Democratic National Convention, where she first connected with the Clintons. In time, the Dozoretzes and Clintons became good friends. The Dozoretzes named their daughter after Melanne Verveer, Hillary Clinton’s former White House chief of staff, and then asked Bill Clinton to be her godfather.
 
In 1994, Dozoretz became head of the DNC’s Major Donor Program and was named vice-chair for both the 1996 Clinton-Gore Campaign and the Presidential Inaugural Committee.
 
During Bill Clinton’s final days in the White House, he pardoned fugitive financier Marc Rich, who had fled to Switzerland in the early 1980s after being convicted of tax evasion and charged with conducting illegal oil deals with Iran during the hostage crisis. Beth Dozoretz was a close friend of Rich’s wife, Denise Rich, who had donated heavily to the Democrats during the Clinton years, including a $450,000 contribution to the presidential library foundation that Dozoretz had solicited. Dozoretz reportedly talked to President Clinton about pardoning Rich and thanked him after doing so. She later was called before Congress to testify about the matter, but refused and invoked her Fifth Amendment rights.
 
Over the past decade, the Dozoretzes have contributed more than $1 million to political candidates.
 
Dozoretz is currently an Advanced Leadership Initiative fellow at Harvard University. She has served on several boards including: Teach for America, V-Day, the Jordan River Foundation (founded by Jordan’s Queen Rania), the Brookings Institute’s Saban Center for Middle East Policy, U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, George Washington University's National Council for Political Management, Rabin Medical Center, the Washington D.C. Jewish Community Center and the Center for Public Leadership (vice president of the advisory board) at Harvard University’s Kennedy School. She also served on the executive committee of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC),
 
Dozoretz and her husband have a son and a daughter.
 
Donor Scorecard: Beth Dozoretz (by Ken Silverstein, Harper’s)
Doyenne of the Dollars (by Viveca Novak, Time)
more
Bookmark and Share
Overview:
Art in Embassies Program (AIEP) promotes the cultural identity of America’s art and artists by borrowing original works of art by U.S. citizens for display in approximately 180 U.S. embassy residences worldwide. These exhibitions are collections of art loaned from galleries, museums, individual artists, and corporate and private collections. Each exhibition is developed collaboratively between a United States ambassador and one of AIEP’s curators.
 
more
History:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AIEP was established within the United States Department of State in 1964 by President John F. Kennedy and his wife Jackie. President Kennedy had the goal of promoting national pride and a sense of cultural identity by displaying America’s art and its artists throughout the world. According to the program's first director, Nancy Kefauver, the group's original goal was to cover "those bare white walls in embassies abroad." Today the program places more than 5,000 works of art, including original paintings, sculptures and prints, in the public rooms of the ambassadors’ homes of nearly 170 U.S. Embassies worldwide.
 

At Home with Art in Embassies

(by Julie Keller, Art Business News)

 

more
What it Does:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Art in Embassies has a team of curators in charge of organizing exhibitions. "We try to create thematic exhibitions so they can tell a story in themselves" said Gwen Berlin, director of AIEP. For example, in Paris, the U.S. Ambassador to France has hosted an exhibition of U.S. women artists who have lived and worked in France. AIEP organizes exhibitions in collaboration with each ambassador. The team also negotiates all loans, and, once all loans are secured and the art is insured, AIEP’s registrars coordinate with professional art handlers for the assembling, packing, crating and safe shipment of each exhibition to post. The length of the loans is usually two and a half to three years, which coincides with the average length of an ambassador’s tenure. Lenders are not compensated financially, but a collection catalog is compiled from each embassy, which documents the collection, promotes the artists and acknowledges the lender. A wall label accompanies each work of art and identifies both the artists and lender. 
"I don't know that there's any other country that is as free and open to express themselves as our artists are and we want to make sure everybody in the world understands that," said Gwen Berlin, director of the AIEP.
 
American Artists Abroad was initiated in 2002 and was created to extend art in embassies’ exhibitions beyond the walls of the U.S diplomatic residents into local communities. Participating American artists travel to countries where their work is exhibited and engage in public cultural programming activities, such as lectures, workshops, and studio visits. 

Art in Embassies Program Celebrates its 40th Anniversary

(Press Release)

 

more
Former Directors:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

more
See all 26 comments

Comments

Jeanne Myers 9 months ago
Application for Russian Tourist VISA requires info on past employment. Phone number does not seem to be included in Art in Embassies sites. My employment there was in 1985, phone numbers have likely changed since then. Can you provide a phone number for AIEP??
Joyce Owens 4 years ago
When I learned of the program I could not believe it! What a great concept! Spread Democracy through the visual arts...the work is loaned by artists or institutions for free. The costs, compared to the potential to visually support the idea of multiculturalism, are minimal. The US constantly attempts to encourage the world to lean towards fairness for all citizens in all countries. This is one way to prove we are an egalitarian country...and of course it is a way to decorate our embassies for events and to boost the artists who are selected. Recognizing the value of art and artists while they are living and when they have died encourages future artists to pursue a career that seems to get little reward compared to some others. The diplomatic, educational, historic and cultural pluses and many. I think the embassies program can expand. Suppose all living artists selected were invited to create online programming about their own work? Bringing some to the host countries would be ideal, but in lieu of that an online interactive space could be used in schools abroad and at home.
Patricia O Shea 4 years ago
Returning to the US after working in several different UK museums. Watching a program on CSPAN on Art in Washington DC. I am dismayed to see the lack of interest of how we treat our history. The lack of knowledge of the importance archive history is amazing. The National Portrait Gallery in London would be a good example for us to follow.
Robert Bensick 5 years ago
I am an American artist that creates healing mandala art that bridges the Western and Eastern art modalities through mandala art. Please see www.gosumjoy.com and send me email contact information to begin a dialogue on how I can share this important message in our Embassies. Thanks Robert Bensick References at Robert Bensick on Linkedin
Evelyn Nitzberg 6 years ago
the art in embassies program is a wonderful and important opportunity to bridglanguage ae cultures and to expand the exhibiting potential of artists. the arts are critical in the expression of culture. i am an exhibiting artists and public school art teacher in california. the art budget continues to be cut. the arts are as essential as math and language arts. i would love to be included in the embassies program as an exhibiting artist. i hope the program continues. how does one a...
Art of John Barge III 6 years ago
hello i have joined aiep a year ago an would like to know the protocal for submitting works of art to the curatorial art team for future exhibition in your varied number of exhibitions. i have been apart of this awesome program for american artists but would like to know if there is a submission process, thank you art of john barge iii www.artofjohnbarge3.weebly.com
Roberta Brown Shader 6 years ago
i would like to submit my artwork to your exhibition program
Joseph Lawrence 7 years ago
to ms. nay and those who advocate cutting off art in embasies: about a year or so ago vanity fair published an article about the art in embasies program. the program was begun during the cold war to counter the negative impression of the u.s. in the developing world. the u.s. wanted to emphasize how much freedome our citizens had to express new ideas. i believe this is still an important goal. now the new cold war is against fundamentalist islam. the art in embasies program...
Marilyn H. Hochhauser 7 years ago
information on how i can submit 'art in embassies program.' thank you m.h.hochhauser
Artist Lew Wilson 7 years ago
to whom it may concern, i have been a professional working artist in photography and painting since the early '70's and i went through college at that time under the gi bill as a vietnam ear veteran, uscg. as part of my career for the last 17 years, i have worked on a national non-profit project under the belief that the fine arts can make a difference to young and old alike fostering a good earth through the sustainable majestic. the project's journey ended during 2010 with reach...

Leave a comment

Founded:
Annual Budget:
Employees:
Official Website: http://art.state.gov/
Art in Embassies Program
Susman, Ellen
Director

Ellen Spencer Susman was appointed in 2013 as director of the U.S. State Department’s Art in Embassies Program, which manages the collection of paintings and other fine art created by U.S. citizens that are on display in U.S. embassies around the world.

 

Her father, Gordon Spencer, was the president of the family business, Spencer Industries, which supplied large retail chains. He and his wife, Babette, Ellen Susman’s mother, also established Glenburn Valley Farm.

 

Susman attended the Long Island women’s university, Briarcliffe College (now Pace University), from 1968 to 1972, earning a B.A. in English.

 

In 1977, Susman was hired to host “Evening/PM Magazine,” which aired on station KYW-TV in Philadelphia. Five years later, she turned producer after founding a Bermuda-based speakers bureau that produced conferences for multinational corporations. 

 

In 1994, Susman created, produced and hosted “The Aspen Institute Television Show,” which featured guests from government, business and media for discussions about leadership. In 1996, she moderated “Experience Teaches,” a monthly two-hour program that was broadcast live on Executive Education Network. The series featured open-forum discussions with hundreds of participants, including business leaders and experts.

 

From 1998 to 2002, Susman moderated “Leaders Forum,” a monthly live conference that streamed live on the Internet. The program worked with a variety of clients—including the Veteran’s Administration, insurance companies and clothing retailers—to provide insights into leadership development and techniques.

 

In January 2002, Susman founded Ellen Susman Enterprises, specializes “in creating, moderating and facilitating programs and seminars for the corporate marketplace.”

 

In September 2001, Susman produced a conference, “The Myth of Superwoman,” which focused on the challenges facing women in the workplace. She followed up on that theme in 2005 with production of a 13-week series, “Superwoman Central,” which aired on PBS in Houston, Texas.

 

The November 2008 publication of a book Susman edited,  Danger Pay: Memoir of a Photojournalist in the Middle East, 1984-1994, offered a memoir of the life of her late sister, Carol Spencer Mitchell, who had worked as a photojournalist in the Middle East. Susman subsequently returned to PBS to produce and host a nationally broadcast TV series, “Balancing Your Life with Ellen Susman,” which addressed challenges facing women in the areas of career and family.

 

On September 6, 2011, President Barack Obama appointed Susman as a member of the President's Advisory Committee on the Arts for the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Cited by the Houston Chronicle as the top female Texas bundler for Obama, she donated $100,000 to the Obama super PAC, Priorities USA Action, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. The “Texas philanthropist [Susman]…has alerted people involved in the decision-making of her interest in serving as director of the State Department’s Art in Embassies program,” wrote The New York Times’ Nicholas Confessore and Sheryl Gay Stolberg in their 2013 article on the relationship between Obama donors and State Department appointments. The Obama administration clearly took notice of Susman’s interest and gave her the job.

 

Susman makes her political donations through Democracy Alliance, which distributes its contributors’ donations to such Democratic-leaning groups as Center for American Progress, Media Matters, and Priorities USA, and keeps a lid on the identities of both its donors and recipients, according to Washington Free Beacon.

 

Susman’s husband, Stephen, whom she married in 1999, is a prominent trial attorney and a founding partner of the law firm Susman Godfrey LLP. He has won some of the largest cases in U.S. history, including a $1.1 billion settlement on behalf of Texas Instruments in Samsung Electronics v. Texas Instruments; and a $536 million jury verdict in El Paso Natural Gas Co., et al., v. GHR Energy Corp. In 2010, he was part of the legal team that represented L.A. Dodgers owner Frank McCourt in his high-profile divorce trial.

 

The Susmans have donated millions of dollars to charitable causes, including an $11 million gift in 2011 to Yale University for new exhibition space at the Yale Art Gallery, and $5 million to the University of Texas Law School in 2010.

 

The couple has four children and several grandchildren.

-Danny Biederman

 

To Learn More:

 Ellen Susman: Stand By Your Man (by Bill McMorris, Washington Free Beacon)

 Ellen Susman Remarks at 2015 Medal of Arts Ceremony (video—ARTinEmbassies)

  Ellen Susman Web Site

  Ellen Spencer Susman Resume

more
Dozoretz, Beth
Previous Director

Beth Dozoretz does not lack for powerful political connections. Chosen to be director of the Art in Embassies Program in December 2010, she is a longtime Democratic fundraiser with close ties to Bill and Hillary Clinton, who also was the first woman to serve as finance chair of the Democratic National Committee, in 1999. The program provides works of art to be displayed in U.S. embassies around the world.

 
Dozoretz grew up in Worcester, Massachusetts. Her father, Melvin Goldman, was a dentist who specialized in root canal work, a teacher and a part-time inventor. Her mother, Sylvia, was a homemaker. Dozoretz graduated from Doherty High School in 1969 and then completed college at the age of 20 and married her high school sweetheart, Dick Schwartz.
 
She worked as a model and a first-grade teacher before settling into retail clothing sales. She moved up to buyer for a sportswear company and, at the age of 31, she became president of Clyde’s Sportswear. Dozonetz then worked her way up to become president of Casual Corner, a women’s clothier, president of the apparel manufacturing firm, S&T Industries, and in 2000, she joined the board of directors of U.S. Technologies Inc.
 
Meanwhile, she divorced, married an apparels executive and divorced again. She met her third, and current, husband, Ron Dozoretz, the founder of FHC Health Systems, at a political fundraiser in Virginia. His estimated net worth is $250 million. The couple married in September 1990, and Beth became senior vice president of FHC.
 
Dozoretz became politically active after her husband took her to the 1992 Democratic National Convention, where she first connected with the Clintons. In time, the Dozoretzes and Clintons became good friends. The Dozoretzes named their daughter after Melanne Verveer, Hillary Clinton’s former White House chief of staff, and then asked Bill Clinton to be her godfather.
 
In 1994, Dozoretz became head of the DNC’s Major Donor Program and was named vice-chair for both the 1996 Clinton-Gore Campaign and the Presidential Inaugural Committee.
 
During Bill Clinton’s final days in the White House, he pardoned fugitive financier Marc Rich, who had fled to Switzerland in the early 1980s after being convicted of tax evasion and charged with conducting illegal oil deals with Iran during the hostage crisis. Beth Dozoretz was a close friend of Rich’s wife, Denise Rich, who had donated heavily to the Democrats during the Clinton years, including a $450,000 contribution to the presidential library foundation that Dozoretz had solicited. Dozoretz reportedly talked to President Clinton about pardoning Rich and thanked him after doing so. She later was called before Congress to testify about the matter, but refused and invoked her Fifth Amendment rights.
 
Over the past decade, the Dozoretzes have contributed more than $1 million to political candidates.
 
Dozoretz is currently an Advanced Leadership Initiative fellow at Harvard University. She has served on several boards including: Teach for America, V-Day, the Jordan River Foundation (founded by Jordan’s Queen Rania), the Brookings Institute’s Saban Center for Middle East Policy, U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, George Washington University's National Council for Political Management, Rabin Medical Center, the Washington D.C. Jewish Community Center and the Center for Public Leadership (vice president of the advisory board) at Harvard University’s Kennedy School. She also served on the executive committee of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC),
 
Dozoretz and her husband have a son and a daughter.
 
Donor Scorecard: Beth Dozoretz (by Ken Silverstein, Harper’s)
Doyenne of the Dollars (by Viveca Novak, Time)
more