Bookmark and Share
Overview:

Part of the Department of Health and Human Services, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) makes grants to various agencies to prevent and treat addictive and mental disorders and furthers its work through public campaigns, system reform, policy and program analysis. SAMHSA seeks to improve the quality and availability of prevention, treatment and rehabilitation services in order to reduce illness, death, disability, and cost to society resulting from substance abuse and mental illnesses. At times the agency has taken public stances on controversial issues such as homosexuality and transgender identity and treatment of heroin addiction.

 
more
History:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) was formed in 1970, when President Richard M. Nixon signed the Comprehensive Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Prevention, Treatment, and Rehabilitation Act of 1970. Also known as the “Hughes Act,” because Senator Harold E. Hughes sponsored the bill, this law recognized alcoholism as a major healthcare problem and established the NIAAA as a way to combat its effects. 

 
The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) traces its roots to 1935, when the Addiction Research Center was established in Lexington, Kentucky. In 1972, the Drug Abuse Warning Network and National Household Survey on Drug Abuse were created to help study and treat drug abuse in the United States, as well as diseases associated with drug use, such as AIDS and hepatitis. In 1974, all three agencies were folded into the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The agency began to monitor the drug use of high school seniors in 1975 with its Monitoring the Future Survey. (The survey was expanded to8th and10th graders in 1991).
 
The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) was formed after World War II, when increased lobbying called for a federal initiative to diagnose and treat mental health problems. Repeated attempts to form a National Neuropsychiatric Institute failed, but in 1946, Robert H. Felix, head of the Division of Mental Hygiene, urged Congress to pass the National Mental Health Act, which was signed in 1946. The bill called for the establishment of a National Advisory Mental Health Council (NAMHC) and advocated research, treatment programs and prevention initiatives. On April 15, 1949, the NIMH was founded. Felix was named director, and immediately began to help shape mental health policy in the United States. 
 
On October 1, 1992, the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration was abolished. A new agency, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), became part of the Public Health Service (PHS). SAMHSA was founded on the principle that people of all ages, whether suffering from or at risk for developing mental illness, could enjoy a fulfilling life, with a home, social life, education and suitable employment. 

 

more
What it Does:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) seeks to improve services for the treatment of drug abuse and mental disorders. It tries to expand access to mental health care, promote safe and effective programs for people suffering from or at risk of developing mental conditions, advocate for families of those suffering from mental disorders and facilitate greater mental healthcare overall. 
 
With more than 22 million Americans aged 12 or older diagnosed with substance abuse or dependence in 2005, and an additional 25 million American aged 18 years or older living with a serious mental health condition, SAMHSA seeks to reduce the physical and emotional toll of these illnesses by prevention and early intervention, through research, services and support.
 
Drug and Alcohol Abuse
The Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) is responsible for expanding the availability of effective treatment and recovery programs, improving access to treatment and removing obstacles to treatment and wellness. Additionally, CSAT promotes treatment programs to those suffering from drug and alcohol problems and works with the families of those affected, providing support and additional information on treatment options. This is in support of President George W. Bush’s Access to Recovery Initiative, a voucher-based program designed to expand access to treatment for drug or alcohol problems. A $98 million discretionary grant has increased the capacity of this program from 125,000 to 137,579 as of December 2006. After receiving services, 81% of clients have stayed clean, and 51% are living in stable housing, according to CSAT. Through the use of their Screening, Brief Intervention, Referral, and Treatment (SBIRT) program, SAMHSA seeks to expand care to community health centers, school-based health clinics, hospitals and emergency rooms, helping 74% of high-risk individuals to lower their drug and alcohol consumption, and 48% percent to stop entirely, officials claim.
   
The Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) is responsible for preventing the abuse of drugs in schools and neighborhoods. By developing policies, and implementing programs and services to prevent the use of illegal drugs and underage alcohol and tobacco use, CSAP tries to extend greater knowledge to states, communities and other organizations. After a resurgence of teen drug use in the 1990s, drug use among8th,10th and12th graders has declined by 23% since 2001, according to the center.
 
The Office of Applied Studies (OAS) collects, analyzes and disseminates information related to drug and alcohol abuse, as well as information related to behavioral health issues. OAS is responsible for the annual National Survey on Drug Use and Health, the Drug Abuse Warning Network and the Drug and Alcohol Services Information System, among other studies.
 
Mental Health
The Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) is responsible for ensuring the application of scientific findings on the prevention and treatment of mental disorders. It provides access to mental health care, helps to remove obstacles to treatment and extends help to the families of those dealing with mental disorders. CMHS also promotes effective programs and services for people with mental disorders or at risk of developing them.
 
Policy and Administration
The Office of the Administrator (OA) is responsible for developing the agency’s policies and programs. It maintains liaisons with the Office of the Secretary about current programs and initiatives and coordinates between SAMHSA and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on research related to alcohol, drug abuse and mental health. In addition, the Office of the Administrator analyzes legislative issues, interfaces with Congressional committees and coordinates agency communications. 
 
The Office of Policy, Planning and Budget (OPPB) develops and implements the administrator’s policies and programs by performing the chief financial officer function. It manages the formulation and execution of the yearly budget and helps to manage program planning activities. Finally, OPPB leads the Center Office of Policy Analysis and Coordination (OPAC) and oversees agency staff to ensure the implementation of budget & planning policies, as well as policy review.
  
The Office of Program Services (OPS) partners with other SAMHSA and HHS components to manage grants and contracts, application review, administrative services, human resources management, equal employment opportunity, organizational development and analysis and information technology. OPS takes the lead in developing policies for SAMHSA’s administrative and management systems and measures performance and improvement of these areas. OPS also oversees the agency’s information technology and administrative needs while conducting all aspects of the grants and contracts process.
 
In addition, SAMHSA addresses the nation’s disaster-related mental health and substance abuse issues through the Disaster Technical Assistance Center. By providing assistance at the community level during and after emergencies, SAMHSA tries to help mitigate the effects of related disorders. In the wake of 9/11, SAMHSA held a national summit in New York City to address community needs and facilitate readiness for the war on terrorism. During Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, the agency provided information, resources and personnel to provide support on the ground. The agency continues to provide support through grants, training and technical assistance.  
 

The Voice Awards honor Hollywood writers and producers “who incorporate dignified, respectful, and accurate portrayals of individuals with mental health problems into film and television productions.”

 

more
Where Does the Money Go:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAMHSA spent more than $2 billion this decade on contracts with 524 different companies and organizations, according to USAspending.gov. The most expensive goods and services that the agency purchased were social services, information and data broadcasting or data distribution services, administrative support services, data entry and basic research.

 
The biggest recipients of SAMHSA contracts were:
 
Research Triangle Institute
$516,104,627
Westat
$269,002,450
InfoUSA
$183,105,345
JBS International         
$132,341,269
Synectics for Management Decisions
$96,504,737
American Institutes for Research In The Behavioral Sciences
$73,150,316
IQ Solutions
$59,245,155
AFYA Inc
$49,475,510
Logicon of Rockville
$49,063,504
Northrop Grumman
$44,662,496

 

more
Controversies:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Use of Methadone Questioned

In April of 2007, Join Together Online reported that a growing number of methadone-related deaths prompted physicians to question the use of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). However, SAMHSA responded that MMT and clinics are not the problem. Instead, they suggested that doctors had been prescribing the drug as a painkiller. “While deaths involving methadone increased, experiences in several states show that addiction treatment programs are not the culprits,” said Dr. H. Westley Clark, Director of SAMHSA’s Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. On April 9th, the Associated Press reported that the state of West Virginia had put a moratorium on opening new MMT clinics. A SAMHSA official said that 85% of these involved drugs from pharmacies, not methadone clinics.
 
Mental Health Screening and Anti-Depressants
In October 2005, SAMHSA’s board members met with several advocacy groups who have been prominent and outspoken critics of mental health screening and using psychiatric drugs on children. SAMHSA Administrator Charles Currie indicated that the Bush administration formally disavowed TeenScreen, a test designed to identify mentally ill children. As well, SAMHSA backed away from the Texas Medication Algorithm, project (TMAP), which identified anti-depressants as a first line, and sometimes only, treatment method. Whistleblower Allen Jones, a former investigator in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Office of the Inspector General (OIG), had previously written President Bush’s Freedom Commission initiative was striving to form a “political/pharmaceutical alliance,” which would promote the use of newer, more expensive antipsychotic and antidepressants “of questionable benefit and deadly side effects, and to force private insurers to pick up more of the tab.” Currie indicated that these TMAP toolkits had been removed from SAMHSA’s public materials.
SAMHSA Promotes Infant and Child Screening & Drugging (by Karen R. Effrem, Alliance for Human Research Protection)
 
SAMHSA Marginalizing Homosexuals
In February 2004, SAMHSA was accused of forcing an Oregon mental health conference to change its name from “Suicide Prevention Among Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual/Transgender Individuals” to “Suicide Prevention in Vulnerable Populations.”

Request to Edit Title of Talk On Gays, Suicide Stirs Ire; HHS Is Being Accused of Marginalization

(by Rick Weiss, Washington Post)

 

more

Comments

Samantha Stewart 2 years ago
now i know for a fact the at the department of human services child welfare program in lane and monmouth county oregon that not only are they revising, altering, and falsifying documents in order to nab babies from their loving parents to defraud the government for their federal funding money,i personally looked up some of the people on the case i still have pending in the juvenile courts in lane county oregon and the woman that kidnapped my baby twyla dee pew and eliezer c gonzalez...
cliff 3 years ago
hi i work for a recovery serve of northwest ohio,i was wondering whom or how do i report things ive seen ,who investigates alligations .
David A Jones 3 years ago
Hello As a substance abuse treatment provider I am being told, by a state agency which is handling criminal justice clientss, that nsubstance abuse provider/counselor are disqualified due to not having a license in a mental health profession. That a substance abuse counselors or programs are conducting mental health care while working with persons abusing alcohol and drugs are practicing mental health without a license. I am becoming concerned this is what is happening in Oregon....

Leave a comment

captcha

Founded: 1992
Annual Budget: $3.3 billion (2009)
Employees: 496
Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration
Hyde, Pamela S.
Administrator

Pamela S. Hyde was sworn in as administrator of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration on December 7, 2009, after spending 30 years managing and consulting for government and non-profit operations that handled mental health and drug treatment services, as well as other health care and welfare programs.

 
Born November 7, 1950, Hyde attended Southwest Baptist College in Bolivar, Missouri,  for a little over a year before moving on to Southwest Missouri State University, earning her Bachelor of Arts in December 1972. She attended law school at the University of Michigan and received her JD in May 1976.
 
She joined the Ohio State Legal Services Association in September 1976 as a VISTA Attorney for one year. Her responsibilities included following and analyzing legislation, regulations and public hearings relating to Social Security Title XX block grants .
 
In September 1977, she joined the Ohio Legal Rights Service, a state government agency that protects and advocates for the rights of adults and children with disabilities. As a staff attorney and chief of the mental health unit, Hyde hired and supervised legal, paralegal and social services staff, and provided written and oral testimony on proposed legislation affecting persons with mental health needs. She represented individual and class-wide clients in civil commitment hearings, employment discrimination cases, and civil rights cases in administrative hearings and state and federal courts.
 
Three years later she was promoted to executive director of the Ohio Legal Rights Service, which came as an appointment from the chief justice of the Ohio Supreme Court. She was in charge of the agency’s overall administrative, fiscal and policy direction. 
 
Hyde’s time with the agency came to an end in April 1983 after Governor Richard Celeste appointed her director of the Ohio Department of Mental Health (ODMH). For the next seven years she oversaw a cabinet-level agency that operated 16 institutions with 6,000 employees and had an annual budget of more than $500 million. ODMH also provided psychiatric services to more than 2,000 inmates in Ohio’s prisons. 
 
In October 1990, Hyde shifted to the Ohio Department of Human Services, serving as director for only four months, before moving to Seattle to take over the city’s Department of Housing and Human Services in January 1991. Her new agency was responsible for the city’s involvement in housing development and supportive services, housing affordability strategies, community services facilities development, block grant administration and human services; family, children and youth services; poverty programs including service for homeless persons, food programs, energy assistance and survival services; Seattle and King County services for older persons (Area Agency on Aging) including the Mayor’s Office for Senior Citizens and citywide coordination and implementation of health and human services for children in Seattle public schools through the city’s Families and Education Levy.
 
Hyde moved again in January 1994, this time to Arizona, to become president and CEO of ComCare. The non-profit organization had a budget of $175 million and focused on providing mental health and substance abuse services for children, adults and families in Maricopa County. ComCare was created from a merger of three organizations, and, under contract with the state of Arizona, was the regional behavioral health authority for 2.6 million people living in Phoenix, Scottsdale, Tempe, Mesa, Avondale, Glendale, El Mirage and other urban and rural areas. The agency managed Medicaid, state, local, and federal funding as well as private insurance and self-pay funding sources.
 
In October 1996 Hyde left ComCare to become a senior consultant for Technical Assistance Collaborative, Inc.            , a national non-profit consulting firm that provides human services, behavioral health, and housing expertise for state and local governments and community organizations. Among the non-profits clients she worked with were the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health (Medicaid Subcommittee), and the U.S. Department of Justice.
 
Then-Democratic Governor Bill Richardson of New Mexico selected Hyde in January 2003 to take over his state’s Human Services Department. She remained in this capacity until receiving her appointment from President Obama. As New Mexico’s secretary of human services, Hyde was responsible for a $2 billion state agency that handled Medicaid, TANF, child support enforcement, food stamps, welfare, the Commodities Distribution Program, and several other federally funded programs for low-income and disabled individuals.
 
Hyde, who is gay, lives with Maggi Konzen, whom she met in Seattle in 1993.
 
Pamela S. Hyde (WhoRunsGov)

NMHSD Sec. Pam Hyde Takes Issue with Dishonesty Accusation (by Heath Haussamen, New Mexico Independent)

more
Broderick, Eric
Previous Administrator

An assistant surgeon general, Rear Admiral Eric B. Broderick has served as the acting administrator for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration since August 2008, overseeing a staff of more than 500 and a budget of $3.3 billion.

 
Broderick attended college at Indiana University, where he received his bachelor’s and doctoral degrees. He completed a General Practice Residency at the U.S. Public Health Service Hospital in Seattle, WA. In 1988, he received a Masters of Public Health degree from the University of Oklahoma and in 1990 he attained a diplomate of the American Board of Dental Public Health.
 
His first job was with the Indian Health Service, and worked in clinical settings in the western United States. He then joined the Public Health Service, embarking on a 34-year career working as a clinician and as an administrator managing health program operations, health policy development and program assessments. He has focused his career on the health needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives. In 2002, he was promoted to rear admiral in the Commissioned Corps of the Public Health Service.
 
He has served as the director of the Division of Oral Health and as acting deputy director of the Office of Public Health for the Indian Health Service. Between 2002 and 2005 he served as Senior Advisor for Tribal Health Policy in the Immediate Office of the Secretary for the Department of Health and Human Services. He joined the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration in 2006.
 
Eric Broderick Biography (SAMHSA)
more
Bookmark and Share
Overview:

Part of the Department of Health and Human Services, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) makes grants to various agencies to prevent and treat addictive and mental disorders and furthers its work through public campaigns, system reform, policy and program analysis. SAMHSA seeks to improve the quality and availability of prevention, treatment and rehabilitation services in order to reduce illness, death, disability, and cost to society resulting from substance abuse and mental illnesses. At times the agency has taken public stances on controversial issues such as homosexuality and transgender identity and treatment of heroin addiction.

 
more
History:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) was formed in 1970, when President Richard M. Nixon signed the Comprehensive Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Prevention, Treatment, and Rehabilitation Act of 1970. Also known as the “Hughes Act,” because Senator Harold E. Hughes sponsored the bill, this law recognized alcoholism as a major healthcare problem and established the NIAAA as a way to combat its effects. 

 
The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) traces its roots to 1935, when the Addiction Research Center was established in Lexington, Kentucky. In 1972, the Drug Abuse Warning Network and National Household Survey on Drug Abuse were created to help study and treat drug abuse in the United States, as well as diseases associated with drug use, such as AIDS and hepatitis. In 1974, all three agencies were folded into the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The agency began to monitor the drug use of high school seniors in 1975 with its Monitoring the Future Survey. (The survey was expanded to8th and10th graders in 1991).
 
The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) was formed after World War II, when increased lobbying called for a federal initiative to diagnose and treat mental health problems. Repeated attempts to form a National Neuropsychiatric Institute failed, but in 1946, Robert H. Felix, head of the Division of Mental Hygiene, urged Congress to pass the National Mental Health Act, which was signed in 1946. The bill called for the establishment of a National Advisory Mental Health Council (NAMHC) and advocated research, treatment programs and prevention initiatives. On April 15, 1949, the NIMH was founded. Felix was named director, and immediately began to help shape mental health policy in the United States. 
 
On October 1, 1992, the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration was abolished. A new agency, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), became part of the Public Health Service (PHS). SAMHSA was founded on the principle that people of all ages, whether suffering from or at risk for developing mental illness, could enjoy a fulfilling life, with a home, social life, education and suitable employment. 

 

more
What it Does:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) seeks to improve services for the treatment of drug abuse and mental disorders. It tries to expand access to mental health care, promote safe and effective programs for people suffering from or at risk of developing mental conditions, advocate for families of those suffering from mental disorders and facilitate greater mental healthcare overall. 
 
With more than 22 million Americans aged 12 or older diagnosed with substance abuse or dependence in 2005, and an additional 25 million American aged 18 years or older living with a serious mental health condition, SAMHSA seeks to reduce the physical and emotional toll of these illnesses by prevention and early intervention, through research, services and support.
 
Drug and Alcohol Abuse
The Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) is responsible for expanding the availability of effective treatment and recovery programs, improving access to treatment and removing obstacles to treatment and wellness. Additionally, CSAT promotes treatment programs to those suffering from drug and alcohol problems and works with the families of those affected, providing support and additional information on treatment options. This is in support of President George W. Bush’s Access to Recovery Initiative, a voucher-based program designed to expand access to treatment for drug or alcohol problems. A $98 million discretionary grant has increased the capacity of this program from 125,000 to 137,579 as of December 2006. After receiving services, 81% of clients have stayed clean, and 51% are living in stable housing, according to CSAT. Through the use of their Screening, Brief Intervention, Referral, and Treatment (SBIRT) program, SAMHSA seeks to expand care to community health centers, school-based health clinics, hospitals and emergency rooms, helping 74% of high-risk individuals to lower their drug and alcohol consumption, and 48% percent to stop entirely, officials claim.
   
The Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) is responsible for preventing the abuse of drugs in schools and neighborhoods. By developing policies, and implementing programs and services to prevent the use of illegal drugs and underage alcohol and tobacco use, CSAP tries to extend greater knowledge to states, communities and other organizations. After a resurgence of teen drug use in the 1990s, drug use among8th,10th and12th graders has declined by 23% since 2001, according to the center.
 
The Office of Applied Studies (OAS) collects, analyzes and disseminates information related to drug and alcohol abuse, as well as information related to behavioral health issues. OAS is responsible for the annual National Survey on Drug Use and Health, the Drug Abuse Warning Network and the Drug and Alcohol Services Information System, among other studies.
 
Mental Health
The Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) is responsible for ensuring the application of scientific findings on the prevention and treatment of mental disorders. It provides access to mental health care, helps to remove obstacles to treatment and extends help to the families of those dealing with mental disorders. CMHS also promotes effective programs and services for people with mental disorders or at risk of developing them.
 
Policy and Administration
The Office of the Administrator (OA) is responsible for developing the agency’s policies and programs. It maintains liaisons with the Office of the Secretary about current programs and initiatives and coordinates between SAMHSA and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on research related to alcohol, drug abuse and mental health. In addition, the Office of the Administrator analyzes legislative issues, interfaces with Congressional committees and coordinates agency communications. 
 
The Office of Policy, Planning and Budget (OPPB) develops and implements the administrator’s policies and programs by performing the chief financial officer function. It manages the formulation and execution of the yearly budget and helps to manage program planning activities. Finally, OPPB leads the Center Office of Policy Analysis and Coordination (OPAC) and oversees agency staff to ensure the implementation of budget & planning policies, as well as policy review.
  
The Office of Program Services (OPS) partners with other SAMHSA and HHS components to manage grants and contracts, application review, administrative services, human resources management, equal employment opportunity, organizational development and analysis and information technology. OPS takes the lead in developing policies for SAMHSA’s administrative and management systems and measures performance and improvement of these areas. OPS also oversees the agency’s information technology and administrative needs while conducting all aspects of the grants and contracts process.
 
In addition, SAMHSA addresses the nation’s disaster-related mental health and substance abuse issues through the Disaster Technical Assistance Center. By providing assistance at the community level during and after emergencies, SAMHSA tries to help mitigate the effects of related disorders. In the wake of 9/11, SAMHSA held a national summit in New York City to address community needs and facilitate readiness for the war on terrorism. During Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, the agency provided information, resources and personnel to provide support on the ground. The agency continues to provide support through grants, training and technical assistance.  
 

The Voice Awards honor Hollywood writers and producers “who incorporate dignified, respectful, and accurate portrayals of individuals with mental health problems into film and television productions.”

 

more
Where Does the Money Go:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAMHSA spent more than $2 billion this decade on contracts with 524 different companies and organizations, according to USAspending.gov. The most expensive goods and services that the agency purchased were social services, information and data broadcasting or data distribution services, administrative support services, data entry and basic research.

 
The biggest recipients of SAMHSA contracts were:
 
Research Triangle Institute
$516,104,627
Westat
$269,002,450
InfoUSA
$183,105,345
JBS International         
$132,341,269
Synectics for Management Decisions
$96,504,737
American Institutes for Research In The Behavioral Sciences
$73,150,316
IQ Solutions
$59,245,155
AFYA Inc
$49,475,510
Logicon of Rockville
$49,063,504
Northrop Grumman
$44,662,496

 

more
Controversies:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Use of Methadone Questioned

In April of 2007, Join Together Online reported that a growing number of methadone-related deaths prompted physicians to question the use of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). However, SAMHSA responded that MMT and clinics are not the problem. Instead, they suggested that doctors had been prescribing the drug as a painkiller. “While deaths involving methadone increased, experiences in several states show that addiction treatment programs are not the culprits,” said Dr. H. Westley Clark, Director of SAMHSA’s Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. On April 9th, the Associated Press reported that the state of West Virginia had put a moratorium on opening new MMT clinics. A SAMHSA official said that 85% of these involved drugs from pharmacies, not methadone clinics.
 
Mental Health Screening and Anti-Depressants
In October 2005, SAMHSA’s board members met with several advocacy groups who have been prominent and outspoken critics of mental health screening and using psychiatric drugs on children. SAMHSA Administrator Charles Currie indicated that the Bush administration formally disavowed TeenScreen, a test designed to identify mentally ill children. As well, SAMHSA backed away from the Texas Medication Algorithm, project (TMAP), which identified anti-depressants as a first line, and sometimes only, treatment method. Whistleblower Allen Jones, a former investigator in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Office of the Inspector General (OIG), had previously written President Bush’s Freedom Commission initiative was striving to form a “political/pharmaceutical alliance,” which would promote the use of newer, more expensive antipsychotic and antidepressants “of questionable benefit and deadly side effects, and to force private insurers to pick up more of the tab.” Currie indicated that these TMAP toolkits had been removed from SAMHSA’s public materials.
SAMHSA Promotes Infant and Child Screening & Drugging (by Karen R. Effrem, Alliance for Human Research Protection)
 
SAMHSA Marginalizing Homosexuals
In February 2004, SAMHSA was accused of forcing an Oregon mental health conference to change its name from “Suicide Prevention Among Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual/Transgender Individuals” to “Suicide Prevention in Vulnerable Populations.”

Request to Edit Title of Talk On Gays, Suicide Stirs Ire; HHS Is Being Accused of Marginalization

(by Rick Weiss, Washington Post)

 

more

Comments

Samantha Stewart 2 years ago
now i know for a fact the at the department of human services child welfare program in lane and monmouth county oregon that not only are they revising, altering, and falsifying documents in order to nab babies from their loving parents to defraud the government for their federal funding money,i personally looked up some of the people on the case i still have pending in the juvenile courts in lane county oregon and the woman that kidnapped my baby twyla dee pew and eliezer c gonzalez...
cliff 3 years ago
hi i work for a recovery serve of northwest ohio,i was wondering whom or how do i report things ive seen ,who investigates alligations .
David A Jones 3 years ago
Hello As a substance abuse treatment provider I am being told, by a state agency which is handling criminal justice clientss, that nsubstance abuse provider/counselor are disqualified due to not having a license in a mental health profession. That a substance abuse counselors or programs are conducting mental health care while working with persons abusing alcohol and drugs are practicing mental health without a license. I am becoming concerned this is what is happening in Oregon....

Leave a comment

captcha

Founded: 1992
Annual Budget: $3.3 billion (2009)
Employees: 496
Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration
Hyde, Pamela S.
Administrator

Pamela S. Hyde was sworn in as administrator of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration on December 7, 2009, after spending 30 years managing and consulting for government and non-profit operations that handled mental health and drug treatment services, as well as other health care and welfare programs.

 
Born November 7, 1950, Hyde attended Southwest Baptist College in Bolivar, Missouri,  for a little over a year before moving on to Southwest Missouri State University, earning her Bachelor of Arts in December 1972. She attended law school at the University of Michigan and received her JD in May 1976.
 
She joined the Ohio State Legal Services Association in September 1976 as a VISTA Attorney for one year. Her responsibilities included following and analyzing legislation, regulations and public hearings relating to Social Security Title XX block grants .
 
In September 1977, she joined the Ohio Legal Rights Service, a state government agency that protects and advocates for the rights of adults and children with disabilities. As a staff attorney and chief of the mental health unit, Hyde hired and supervised legal, paralegal and social services staff, and provided written and oral testimony on proposed legislation affecting persons with mental health needs. She represented individual and class-wide clients in civil commitment hearings, employment discrimination cases, and civil rights cases in administrative hearings and state and federal courts.
 
Three years later she was promoted to executive director of the Ohio Legal Rights Service, which came as an appointment from the chief justice of the Ohio Supreme Court. She was in charge of the agency’s overall administrative, fiscal and policy direction. 
 
Hyde’s time with the agency came to an end in April 1983 after Governor Richard Celeste appointed her director of the Ohio Department of Mental Health (ODMH). For the next seven years she oversaw a cabinet-level agency that operated 16 institutions with 6,000 employees and had an annual budget of more than $500 million. ODMH also provided psychiatric services to more than 2,000 inmates in Ohio’s prisons. 
 
In October 1990, Hyde shifted to the Ohio Department of Human Services, serving as director for only four months, before moving to Seattle to take over the city’s Department of Housing and Human Services in January 1991. Her new agency was responsible for the city’s involvement in housing development and supportive services, housing affordability strategies, community services facilities development, block grant administration and human services; family, children and youth services; poverty programs including service for homeless persons, food programs, energy assistance and survival services; Seattle and King County services for older persons (Area Agency on Aging) including the Mayor’s Office for Senior Citizens and citywide coordination and implementation of health and human services for children in Seattle public schools through the city’s Families and Education Levy.
 
Hyde moved again in January 1994, this time to Arizona, to become president and CEO of ComCare. The non-profit organization had a budget of $175 million and focused on providing mental health and substance abuse services for children, adults and families in Maricopa County. ComCare was created from a merger of three organizations, and, under contract with the state of Arizona, was the regional behavioral health authority for 2.6 million people living in Phoenix, Scottsdale, Tempe, Mesa, Avondale, Glendale, El Mirage and other urban and rural areas. The agency managed Medicaid, state, local, and federal funding as well as private insurance and self-pay funding sources.
 
In October 1996 Hyde left ComCare to become a senior consultant for Technical Assistance Collaborative, Inc.            , a national non-profit consulting firm that provides human services, behavioral health, and housing expertise for state and local governments and community organizations. Among the non-profits clients she worked with were the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health (Medicaid Subcommittee), and the U.S. Department of Justice.
 
Then-Democratic Governor Bill Richardson of New Mexico selected Hyde in January 2003 to take over his state’s Human Services Department. She remained in this capacity until receiving her appointment from President Obama. As New Mexico’s secretary of human services, Hyde was responsible for a $2 billion state agency that handled Medicaid, TANF, child support enforcement, food stamps, welfare, the Commodities Distribution Program, and several other federally funded programs for low-income and disabled individuals.
 
Hyde, who is gay, lives with Maggi Konzen, whom she met in Seattle in 1993.
 
Pamela S. Hyde (WhoRunsGov)

NMHSD Sec. Pam Hyde Takes Issue with Dishonesty Accusation (by Heath Haussamen, New Mexico Independent)

more
Broderick, Eric
Previous Administrator

An assistant surgeon general, Rear Admiral Eric B. Broderick has served as the acting administrator for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration since August 2008, overseeing a staff of more than 500 and a budget of $3.3 billion.

 
Broderick attended college at Indiana University, where he received his bachelor’s and doctoral degrees. He completed a General Practice Residency at the U.S. Public Health Service Hospital in Seattle, WA. In 1988, he received a Masters of Public Health degree from the University of Oklahoma and in 1990 he attained a diplomate of the American Board of Dental Public Health.
 
His first job was with the Indian Health Service, and worked in clinical settings in the western United States. He then joined the Public Health Service, embarking on a 34-year career working as a clinician and as an administrator managing health program operations, health policy development and program assessments. He has focused his career on the health needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives. In 2002, he was promoted to rear admiral in the Commissioned Corps of the Public Health Service.
 
He has served as the director of the Division of Oral Health and as acting deputy director of the Office of Public Health for the Indian Health Service. Between 2002 and 2005 he served as Senior Advisor for Tribal Health Policy in the Immediate Office of the Secretary for the Department of Health and Human Services. He joined the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration in 2006.
 
Eric Broderick Biography (SAMHSA)
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