Bookmark and Share
Overview:

Although the Census Bureau carries out hundreds of surveys every year, its most well-known duty is still to conduct the decennial census. The U.S. Census Bureau is responsible for distributing, gathering and calculating the significance of a census given every ten years to the residents of the United States. The census is used to determine the number of each state’s congressional representatives and electoral votes, as well as the allocation of federal tax dollars. Census data directly affect how more than $200 billion per year in federal and state funding is allocated to local, state, and tribal governments. The data are vital to other planning decisions, such as emergency preparedness and disaster recovery. The accuracy of the data decides the legitimacy of important decisions.

 

Because society changes significantly every 10 years in the United States, the census must be updated to encompass racial, sexual orientation, and financial categories. The census collects a large amount of sensitive information, which it has been criticized for leaking.

more
History:

Because the census has been around for almost 240 years, its results have been important in decision-making for the United States government since the nation was founded. In 2020 the U.S. Census Bureau will take the 24th decennial census.

 

As nominal director, Thomas Jefferson oversaw the first census in 1790. The six questions in 1790 called for the name of the head of the family and the number of persons in each household of the following descriptions: Free White males of 16 years and upward; Free White males under 16 years; Free White females; All other free persons; and Slaves. The first Census was taken of the original 13 states, plus the districts of Kentucky, Maine, and Vermont, and the Southwest Territory (Tennessee). The authorization act for the third census of 1810 stipulated that an assistant marshal must actually visit each household, or the head of each family, within his designated enumeration district and should not rely on hearsay or the like to complete his count. The first census of manufactures also occurred in 1810. The 1830 census was the first to use standardized questionnaire forms. In 1850 a new rule stipulated that each marshal was to be responsible for subdividing his district into “known civil divisions," such as counties, townships, or wards. Every free person’s name was to be listed, not just the head of the household.

 

In 1870, due to the heavy burden of tallying and tabulating census data, use was made of a rudimentary tallying machine, invented by the chief clerk of the Census Office, and later superintendent, Charles W. Seaton. Every free person’s name was to be listed, not just the head of the household. The marshals also collected additional “social statistics,” including information on taxes, schools, crime, wages, value of the estate, etc. and data on mortality. After the Civil War, the decennial census questionnaires were reordered and redesigned to account for end of the “slave questionnaire.” A new question was formed in 1890 which dealt with race, including “Japanese” as a category for the first time, along with “Chinese,”  “Negro,”  “mulatto,” “quadroon,” “octoroon,” and “white.” Also in 1890, for the first time, enumerators were given detailed maps to follow so they could account for every street or road and not stray beyond their assigned boundaries. The 1890 census was notable as the first in which the electric tabulating system, invented by former Census Office employee Herman Hollerith, was used. Hollerith’s machine required information from the census questionnaires to be transferred to a card, which was hole-punched at various places to indicate the characteristics—age, sex, color, marital status, etc.— of a person enumerated. The cards were then run through an electronic tabulating machine, which, using metal pins to complete circuits through the punched holes, counted or cross-tabulated different characteristics. Tabulation of the 1880 census results took almost a decade to complete. 

 

Hawaii, which had been annexed in 1898, was included in the 1900 census for the first time. In 1902, the formerly temporary Census Office was made a permanent organization within the Department of Interior. In 1903, it became the Census Bureau and was moved to the new Department of Commerce and Labor. The 1905 economic census was the first U.S. census to be conducted by mail. When the United States entered World War I in 1917, the Census Bureau took on an important new role. During the nation’s mobilization for the war, the Census Bureau was able to use its compiled population and economic data to report on populations of draft-age men, along with the different states’ industrial capacities. The Census Bureau's 1937 special census of unemployment, prompted by the Great Depression, was the first survey to use probability sampling techniques. The Census Bureau used the first non-military computer, UNIVAC I, to process the 1950 decennial and 1952 economic censuses. In 1960 the decennial census was sent out by mail. In 1960 additional sample questions were asked of 25% of the population, by having enumerators take extra information from every fourth house. 

 

In 1980 the Census Bureau made a special effort to enumerate historically undercounted groups during two programs, “M-Night” (“M” for mission) and “T-Night” (“T” for transient). On M-Night, specially trained enumerators counted people staying in homeless shelters, soup kitchens, bus and rail stations, dormitories, and others. On T-Night, the enumeration focused on hotels and motels with permanent residents. The Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing System (TIGER) developed by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Census Bureau, was introduced for the 1990 census. This was created in order to geographically code addresses into appropriate census geographic areas, as well as to produce the many different maps required for data collection and tabulation. The 1987 Economic Census was the first to be published on CDROM, and 10 years later, in 1997, all census data became available on the Internet.  On January 25, 1999, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled by a 5-4 margin in Clinton v. Glavin that the Census Bureau cannot use statistical sampling in the 2000 census to determine the population for congressional apportionment purposes.

The Decennial Census 1790 to 2000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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What it Does:

 

 

 

The Census Bureau collects data through surveys and conducts statistical analysis of the results to be used in policy-making decisions by the U.S. government. The mission and operations of the U.S. Census Bureau are laid out in Title 13 of the United States Code.

The completed decennial census answers such questions as: Will the increase in the older population bankrupt the Social Security system? Would federal subsidies to inner-city areas help lower the unemployment rate? Are undocumented immigrants creating an undue burden on the criminal justice systems in border counties?

 

Politicians are not completely altruistic, and have been known to apply demographics for their own personal use when campaign time rolls around asking, what are the characteristics of a candidate’s supporters and where are those voters located?

Population Clock

Statistical Abstract of the United States:

Published in print since 1878, the Abstract has hundreds of statistical tables summarizing the social, political, and economic scene in the United States, as well as an international section. 

The 2012 Statistical Abstract

American Community Survey

American Fact Finder

Field Data Collection Automation (FDCA) Market Research

Planning for the 2020 Census

 

From the Web Site of the U.S. Census Bureau

American Community Survey

Blogs

Business and Industry

Business Help

Business Patterns and Demographics

Catalogs

Census 2000

Census 2010

Census 2020

Census in Schools

Census of Governments

Center for Economic Studies

Contact Information

Data Access Tools

Director’s Corner

Economic Indicators

Economic Census

Electronic Economy Statistics

Emergency Preparedness

Employment Opportunities

Events Calendar

Export Codes

Facts for Features

FAQs

Foreign Trade

Fraud

Gazetteer Files

Genealogy

Geography

Health Insurance

History

Housing Topics

Income

Interactive Population Map

International Programs

Maps

Multimedia Gallery

NAICS

News Releases

Newsroom

People and Households

Photos

Population and Housing Estimates

Population Clocks

Population Finder

Population Projections

Poverty

Product Schedule

Publications

QuickFacts

Radio

Regional Offices

Statistical Abstract

Survey of Business Owners

Training and Workshops

Videos

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Where Does the Money Go:

 

 

 

The expected stakeholders of the Census Bureau are federal government departments and agencies that use the data to make decisions, as well as state and local government officials. Private sector companies are interested in the census outcome, because they will use this in order to target specific markets for their products. The world of academia uses the census data to conduct research, while non-governmental organizations use the data to assess the socio-economic conditions of certain groups.

The Census Project: Census 2020 Stakeholder List

 

Between 2002 and 2012, the Census Bureau spent $5.44 billion on 23,645 contractor transactions, according to USAspending.gov. The following are the five biggest contractor recipients during that period, along with the amount they were paid and the respective percentage of the Census Bureau’s total contractor spending:

1. Harris Corporation                                                  $1,019,439,353  (19%) 

2. Lockheed Martin Corporation                                   $932,425,989  (17%) 

3. The Interpublic Group of Companies Inc.                 $365,012,566  (7%) 

4. IBM Corporation                                                       $163,717,592  (3%) 

5. Miscellaneous Foreign Contractors                            $159,400,751  (3%)

 

Due to cuts in the agency’s FY 2013 budget, the Census Bureau plans to close half of its dozen regional offices.

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Controversies:

Field Data Collection Automation Program

In order to reduce the cost of the census, the Census Bureau has recognized the need to reduce the amount of paper used in collection. Thus, for 2010, the Bureau proposed the use of handheld computers (HHCs) equipped with GPS tracking systems in order to completely restructure the data collection process. But the HHC plan fell behind schedule in programming these devices, as well as training the 500,000 temporary interviewers to use the equipment. Census Bureau director Steve H. Murdock blamed the delay on a lack of communication between the Bureau and the prime contractor for the Field Data Collection Automation (FDCA) program.  He explained in a press release that the contractor had difficulty developing the full scope of the project within the Bureau’s deadline.

 

Although HHCs were eventually used in address canvassing, the primary program was scrapped after a special task force recommended a return to paper-based methods. The reasons all related to an array of problems with the development of the handheld devices, including missed deadlines, technical problems, cost overruns, and poor contractor communication. Harris Corporation had been awarded a $595 million contract for developing 525,000 HHCs. The decision to revert to paper resulted in an added cost of between $2.2 and $3 billion, bringing the total cost of the 2010 census to upward of $14.5 billion.

Automated Field Data Collection for the 2010 Census

The Census at “High Risk” (Editorial, New York Times)

Census to scrap handheld computers for 2010 count (by Gautham Nagesh, Nextgov)

 

Confidentiality Issues Remain Today

The American Civil Liberties Union and the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (PRC) criticized the Bureau in 2004 for providing detailed data “on the distribution of Arab Americans of various backgrounds across U.S. ZIP Codes” to the Department of Homeland Security, purportedly for the purpose of determining what languages to use on signs to be posted at airports. The two advocacy groups urged the Bureau to create “a new outside body to advise the bureau on privacy and civil liberties issues.”

ACLU Urges Census Bureau to Create Privacy Advisory Committee

Letter to Charles Louis Kincannon (by Barry Steinhardt, ACLU, and Beth Givens, Privacy Rights Clearinghouse)

Dept. of Homeland Security gets census data on Arab American — Decried as violation of trust (Arab American Business)

Homeland Security Given Data on Arab-Americans (by Lynette Clemetson, New York Times)

 

Utah Controversy

After the 2000 census, the strongest disputation of count results came from the state of Utah, which challenged the results in two different ways. Utah was extremely close to gaining a fourth congressional seat. The Census Bureau counted members of the military serving abroad as residents of their home state, but did not count as residents people from Utah traveling abroad as religious missionaries. If this policy had been changed, Utah would have received an additional seat at the expense of North Carolina. After losing a lawsuit over this matter, the state of Utah then filed another lawsuit alleging that the statistical methods used in computing the state populations were improper and cost Utah the seat. This case made it to the Supreme Court, but Utah was again defeated.

 

Violating the Privacy of Japanese-Americans

The U.S. Census Bureau gave up names of Japanese-Americans during WWII. This contributed to the racism and prejudice against them at the time, and was a blatant violation of Title 13, which prohibits the re-releasing of information about individuals. In 2000, former Census Bureau chief Kenneth Prewitt apologized for the role it played in relocating the Japanese-American citizens to internment camps.

Confirmed: The U.S. Census Bureau Gave Up Names of Japanese-Americans in WW II (by J.R. Minkel, Scientific American)

 

Who Counts?

Most controversies relating to the Census Bureau have to do with the counting of minorities and other marginalized groups, such as the homeless, prisoners, and undocumented workers. According to the Constitution, the census should count everyone in the country. Attempts to bend that requirement inevitably arise, because the stakes are so high. The census determines the number of representatives elected from each state and the distribution of federal money among the states. 

 

The Bureau counts prisoners in the districts in which they are incarcerated. Some argue that this practice is a violation of international treaty. Counting prisoners as local residents, despite the fact that they can’t vote or participate in the communities where they are incarcerated, leads to unequal distributions of power. 

 

The 1990 census was criticized for excluding one Native American in every eight. The statisticians’ solution is to follow each census with a quality check, surveying representative areas to create a picture of those overlooked in the full count and correcting the figures accordingly. Because of the transient nature of many homeless people, it is virtually impossible to count the whole of this population and leads to distortion as to the nature of homelessness and the magnitude of the problem. In 1992, the cities of Baltimore and San Francisco, along with homeless advocates, sued the Bureau, accusing it of deliberately setting out to undercount the homeless during its one-night count of street people for the 1990 census.

Prisoners of the Census

Prison Policy Initiative

 

Race Options

Since 1977, under Office of Management and Budget Statistical Directive 15, the Census Bureau has recognized five basic categories: American Indian or Alaskan Native, Asian or Pacific Islander, Hispanic, black, and white. The 2000 census was the first time survey options for multiracial Americans were provided. PROJECT RACE (Reclassify All Children Equally) and AMEA (Association of MultiEthnic Americans) argue that the previous census form forces those with parents of different races to deny or suppress part of their heritage. In 1997, the decision to use the instruction “mark one or more races” was reached after finding that an increasing number of children are from interracial unions and a need to measure the increased diversity in the United States.

Questions and Answers for Census 2000 Data on Race (U.S. Census Bureau)

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Former Directors:

Charles Louis Kincannon

Kincannon retired on January 3, 2008, after 6 years as director, and 29 years at the Census Bureau. 

 

Kincannon was born in Waco, Texas, in 1940. In 1963 he earned an economics degree from the University of Texas, Austin, and continued postgraduate work in statistics and economics at George Washington University, Georgetown University and University of Maryland. He took a position as a statistician at the U.S. Census Bureau in 1963. He left the Bureau in 1975 during the Ford administration, but returned upon the election of Ronald Reagan. This time he held the position of deputy director and chief operating officer in January 1982 after being recommended by Reagan’s first Bureau Director, Bruce Chapman. From 1992 to 2000, Kincannon served as the First Chief Statistician in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and development in Paris.

 

Kincannon was nominated for the position of director of the Census Bureau by President George W. Bush in 2001 and confirmed by the Senate on March 13, 2002. In November 2006, Kincannon and his deputy director, Hermann Habermann, abruptly decided to quit, acknowledging tensions with their bosses in the Bush administration, but giving no other details. He did stay on as acting director until the position was filled more than a year later. He died of cancer at the age of 72 on December 15, 2012.  

 

Other Previous Directors:

Kenneth Prewitt (1998-2001)

Martha Farnsworth Riche (1994-1998)

Barbara Everitt Bryant (1989-1993) — the first woman to be named director of the Bureau.

 

 

All Past Directors

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See all 11 comments

Comments

Pam Elsayed 2 years ago
I live at 3626 Frazier st Pittsburgh Pa 15213. I am constantly being bothered by your census people regarding a survey and I have recieved 3 letters with phone numbers which I have called to decline any survey/phone or otherwise. Spoke to the person twice a Dave something . I've blocked the person and called the supervisor via the letter to tell them to stop harassing us we won't take a survey if it's helpful to them or not. Today I just recieved another card from a Tarisa P something ? I ripped it up. Please take or adress off your survey purview. This is either some con going on or extreme harassment.Our door says no soliciting so they should never have come to our door at all. Thanks. Please look into this and correct this privacy intrusion.Thanks, Pam Elsayed
sharon 2 years ago
with all the identity theft going on, no information is safe.the census bureau says your information is kept private..but Genealogy.com.....Ancestry.com....and any other paid search .com can give out this information.
Bill, Linda Hill 2 years ago
No more ethnic distinctions are needed--- i.e. North African-Middle East. There are too many now.... Where does it stop??????????????????????
Anonymous 3 years ago
Print 9-24-2014 List of nations by largest to smallest according to total in kilometers square. Top nations by rank and size: 1. Russia 2. Antarctica(no ranking) 2. Canada 3. China 4. United States 5. Brazil 6. Australia 7. India 8. Argentina 9. Kazakhstan 10.Algeria Fact from the CIA fact book & world report.
N Kyle 5 years ago
WHY--if I tell Census takers that NO ONE WHO SHOULD BE COUNTED lives at the address where they have bugged me nine times, including letters. phone calls and personal visits--can't they understand that they are bugging me at a second home and do not want to be counted two, three, or four times? Am I the only person in the world with two or more homes? NEXT TIME, I will report seventeen children and a household income of $0.49. Would that stop the harassment?
Kent Olinger 6 years ago
Ladies and Gentlemen... I need populations of three cities (Huntingburg, Jasper, Ferdinand) in SW Indiana. Need one number per city per decade, 1850 through 1990. Where can I find the data? Thank You! --K.O.
Jesus Cordero 7 years ago
I need to obtain a birth cerificate for my son that was born at the Naval Military Hospita Naples, Italy in 1979. I was never issues a birth certificate that I know of, unless it was put in his medical record, I was never provided with a copy. i served in Italy from 1978 thru 1981. Can someone guide me on how to obtain a copy of htis document for my son. I am from Puerto Rico and now with the change of birth certificates in Puerto Rico, my son has no way to proof his identity. Thank...
Eric 7 years ago
There have been complaints from people in Greenfield and West Allis, WI stating that the monies ARE NOT going to those cities, instead they're going to the city of Milwaukee. Can you email me a pdf that shows that the monies is actually going to West Allis and Greenfield, WI?? Thanks
Mara 7 years ago
Recently, I found the 2010 Census form hanging on my door. As I began filling it out, I came across a dilemma. The U.S. government wants to know if my children are adopted or not and it wants to know what our races are. Being adopted myself, I had to put “Other” and “Don’t Know Adopted” for my race and “Other” and “Don’t Know” for my kids’ races. Can you imagine not knowing your ethnicity, your race? Now imagine walking into a vital records office and asking the clerk for y...
Michael Noferi 7 years ago
Can you confirm that the 2010 census will cost us approximately 15 billion dollars?? What is the purpose of mailing as letter saying that a census form will be arriving?? My 89 year old aunt received her census form approximately 2 weeks ago and yesterday received her letter adbising her to be on the lookout for the form. What a waste of money.

Leave a comment

Founded: The first Census was conducted in 1790, but the Census Bureau was not made a permanent institution until 1902.
Annual Budget: $1 billion (FY 2013 Request)
Employees: 9,862 (FY 2013 Estimate) The work force expands dramatically when the census is taken every 10 years. About 1.4 million temporary workers were hired for the 2010 census.
Official Website: http://www.census.gov/
U.S. Census Bureau
Thompson, John
Previous Director

President Barack Obama last week nominated a career statistician who spent more than 25 years at the U.S. Census Bureau before leaving for the private sector. If confirmed as expected by the Senate, John H. Thompson would succeed Robert Groves, who served from June 2009 to August 2012. 

 

The Census Project, a non-partisan group that represents stakeholders for the decennial survey, praised Obama’s decision and encouraged the Senate to confirm Thompson “so that the bureau can continue serious planning for Census 2020.”

 

Born circa 1951, Thompson earned a B.S. and M.S. in Mathematics at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) in 1973 and 1975, respectively. 

 

Thompson soon went to work at the Census Bureau, where he remained from 1975 to 2002, working in the Statistical Methods Division from 1975 to 1987 and in the Statistical Support Division from 1987 to 1995. He was associate director for the 2000 decennial census and chief of the decennial management division.

 

Leaving government service for the private sector in 2002, Thompson joined the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago, serving as executive vice president from 2002 to 2008, and as president and CEO since 2008.

 

A member of the American Statistical Association since 1975, Thompson was elected a fellow of the Association in 2000, and chaired the Social Statistics Section in 2011 and the Committee on Fellows in 2009. He is currently serving as a member of the Committee on National Statistics with the National Academy of Sciences

 

To Learn More:

Biography

Obama Nominates John H. Thompson to Head Census Bureau (by Josh Hicks, Washington Post)

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Groves, Robert
Former Director

On April 2, 2009, President Obama nominated Dr. Robert M. Groves to be the next Director of the Census Bureau and he was confirmed on July 13. Groves, who will direct the 2010 Census, is a generally uncontroversial professor of sociology  However, his nomination was contentious because his support for using statistical sampling, a statistical method commonly used to correct for errors and biases in the census, raised the ire of Republican critics, who believe that sampling would benefit minorities and the poor, who generally vote Democratic. Although the Supreme Court ruled in 1999 that apportionment of House seats must be based on the Census’s physical enumeration of Americans without use of statistical sampling, the Census Bureau could still use sampling in reporting figures used to draw Congressional districts and award federal funds for various programs. After serving for three years, Groves announced his resignation on April 10, 2012, (effective in August) in order to take the position of provost of Georgetown University.

 
Originally from Kansas City, Missouri, Groves earned an AB in sociology from Dartmouth College in 1970, Master’s degrees in Sociology and Statistics from the University of Michigan in 1973, and a PhD in Sociology from the University of Michigan in 1975. He has spent his entire academic career at the University of Michigan, where he is now Research Professor of Sociology, starting his academic career there in 1975 as a Lecturer. He left Ann Arbor for brief stints as a Visiting Professor at the Center for Surveys, Methods and Analysis in Mannheim, Germany (now part of the GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences) in 1987 and 1997, and at Statistics Sweden in Stockholm in 1989. Since 2001, Groves has been the Director of the prestigious University of Michigan Survey Research Center, one of the leading academic institutions in the field, which conducts the closely followed Consumer Survey and other studies. During the course of his career, Groves has published eight books and numerous articles. 
 
A specialist in survey methodology and statistics, Groves is no stranger to the Census Bureau, whose decennial census is one of the world’s largest and most sophisticated statistical exercises. Groves served there early in his career as a Visiting Statistician in 1982, and later as Associate Director of Statistical Design, Standards, and Methodology from 1990 to 1992. It was during the latter period that Groves became embroiled in the controversy over the proposed use of statistical sampling to correct known biases and deficiencies in the Census head count. Groves and others at the Census Bureau proposed using sampling techniques to correct an admitted 1.2% undercount in the 1990 Census, which failed to include millions of homeless, minority and poor persons mainly living in big cities, which lost millions of dollars in federal funds when Republican Commerce Secretary Robert Mosbacher vetoed the sampling proposal. 
 
Republicans reacted negatively to Groves’s nomination by President Barack Obama. Darrell Issa (R-CA), the ranking member on the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, said that he found it “an incredibly troubling selection that contradicts the administration’s assurances that the census process would not be used to advance an ulterior political agenda.” Likewise, Congressman Patrick McHenry (R-NC) warned that, “With the nomination of Robert Groves, President Obama has made clear that he intends to employ the political manipulation of census data for partisan gain.” On the other hand, Mark Blumenthal, publisher and editor of the nonpartisan website Pollster.com retorted that, “the notion of Bob Groves yielding to partisanship is laughable. As in rolling on the floor laughing out loud laughable.” 
 
Should Statistical Sampling be Used in the United States Census? (by K. Lee Lerner and M.C. Nagel, Science Clarified.com)
Why the 2010 Census Stirs Up Partisan Politics (by Amy Sullivan, Time Magazine)
more
Bookmark and Share
Overview:

Although the Census Bureau carries out hundreds of surveys every year, its most well-known duty is still to conduct the decennial census. The U.S. Census Bureau is responsible for distributing, gathering and calculating the significance of a census given every ten years to the residents of the United States. The census is used to determine the number of each state’s congressional representatives and electoral votes, as well as the allocation of federal tax dollars. Census data directly affect how more than $200 billion per year in federal and state funding is allocated to local, state, and tribal governments. The data are vital to other planning decisions, such as emergency preparedness and disaster recovery. The accuracy of the data decides the legitimacy of important decisions.

 

Because society changes significantly every 10 years in the United States, the census must be updated to encompass racial, sexual orientation, and financial categories. The census collects a large amount of sensitive information, which it has been criticized for leaking.

more
History:

Because the census has been around for almost 240 years, its results have been important in decision-making for the United States government since the nation was founded. In 2020 the U.S. Census Bureau will take the 24th decennial census.

 

As nominal director, Thomas Jefferson oversaw the first census in 1790. The six questions in 1790 called for the name of the head of the family and the number of persons in each household of the following descriptions: Free White males of 16 years and upward; Free White males under 16 years; Free White females; All other free persons; and Slaves. The first Census was taken of the original 13 states, plus the districts of Kentucky, Maine, and Vermont, and the Southwest Territory (Tennessee). The authorization act for the third census of 1810 stipulated that an assistant marshal must actually visit each household, or the head of each family, within his designated enumeration district and should not rely on hearsay or the like to complete his count. The first census of manufactures also occurred in 1810. The 1830 census was the first to use standardized questionnaire forms. In 1850 a new rule stipulated that each marshal was to be responsible for subdividing his district into “known civil divisions," such as counties, townships, or wards. Every free person’s name was to be listed, not just the head of the household.

 

In 1870, due to the heavy burden of tallying and tabulating census data, use was made of a rudimentary tallying machine, invented by the chief clerk of the Census Office, and later superintendent, Charles W. Seaton. Every free person’s name was to be listed, not just the head of the household. The marshals also collected additional “social statistics,” including information on taxes, schools, crime, wages, value of the estate, etc. and data on mortality. After the Civil War, the decennial census questionnaires were reordered and redesigned to account for end of the “slave questionnaire.” A new question was formed in 1890 which dealt with race, including “Japanese” as a category for the first time, along with “Chinese,”  “Negro,”  “mulatto,” “quadroon,” “octoroon,” and “white.” Also in 1890, for the first time, enumerators were given detailed maps to follow so they could account for every street or road and not stray beyond their assigned boundaries. The 1890 census was notable as the first in which the electric tabulating system, invented by former Census Office employee Herman Hollerith, was used. Hollerith’s machine required information from the census questionnaires to be transferred to a card, which was hole-punched at various places to indicate the characteristics—age, sex, color, marital status, etc.— of a person enumerated. The cards were then run through an electronic tabulating machine, which, using metal pins to complete circuits through the punched holes, counted or cross-tabulated different characteristics. Tabulation of the 1880 census results took almost a decade to complete. 

 

Hawaii, which had been annexed in 1898, was included in the 1900 census for the first time. In 1902, the formerly temporary Census Office was made a permanent organization within the Department of Interior. In 1903, it became the Census Bureau and was moved to the new Department of Commerce and Labor. The 1905 economic census was the first U.S. census to be conducted by mail. When the United States entered World War I in 1917, the Census Bureau took on an important new role. During the nation’s mobilization for the war, the Census Bureau was able to use its compiled population and economic data to report on populations of draft-age men, along with the different states’ industrial capacities. The Census Bureau's 1937 special census of unemployment, prompted by the Great Depression, was the first survey to use probability sampling techniques. The Census Bureau used the first non-military computer, UNIVAC I, to process the 1950 decennial and 1952 economic censuses. In 1960 the decennial census was sent out by mail. In 1960 additional sample questions were asked of 25% of the population, by having enumerators take extra information from every fourth house. 

 

In 1980 the Census Bureau made a special effort to enumerate historically undercounted groups during two programs, “M-Night” (“M” for mission) and “T-Night” (“T” for transient). On M-Night, specially trained enumerators counted people staying in homeless shelters, soup kitchens, bus and rail stations, dormitories, and others. On T-Night, the enumeration focused on hotels and motels with permanent residents. The Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing System (TIGER) developed by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Census Bureau, was introduced for the 1990 census. This was created in order to geographically code addresses into appropriate census geographic areas, as well as to produce the many different maps required for data collection and tabulation. The 1987 Economic Census was the first to be published on CDROM, and 10 years later, in 1997, all census data became available on the Internet.  On January 25, 1999, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled by a 5-4 margin in Clinton v. Glavin that the Census Bureau cannot use statistical sampling in the 2000 census to determine the population for congressional apportionment purposes.

The Decennial Census 1790 to 2000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

more
What it Does:

 

 

 

The Census Bureau collects data through surveys and conducts statistical analysis of the results to be used in policy-making decisions by the U.S. government. The mission and operations of the U.S. Census Bureau are laid out in Title 13 of the United States Code.

The completed decennial census answers such questions as: Will the increase in the older population bankrupt the Social Security system? Would federal subsidies to inner-city areas help lower the unemployment rate? Are undocumented immigrants creating an undue burden on the criminal justice systems in border counties?

 

Politicians are not completely altruistic, and have been known to apply demographics for their own personal use when campaign time rolls around asking, what are the characteristics of a candidate’s supporters and where are those voters located?

Population Clock

Statistical Abstract of the United States:

Published in print since 1878, the Abstract has hundreds of statistical tables summarizing the social, political, and economic scene in the United States, as well as an international section. 

The 2012 Statistical Abstract

American Community Survey

American Fact Finder

Field Data Collection Automation (FDCA) Market Research

Planning for the 2020 Census

 

From the Web Site of the U.S. Census Bureau

American Community Survey

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Census 2000

Census 2010

Census 2020

Census in Schools

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Center for Economic Studies

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Director’s Corner

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Economic Census

Electronic Economy Statistics

Emergency Preparedness

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Events Calendar

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Interactive Population Map

International Programs

Maps

Multimedia Gallery

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Population Clocks

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Statistical Abstract

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Where Does the Money Go:

 

 

 

The expected stakeholders of the Census Bureau are federal government departments and agencies that use the data to make decisions, as well as state and local government officials. Private sector companies are interested in the census outcome, because they will use this in order to target specific markets for their products. The world of academia uses the census data to conduct research, while non-governmental organizations use the data to assess the socio-economic conditions of certain groups.

The Census Project: Census 2020 Stakeholder List

 

Between 2002 and 2012, the Census Bureau spent $5.44 billion on 23,645 contractor transactions, according to USAspending.gov. The following are the five biggest contractor recipients during that period, along with the amount they were paid and the respective percentage of the Census Bureau’s total contractor spending:

1. Harris Corporation                                                  $1,019,439,353  (19%) 

2. Lockheed Martin Corporation                                   $932,425,989  (17%) 

3. The Interpublic Group of Companies Inc.                 $365,012,566  (7%) 

4. IBM Corporation                                                       $163,717,592  (3%) 

5. Miscellaneous Foreign Contractors                            $159,400,751  (3%)

 

Due to cuts in the agency’s FY 2013 budget, the Census Bureau plans to close half of its dozen regional offices.

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Controversies:

Field Data Collection Automation Program

In order to reduce the cost of the census, the Census Bureau has recognized the need to reduce the amount of paper used in collection. Thus, for 2010, the Bureau proposed the use of handheld computers (HHCs) equipped with GPS tracking systems in order to completely restructure the data collection process. But the HHC plan fell behind schedule in programming these devices, as well as training the 500,000 temporary interviewers to use the equipment. Census Bureau director Steve H. Murdock blamed the delay on a lack of communication between the Bureau and the prime contractor for the Field Data Collection Automation (FDCA) program.  He explained in a press release that the contractor had difficulty developing the full scope of the project within the Bureau’s deadline.

 

Although HHCs were eventually used in address canvassing, the primary program was scrapped after a special task force recommended a return to paper-based methods. The reasons all related to an array of problems with the development of the handheld devices, including missed deadlines, technical problems, cost overruns, and poor contractor communication. Harris Corporation had been awarded a $595 million contract for developing 525,000 HHCs. The decision to revert to paper resulted in an added cost of between $2.2 and $3 billion, bringing the total cost of the 2010 census to upward of $14.5 billion.

Automated Field Data Collection for the 2010 Census

The Census at “High Risk” (Editorial, New York Times)

Census to scrap handheld computers for 2010 count (by Gautham Nagesh, Nextgov)

 

Confidentiality Issues Remain Today

The American Civil Liberties Union and the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (PRC) criticized the Bureau in 2004 for providing detailed data “on the distribution of Arab Americans of various backgrounds across U.S. ZIP Codes” to the Department of Homeland Security, purportedly for the purpose of determining what languages to use on signs to be posted at airports. The two advocacy groups urged the Bureau to create “a new outside body to advise the bureau on privacy and civil liberties issues.”

ACLU Urges Census Bureau to Create Privacy Advisory Committee

Letter to Charles Louis Kincannon (by Barry Steinhardt, ACLU, and Beth Givens, Privacy Rights Clearinghouse)

Dept. of Homeland Security gets census data on Arab American — Decried as violation of trust (Arab American Business)

Homeland Security Given Data on Arab-Americans (by Lynette Clemetson, New York Times)

 

Utah Controversy

After the 2000 census, the strongest disputation of count results came from the state of Utah, which challenged the results in two different ways. Utah was extremely close to gaining a fourth congressional seat. The Census Bureau counted members of the military serving abroad as residents of their home state, but did not count as residents people from Utah traveling abroad as religious missionaries. If this policy had been changed, Utah would have received an additional seat at the expense of North Carolina. After losing a lawsuit over this matter, the state of Utah then filed another lawsuit alleging that the statistical methods used in computing the state populations were improper and cost Utah the seat. This case made it to the Supreme Court, but Utah was again defeated.

 

Violating the Privacy of Japanese-Americans

The U.S. Census Bureau gave up names of Japanese-Americans during WWII. This contributed to the racism and prejudice against them at the time, and was a blatant violation of Title 13, which prohibits the re-releasing of information about individuals. In 2000, former Census Bureau chief Kenneth Prewitt apologized for the role it played in relocating the Japanese-American citizens to internment camps.

Confirmed: The U.S. Census Bureau Gave Up Names of Japanese-Americans in WW II (by J.R. Minkel, Scientific American)

 

Who Counts?

Most controversies relating to the Census Bureau have to do with the counting of minorities and other marginalized groups, such as the homeless, prisoners, and undocumented workers. According to the Constitution, the census should count everyone in the country. Attempts to bend that requirement inevitably arise, because the stakes are so high. The census determines the number of representatives elected from each state and the distribution of federal money among the states. 

 

The Bureau counts prisoners in the districts in which they are incarcerated. Some argue that this practice is a violation of international treaty. Counting prisoners as local residents, despite the fact that they can’t vote or participate in the communities where they are incarcerated, leads to unequal distributions of power. 

 

The 1990 census was criticized for excluding one Native American in every eight. The statisticians’ solution is to follow each census with a quality check, surveying representative areas to create a picture of those overlooked in the full count and correcting the figures accordingly. Because of the transient nature of many homeless people, it is virtually impossible to count the whole of this population and leads to distortion as to the nature of homelessness and the magnitude of the problem. In 1992, the cities of Baltimore and San Francisco, along with homeless advocates, sued the Bureau, accusing it of deliberately setting out to undercount the homeless during its one-night count of street people for the 1990 census.

Prisoners of the Census

Prison Policy Initiative

 

Race Options

Since 1977, under Office of Management and Budget Statistical Directive 15, the Census Bureau has recognized five basic categories: American Indian or Alaskan Native, Asian or Pacific Islander, Hispanic, black, and white. The 2000 census was the first time survey options for multiracial Americans were provided. PROJECT RACE (Reclassify All Children Equally) and AMEA (Association of MultiEthnic Americans) argue that the previous census form forces those with parents of different races to deny or suppress part of their heritage. In 1997, the decision to use the instruction “mark one or more races” was reached after finding that an increasing number of children are from interracial unions and a need to measure the increased diversity in the United States.

Questions and Answers for Census 2000 Data on Race (U.S. Census Bureau)

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Former Directors:

Charles Louis Kincannon

Kincannon retired on January 3, 2008, after 6 years as director, and 29 years at the Census Bureau. 

 

Kincannon was born in Waco, Texas, in 1940. In 1963 he earned an economics degree from the University of Texas, Austin, and continued postgraduate work in statistics and economics at George Washington University, Georgetown University and University of Maryland. He took a position as a statistician at the U.S. Census Bureau in 1963. He left the Bureau in 1975 during the Ford administration, but returned upon the election of Ronald Reagan. This time he held the position of deputy director and chief operating officer in January 1982 after being recommended by Reagan’s first Bureau Director, Bruce Chapman. From 1992 to 2000, Kincannon served as the First Chief Statistician in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and development in Paris.

 

Kincannon was nominated for the position of director of the Census Bureau by President George W. Bush in 2001 and confirmed by the Senate on March 13, 2002. In November 2006, Kincannon and his deputy director, Hermann Habermann, abruptly decided to quit, acknowledging tensions with their bosses in the Bush administration, but giving no other details. He did stay on as acting director until the position was filled more than a year later. He died of cancer at the age of 72 on December 15, 2012.  

 

Other Previous Directors:

Kenneth Prewitt (1998-2001)

Martha Farnsworth Riche (1994-1998)

Barbara Everitt Bryant (1989-1993) — the first woman to be named director of the Bureau.

 

 

All Past Directors

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See all 11 comments

Comments

Pam Elsayed 2 years ago
I live at 3626 Frazier st Pittsburgh Pa 15213. I am constantly being bothered by your census people regarding a survey and I have recieved 3 letters with phone numbers which I have called to decline any survey/phone or otherwise. Spoke to the person twice a Dave something . I've blocked the person and called the supervisor via the letter to tell them to stop harassing us we won't take a survey if it's helpful to them or not. Today I just recieved another card from a Tarisa P something ? I ripped it up. Please take or adress off your survey purview. This is either some con going on or extreme harassment.Our door says no soliciting so they should never have come to our door at all. Thanks. Please look into this and correct this privacy intrusion.Thanks, Pam Elsayed
sharon 2 years ago
with all the identity theft going on, no information is safe.the census bureau says your information is kept private..but Genealogy.com.....Ancestry.com....and any other paid search .com can give out this information.
Bill, Linda Hill 2 years ago
No more ethnic distinctions are needed--- i.e. North African-Middle East. There are too many now.... Where does it stop??????????????????????
Anonymous 3 years ago
Print 9-24-2014 List of nations by largest to smallest according to total in kilometers square. Top nations by rank and size: 1. Russia 2. Antarctica(no ranking) 2. Canada 3. China 4. United States 5. Brazil 6. Australia 7. India 8. Argentina 9. Kazakhstan 10.Algeria Fact from the CIA fact book & world report.
N Kyle 5 years ago
WHY--if I tell Census takers that NO ONE WHO SHOULD BE COUNTED lives at the address where they have bugged me nine times, including letters. phone calls and personal visits--can't they understand that they are bugging me at a second home and do not want to be counted two, three, or four times? Am I the only person in the world with two or more homes? NEXT TIME, I will report seventeen children and a household income of $0.49. Would that stop the harassment?
Kent Olinger 6 years ago
Ladies and Gentlemen... I need populations of three cities (Huntingburg, Jasper, Ferdinand) in SW Indiana. Need one number per city per decade, 1850 through 1990. Where can I find the data? Thank You! --K.O.
Jesus Cordero 7 years ago
I need to obtain a birth cerificate for my son that was born at the Naval Military Hospita Naples, Italy in 1979. I was never issues a birth certificate that I know of, unless it was put in his medical record, I was never provided with a copy. i served in Italy from 1978 thru 1981. Can someone guide me on how to obtain a copy of htis document for my son. I am from Puerto Rico and now with the change of birth certificates in Puerto Rico, my son has no way to proof his identity. Thank...
Eric 7 years ago
There have been complaints from people in Greenfield and West Allis, WI stating that the monies ARE NOT going to those cities, instead they're going to the city of Milwaukee. Can you email me a pdf that shows that the monies is actually going to West Allis and Greenfield, WI?? Thanks
Mara 7 years ago
Recently, I found the 2010 Census form hanging on my door. As I began filling it out, I came across a dilemma. The U.S. government wants to know if my children are adopted or not and it wants to know what our races are. Being adopted myself, I had to put “Other” and “Don’t Know Adopted” for my race and “Other” and “Don’t Know” for my kids’ races. Can you imagine not knowing your ethnicity, your race? Now imagine walking into a vital records office and asking the clerk for y...
Michael Noferi 7 years ago
Can you confirm that the 2010 census will cost us approximately 15 billion dollars?? What is the purpose of mailing as letter saying that a census form will be arriving?? My 89 year old aunt received her census form approximately 2 weeks ago and yesterday received her letter adbising her to be on the lookout for the form. What a waste of money.

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Founded: The first Census was conducted in 1790, but the Census Bureau was not made a permanent institution until 1902.
Annual Budget: $1 billion (FY 2013 Request)
Employees: 9,862 (FY 2013 Estimate) The work force expands dramatically when the census is taken every 10 years. About 1.4 million temporary workers were hired for the 2010 census.
Official Website: http://www.census.gov/
U.S. Census Bureau
Thompson, John
Previous Director

President Barack Obama last week nominated a career statistician who spent more than 25 years at the U.S. Census Bureau before leaving for the private sector. If confirmed as expected by the Senate, John H. Thompson would succeed Robert Groves, who served from June 2009 to August 2012. 

 

The Census Project, a non-partisan group that represents stakeholders for the decennial survey, praised Obama’s decision and encouraged the Senate to confirm Thompson “so that the bureau can continue serious planning for Census 2020.”

 

Born circa 1951, Thompson earned a B.S. and M.S. in Mathematics at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) in 1973 and 1975, respectively. 

 

Thompson soon went to work at the Census Bureau, where he remained from 1975 to 2002, working in the Statistical Methods Division from 1975 to 1987 and in the Statistical Support Division from 1987 to 1995. He was associate director for the 2000 decennial census and chief of the decennial management division.

 

Leaving government service for the private sector in 2002, Thompson joined the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago, serving as executive vice president from 2002 to 2008, and as president and CEO since 2008.

 

A member of the American Statistical Association since 1975, Thompson was elected a fellow of the Association in 2000, and chaired the Social Statistics Section in 2011 and the Committee on Fellows in 2009. He is currently serving as a member of the Committee on National Statistics with the National Academy of Sciences

 

To Learn More:

Biography

Obama Nominates John H. Thompson to Head Census Bureau (by Josh Hicks, Washington Post)

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Groves, Robert
Former Director

On April 2, 2009, President Obama nominated Dr. Robert M. Groves to be the next Director of the Census Bureau and he was confirmed on July 13. Groves, who will direct the 2010 Census, is a generally uncontroversial professor of sociology  However, his nomination was contentious because his support for using statistical sampling, a statistical method commonly used to correct for errors and biases in the census, raised the ire of Republican critics, who believe that sampling would benefit minorities and the poor, who generally vote Democratic. Although the Supreme Court ruled in 1999 that apportionment of House seats must be based on the Census’s physical enumeration of Americans without use of statistical sampling, the Census Bureau could still use sampling in reporting figures used to draw Congressional districts and award federal funds for various programs. After serving for three years, Groves announced his resignation on April 10, 2012, (effective in August) in order to take the position of provost of Georgetown University.

 
Originally from Kansas City, Missouri, Groves earned an AB in sociology from Dartmouth College in 1970, Master’s degrees in Sociology and Statistics from the University of Michigan in 1973, and a PhD in Sociology from the University of Michigan in 1975. He has spent his entire academic career at the University of Michigan, where he is now Research Professor of Sociology, starting his academic career there in 1975 as a Lecturer. He left Ann Arbor for brief stints as a Visiting Professor at the Center for Surveys, Methods and Analysis in Mannheim, Germany (now part of the GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences) in 1987 and 1997, and at Statistics Sweden in Stockholm in 1989. Since 2001, Groves has been the Director of the prestigious University of Michigan Survey Research Center, one of the leading academic institutions in the field, which conducts the closely followed Consumer Survey and other studies. During the course of his career, Groves has published eight books and numerous articles. 
 
A specialist in survey methodology and statistics, Groves is no stranger to the Census Bureau, whose decennial census is one of the world’s largest and most sophisticated statistical exercises. Groves served there early in his career as a Visiting Statistician in 1982, and later as Associate Director of Statistical Design, Standards, and Methodology from 1990 to 1992. It was during the latter period that Groves became embroiled in the controversy over the proposed use of statistical sampling to correct known biases and deficiencies in the Census head count. Groves and others at the Census Bureau proposed using sampling techniques to correct an admitted 1.2% undercount in the 1990 Census, which failed to include millions of homeless, minority and poor persons mainly living in big cities, which lost millions of dollars in federal funds when Republican Commerce Secretary Robert Mosbacher vetoed the sampling proposal. 
 
Republicans reacted negatively to Groves’s nomination by President Barack Obama. Darrell Issa (R-CA), the ranking member on the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, said that he found it “an incredibly troubling selection that contradicts the administration’s assurances that the census process would not be used to advance an ulterior political agenda.” Likewise, Congressman Patrick McHenry (R-NC) warned that, “With the nomination of Robert Groves, President Obama has made clear that he intends to employ the political manipulation of census data for partisan gain.” On the other hand, Mark Blumenthal, publisher and editor of the nonpartisan website Pollster.com retorted that, “the notion of Bob Groves yielding to partisanship is laughable. As in rolling on the floor laughing out loud laughable.” 
 
Should Statistical Sampling be Used in the United States Census? (by K. Lee Lerner and M.C. Nagel, Science Clarified.com)
Why the 2010 Census Stirs Up Partisan Politics (by Amy Sullivan, Time Magazine)
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