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Overview:

An independent Executive branch agency, CSOSA provides supervision and related supportive services for more than 2,000 District of Columbia offenders who are either on probation, parole, or supervised release, with the objective to increase public safety, prevent crime, reduce recidivism, and garner and maintain confidence and cooperation from the local community.  

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History:

CSOSA was created by the National Capital Revitalization and Self-Government Improvement Act of 1997, to provide financial assistance to the District of Columbia by restructuring and moving a number of criminal justice entities of the D.C. government into the new federal agency. Under the direction of a trustee appointed by the U.S. Attorney General, adult probation, parole, and pre-trial services were reconfigured to operate within CSOSA. The new agency assumed its probation function from the D.C. Superior Court, and its parole function from the D.C. Board of Parole, and the D.C. Pretrial Services Agency was set up under the CSOSA umbrella as an independent entity with its own budget. For its first three years, CSOSA operated in a trusteeship arrangement. It received certification as an independent Executive agency on August 4, 2000.

more
What it Does:

CSOSA is an adult offender supervision program that provides pre-trial services for the federal and local courts of the District of Columbia, as well as supervision for adult D.C. offenders on probation, parole, or supervised release. It is composed of two components, the D.C. Pretrial Services Agency (PSA) and the Community Supervision Program (CSP), both of which work on behalf of the court or agency that has jurisdiction over the person being supervised. CSOSA also addresses the conditions that fuel recidivism, including addiction, unemployment, lack of education, unstable housing, and broken relationships.

 

Among its specific functions:

Determining and maintaining uniform supervision and reporting practices.

Providing verified background information and criminal histories on all arrestees.

Operating and maintaining a sex offender registry for the District of Columbia.

Establishing and implementing an effective Risks and Needs Assessment and case management process to help officials determine whom it is appropriate to release an offender and at what level of supervision.

  • Establishing and implementing an ongoing evaluation process that assesses a defendant’s compliance with release conditions and an offender’s progress in reforming his or her behavior.
  • Providing close supervision of high-risk defendants and offenders, with intermediate graduated sanctions for violations of release conditions.
  • Placing certain high-risk offenders on GPS monitors; putting in place stringent contact standards and drug testing requirements; and utilizing Day Reporting and Violence Reduction Programs to target non-compliance potential among high-risk offenders with violent histories, particularly those who are unemployed.
  • Presenting information on appropriate Treatment and Support Services, including links to the District’s health and mental health agencies, and community-based education and training, to assist defendants in complying with release conditions, and offenders in reintegrating into the community.
  • Utilizing, when appropriate, a new resource, The Reentry and Sanctions Center, a 28-day residential program, which provides intensive assessment and treatment readiness programming to offenders at point of reentry.
  • Maintaining an active community presence, with field offices and officers located primarily in the neighborhoods where offenders live and work.
  • Conducting joint field visits or accountability tours with the Metropolitan Police Department at offender’s home or work site.
  • Establishing partnerships with other criminal justice agencies and community organizations.
  • Contracting with faith-based organizations as well as other neighborhood providers of residential, outpatient, and sex offender treatment services, and referring offenders to the ones that relate to their specific needs.

 

From the CSOSA Web Site

Pretrial Services

DC Public Safety Radio and Television shows

Audio podcasts

Video podcasts

more
Where Does the Money Go:

In 2010 and 2011, CSOSA has to date spent $64.8 million in 542 contractor transactions for services such as ADP software ($37,309,375 million), other management support services ($9,794,657), and ADP support equipment ($3,087,649).

 

The top five recipients of contracts with CSOSA are:

1. IPI Grammtech                                                                                          $35,145,691

2. Inter-Con Security Systems Inc.                                                                 $5,820,798

3. Satellite Tracking of People LLC                                                                  $2,260,820

4. Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority                                                  $1,351,164

5. The Center for Clinical and Forensic Services Inc.                           $1,118,866

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Founded: 1997
Annual Budget: $215.5 million (FY 2013 Request)
Employees: Around 1,296 (FY 2013 Estimate)
Official Website: http://www.csosa.gov/
Court Services & Offender Supervision Agency for the District of Columbia
Ware, Nancy
Director

On August 2, 2011, President Barack Obama nominated Nancy M. Ware to serve as the Director of the District of Columbia Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency (CSOSA), a large agency that supervises offenders who are on probation, parole, or supervised release. Although it is a local, District of Columbia agency, the position is subject to federal control under the District’s home rule charter. 

 
Born in 1950, Ware earned a B.A. and an M.Ed. at Howard University. Early in her career, Ware worked as a clinical psychologist for the (D.C.) Public Schools Special Education Department, director of the Paul Robeson Psychoeducational School for emotionally disturbed children, and chief of emergency mental health services and outreach for children in the
District of Columbia.
 
She was also Executive Director of the District of Columbia Mayor’s Youth Initiatives Office under Mayor Sharon Pratt Kelly, Executive Director of the Citizenship Education Fund and executive director of the Rainbow Coalition.
 
Her work in the criminal justice field began when she served as the Director of Program Development for the Bureau of Justice Assistance in the Office of Justice Programs, after which she became Director of Technical Assistance and Training for the Department of Justice Executive Office for Weed and Seed, where she was responsible for helping local communities implement plans to fight crime and promote public safety. 
 
From 2002 to 2010, Ware served as the Executive Director for the District of Columbia Criminal Justice Coordinating Council, an independent agency established by Congress, whose members include the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, the D.C. police chief and other city officials, the director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons and the chairman of the U.S. Parole Commission. She developed the infrastructure to support law enforcement, juvenile justice, and other criminal justice branches. 
 
In 2010, Ware joined CSOSA as a management analyst and wrote its five-year strategic plan mandated by federal law.   
 
According to the OpenSecrets website, Ware once contributed $250 to the Congressional campaign Jesse Jackson, Jr., who is the son of her former employer, Rev. Jesse Jackson, Sr., who founded the Rainbow Coalition in 1984. 
 
Howard Alum tapped by Obama to head CSOSA (by Reginald Johnson, Washington Examiner)
 
 
 
 
 
more
Poteat, Adrienne
Previous Director

A longtime employee of the District of Columbia’s Department of Corrections, Adrienne R. Poteat served as the head of the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency (CSOSA), where she has been deputy director since 2002. This federal agency oversees pre-trial maintenance of prisoners in Washington D.C. and supervises offenders who are on probation, parole, or supervised release. When CSOCA director Paul Quander stepped down at the end of his six-year term, Poteat took over leadership of the agency as acting director on July 31, 2008.

 
A native of Washington, DC, Poteat holds a Bachelor of Arts in sociology from Hampton Institute in Virginia.
 
After graduating from college, she began her law enforcement career with the Hampton Police Department as an intake officer, followed by a short term with the Newport News Juvenile Domestic Relations Court and another teaching junior high school in Montgomery County.
 
In 1975, Poteat became the first woman correctional officer hired by the DC Department of Corrections. This was not an easy field in which to be a trailblazer. She was harassed for years by her male co-workers and supervisors. “I was truly not wanted,” she stated in a deposition in support of a sexual harassment lawsuit against the department in 1995. Once, her co-workers conspired with some of the inmates. She was sent alone to do a bed count in a tough dormitory. Some of the inmates stripped naked in front of her, while others lay on their beds and masturbated. She was saved by the arrival of more sympathetic officers. Another time, she dealt with a prisoner who kept flashing her by grabbing his penis and pulling it across the wires of a fence.
 
Poteat also had to deal with racial issues. “You know, part of it…was probably things that were instilled in you as a child,” she said in the deposition. “Oftentimes you felt that, when a white male told you something, that was the law and you did not challenge it. You were almost subservient. If he said do it, you did it. I guess as time went on, the best treatment later on down the line and the most respect that I got was from the white males.”
 
Over time she was promoted to case manager, unit manager, deputy warden, warden and deputy director. In 1999 the new head of the DC Department of Corrections, Odie Washington, removed Poteat from her post as deputy director for institutions and made her warden of the Maximum Security Facility and the Correctional Treatment Facility, which she helped privatize as part of a 20-year sale/lease-back agreement between the Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) and the DC government.
 
In 2001, Poteat left the DC Department of Corrections and joined the United States Parole Commission as a hearing examiner, where she remained until assuming the deputy director post at CSOSA.
 
Biography: Adrienne R. Poteat (Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency for the District of Columbia)
more
Bookmark and Share
Overview:

An independent Executive branch agency, CSOSA provides supervision and related supportive services for more than 2,000 District of Columbia offenders who are either on probation, parole, or supervised release, with the objective to increase public safety, prevent crime, reduce recidivism, and garner and maintain confidence and cooperation from the local community.  

more
History:

CSOSA was created by the National Capital Revitalization and Self-Government Improvement Act of 1997, to provide financial assistance to the District of Columbia by restructuring and moving a number of criminal justice entities of the D.C. government into the new federal agency. Under the direction of a trustee appointed by the U.S. Attorney General, adult probation, parole, and pre-trial services were reconfigured to operate within CSOSA. The new agency assumed its probation function from the D.C. Superior Court, and its parole function from the D.C. Board of Parole, and the D.C. Pretrial Services Agency was set up under the CSOSA umbrella as an independent entity with its own budget. For its first three years, CSOSA operated in a trusteeship arrangement. It received certification as an independent Executive agency on August 4, 2000.

more
What it Does:

CSOSA is an adult offender supervision program that provides pre-trial services for the federal and local courts of the District of Columbia, as well as supervision for adult D.C. offenders on probation, parole, or supervised release. It is composed of two components, the D.C. Pretrial Services Agency (PSA) and the Community Supervision Program (CSP), both of which work on behalf of the court or agency that has jurisdiction over the person being supervised. CSOSA also addresses the conditions that fuel recidivism, including addiction, unemployment, lack of education, unstable housing, and broken relationships.

 

Among its specific functions:

Determining and maintaining uniform supervision and reporting practices.

Providing verified background information and criminal histories on all arrestees.

Operating and maintaining a sex offender registry for the District of Columbia.

Establishing and implementing an effective Risks and Needs Assessment and case management process to help officials determine whom it is appropriate to release an offender and at what level of supervision.

  • Establishing and implementing an ongoing evaluation process that assesses a defendant’s compliance with release conditions and an offender’s progress in reforming his or her behavior.
  • Providing close supervision of high-risk defendants and offenders, with intermediate graduated sanctions for violations of release conditions.
  • Placing certain high-risk offenders on GPS monitors; putting in place stringent contact standards and drug testing requirements; and utilizing Day Reporting and Violence Reduction Programs to target non-compliance potential among high-risk offenders with violent histories, particularly those who are unemployed.
  • Presenting information on appropriate Treatment and Support Services, including links to the District’s health and mental health agencies, and community-based education and training, to assist defendants in complying with release conditions, and offenders in reintegrating into the community.
  • Utilizing, when appropriate, a new resource, The Reentry and Sanctions Center, a 28-day residential program, which provides intensive assessment and treatment readiness programming to offenders at point of reentry.
  • Maintaining an active community presence, with field offices and officers located primarily in the neighborhoods where offenders live and work.
  • Conducting joint field visits or accountability tours with the Metropolitan Police Department at offender’s home or work site.
  • Establishing partnerships with other criminal justice agencies and community organizations.
  • Contracting with faith-based organizations as well as other neighborhood providers of residential, outpatient, and sex offender treatment services, and referring offenders to the ones that relate to their specific needs.

 

From the CSOSA Web Site

Pretrial Services

DC Public Safety Radio and Television shows

Audio podcasts

Video podcasts

more
Where Does the Money Go:

In 2010 and 2011, CSOSA has to date spent $64.8 million in 542 contractor transactions for services such as ADP software ($37,309,375 million), other management support services ($9,794,657), and ADP support equipment ($3,087,649).

 

The top five recipients of contracts with CSOSA are:

1. IPI Grammtech                                                                                          $35,145,691

2. Inter-Con Security Systems Inc.                                                                 $5,820,798

3. Satellite Tracking of People LLC                                                                  $2,260,820

4. Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority                                                  $1,351,164

5. The Center for Clinical and Forensic Services Inc.                           $1,118,866

more

Comments

Leave a comment

captcha

Founded: 1997
Annual Budget: $215.5 million (FY 2013 Request)
Employees: Around 1,296 (FY 2013 Estimate)
Official Website: http://www.csosa.gov/
Court Services & Offender Supervision Agency for the District of Columbia
Ware, Nancy
Director

On August 2, 2011, President Barack Obama nominated Nancy M. Ware to serve as the Director of the District of Columbia Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency (CSOSA), a large agency that supervises offenders who are on probation, parole, or supervised release. Although it is a local, District of Columbia agency, the position is subject to federal control under the District’s home rule charter. 

 
Born in 1950, Ware earned a B.A. and an M.Ed. at Howard University. Early in her career, Ware worked as a clinical psychologist for the (D.C.) Public Schools Special Education Department, director of the Paul Robeson Psychoeducational School for emotionally disturbed children, and chief of emergency mental health services and outreach for children in the
District of Columbia.
 
She was also Executive Director of the District of Columbia Mayor’s Youth Initiatives Office under Mayor Sharon Pratt Kelly, Executive Director of the Citizenship Education Fund and executive director of the Rainbow Coalition.
 
Her work in the criminal justice field began when she served as the Director of Program Development for the Bureau of Justice Assistance in the Office of Justice Programs, after which she became Director of Technical Assistance and Training for the Department of Justice Executive Office for Weed and Seed, where she was responsible for helping local communities implement plans to fight crime and promote public safety. 
 
From 2002 to 2010, Ware served as the Executive Director for the District of Columbia Criminal Justice Coordinating Council, an independent agency established by Congress, whose members include the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, the D.C. police chief and other city officials, the director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons and the chairman of the U.S. Parole Commission. She developed the infrastructure to support law enforcement, juvenile justice, and other criminal justice branches. 
 
In 2010, Ware joined CSOSA as a management analyst and wrote its five-year strategic plan mandated by federal law.   
 
According to the OpenSecrets website, Ware once contributed $250 to the Congressional campaign Jesse Jackson, Jr., who is the son of her former employer, Rev. Jesse Jackson, Sr., who founded the Rainbow Coalition in 1984. 
 
Howard Alum tapped by Obama to head CSOSA (by Reginald Johnson, Washington Examiner)
 
 
 
 
 
more
Poteat, Adrienne
Previous Director

A longtime employee of the District of Columbia’s Department of Corrections, Adrienne R. Poteat served as the head of the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency (CSOSA), where she has been deputy director since 2002. This federal agency oversees pre-trial maintenance of prisoners in Washington D.C. and supervises offenders who are on probation, parole, or supervised release. When CSOCA director Paul Quander stepped down at the end of his six-year term, Poteat took over leadership of the agency as acting director on July 31, 2008.

 
A native of Washington, DC, Poteat holds a Bachelor of Arts in sociology from Hampton Institute in Virginia.
 
After graduating from college, she began her law enforcement career with the Hampton Police Department as an intake officer, followed by a short term with the Newport News Juvenile Domestic Relations Court and another teaching junior high school in Montgomery County.
 
In 1975, Poteat became the first woman correctional officer hired by the DC Department of Corrections. This was not an easy field in which to be a trailblazer. She was harassed for years by her male co-workers and supervisors. “I was truly not wanted,” she stated in a deposition in support of a sexual harassment lawsuit against the department in 1995. Once, her co-workers conspired with some of the inmates. She was sent alone to do a bed count in a tough dormitory. Some of the inmates stripped naked in front of her, while others lay on their beds and masturbated. She was saved by the arrival of more sympathetic officers. Another time, she dealt with a prisoner who kept flashing her by grabbing his penis and pulling it across the wires of a fence.
 
Poteat also had to deal with racial issues. “You know, part of it…was probably things that were instilled in you as a child,” she said in the deposition. “Oftentimes you felt that, when a white male told you something, that was the law and you did not challenge it. You were almost subservient. If he said do it, you did it. I guess as time went on, the best treatment later on down the line and the most respect that I got was from the white males.”
 
Over time she was promoted to case manager, unit manager, deputy warden, warden and deputy director. In 1999 the new head of the DC Department of Corrections, Odie Washington, removed Poteat from her post as deputy director for institutions and made her warden of the Maximum Security Facility and the Correctional Treatment Facility, which she helped privatize as part of a 20-year sale/lease-back agreement between the Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) and the DC government.
 
In 2001, Poteat left the DC Department of Corrections and joined the United States Parole Commission as a hearing examiner, where she remained until assuming the deputy director post at CSOSA.
 
Biography: Adrienne R. Poteat (Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency for the District of Columbia)
more