Solutions to the Financial Crisis

Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 1:01 AM
Category: Allgov Blogs
Watching the nation’s news commentators, you would think that the bailout proposal created by the Bush administration, adjusted by the Congressional leaders and then rejected by the House of Representatives was the only possible answer to the nation’s financial problems. Fortunately, many observers from the Left, Right and Middle have presented alternative solutions. Here are a few of these ideas. Some are comprehensive and some deal with individual issues, but they are all worth a look.
 

Where to Find $900 billion for Recovery (by Anderson, Collins, Muhammad and Pizzigati, Institute for Policy Studies

Tweak the Bailout Plan (by Stuart M. Butler and Edwin Meese, III, Heritage Foundation)
Fix the Bailout Plan (by Dominique Strauss-Kahn, International Monetary Fund)
Increase Transparency, Liquidity and Supervision (by Martin Neil Naily and Robert E. Litan, Brookings Institution)
Home Owners Loan Corp. and Federal Revenue Sharing (by James K. Galbraith, Washington Post)
Cut Defense Spending, now at $612 billion for 2009 (by Chalmers Johnson, TomDispatch.com)
Homeowners Emergency Loan Program (National Community Reinvestment Coalition)
Keep Borrowers in Their Homes (by Andrew Jakabovics, Center for American Progress)
Super-Bonds (by John P. Hussman, Hussman Funds)
 

Latest News

Trump at 100 Days: What the Polls Say

Trump’s numbers at 100 Days—usually one of the high points of a president’s popularity—are closer to those of a failing president than a newly minted one. Hovering around 40%, his approval is comparable to George W. Bush’s right after Hurricane Katrina, Gerald Ford’s during the 1975 recession, and Jimmy Carter’s during the Iran hostage crisis. Those presidents were so weakened by low public support that they failed to win re-election.   read more

Co-Chair of the Appalachian Regional Commission: Who Is Tom Wolf?

In 2014, Wolf campaigned in the contest for the Pennsylvania statehouse. Although a relative unknown, he won a four-way Democratic primary and ended up winning the general election with 54.9% of the vote, turning out deeply unpopular incumbent Tom Corbett (R). Among Wolf’s moves as governor were a ban on fracking in state parks and a moratorium on the death penalty. He has since proposed increased funding for Pennsylvania schools and more support for fighting the opioid epidemic in his state.   read more

Vice Chair of the United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission: Who Is Dennis Shea?

In 2004, Shea became assistant secretary for HUD's Policy Development and Research. In 2005, he left to serve as senior advisor to Sen. Elizabeth Dole, who was chair of the National Republican Senatorial Committee. After the 2006 elections, Shea became VP for government affairs in the Americas for Pitney Bowes. In 2010, he left to start his own firm, Shea Public Strategies LLC. He serves as a consultant to the Bipartisan Policy Center Senior Health and Housing Task Force.   read more

Chair of the State Justice Institute: Who Is Chase Rogers?

Rogers spent the first 15 years of her career in private law practice and, in 1998, became a Superior Court judge. After eight years on the bench, she became an appeals court judge, serving on the Connecticut Appellate Court until 2007, when she was sworn in as chief justice of the Connecticut Supreme Court. Rogers was appointed to the Federal-State Jurisdiction Committee of the Judicial Conference of the U.S. by Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts in 2012.   read more

Acting Chair of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights: Who Is Patricia Timmons-Goodson?

In 2016, President Barack Obama nominated Timmons-Goodson to the U.S. District Court in eastern North Carolina. She would have been the first African-American to serve in that district, which includes a significant black population. The seat had been vacant since 2006, but Timmons-Goodson’s nomination was blocked by Republican Senator Richard Burr. It was the second time Burr had blocked an Obama nominee for that seat; the first nominee was also a black woman, Jennifer May-Parker.   read more
see more...