In Praise of George Bush

Date: Wednesday, November 26, 2008 10:09 PM
Category: Allgov Blogs
I don’t think that anyone would accuse me of being soft on George W. Bush. For example, I have argued that Bush should be indicted for violating the U.S. War Crimes Act. However, the man is not all bad. I believe that his lack of racism played a significant role in paving the way for the electoral victory of Barack Obama.
 
As recently as eight years ago, before the George W. Bush administration, I think it would have been impossible for a black person to be elected president of the United States. Among independents and moderate Democrats and Republicans, there were too many white citizens who simply could not accept the concept of a black family occupying the White House. But then Bush chose Colin Powell to be his secretary of state. For his second term, Bush replaced Powell with Condoleezza Rice. Over a period of almost eight years, borderline racists got used to African-Americans operating at the highest level of government, and they got used to judging Powell and Rice as individuals, without thinking about their race.
 
Thanks to George Bush, when this critical electoral constituency of borderline racists was confronted with a black presidential candidate, they were already comfortable with the idea of black leaders, and they were willing to judge Barack Obama on his merits rather than his race.
 
So let’s give credit where credit is due. George W. Bush, for all of his faults, taught a lot of white Americans to respect African-American leaders. It could turn out that Bush’s most positive historical legacy will be his contributions to racial tolerance.
 

Latest News

Morocco’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is Lalla Joumala Alaoui?

Lalla Joumala served for a time as an executive at Bank Al Maghrib, but turned her focus to diplomacy in the late 1990s. She served briefly as an attaché at Morocco’s mission to the UN in New York, and led her country’s delegation to the UN session on HIV/AIDS. Lalla Joumala founded the Moroccan-British Society, promoting improved relations between the two countries, in 2003. She later took over as ambassador to the United Kingdom, where she served until being tapped for the U.S. post.   read more

Ambassador of Togo to the United States: Who Is Frédéric Hegbe?

Presenting his credentials to President Trump in April 2017, Hegbe expressed his country’s desire to work with the U.S. in the context of the African Growth Opportunity Act and the Millennium Challenge Corp, perhaps not knowing that Trump intends to cut foreign aid substantially. Hegbe has served as chargé d’affaires at Togo’s embassy in Washington since 1993, including a stint as interim chief of mission. He also worked for the State Dept’s Foreign Service Institute, where he taught French.   read more

Undersecretary for Intelligence and Analysis: Who Is Dave Glawe?

No sooner did Glawe take over as DHS acting undersecretary in January than he found himself forced to defend President Trump’s proposed travel ban on Muslims from seven nations. Then came the leak of a report, created under his direction, from the Office of Intelligence and Analysis that disagreed with the premise of Trump’s travel ban that citizens of the seven countries posed a special threat. Trump officials emphasized that the report was a draft and not final.   read more

Qatar’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is Meshal bin Hamad Al-Thani?

In June, shortly after Al-Thani’s arrival in Washington as Qatar's ambassador, Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Egypt and Bahrain moved to sever relations with Qatar, supposedly for financing terrorism. President Trump tweeted his support for the action, leaving Al-Thani, whose country hosts the largest U.S. military base in the Middle East, puzzled. “It’s unfortunate to see these tweets,” Al-Thani said. “We have close coordination with the U.S. They know our efforts to combat...terrorism.”   read more

Ambassador of the U.S. to New Zealand and Samoa: Who Is Scott Brown?

After 10 years as a male model and seven years of law practice, Brown entered politics when he was elected to several city positions in Wrentham, Mass. He later served multiple terms as a Republican in the Massachusetts House of Representatives. In 2010, Brown shocked the political world by winning a special election to fill the remainder of Sen. Edward M. Kennedy’s unfinished term, after Kennedy died. Brown lasted only two years in the Senate before losing his seat to Elizabeth Warren in 2012.   read more
see more...