Acceptance Speech

Date: Sunday, June 22, 2008 9:24 PM
Category: Allgov Blogs
Thank you, thank you. My family and I want to thank everyone here and all of my supporters around the country for your hard work and dedication. I see that the television networks are calling this victory the biggest upset in the history of American elections. I don’t blame them. For the first time, the American people have elected as President of the United States an independent who does not belong to a political party. 
 
I have no illusions about having a “mandate.” It looks like I won with 40% of the popular vote. That means that most voters did not choose me. I can only hope that all of you who did not vote for me will give me the benefit of the doubt…at least for a couple of months after I take office. I know that I will be at a disadvantage in comparison to other presidents because I do not belong to a political party. Usually, when a president wants to promote his agenda, he consults with the Congressional leaders of his party and asks them to guide through the legislative process the bills and programs that he proposes. I will not have that luxury. On the other hand, my lack of affiliation to a party means that I will not have to spend time raising money for a party, campaigning for others and engaging in other partisan activities. I will be free to do only what I believe is best for our country and not what is best for a political party. 
 
It is has been a long night and I, for one, would like to go to sleep. Tomorrow, when I am better rested, I will speak to the American people in greater detail. Good night. Celebrate safely…and then get some sleep. Thank you.

 

Latest News

National Security Adviser: Who Is John Bolton?

As a reward for his efforts to help get George W. Bush elected in the contested 2000 presidential race, Bolton was named under secretary of state for arms control. In that post he effected the withdrawal of the U.S. from the International Criminal Court, and claimed without evidence that Cuba was running a biological weapons program. In 2001, he helped derail the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention that banned production and use of such weapons, claiming it endangered U.S. national security.   read more

U.S. Ambassador to Kenya: Who Is Kyle McCarter?

As an Illinois state senator, McCarter filed a bill in 2011 to allow Catholic charities to discriminate against gay and lesbian couples and unmarried couples in adoption and foster care placements. The following year, he worked successfully to defeat an anti-bullying bill because, he said, it would promote homosexuality. In 2015, he opposed a bill to fund treatment for heroin addicts, even though his daughter had died of an overdose of heroin and fentanyl.   read more

United States Ambassador to Trinidad and Tobago: Who Is Joseph Mondello?

Donald Trump chose a longtime Republican politico to be the next United States ambassador to the Caribbean nation of Trinidad and Tobago. Joseph N. Mondello has served as chairman of the Nassau County, New York, Republican Committee since May 1983. He also served as the Republican National Committeeman for New York from 1992 to 2004, as chairman of the New York Republican State Committee from 2006 to 2009, and as a Trump delegate to the 2016 Republican Convention, as did his wife, Linda.   read more

Director of the Defense Information Systems Agency: Who Is Nancy A. Norton?

After serving as chief of Naval operations strategic studies group fellow in Newport, Rhode Island, Norton was promoted in 2013 to rear admiral and named director for command, control, communications and cyber for the U.S. Pacific Command in Hawaii. She was transferred to the Pentagon in 2015 as director of the Warfare Integration Directorate in the office of the Chief of Naval Operations. Norton was named vice director of DISA in 2017 in preparation for taking over as the agency’s director.   read more

Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs: Who Is Kimberly Breier?

In 2007, Breier became the senior political analyst for a “key Middle Eastern country” until 2009, when she was promoted to manager and worked on creating and running what she describes as “the first-ever analytic tradecraft team covering a high-profile country in the Middle East.” Breier left government service in 2012 to work for the consulting firm Peschard-Sverdrup International, where she performed country risk assessments on Latin American countries for three mining companies.   read more
see more...