Acceptance Speech

Date: Sunday, June 22, 2008 9:24 PM
Category: Allgov Blogs
Thank you, thank you. My family and I want to thank everyone here and all of my supporters around the country for your hard work and dedication. I see that the television networks are calling this victory the biggest upset in the history of American elections. I don’t blame them. For the first time, the American people have elected as President of the United States an independent who does not belong to a political party. 
 
I have no illusions about having a “mandate.” It looks like I won with 40% of the popular vote. That means that most voters did not choose me. I can only hope that all of you who did not vote for me will give me the benefit of the doubt…at least for a couple of months after I take office. I know that I will be at a disadvantage in comparison to other presidents because I do not belong to a political party. Usually, when a president wants to promote his agenda, he consults with the Congressional leaders of his party and asks them to guide through the legislative process the bills and programs that he proposes. I will not have that luxury. On the other hand, my lack of affiliation to a party means that I will not have to spend time raising money for a party, campaigning for others and engaging in other partisan activities. I will be free to do only what I believe is best for our country and not what is best for a political party. 
 
It is has been a long night and I, for one, would like to go to sleep. Tomorrow, when I am better rested, I will speak to the American people in greater detail. Good night. Celebrate safely…and then get some sleep. Thank you.

 

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