Featured Story

Federal Reserve Gives Yet another Gift to Big Banks

Monday, December 22, 2014
Thursday the Federal Reserve granted financial institutions extra time to divest themselves of private equity and hedge fund investment they’d been required to sell as part of the Volcker Rule, which prohibits banks from investing their own capital. The postponement is seen as the work of Fed general counsel Scott Alvarez, a holdover from Alan Greenspan’s tenure as Fed chair who has been trying to water down Dodd-Frank since it was passed.   read more
Latest News

Top Stories

  • EPA Declines to Classify Coal Ash as Hazardous Waste

    Sunday, December 21, 2014
    The decision came as a disappointment to those who had hoped the substance would be classified as hazardous waste. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy said the rules, which will cover 1,425 coal ash ponds and landfills in 37 states, will treat coal ash the same as common household waste. That designation comes even though coal ash contains chemicals such as arsenic, chromium, mercury, and lead.   read more
  • 86 Firearm Deaths a Day in U.S.; 60% are Suicides

    Saturday, December 20, 2014
    “Suicide is far more common than homicide and its rate is increasing,” Garen Wintemute of U.C. Davis wrote in his new study. “The homicide rate is decreasing.” He also noted that firearm violence is a “large and costly public health problem in the United States for which the mortality rate has remained unchanged for more than a decade.” Even when the homicide rate was far higher than now, it was outpaced by the suicide rate, according to the study.   read more
  • Gov. Cuomo Bans Fracking in New York

    Friday, December 19, 2014
    State health officials said that until more studies can be performed, it was necessary to stop fracking because of the risks it poses to residents’ water supplies. The decision comes in the wake of state environmental and health reports that concluded New York citizens would be placed at risk by continued fracking operations. “We cannot afford to make a mistake,” said acting state Health Commissioner Howard Zucker. “The potential risks are too great. In fact, they are not fully known.”   read more

Unusual News

  • Researchers Sue for Release of 60-Year-Old Documents on Organized Crime

    Saturday, December 20, 2014
    In 1950, a special commission convened by California Governor Earl Warren completed publication of four groundbreaking reports on the growing threat of organized crime in the state. When researchers recently sought access to the material, they were told the documents were sealed and unavailable until 2028 because of confidentiality concerns.   read more
  • Virginia Legislator will Continue to Serve While Spending Nights in Jail for Sex with a Minor

    Wednesday, December 17, 2014
    Morrissey was allowed to enter into a work-release program, which permits him to continue his duties as a public official. He is allowed to drive his own car between the jail house and his legislative office. And if he doesn’t show up at the jail? “We understand that the legislature can run late into the night; but we will know where he is,” Henrico County Sheriff Michael Wade told the Dispatch. A monitoring device has been secured to Morrissey’s ankle.   read more
  • Navy Unveils Laser “Ray Gun”

    Sunday, December 14, 2014
    The skills needed to operate this deadly weapon are familiar to many young sailors. The controller “looks a lot like a game controller, Xbox, PS4 or whatever.” Klunder added, “Any of you that can do Xbox or PS4, you’ll be good with this.” One advantage of this system to the Navy is cost. Firing a missile costs about $2 million, while the laser can do some of the same jobs for about 59 cents—the cost of electricity.   read more

Where is the Money Going?

  • Social Security Administration Still Collecting Debts from Children of Overpaid Recipients Despite Promising to Stop

    Thursday, December 18, 2014
    Acting SSA commissioner Carolyn Colvin publicly said the collection efforts would end, but the collections have continued. Some who were reimbursed for the refunds they never received have said the SSA turned around and came after them again for the overpayments. At least five of these individuals are now suing the agency to halt the practice once and for all. The agency’s actions have stirred up members of Congress on both sides of the aisle.   read more
  • NASA Spent $349 Million for a Useless Lab Tower for a Project that had Already been Cancelled

    Wednesday, December 17, 2014
    The tower “is evidence of a breakdown at NASA, which used to be a glorious symbol of what an American bureaucracy could achieve," wrote the Post's David Fahrenthold. "In the Space Race days of the 1960s, the agency was given a clear, galvanizing mission: reach the moon within the decade. In less than seven, NASA got it done. Now, NASA has become a symbol of something else: what happens to a big bureaucracy after its sense of mission starts to fade.”   read more
  • For the First Time, Congress Allocates Money to Protect Battlefields from Revolutionary War and War of 1812

    Wednesday, December 17, 2014
    More than 200 years after the fact, Congress has finally decided to spend money on preserving battlefields from some of the most critical wars in American history. In a first, lawmakers have expanded the federal matching grants program that until now only supported landmarks from the Civil War. Now the Civil War Battlefield Preservation Program will also be able to accept requests to fund and preserve battlefields from the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812.   read more

Controversies

  • Congress Ends 35-Year Ban on Abortion Coverage for Peace Corps Volunteers

    Sunday, December 21, 2014
    For the first time since the 1970s, female Peace Corps volunteers will receive federal assistance for abortions, granting them the same coverage as those in other federal programs. As part of the omnibus spending bill adopted by Congress, medical coverage for Peace Corps volunteers will include abortion in cases of rape, incest and life endangerment.   read more
  • South Carolina Judge Voids Murder Conviction of 14-Year-Old…70 Years after he was Executed

    Sunday, December 21, 2014
    George Stinney Jr., who was black, was charged with murder for the death of 11-year-old Betty June Binnicker and 7-year-old Mary Emma Thames, who were white. Judge Carmen T. Mullen of Circuit Court didn’t rule on the merits of the prosecution’s case because of the lack of transcripts and case files. However, she noted the violations of Stinney’s rights   read more
  • The 3 Ambassador Nominees who have Waited the Longest for Confirmation are all Black

    Saturday, December 20, 2014
    All three are also considered political, rather than career Foreign Service, appointments. John Estrada, President Barack Obama’s choice for Trinidad and Tobago, has waited the longest of anyone: 504 days. He is a former Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps, the highest-ranking enlisted Marine, and a native Trinidadian. After leaving the service, he worked at Lockheed Martin as a senior manager.   read more

U.S. and the World

  • The Other Torture Report: U.S. Taught Torture Techniques to Brazil Dictatorship

    Monday, December 15, 2014
    More than 300 Brazilians came to the School of the Americas, located at Fort Benning, Georgia, where instructors “recommended interrogation techniques like torture, execution, blackmail and arresting the relatives of those being questioned,” according to a Pentagon manual released in 1996. Among their victims was Dilma Rousseff, who was a political activist in the 1960s and is now Brazil’s president.   read more
  • Are U.S. Torturers Above the Law?

    Friday, December 12, 2014
    The U.S. is obligated under the International Convention on Torture to investigate any U.S. citizen accused of torturing someone, and the U.N. high commissioner for human rights said he welcomes the prosecution of CIA personnel who either ordered or carried out the torture against detainees. “The convention lets no one off the hook — neither the torturers themselves, nor the policy-makers, nor the public officials who define the policy or give the orders,” said the commissioner.   read more
  • Taliban Using Jihadist Textbooks…Supplied by the U.S.

    Wednesday, December 10, 2014
    As part of the U.S. campaign to undermine Soviet control over Afghanistan, USAID provided school books in local Afghan languages that taught children how to become jihadists. The books are “filled with talk of jihad and featured drawings of guns, bullets, soldiers and mines, [and] have served since then as the Afghan school system’s core curriculum,” said the Post in 2002. Not only did many of the books survive, but the Taliban is reprinting the books to help those who want to destroy the U.S.   read more

Appointments and Resignations

  • Costa Rica’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is Román Macaya?

    Sunday, December 21, 2014
    He joined his family business in 2002, managing Agroquimica Industrial RIMAC, an agricultural chemical firm. In 2009, Macaya campaigned for the presidential nomination of the Citizens Action Party. He came in third in the party’s primary with 9% of the vote. He continued managing Agroquimica Industrial RIMAC until his appointment as ambassador. At that time, he also had to renounce his U.S. citizenship.   read more
  • Panama’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is Emanuel González-Revilla?

    Sunday, December 21, 2014
    González-Revilla was founder and director of BellSouth Panama and BellSouth Guatemala wireless services. From 2000 to 2004, González-Revilla also served as a director of the Panama Canal Commission. In 2005, González-Revilla became president of Panama Power Holdings, which develops and operates hydro-electric power facilities in his home country. He remained with that company until being named ambassador.   read more
  • El Salvador’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is Francisco Altschul?

    Saturday, December 20, 2014
    In March 2009, for the first time, an FMLN candidate, Mauricio Funes, was elected president of El Salvador. Four months later, Altschul was appointed chargé d’affaires at the embassy of El Salvador in Washington, D.C., and eight months after that, he moved up to ambassador. He served until 2013, when he was replaced by Ruben Zamora. In August 2014, Zamora was moved to the United Nations in New York and Altschul was brought back as ambassador in Washington.   read more

Featured Story

Federal Reserve Gives Yet another Gift to Big Banks

Monday, December 22, 2014
Thursday the Federal Reserve granted financial institutions extra time to divest themselves of private equity and hedge fund investment they’d been required to sell as part of the Volcker Rule, which prohibits banks from investing their own capital. The postponement is seen as the work of Fed general counsel Scott Alvarez, a holdover from Alan Greenspan’s tenure as Fed chair who has been trying to water down Dodd-Frank since it was passed.   read more
Latest News

Top Stories

  • EPA Declines to Classify Coal Ash as Hazardous Waste

    Sunday, December 21, 2014
    The decision came as a disappointment to those who had hoped the substance would be classified as hazardous waste. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy said the rules, which will cover 1,425 coal ash ponds and landfills in 37 states, will treat coal ash the same as common household waste. That designation comes even though coal ash contains chemicals such as arsenic, chromium, mercury, and lead.   read more
  • 86 Firearm Deaths a Day in U.S.; 60% are Suicides

    Saturday, December 20, 2014
    “Suicide is far more common than homicide and its rate is increasing,” Garen Wintemute of U.C. Davis wrote in his new study. “The homicide rate is decreasing.” He also noted that firearm violence is a “large and costly public health problem in the United States for which the mortality rate has remained unchanged for more than a decade.” Even when the homicide rate was far higher than now, it was outpaced by the suicide rate, according to the study.   read more
  • Gov. Cuomo Bans Fracking in New York

    Friday, December 19, 2014
    State health officials said that until more studies can be performed, it was necessary to stop fracking because of the risks it poses to residents’ water supplies. The decision comes in the wake of state environmental and health reports that concluded New York citizens would be placed at risk by continued fracking operations. “We cannot afford to make a mistake,” said acting state Health Commissioner Howard Zucker. “The potential risks are too great. In fact, they are not fully known.”   read more

Unusual News

  • Researchers Sue for Release of 60-Year-Old Documents on Organized Crime

    Saturday, December 20, 2014
    In 1950, a special commission convened by California Governor Earl Warren completed publication of four groundbreaking reports on the growing threat of organized crime in the state. When researchers recently sought access to the material, they were told the documents were sealed and unavailable until 2028 because of confidentiality concerns.   read more
  • Virginia Legislator will Continue to Serve While Spending Nights in Jail for Sex with a Minor

    Wednesday, December 17, 2014
    Morrissey was allowed to enter into a work-release program, which permits him to continue his duties as a public official. He is allowed to drive his own car between the jail house and his legislative office. And if he doesn’t show up at the jail? “We understand that the legislature can run late into the night; but we will know where he is,” Henrico County Sheriff Michael Wade told the Dispatch. A monitoring device has been secured to Morrissey’s ankle.   read more
  • Navy Unveils Laser “Ray Gun”

    Sunday, December 14, 2014
    The skills needed to operate this deadly weapon are familiar to many young sailors. The controller “looks a lot like a game controller, Xbox, PS4 or whatever.” Klunder added, “Any of you that can do Xbox or PS4, you’ll be good with this.” One advantage of this system to the Navy is cost. Firing a missile costs about $2 million, while the laser can do some of the same jobs for about 59 cents—the cost of electricity.   read more

Where is the Money Going?

  • Social Security Administration Still Collecting Debts from Children of Overpaid Recipients Despite Promising to Stop

    Thursday, December 18, 2014
    Acting SSA commissioner Carolyn Colvin publicly said the collection efforts would end, but the collections have continued. Some who were reimbursed for the refunds they never received have said the SSA turned around and came after them again for the overpayments. At least five of these individuals are now suing the agency to halt the practice once and for all. The agency’s actions have stirred up members of Congress on both sides of the aisle.   read more
  • NASA Spent $349 Million for a Useless Lab Tower for a Project that had Already been Cancelled

    Wednesday, December 17, 2014
    The tower “is evidence of a breakdown at NASA, which used to be a glorious symbol of what an American bureaucracy could achieve," wrote the Post's David Fahrenthold. "In the Space Race days of the 1960s, the agency was given a clear, galvanizing mission: reach the moon within the decade. In less than seven, NASA got it done. Now, NASA has become a symbol of something else: what happens to a big bureaucracy after its sense of mission starts to fade.”   read more
  • For the First Time, Congress Allocates Money to Protect Battlefields from Revolutionary War and War of 1812

    Wednesday, December 17, 2014
    More than 200 years after the fact, Congress has finally decided to spend money on preserving battlefields from some of the most critical wars in American history. In a first, lawmakers have expanded the federal matching grants program that until now only supported landmarks from the Civil War. Now the Civil War Battlefield Preservation Program will also be able to accept requests to fund and preserve battlefields from the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812.   read more

Controversies

  • Congress Ends 35-Year Ban on Abortion Coverage for Peace Corps Volunteers

    Sunday, December 21, 2014
    For the first time since the 1970s, female Peace Corps volunteers will receive federal assistance for abortions, granting them the same coverage as those in other federal programs. As part of the omnibus spending bill adopted by Congress, medical coverage for Peace Corps volunteers will include abortion in cases of rape, incest and life endangerment.   read more
  • South Carolina Judge Voids Murder Conviction of 14-Year-Old…70 Years after he was Executed

    Sunday, December 21, 2014
    George Stinney Jr., who was black, was charged with murder for the death of 11-year-old Betty June Binnicker and 7-year-old Mary Emma Thames, who were white. Judge Carmen T. Mullen of Circuit Court didn’t rule on the merits of the prosecution’s case because of the lack of transcripts and case files. However, she noted the violations of Stinney’s rights   read more
  • The 3 Ambassador Nominees who have Waited the Longest for Confirmation are all Black

    Saturday, December 20, 2014
    All three are also considered political, rather than career Foreign Service, appointments. John Estrada, President Barack Obama’s choice for Trinidad and Tobago, has waited the longest of anyone: 504 days. He is a former Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps, the highest-ranking enlisted Marine, and a native Trinidadian. After leaving the service, he worked at Lockheed Martin as a senior manager.   read more

U.S. and the World

  • The Other Torture Report: U.S. Taught Torture Techniques to Brazil Dictatorship

    Monday, December 15, 2014
    More than 300 Brazilians came to the School of the Americas, located at Fort Benning, Georgia, where instructors “recommended interrogation techniques like torture, execution, blackmail and arresting the relatives of those being questioned,” according to a Pentagon manual released in 1996. Among their victims was Dilma Rousseff, who was a political activist in the 1960s and is now Brazil’s president.   read more
  • Are U.S. Torturers Above the Law?

    Friday, December 12, 2014
    The U.S. is obligated under the International Convention on Torture to investigate any U.S. citizen accused of torturing someone, and the U.N. high commissioner for human rights said he welcomes the prosecution of CIA personnel who either ordered or carried out the torture against detainees. “The convention lets no one off the hook — neither the torturers themselves, nor the policy-makers, nor the public officials who define the policy or give the orders,” said the commissioner.   read more
  • Taliban Using Jihadist Textbooks…Supplied by the U.S.

    Wednesday, December 10, 2014
    As part of the U.S. campaign to undermine Soviet control over Afghanistan, USAID provided school books in local Afghan languages that taught children how to become jihadists. The books are “filled with talk of jihad and featured drawings of guns, bullets, soldiers and mines, [and] have served since then as the Afghan school system’s core curriculum,” said the Post in 2002. Not only did many of the books survive, but the Taliban is reprinting the books to help those who want to destroy the U.S.   read more

Appointments and Resignations

  • Costa Rica’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is Román Macaya?

    Sunday, December 21, 2014
    He joined his family business in 2002, managing Agroquimica Industrial RIMAC, an agricultural chemical firm. In 2009, Macaya campaigned for the presidential nomination of the Citizens Action Party. He came in third in the party’s primary with 9% of the vote. He continued managing Agroquimica Industrial RIMAC until his appointment as ambassador. At that time, he also had to renounce his U.S. citizenship.   read more
  • Panama’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is Emanuel González-Revilla?

    Sunday, December 21, 2014
    González-Revilla was founder and director of BellSouth Panama and BellSouth Guatemala wireless services. From 2000 to 2004, González-Revilla also served as a director of the Panama Canal Commission. In 2005, González-Revilla became president of Panama Power Holdings, which develops and operates hydro-electric power facilities in his home country. He remained with that company until being named ambassador.   read more
  • El Salvador’s Ambassador to the United States: Who Is Francisco Altschul?

    Saturday, December 20, 2014
    In March 2009, for the first time, an FMLN candidate, Mauricio Funes, was elected president of El Salvador. Four months later, Altschul was appointed chargé d’affaires at the embassy of El Salvador in Washington, D.C., and eight months after that, he moved up to ambassador. He served until 2013, when he was replaced by Ruben Zamora. In August 2014, Zamora was moved to the United Nations in New York and Altschul was brought back as ambassador in Washington.   read more